News

Hubway's new customer support phone number

EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY: Hubway’s new customer support phone number is 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929)

We only changed one digit, but it’s an important one. Starting today, Tuesday, April 22nd, Hubway Customer Support has a new phone number. Hubway’s keys, docks, bikes, and stations are designed to be intuitive, but if you ever need any help, ignore the old number on your key fob, drop us a line here, and we’ll be happy to help.

1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929)
24 hours a day / 7 days a week
in English and Spanish.

If you have suggestions for future station locations, please continue to use our Station Locator Tool to tell us exactly where you want to see them. Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Hubway Everyday,

The Hubway Team

Station Relocation Alert: Harvard University Housing & Harvard University Transportation Services stations in slightly different locations

Station Alert: The following two Hubway stations were deployed today, Thursday, April 17th, but the locations are slightly different than last year:

  • Harvard University Housing - 111 Western Ave at Soldier’s Field Park This is a 15-dock station that is now closer to Soldier’s Field.
  • Harvard University Transportation Services - 175 North Harvard St This is a 19-dock station that was formerly located in the parking lot at the intersection of N Harvard and Western and has now moved around the corner onto N Harvard.

Both stations are open & operational.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

[PeopleForBikes] Protected bike lanes coming to town will make biking easy on big streets

The following is a guest post by PeopleForBikes, a movement to improve bicycling in the U.S.

Great news for comfortable biking: Boston is one of six cities recently selected to receive two years of free expertise and support for building a network of protected bike lanes that physically separate bike and auto traffic. The PeopleForBikes Green Lane Project will help the city build the Connect Historic Boston project, which starts construction this fall on a family-friendly figure-eight bike loop around and through downtown.

New York City’s network of protected bike lanes, currently the country’s biggest, has been a big part of making Citi Bike bikeshare so popular there: in a recent Manhattan bike count, 45 percent of Citi Bike users were using the protected lanes. We’re eager to see more of this modern bike infrastructure hit the streets. The image above is an artist rendering from Connect Historic Boston of what the protected lanes might look like on Causeway Street at Haverhill Street.

To join PeopleForBikes and support its programs like the Green Lane Project, visit peopleforbikes.org/hubway.

Station Alert: List of station deployments delayed until after Boston Marathon

Station Alert: As requested by the City of Boston, the following stations will not be deployed until late April, after the Boston Marathon:

    BROOKLINE
  • Coolidge Corner - Beacon St @ Centre St
  • Washington Square at Washington St. / Beacon St
    BOSTON
  • Newbury St / Hereford St
  • Boylston at Fairfield
  • Boylston St / Berkeley St
  • Boston Public Library - 700 Boylston St.
  • New Balance Experience Store - Boylston / Dartmouth
  • Charles St at Beacon St

These stations are expected to be deployed the week of April 22nd, but the schedule is subject to change. Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

Station Alert: Charles Circle / MGH station expected to return late April

Station Alert: Due to Longfellow Bridge construction, the deployment of Hubway’s Charles Circle / MGH location is delayed as a location is finalized near the previous location. The station is expected to be deployed in April but the exact timing has yet to be determined.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

New Station Alert: Day Boulevard, South Boston

New Station Alert: Effective Friday morning, April 11th, the new Hubway station, Day Boulevard, in South Boston, is open & operational. This is a 19-dock station, located on a wide sidewalk alongside Day Boulevard, just north of the rotary intersection with Broadway.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

New Station Alert: Dana Park, Cambridgeport

New Station Alert: Effective Thursday morning, April 10th, the new Hubway station, Dana Park, in the Cambridgeport region of Cambridge, is open & operational. This station is a 19-dock station, located on Lawrence Street between Pearl and Magazine, adjacent to Dana Park.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

Station Alert: New (temporary) location for JP Centre Station, Jamaica Plain

Station Alert: Effective Wednesday morning, April 9th, the JP Centre Hubway station located on Centre Street at Myrtle Street in front of the post office, has been deployed down the block to Centre Street at Seaverns. This station is a 15-dock station, adjacent to the Bank of America, and is fully operational. This is a temporary location, pending a community meeting later this spring.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

[Boston Globe] Public-Private Funding for Hubway paying off

This article was originally published by Martine Powers in the Boston Globe on April 7th, 2014.

PUBLIC-PRIVATE FUNDING FOR HUBWAY PAYING OFF
City in line for more profit in Year 4

For some bike-share programs in North America, it was a winter of discontent.

In January, Montreal’s bike-share program Bixi filed for bankruptcy. Then, last month, reports surfaced that the operators of New York’s Citi Bike had asked for tens of millions of dollars in aid from the City of New York.

But in Boston last week, Hubway opened for its fourth season with a rosy financial prognosis, a fresh contract between the City of Boston and bike-share operators, an expectation that the system will continue turning a profit, and plans for 10 new stations.

“We’re in a very, very solid financial place,” said Nicole Freedman, director of the city’s Boston Bikes program. “We’re in a position to fund expansion.”

Some have attributed Hubway’s success to its more conservative choices — closing for winter and launching with a compact system that spread cautiously — as well as its dependence on both public and private money.

“Bike share systems in Boston, Denver, Chicago, Minneapolis, and Washington, D.C., all of which started relatively small and relied on public sector funds, were able to launch with success, iron out kinks, stabilize, and expand quickly,” said Mia Birk, Hubway Bike Share vice president.

Now, Boston will pay a lower rate for bike-share operations with a new contract that stands to allow the city to collect larger profits.

Previously Boston divided the costs of operating the system 50-50 with Alta Bicycle Share, the contractor that operates and maintains the system’s bikes, stations, software, and memberships. Boston uses public grant money, along with private sponsorships, to pay the city’s share without dipping into municipal coffers — and up until now, Alta and Boston have split the profits in half. It was a risk-sharing model favored by former mayor Thomas M. Menino, who was wary of placing the city on the hook if forays into bike share fell flat, Freedman said.

Now, Boston will pay Alta for the full operations cost, but in turn, the city will take all of the profits from membership fees and advertising — a sign that city officials are confident in the bike-share program’s continued profitability. And the city is getting Alta’s services at a new, lower rate: Boston will pay the company about $70 per bike dock per month for maintenance and operations, about a 30 percent reduction from previous operation rates, and well below the average price for other bike-share systems, such as the $111 rate paid by Capital Bikeshare in Washington, D.C.

The cities of Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline — some of which use municipal dollars to help pay their share — are considering whether to switch to Boston’s funding model.

Hubway’s diversified funding approach has been championed by some as the most stable option.

In January, Bixi, the company that operated bike shares in Montreal and Toronto and also manufactures bike-share equipment, filed for bankruptcy protection. The City of Montreal, which is owed about $30 million from Bixi, has seized the company’s Montreal assets. The City of Toronto has taken over its own bike-share operations.

