News

Station Alert: Boston Public Library station closed Sunday, September 28th, 1-7pm

Station Alert: Due to film production, the Boston Public Library Hubway station located at 700 Boylston Street, will be temporarily closed and inaccessible on Sunday, September 28th, between the hours of 1pm and 7pm. During this time, the station will be unavailable for renting or docking bikes. If you are planning to use Hubway in the area during this period, please make arrangements to use alternate stations. The closest stations are:

  • New Balance Store - Boylston at Dartmouth
  • Boylston St / Berkeley St
  • Back Bay / South End Station
  • Boylston at Fairfield

The station is expected to reopen and be fully operational at 7pm on Sunday evening. For station map and up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this planned outage, and thank you for using Hubway.

[AUDIO] RadioBoston, 90.9 WBUR: 8 Ways To Diversity Transportation In Neighborhoods Like Somerville's Union Square

“What I think people haven’t really taken into account is this really is a mobility revolution we’re in the middle of. And it’s not just about the green line. Right behind you there’s Hubway bikes… and all those bikes are gone, somebody’s taken all of them somewhere else. We are going to have more and more car sharing here. There’s a Zipcar…station right behind us over there. We have people walking here, biking here, taking the train. There’s a huge amount of change [that’s] going to be happening in the way we use our cars in the future. [The] millennial generation — fewer and fewer of them are getting driving licenses now. People don’t want to use cars, they don’t want to own cars.” Click here to read and hear more.

Boston Local Food Festival: A Zero Waste Event!

This year, the 5th Annual Boston Local Food Festival will be taking place on Sunday, September 14th, from 11am-5pm on the Rose Kennedy Greenway. In addition to featuring a wide variety of local food vendors, demos from local chefs, a DIY station, live music and more, the festival also strives to be a zero waste event.

When a festival or event is “zero waste,” it means that 90% of the waste is recycled, reduced or reused, and thus it also means that the event strives to leave the smallest possible impact on the environment. The Boston Local Food Festival works in various ways to achieve this goal, one of which involves its close partnership with long-time festival partner and sponsor, Save That Stuff (STS). STS is a Boston-based, company leading in Zero Waste Services. Each year, STS sets up Zero-Waste Stations throughout the festival that are all equipped with separate bins for compost, commingled recycling, and trash. They also provide the necessary training and resources to festival staff to ensure their continued success in this mission.

Vendors, exhibitors and attendees also play a huge role in achieving zero waste. Vendors and exhibitors assist by only serving on biodegradable dishes, by using as many recyclable materials as possible, and by composting any food scraps. Festival goers can contribute by bringing their own forks, spoons and, reusable bags. No bottle water will be sold on-site, so attendees are encouraged to bring their own reusable water bottles as well! The Sustainable Business Network of MA has partnered with Boston Water and Sewer Commission this year to provide free, local water to all attendees from their travelling water truck! Attendees can also help reduce their impact on the environment at Boston Local Food Festival by walking, cycling or taking public transportation to the festival, and by signing up as a zero-waste volunteer.

Boston Local Food Festival’s zero-waste volunteers are crucial to minimizing waste by maximizing composting and recycling during the festival. They stand by the disposal bins to educate the crowd about where waste should and should not go, as well foresee that all festival-goers are disposing of their waste correctly.

This year, the Boston Local Food Festival is looking to increase the amount of waste they diverted in 2013, making it yet another successful zero waste event. In addition to that, and in an effort to be even greener, they have partnered up with Hubway to provide an easy and eco-friendly way for attendees get to and from the festival. There are multiple Hubway stations located in the area so grab your water bottle, jump on a bike and come join in on the fun! Learn more about Boston Local Food Festival on their website at BostonLocalFoodFestival.org!

Station Move Alert: Beacon Street at Washington / Kirkland [Somerville]

Station Move Alert: Beginning Thursday, September 11th, the Beacon Street at Washington / Kirkland Hubway station in Somerville will move around the corner onto Washington Street, directly across from the Wine & Cheese Cask. The move is due to a large-scale road improvement project along Beacon Street. The new location is being considered permanent through the end of the 2014 riding season.

During the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.

All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for riding Hubway!

These 12 "Don'ts" of Bicycling still apply 45 years later!

Increased safety isn’t the sole responsibility of any one party or group of individuals. The responsibility for increasing safety for bicycles, drivers, and pedestrians alike lies in the concerted efforts from (and respect for) all parties & individuals, and each of us can take responsibility for the safety of both ourselves and others.

That being said, we thought the image below from a 1969 bicycle safety manual, found in a 2012 blog post by Maria Popova in Brain Pickings, was pretty spot on. Click the image to view the full post and other fantastic images from the manual.