And New York’s Citi Bike — widely touted for being funded entirely through private sponsorships and membership fees — is now seeking tens of millions of dollars from the City of New York to maintain and expand operations, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal. Citi Bike, also operated by Alta, has proven popular with residents, but a faulty software system and sparse winter ridership incited financial concerns.

“As with any new industry, there are challenges,” Alta officials said in a statement, adding that the challenges are fixable “and we are working diligently to fix them.”

But some, such as Caroline Samponaro, senior director for campaigns and organizing at Transportation Alternatives, a New York City transit advocacy group, think that Citi Bike should adopt Hubway’s model, incorporating corporate sponsorships and public money.

Starting the system without public funding was necessary in a city where naysayers threatened to prevent the bike share from getting off the ground, she said. But, she continued, government funding is now necessary to ensure stations spread evenly across the city’s neighborhoods.

“It’s a new thing to think about bike share as a public transit system, but now that’s where we are, and it’s important to bring some amount of subsidy so our program can grow to a scale that’s equitable,” Samponaro said.

Encouraging an equitable distribution of bikes and stations is also a problem in Boston, where large swaths — East Boston, Dorchester, Roxbury, Mattapan, and Hyde Park — have few or no stations.

This year, Cambridge embarked on a pilot to test how the system would fare during the winter. Emily Stapleton, Hubway general manager, said ridership in Cambridge was 15 to 20 percent of regular season averages. And there were no Hubway crashes through the winter — a sign of success, said Cara Seiderman, Cambridge’s transportation program manager.

“It was a very tough winter, and counter to what you might expect, we were very happy about it,” Seiderman said. “It gave us the opportunity to do exactly what we wanted to do with this pilot, figuring out what happens when you have cold and difficult winter.”

Still, Cambridge officials have not decided whether year-round service will be permanent. Likewise, Freedman said a decision has not been made on whether Boston will experiment with an all-seasons operation. With fewer winter riders, she said, each ride becomes more expensive, and that is money that could also be used to expand the system into other neighborhoods. Instead of going year-round, she conjectured, the off-season could be shortened to just January and February.

“It really comes down to cost and benefit,” Freedman said. “And if we have a limited amount of money, how do we use that money?”

[Boston Globe] Boston's bike share program thrives, official says

This article was originally published in the Boston Globe on April 7th, 2014.

BOSTON (AP) — Boston’s bicycle sharing program, which just opened for its fourth season, is thriving, the program’s director said, at a time when similar programs in other cities are struggling financially.

Hubway opened last week with a positive financial prognosis, a fresh contract between the city and bike-share operators, an expectation that the system will continue turning a profit and plans for 10 new stations, The Boston Globe reported (http://b.globe.com/1mU7vFD ).

‘‘We’re in a very, very solid financial place,’’ said Nicole Freedman, director of the city’s program. ‘‘We’re in a position to fund expansion.’’

Montreal’s bike-share program filed for bankruptcy in January. Last month, reports surfaced that operators of New York’s program had asked for tens of millions of dollars in aid from the city.

Some have attributed Hubway’s success to more conservative choices — closing for winter and launching with a compact system that spread cautiously — as well as its dependence on both public and private money.

Boston will now pay a lower rate for bike-share operations with a new contract that could allow the city to collect larger profits.

Previously Boston divided the costs of operating the system 50-50 with Alta Bicycle Share, the contractor that operates and maintains the system’s bikes, stations, software and memberships. Boston uses public grant money, along with private sponsorships, to pay the city’s share without dipping into municipal coffers. Up until now, Alta and Boston have split the profits in half.

Now, Boston will pay Alta for the full operations cost, but in turn, the city will take all of the profits from membership fees and advertising.

PRESS RELEASE: Hubway Reopens System-Wide Operations Wednesday, April 2nd








FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to download PDF.
April 1, 2014

CONTACT:
Nicole Freedman, Boston Bikes / City of Boston
nicole.freedman@boston.gov,617.918.4456

Joe Viola, Town of Brookline Community Planning
jviola@brooklinema.gov, 617.730.2125

Cara Seiderman, City of Cambridge Development Department
cseiderman@cambridgema.gov, 617.349.4629

Sarah Spicer, City of Somerville Transportation & Infrastructure
sspicer@somervillema.gov, 617.625.6600 x2519

Benjy Kantor, Hubway
benjykantor@altabicycleshare.com, 617.968.0361

HUBWAY REOPENS SYSTEM-WIDE OPERATIONS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2nd
Mayor Walsh to officially “flip the switch” at New Balance Experience Store
as Boston, Brookline, Somerville rejoin Cambridge after successful winter operations.


Hubway, metro-Boston’s public bike share system, will formally reopen system-wide operations with a special reopening day party hosted by New Balance at the New Balance Experience Store in Boston (583 Boylston Street), on Wednesday, April 2nd, from Noon to 2pm. Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh is scheduled to speak at 12:30pm and will officially reopen Boston, Brookline, and Somerville’s stations by docking the first bike of the season at the New Balance Hubway station on Boylston Street.

“Mayor Walsh is thrilled to be reopening Hubway,” said Nicole Freedman, Director of the city’s Boston Bikes program. “It’s really become part of the transportation fabric of Boston.”

In addition to Mayor Walsh, speakers at the event will include Somerville Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone; Brookline Selectman, Neil Wishinsky; New Balance President & CEO, Rob DeMartini; Boston Bikes Director, Nicole Freedman; and Hubway General Manager, Emily Stapleton. The event will feature special guests including Red Sox mascot Wally the Green Monster and “Newbie” the New Balance mascot, who will be taking pictures with attendees in the Hubway photo booth. There will also be giveaways of New Balance shoes, Hubway memberships, Hub On Wheels registrations, gift certificates, and other bike-related gear, and free food will be provided by Boloco and Ben & Jerry’s.

The Hubway bike share is a regional partnership between Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville. Wednesday’s system-wide reopening connects seamlessly with a Cambridge year-round operations pilot that saw an average of approximately 2,000 Hubway trips per week during the winter season with no incidents or injuries reported. “Cambridge is very excited for the return of Hubway to other points in the network,” says Cambridge Mayor David Maher. “Our pilot program kept Hubway available throughout the winter and has shown the incredible strength of this program. I know that both residents and visitors benefit a great deal from this car-free solution, and our city is committed to continue encouraging this type of mode-shift for commuters.”

This season, 1,300 shared Hubway bicycles will be distributed throughout the system’s 140 stations across the region. While station expansions last fall brought service to neighborhoods in Jamaica Plain and Dorchester, 10 new expansion stations are planned for 2014.

The City of Cambridge has announced plans to add six new Hubway stations, including one on Kendall Street donated by BioMed Realty. “We congratulate the City of Cambridge on the opening of new Hubway stations across the city, including the Kendall Street station,” said Bill Kane, Vice President, Leasing and Development at BioMed Realty. “We are excited to be a part of the Hubway program and the bike share initiative which is consistent with our sustainability efforts throughout Cambridge.” The other five Cambridge locations will be announced in April as they are deployed.

The City of Boston has added two new stations in the Seaport District on the campus of station sponsor Design Center, as well as two additional sites to be announced.

Four stations in Brookline are expected to reopen in the same locations as last year. “We’re excited to begin our third year as a member of the bike share program,” says Betsy DeWitt, Chairwoman of the Brookline Board of Selectmen. “Hubway has provided Brookline residents with a great addition to the regional transit system. Hubway stations are located in the Town’s major commercial areas – Coolidge Corner, Washington Square, Brookline Village – with direct access to public transportation so that riders can easily travel intercity.  Brookline residents are strong supporters, as the continued increase in ridership has shown.  We look forward to another successful season.”

Somerville will be reopening its 12 stations in 2014, with two location changes; one from Ball Square to Magoun Square, and the other to be announced. “Bicycle infrastructure connects people with mass transit and jobs,” says Somerville Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone. “It brings more customers to local businesses and attracts developers with vibrant, active streets filled with faces seen on foot or bicycle rather than through the windows of cars. Hubway is one of the best investments our administration has taken on.”

By April 2nd, approximately 100 stations will have been deployed and will be activated for customer use. The remaining 40 stations are expected to be deployed in the coming days and weeks. Stations in Brookline and Boston that are located along the Boston Marathon route, for example, will not be deployed until after the running of the marathon, which is scheduled to take place Monday, April 21. Customers can view the Hubway website or use the Spotcycle app to confirm station availability.

Since opening in 2011, the Hubway system has logged over 1.7 million bicycle miles, and Hubway riders have burned 67 million calories and offset 500 tons of CO2 emissions. Hubway has nearly 10,000 annual subscribers and last year sold more than 79,000 24-Hour subscriptions, 9,000 72-Hour subscriptions, and 2,000 monthly subscriptions.

Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

###

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Hubway Launches World's First Unicycle-Share

Does the Hubway garage have a unicycle? YES!
Does our mechanic, Mary, know how to ride it? YES!
Is Hubway rolling out the first unicycle-share in the country? ABSOLUTELY NOT!

If we didn’t have an actual, very cool announcement about tomorrow’s (April 2, 2014) system-wide reopening, we’d take this April Fool’s joke a bit further. But we don’t want to tease you too much, so for now enjoy the picture of the unicycle docked safely at a Hubway station, and read the real, complete press release by clicking the headline or image below:

HUBWAY REOPENS SYSTEM-WIDE OPERATIONS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2nd
Mayor Walsh to officially “flip the switch” at New Balance Experience Store
as Boston, Brookline, Somerville rejoin Cambridge after successful winter operations.

Add a description

[WBUR - NPR] Hubway Set To Reopen With 10 New Stations

This article was originally published by Martin Kessler on WBUR.org on April 1st, 2014.

BOSTON — The Boston-area bike-sharing program Hubway reopens Wednesday.

Most of the 140 stations operated by Hubway — a program that allows riders to pick up and drop off rented bikes at stations in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville — were closed for the winter. About 100 stations, including 10 new ones, will open Wednesday.

The remaining stations will reopen throughout April. Stations along the Boston Marathon route will not reopen until after the April 21 race.

Four of the new stations will be located in Boston; the other six will be in Cambridge.

In a pilot program to test the feasibility of yearlong service, stations in Cambridge were open throughout the winter. According to Hubway, approximately 2,000 trips were made per week throughout the winter.

“The fact that we were able to pilot running year-round operations turned out to be one of the most popular things that we’ve done,” Cambridge Transportation Program Manager Cara Seiderman told WBUR. “Everything really went smoothly.”

Hubway came to Boston in 2011. Last summer, it expanded to Brookline, Somerville and Cambridge.

In an effort to address health disparities, Boston last week announced the creation of the “Prescribe-a-Bike” program, which allows Boston Medical Center physicians to refer low-income patients for a $5 Hubway membership. A typical annual membership costs $85.

[Metro Boston] Cambridge cyclists took 32,000 Hubway trips this winter

This article was originally published by Morgan Rousseau in Metro Boston on March 31st, 2014.

Despite the bitter, seemingly endless cold and snow that wore away at New Englanders in recent months, Hubway is reporting that the winter blues didn’t keep Cambridge’s cyclists off the roads.

Last year, Hubway announced that it would test a pilot program in Cambridge. Most stations operated throughout the winter to test year-round feasibility.

Due to the positive reception, Cambridge cyclists can expect year-round operations to continue.

“We received a considerable amount of positive feedback from Hubway users about keeping the system open year-round and the team did a great job of managing operations including through the various storm events,” said Seiderman.

Although no formal decision has been made, the city anticipates that it is likely it will continue with year-round operations.

“The other municipalities are [sic] considering what they will do and I expect an announcement will be forthcoming, although their focus right now is on spring re-opening and getting new stations out,” she said.

The busiest Cambridge stations this winter generally were the MIT stations, Central Square, Kendall Square and Inman Square.

Hubway is set to open its spring operations Wednesday.

[Video: CBS Boston] Hubway Gears Up For Bike Share Program's Spring Launch

This piece originally aired on CBS Boston on March 28th, 2014.


BOSTON (CBS) – On the streets of downtown Boston, pedal power is returning from hibernation

So inside a Charlestown warehouse, mechanics are going full tilt on the tuneups to make sure the Hubway fleet is roadworthy.

Hubway is the public bike-share program whereby you can grab some wheels at docking stations around town, pedal to your destination and drop it off at another station.

The service comes with online trackers and mobile apps.

“So there is some planning and thinking involved to starting your trip,” said Hubway’s Emily Stapleton.

Next week 1,300 bikes now in the warehouse will be out on the streets when about two-thirds of Hubway’s 140 stations will open up in Boston, Cambridge, Brookline and Somerville.

Roughly 9,700 folks now pay an annual fee of $85 to Hubway, which entitles riders to unlimited trips under 30 minutes.

But a new program will let doctors at Boston Medical Center actually prescribe a membership to low-income patients as part of an exercise regimen for just $5.

“For the mayor it’s very important that this program is for all Boston residents regardless of income,” said Nicole Freedman, Boston’s bike czar.

Believe it or not, some Hubway bike stations were open all winter long in Cambridge to test snowy ridership — and people still made 2,000 trips per week.

But the lion’s share of docking stations – and bikes – spend the winter inside and have to be hauled back outside each spring.

Hubway’s spring launch is actually earlier this year than last, despite our nasty winter.

So the next several days are going to be kind of crazy in the repair shop.

[Boston Herald] Soon-to-reopen Hubway pedals 10 new stations

This article was originally published by Marie Szaniszlo in the Boston Herald on March 28th, 2014.

In what may be the surest sign yet that spring has arrived, the Hubway bike-share program is set to reopen next week with 10 new stations and new, subsidized memberships for low-income patients of one Boston hospital.

After a year-round Cambridge pilot program that averaged 2,000 trips per week during the winter, nearly 100 of the 140 stations in that city, as well as in Boston, Brookline and Somerville, are expected to be operational by April 2, with most of the remaining ones to be rolled out in early April.

Eight stations that are along the marathon route will be deployed after the April 21 race, said Emily Stapleton, general manager of Alta Bicycle Share, the Oregon-based company Boston hired to run the program in 2011.

Since then, Hubway has logged about 1.6 million trips and 9,700 annual members among the four communities, Stapleton said.

“Mayor (Martin J.) Walsh is thrilled to be reopening Hubway,” said Nicole Freedman, the city’s director of bicycle programs. “It’s really become part of the transportation fabric of Boston.”

Two of the 10 new bike stations will be at the Boston Design Center, which is sponsoring them, Stapleton said.

The exact locations of two other new Boston stations and six new Cambridge stations are expected to be announced next month.

Walsh and Boston Medical Center this week also announced the launch of “Prescribe a Bike,” a new program that allows BMC doctors to write prescriptions for $5 Hubway annual memberships, which normally cost $85, to low-income residents.

You're invited to Hubway's Official System-wide Reopening Day Party, Wednesday, April 2nd

This is no April Fool’s joke! System-wide Hubway begins anew as Boston, Brookline, and Somerville rejoin Cambridge operations. Join us to celebrate at the official reopening day party!

Wednesday, April 2nd, Noon-2pm
New Balance Experience Store
583 Boylston Street, Boston
RSVP here!


  • FOOD: Free burritos from Boloco & ice cream provided by Ben & Jerry’s Boston.

  • FREE STUFF: Giveaways & discounts from New Balance, Hubway, Hub on Wheels, and more.

  • DIGNITARIES: Speakers from Hubway member municipalities.

  • MASCOTS EVERYWHERE: Wally the Green Monster & Newbie!

  • PHOTO BOOTH: Get your picture taken Wally, Newbie, and friends!

  • FREE PASSES: Grab a free Hubway 24-Hour pass.

  • Music, merriment, special announcements, and more!

    More details to be announced on March 31st.
    RSVP here to let us know you’re coming!

    Thank you to:

    Add a description      Add a description




    Add a description      Add a description

  • System Alert: System-wide Hubway operations reopen Wednesday, April 2nd

    Boston, Brookline, Somerville rejoin Cambridge as Hubway reopens system-wide on Wednesday, April 2nd.

    “Spring must be on its way if Hubway is setting up shop!”
    “I get so excited when I see Hubway stations back again #springishere”
    “Yaaaaasss can’t wait for Hubway season #suchatease.”


    Snow may be on the way this week, but we have something for you to look forward to! Consider yourself the first to know: After a successful year-round pilot program in Cambridge, Hubway’s system-wide operations begin anew with an official reopening on Wednesday, April 2nd.

    The Hubway team has been hard at work deploying stations, and nearly 100 stations (out of 140) are expected to be operational by April 2nd, with most remaining stations to be rolled out in early April. Please note: stations along Boylston Street in Brookline and Boston will not be deployed until after the Boston Marathon.

    For up-to-the-minute station, bike, and dock availability, we recommend using the Spotcycle smartphone app, or Hubway Tracker from a desktop computer.

    Get ready to ride.

    New(ish) Station Alert: Lafayette Square station returns

    New(ish) Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, March 21st, the Hubway station located at Lafayette Square in Cambridge, has been re-deployed in the same location as last year, and is fully operational. This station is a 19-dock station on Mass Ave at Lafayette Square adjacent to Main & Columbia Streets.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    System Alert: deploying stations for full system reopening

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has begun deploying stations in Boston this week in preparation for the spring season. Somerville and Brookline stations will follow shortly.

    PLEASE NOTE: While the Cambridge winter pilot is still taking place as normal, at this time Boston / Brookline / Somerville stations are not operational and they will not accept bicycle returns. Plans are to fully connect all deployed stations within the next few weeks. Sign up to receive the reopening announcement by entering your email on the Hubway homepage.

    If you have any question about whether a particular station is open or closed, please check Hubway Tracker or download Spotcycle for your smartphone for the most up-to-date information, or call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929).

    [Boston Magazine] Boston selected for national project to create cycletracks

    This article was originally published by Steven Annear in Boston Magazine on March 11th, 2014.

    The country’s “leading bicycle movement” has selected Boston as one of just six cities in the country to get new bike lanes designed to help keep cyclists separated from vehicles on the roadways.

    Nicole Freedman, director of the city’s Boston Bikes program, sent out an email Monday announcing that The PeopleForBikes Green Lane Project will work with officials to implement “its intensive two-year program to build protected bike lanes” on city streets.

    Under the terms of the partnership program, Boston will get strategic, technical assistance from The Green Lane Project, an initiative run by the non-profit PeopleForBikes, to speed up the installation of protected bike lanes—also known as cycle tracks—already in the works. The lanes will keep cyclists and cars in two different sections of the roadways by using either raised curbs, planters, parked cars, or posts “to make riding a bike an appealing option for more people.”

    Freedman said the projects vary. Some of the proposed tracks can be done by repainting roadways, while others are still in the design phase. The tracks are city-funded, but will most likely be paid for through grant money. The Green Lane Project helps push the projects forward in a timely manner. “We proposed a specific number of projects in our application all in various levels of design, from early concept to advanced design. Implementation is subject to the public process,” she said.

    Boston was picked from a pool of 100 cities across the country and will join Atlanta, Denver, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, and Seattle as the test cities for the program. The folks at PeopleForBikes said it was a tough decision sifting through the various cities that applied for the installation project, but because Boston has a reputation for getting certain things done in record time, it made the area an obvious choice for the grant.

    “It was extremely difficult to narrow down our selection to just six cities; we are seeing an upsurge of interest in accommodating bikes on busy city streets,” said Martha Roskowski, PeopleForBikes’ vice president of local innovation. “Boston has ambitious goals and a strong vision supported by the elected officials and the community. They are poised to get projects on the ground quickly and will serve as an excellent example for other interested cities.”

    Boston leaders will join the Green Lane Project at an official kickoff event in Indianapolis in late April, according to Freedman.

    “This is just what Boston needs to jumpstart the expansion of protected bike lanes here,” said David Watson, executive director of the Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition, or MassBike. “We sent a letter of support for the city’s application to the Green Lane Project, and we are looking forward to seeing more people of all ages and abilities biking safely in Boston.”

    The announcement comes just days after the city hosted a meeting to outline the design plans for a new network of bike paths that will loop around the historic monuments Boston has to offer, as part of the “Connect Historic Boston” project.

    According to project details, a four-mile track will circle the downtown area after modifications to busy streets are made to better connect cyclists with regional paths and T stations. The bike trail will include a two-way, elevated bicycle track along Staniford, Causeway, and Commercial Streets, as well as Atlantic Avenue. It will also require the reconstruction of Lowell Square and Keany Square.

    “Over the next six years, I want to take Boston from one of the best bicycling cities in the country to one of the best in the world. Investing in protected bike lanes is a critical path to that success,” Mayor Marty Walsh said in a statement Monday.

    Since 2007, Boston has added 82 miles of bike lanes to city streets and 1,500 bike racks. The city also launched one of the first bike share systems in the country, Hubway, which has grown to 130 stations and more than 1,100 available bicycles.

    “With Connect Historic Boston planning underway, we are on track to see some incredible improvements over the next few years, not just for people on bikes, but for all road users, ” Freedman said.

    [Boston Cyclists Union] Boston selected for national project to create cycletracks

    This article was originally published by the Boston Cyclists Union on March 10th, 2014.

    The PeopleForBikes Green Lane Project has selected Boston as one of six new U.S. cities to join its intensive two-year program to build protected bike lanes. Boston will receive financial, strategic and technical assistance to create protected bike lanes, also known as cycletracks. The Boston Cyclists Union helped support the city’s application this year, and also helped the city apply for the first year of the program in 2012. Boston, Atlanta, GA, Denver, CO, Indianapolis, IN, Pittsburgh, PA and Seattle, WA.,were chosen from more than 100 U.S. cities that submitted letters of interest for the program.
    Cycletracks are separated from traffic by curbs, planters, parked cars or posts to make riding a bike an appealing option for more people.

    “It was extremely difficult to narrow down our selection to just six cities; we are seeing an upsurge of interest in accommodating bikes on busy city streets,” said Martha Roskowski, PeopleForBikes Vice President of Local Innovation. “Boston has ambitious goals and a strong vision supported by the elected officials and the community. They are poised to get projects on the ground quickly and will serve as an excellent example for other interested cities.”

    “Over the next six years, I want to take Boston from one of the best bicycling cities in the country to one of the best in the world. Investing in protected bike lanes is a critical path to that success,” Boston’s Mayor Martin Walsh said.

    Since 2007, Boston went from the worst bicycling city in the country, according to Bicycling Magazine, to one of the best. Boston launched one of the first bike share systems in the country, the New Balance Hubway system, which has since grown to 130 stations and more than 1100 bicycles. Boston has added 82 miles of bike lanes and1500 bike racks and created one of the most successful community bike programs in the country, donating 1,000 bikes to low income residents and training 5,000 youth in 2013.

    Under Mayor Walsh’s leadership, Boston will begin investing in protected bike lanes consistent with the recently completed Bike Network Plan, implement a women’s cycling program and expand Hubway into the neighborhoods. “With Connect Historic Boston planning underway, we are on track to see some incredible improvements over the next few years, not just for people on bikes, but for all road users, “said Boston Director of Bicycle Programs, Nicole Freedman.

    In the first two years of the program (2012 and 2013), the Green Lane Project worked closely with other major U.S. cities – Austin, TX, Chicago, IL, Memphis, TN, Portland, OR, San Francisco, CA and Washington, DC – to build protected bike lanes. Since then, the number of protected bike lanes on city streets nationwide has nearly doubled from 80 to 142 – with more than half of all growth coming from the Project’s six focus cities. The founding cities will continue as mentors to the new class while continuing to build their bicycling networks with the momentum driven by the Project.

    Boston leaders will join the Green Lane Project at an official kickoff event in Indianapolis in late April.

    #WinterWonderHubway Photo Contest Winners Receive Their Prizes

    When Hubway teamed up with the awesome crew at Timbuk2 to present the #WinterWonderHubway photo contest, we knew we would be introduced to some of our most creative and dedicated Hubway riders! So it was a special treat for us to gather together with them last month at Cambridge City Hall Annex to hand them their very cool custom bag prize and talk with them about why they plan to #hubwayeveryday.

    We captured their first reactions to their new bags! Check out the video!

    And click here to view the winning contest entry photos!

    [BostInno] Boston Among 6 Cities Selected to Create More Green Bike Lanes

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno on March 11th, 2014.

    The PeopleForBikes Green Lane project has chosen Boston to join an intensive two-year program to build protected, green cycling lanes throughout each city. During the course of the project, Boston will receive financial aid, strategic and technical assistance to create cycletracks.

    “Over the next six years, I want to take Boston from one of the best bicycling cities in the country to one of the best in the world. Investing in protected bike lanes is a critical path to that success,” Boston’s Mayor Martin Walsh said in a statement.

    Boston, along with Atlanta, GA.; Denver, CO.; Indianapolis, IN.; Pittsburgh, PA.; and Seattle WA.; were the six cities chosen this year out of 100 applicants.

    Boston’s application to the Green Lane Project was backed by the Boston Cyclist Union, which also helped the city apply in 2012.

    “It was extremely difficult to narrow down our selection to just six cities; we are seeing an upsurge of interest in accommodating bikes on busy city streets,” said Martha Roskowski, PeopleForBikes Vice President of Local Innovation, in a statement.

    Programs such as Connect Historic Boston and the possibility of expanding Hubway service into neighborhoods, Boston Bikes Director Nicole Freedman said, indicates the city is “on track to see some incredible improvements over the next few years, not just for people on bikes, but for all road users.

    The Green Lane Project is entering its third year. Since 2012, the project has nearly doubled the amount of bike lanes nationwide, from 80 up to 142.

    [Montreal Gazette] Bike-sharing has health benefits, study finds

    This is an excerpt of an article that was originally published by Jill Barker in The Montreal Gazette on March 2nd, 2014.

    In one study, most of the users of a bike-share program were men 15 to 44. Bixi could maximize health benefits by trying to boost ridership among women and older cyclists. Men benefit from a decrease in heart disease, while women have a reduction in depression, the study, in London, showed.

    When all factors were considered, including the risks associated with cycling, the boost in physical activity among bike-share users resulted in significant health gains at the population level. Men benefited from a decrease in heart disease while women had a reduction in depression. Because women used the service less than men, though, they realized fewer health benefits.

    At the individual level, however, the health benefits were small, due mainly to the infrequent use of the bikes. Researchers estimated a reduced death rate of 3.3 — 10.9 deaths per million users per year.

    As for the effects of air pollution on urban cyclists, the researchers estimated that exposure levels were small and of little effect as compared to other modes of transportation.

    When it came to road injuries, the rate of injury was lower than for cycling in general, despite the lack of compulsory helmets. It was hypothesized that the heavier, sturdy bikes resulted in reduced speeds, which when combined with designated bike paths and built-in lights, made the use of city bikes safer than traditional road bikes.

    Overall, the researchers concluded, the benefits of using bike-share programs outweighed any risk. This is especially true as cyclists got older. In a younger population, 30 to 44 years old, where the risk of chronic disease is lower, the health effects were minimal. But for bike-share users 45 to 59 years of age, the extra physical activity had a far greater impact on health.

    To read the full article, click here.

    Press Release: Data Geeks: Rejoice! 2013 Comprehensive Hubway Trip Data Released













    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 27, 2014
    Click here to download PDF.

    CONTACT: Jessica Robertson, Transportation Coordinator, MAPC
    JRobertson@mapc.org

    DATA GEEKS: REJOICE!
    Metropolitan Area Planning Council and Hubway
    Release New Comprehensive Hubway Trip Data


    Boston – The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), in partnership with Hubway, the City of Boston, the City of Cambridge, the City of Somerville, and the Town of Brookline, today released new and comprehensive trip data from the Hubway bike-share system. Taken as a whole, these data can illustrate major travel patterns, help Hubway plan new stations and optimize rebalancing, and even show where new transit connections might be needed.

    The data include information on Hubway trips from the July 2011 launch through the end of the regular 2013 season. Information includes the starting and ending time and date of every Hubway ride; which Hubway bike was used and from which station; whether the rider was an annual or monthly member or was using a one-day pass; and the gender and zip code of the rider.

    This release updates the data on which the 2012 Hubway Data Challenge, MAPC’s public data visualization competition, was based. The new data are available for download at www.hubwaydatachallenge.org, where all the entries from the data challenge are still available.

    STAY TUNED: MAPC will be announcing another transportation-related data challenge in early March.

    For more information about the Hubway data release, please contact Jessica Robertson, Transportation Coordinator at MAPC, at JRobertson@mapc.org.

    ###

    ABOUT MAPC
    The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning agency serving the people who live and work in Greater Boston. Our work is guided by our regional plan, “MetroFuture: Making a Greater Boston Region.”

    Find out more about the Hubway system, extensions, station outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Saturday, February 15th, at 5:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we will temporarily close Hubway at 5:00PM on Saturday, February 15th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun, though any bikes in use at the time can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    #WinterWonderHubway Photo Contest Winners Announced!

    We’re excited to present the winning photos in our #WinterWonderHubway contest! Each of the savvy photogs/posters below will make a visit to Cambridge City Hall to receive a winter-Hubway-customized bike bag from the fantastic folks at Timbuk2! Thanks to everyone who participated and rode. You can customize your own Timbuk2 bag HERE. Scroll over the images below to reveal the winning photos, and click to see each post!

    New Cambridge Station Posters

    Short days, short commute.
    Slow down and see what you’re missing.
    Get cozy, share a lane.
    Brighten up your nights, remember your lights.

    The people you share the road with are your friends, neighbors, etc., and the Cambridge Community Development Department (CDD) wants to remind you with its release of a series of winter public service posters. You’ll see them displayed at Hubway station kiosks throughout the city beginning next week. Scroll below for larger versions, and spread the word!

    [The Transit Wire] Hubway trying something different

    This piece was originally published on TheTransitWire.com on February 7th, 2014, and is based on an article by Martine Powers in the Boston Globe.

    News on three bikeshare programs: Biking through the New England winter, crowd-funding in Kansas City, and a new program in Cincinnati.

    Most bicycle-sharing programs operating in colder climates take a winter break, but Hubway (MA) is trying something different.  Although the program has shut down for the winter in Boston and neighboring Brookline and Somerville, Cambridge officials have decided to keep service running year-round.

    And then it snowed.  “It’s been an opportunity for us to experiment every time we’ve had a snowstorm this winter,” said Hubway general manager Emily Stapleton.  She said that staff has become adept at protecting some 250 bikes from the elements. When a storm is on the way, Hubway declares a temporary shutdown to prevent users from removing a bike from its dock. Sometimes officials remove the bikes and store them off site; at other times they leave the bikes on the street.  So far, the bicycles have survived everything that Mother Nature can throw at them. And in the winter of 2014, that’s been a lot.

    [BostInno] Boston-Area Universities Among Best in U.S. at Reducing Campus Driving

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno on February 6th, 2014.

    Collaboration between Hubway and four Boston-area colleges and universities has become a template for other communities around the country to reduce their reliance on driving, according to a new report.

    Released by MASSPIRG, the report, dubbed, “A New Course: How Innovative University Programs Are Reducing Driving on Campus And Creating New Models for Transportation Policy,” concluded that Harvard, MIT, Northeastern and UMass Boston are leading national efforts to limit the amount of cars on the road.

    Specifically, the report touts Harvard and UMass Boston as “trailblazers,” leading the shift away from driving, and encouraging student innovation in transportation policy.

    “Across America, colleges and universities are showing that efforts to meet increased demand for transportation options deliver powerful benefits for their community and surrounding areas,” said Kirstie Pecci at MASSPIRG Education Fund in a statement. “Partnerships like that seen between the cities of Cambridge and Boston, Hubway and local colleges are saving money for universities and improving the quality of life on campus.”

    Research by the Federal Highway Administration concluded that Americans aged between 16 and 34 managed to reduce their annual driving miles by 23 percent per person between 2001 and 2009.

    “What we design today and build tomorrow is going to define how we live for decades. Many people, especially millennials, are owning fewer cars and traveling differently from previous generations,” said Cambridge City Councilor Craig Kelley in a statement. “Realizing this is crucial to making sure the world we’ll be living in tomorrow reflects the reality being created today.”

    With millennials now America’s largest generation, future government investments in infrastructure will correspond to Millennials transportation preferences.

    “University and college campuses are at the forefront of encouraging new ways to get around that don’t depend on personal cars. Public officials who want to stay ahead of the curve should be taking notes,” added Pecci.

    For access to the full article and a download of the report, click here.

    System Alert: Hubway (all stations in Cambridge) has reopened

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Thursday, February 6th, at Noon. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    [Boston.com] In brutal winter, Hubway perfects the art of snow removal

    This article was originally published by Martine Powers on Boston.com on February 5th, 2014.

    Hubway announced in November it planned to operate all-seasons in Cambridge.

    This season’s onslaught of snowfall may elicit groans of dread from public works departments and state transportation officials, but there’s one organization benefiting from each wintry downpour: Hubway.

    “It’s been an opportunity for us to experiment every time we’ve had a snowstorm this winter,” said Emily Stapleton, general manager of the bike-share program.

    The announcement last November that Hubway would try its hand at operating Cambridge’s 26 bike stations straight through the winter prompted some trepidation. Who would want to bike in the snow? And what would happen to the bikes when clouds inevitably dumped inches of snow on the region?

    Stapleton said Tuesday that Hubway staff have learned to deal with snow and ice, refining their strategy for protecting the approximately 250 bikes in circulation from becoming damaged by the elements. When the National Weather Service announces a winter storm warning, Hubway officials declare a temporary system shutdown, which prevents users from removing a bike from the docks.

    But when it comes to deciding what happens to the bikes during the storm, the answer is less clear.

    Sometimes, Stapleton said, Hubway staff has removed all the bikes from the streets and stored them inside a warehouse to ride out the storm, using custom-made canvas covers to protect some of the docks.

    But other times, they’ve left some of the bikes out in the elements — and so far, she said, they have not noticed any ill-effects. Keeping the bikes parked in their spots on sidewalks and curbs can also prevent ice from becoming lodged in the docks.

    Usually, it takes four to five hours for the Hubway staff to remove all the bikes, though it can take longer if the approaching storm coincides with afternoon rush hour, prompting a mass exodus from Cambridge.

    “We’ve been perfecting that lead time,” Stapleton said.

    And when it comes to snow removal, she said, Hubway staff have been able to handle the more minor flurries by themselves, hiring outside contractors to help plow after more significant winter storms. Stapleton said Hubway has been communicating with public works departments to ensure that the bike-share stations don’t end up as a dumping ground for plowed snow.

    “Where possible, we’ve tried to be mindful of one another, so we’re not creating more work for the other person,” Stapleton said.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Tuesday, February 4th, at 7:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we will temporarily close Hubway at 7:00PM on Tuesday, February 4th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun, though any bikes in use at the time can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    There is a winter storm warning in effect until Wednesday, February 5th, at 6:00PM. We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    City "Actively Pursuing" Hubway Station for Magoun Square

    This article was originally published on Ward5Online.com on January 29th, 2014.

    Last night’s Housing and Community Development meeting brought some exciting news for Magoun Square businesses and residents as it was revealed that the City will “actively pursue” a Hubway Bicycle Station for the business district when they enter into negotiations with the company this Spring.

    While discussing legislative item number 195173, a representative from the Administration revealed that the city is “actively pursuing” a station for the Magoun Square/Trum Field area, but that Hubway does have specific criteria for locations before they agree to install a station. Hubway began a phased launch of the bicycle-renting stations in Somerville in July of 2011, eventually becoming fully expanded in the Fall of 2012.

    As the sponsor of this item, I thought it would be a great addition to the area considering the increased bicycle lanes and visibly improved traffic markings. The completion of the Community Path Extension to Lowell Street (and eventually to Boston), however, was my main leverage for wanting the station near Magoun. Currently, Magoun Square does have some bicycle parking including one directly next to Olde Magoun’s Saloon that’s installed from the Spring to early Winter.

    After sending the great news through my Twitter feed last night (@Ward5Online), one person also recommended Winter Hill as an ideal location for Hubway, calling it a “lost opportunity.”

    Hubway does provide a location map that has an interactive tool feature to suggest locations. I encourage all to suggest locations where they feel Hubway would be best utilized.

    The City will enter into these negotiations this Spring with Director of Transportation and Infrastructure Hayes Morrison stepping up to the plate for Somerville.

    System Alert: Hubway (all stations in Cambridge) has reopened

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Wednesday, January 22nd, at 3:00PM. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    Two new Hubway stations slated for South Boston Waterfront

    This article was originally published by Patrick Rosso on Boston.com on January 22nd, 2014.

    The South Boston Waterfront will welcome two new Hubway stations this spring.

    The new stations, sponsored by Jamestown Properties, will be placed outside the real estate investment firm’s Innovation and Design Building on Drydock Avenue. The building, located near the Black Falcon Cruise Terminal, was purchased by the Atlanta-based firm in 2013 and is expected to be fully operational this spring.

    “The addition of Hubway will provide alternative transportation options that are important to our tenants and others working in the Marine Industrial Park,” said Michael Phillips, chief operating office of Jamestown.

    The company has committed $100,000 to sponsor the two stations, as well as pledged $50,000 for the construction of the concrete pads, access ramps, and striping necessary to install the new stations.

    “The new bike stations are just one example of many improvements we are making at The Innovation and Design Building to support the growing base of innovation and the manufacturing companies in this eastern corner of the Seaport District,” Phillips added.

    Hubway, a short-term bike rental program, has over 100 stations throughout the city of Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville.

    Stations in Boston are expected to reopen in the spring.

    More Hubways Springing Up in Boston's Innovation District

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno on January 21st, 2014.

    Come spring time, Innovation District residents and work commuters could have more Hubway stations at their disposal.

    Real estate firm Jamestown Properties plans to install two additional Hubway stations outside of the Innovation and Design Building. According to a press release announcing the firm’s plans, the bike-share stations are slated to be up and fully operational by spring. When the new stations open, the area will be home to five Hubway locations.

    Seaport Hotel, Seaport Square, and the Boston Convention Center Hubway stations are currently closed for the winter.

    More than 100 Hubway stations and 1,000 bikes are scattered around Boston during the spring, summer and fall, before winter removal. Currently, Cambridge is in the midst of a one-year pilot program, which allows ambitious customers to rent bikes from more than 25 Hubway locations in that city during the winter.

    Jamestown Properties has invested $100,000 to sponsor the two additional Innovation District stations, and an extra $50,000 in infrastructure costs.

    The Seaport’s IDB is located on the corner of Drydock Ave and Design Center Place, just a short bike ride away from the Harpoon Brewery.

    Snapping Hubway pics could earn you free winter swag

    This is an excerpt of an article originally published by Nate Boroyan on BostInno on January 21st, 2014.

    Chances are, unless you’re a diehard cyclist hellbent on trekking through the city during the most adverse conditions, rain, snow, frigid temperatures, and slick roads probably offer enough incentive for you to opt for a T ride.

    With bike-sharing ridership down during the winter, Hubway is offering customers an excuse to brave the elements, hop on a bike, and leave any fears at the door.

    So, if you’re in the market for some fresh winter gear, snap a picture featuring a Hubway station or bike, post it to your social network – Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter – of choice, and include #WinterWonderHubway.

    Ten winners will be selected to receive some fresh winter swag, courtesy of San Francisco-based Timbuk2 (see: below). The last day to submit a photo is January 31.

    Click here for the full article and more contest details.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Tuesday, January 21st, at 1:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we will temporarily close Hubway at 1:00PM on Tuesday, January 21st, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun, though any bikes in use at the time can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    There is a winter storm warning in effect until Thursday, January 23rd, at 1:00PM. We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    Alternate Mobility Choices

    These are excerpts from an article originally published in the Beacon Hill Times on January 21st, 2014.

    Beacon Hill gives residents a head start when it comes to adopting greener lifestyles. It’s a neighborhood whose convenient location and MBTA accessibility spawns walkers and transit users alike; its limited parking spaces often make Zipcars and taxis seem preferable to vehicle ownership…

    Boston’s Climate Action Plan gives communities like Beacon Hill a framework for building greener, healthier and more sustainable neighborhoods.  The BHCA Green Committee, chaired by West Cedar Street resident Eve Waterfall and Lime Street resident Diana Coldren, also supports and encourages sustainable living, with transportation as one of its primary focuses…

    The New Balance Hubway Bike Share System impact on Beacon Hill is “awesome,” said Boston Bikes director Nicole Freedman. Its stations at Charles Circle, the Charles and Beacon intersection, the Arthur Fiedler footbridge and Whole Foods are among the busiest of Boston’s 72 stations.

    In September alone, 6163 trips taken by visitors and residents originated or ended at the Charles Circle station, making it the third most popular station in Boston. The Fiedler Bridge station ranked ninth with 4113 trips and the Whole Foods station had 3783 trips. Those trips translated to substantially fewer cars driving through or parking in the neighborhood…

    “Top on my list of issues with bikes on Beacon Hill is figuring out a way for northbound traffic on Charles Street,” said Chestnut Street Gordon Burnes, an avid bike rider himself. “There’s hardly a time when I am biking southbound that I don’t see another biker heading upstream against the traffic. It’s quite dangerous.”

    Freedman acknowledged the need to give bicyclists heading toward Mass General Hospital and the Longfellow Bridge a route that does not threaten the safety of pedestrians crossing Charles Street but said there are no discussions planned in the near future. Installing a two-way cycle track around the Public Garden to allow bicyclists easier transitions to existing cycle lanes across the city is a higher priority at this time, she said…

    “Right now there’s a wild west mentality out there, a survival of the fittest,” said Waterfall. “Walkers, bikers and drivers need to work together to stress the benefits of each mode of transportation and then to build an infrastructure safe enough so people will consider which mode of transportation to use each time they head out the door,” urged Waterfall…

    Click here to read the full article.

    Best of the New: Bike Helmet Vending Machine and other Bostonian ideas

    This is an excerpt of an article originally published in the “Best of the New: People & Ideas” section of theBoston Globe Magazine on January 19th, 2014.

    24 movers, shakers, and AHA! moments.

    Bike Helmet Vending Machine

    Somerville-based HelmetHub tested its first machine on the [Hubway station at the] corner of Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue this past fall. The compact kiosk can dispense 36 helmets and accept 25 returns; everything is solar-powered. Expect more of the machines [at stations] around Boston this spring, and with other cities interested, around the world after that.

    To read the other great Bostonian ideas, click here.

    Christopher Robin Rides His Bike

    “The things that make me different are the things that make me.” - Winnie the Pooh

    This week marks the 132nd anniversary of the birth of A.A. Milne, the creator of Winnie the Pooh, and so we celebrate his sentiment above, voiced through the tenderness of a little, stuffed, yellow, honey-loving bear in the imagination of a small child. It’s a simple recognition of childlike innocence and wonder, an attitude we see on the faces of other riders going the opposite direction on the bike-path, a respect in the nod of a helmet or a ding of a bell (or a smile or “excuse me”) that Hubway riders give to let others know they’re about to pass by. Happy birthday, A.A.

    #WinterWonderHubway Photo Contest! Win a custom bike bag!

    We’re super excited to be teaming up with San Francisco-based Timbuk2 to hook you up with a chance to win one of these sweet winter-customized Hubway-green bike bag (over $149 value). To get your name in the proverbial hat, simply:

    (1) Snap a photo that includes Hubway (bonus points if you’re in it)!

    (2) Upload your photo #WinterWonderHubway photos to Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook between now and January 31st! Make sure to include the hashtag!

    (3) There is no step 3. You’re done! 10 winners will be selected by the end of the month. Points for clever & creative! Get your #WinterWonderHubway photos up now!


    Need some creative inspiration? Click here for some Hubway user photos, or scroll down for some more examples! Make sure to tag your pics with #WinterWonderHubway

    instagram.com/meaghano9


    instagram.com/rh_moreno


    instagram.com/mistakwigz


    Hubway staff photo

    Beware: Latest evidence suggests that bike sharing is contagious

    This article was originally published by Michael Anderson, Green Lane Project staff writer, on PeopleForBikes.org on January 9th, 2014.

    The first week of 2014 brought the latest chilling sign that public bicycle sharing in North America has reached a new level of virulence.

    Far from slowing their recent epidemic, bike sharing systems now seem likely to spread from major metro areas into college towns and dozens of smaller cities across the continent.

    Since their emergence from central France in 2007, electronic bike sharing systems have spread rapidly around the world. Though experts have identified a few factors that can slow their advance, such as excisions of on-street bike infrastructure and occasional mutations within the organism itself, there is no known cure for modern dock-based bike sharing once it becomes operational.

    Now, a list of subscribers to a webinar series that discusses how to secure funding for such systems offers a peek at 21 cities that face a high risk of contracting bike sharing in the near future.

    Perhaps clearly than ever before, this map suggests that when a bike sharing program infects a major metro area, all nearby cities are at risk. From Charlotte, it can leap quickly to Raleigh and Norfolk; from New York City, to Newark and Hartford; from San Francisco, to Reno and Santa Cruz; from Portland, to Bend and Eugene.

    Even Texans, long thought to be inoculated against urban bicycling, have seen sharing systems spread rapidly since 2011 from San Antonio to Houston, Austin, Fort Worth and El Paso. The participation of Texas A&M University in this week’s webinar suggests that even the vulnerable youngsters of College Station, Tex., may now be at risk.

    There is also continuing evidence that cities with bike sharing tend to develop other troubling comorbidities such as protected bike lanes, another highly infectious variety of urban infrastructure.

    Here’s the latest list of cities that have begun to show early symptoms of interest in bicycle sharing:

    Albuquerque, NM
    Bend, OR
    Calgary, AB
    Canmore, AB
    College Station, TX
    Columbia, MO
    Dayton, OH
    Edmonton, AB
    Eugene, OR
    Greeley, CO
    Hartford, CT
    Nanaimo, BC
    Newark, NJ
    Norfolk, VA
    Peterborough, ON
    Raleigh, NC
    Reno, NV
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Springfield, MO
    Tucson, AZ
    Winooski, VT

    In addition to these 21 cities without bikesharing that sent government employees to join the webinar, participants also came from cities such as Columbus and Indianapolis, already known carriers of bike sharing that seem now to have been seized with a fever to expand their existing systems into more neighborhoods; and cities such as Honolulu and Greensboro, where local retail associations and bicycling advocates — two risk factors that strongly correlate to future bicycle sharing — seem to be taking the lead.

    “Albuquerque has been infected,” Julie Luna, a trail planner for the Mid-Region Council of Governments, said in an interview Wednesday. “The downtown business organization is interested in bikesharing. The university is interested in bikesharing. Some people at the city are interested in bikesharing.”

    David Hutchison, a city engineer in Springfield, Mo., said he’d joined the seminar after being exposed to bikesharing systems in Boulder, Colo, Fort Collins, Colo., and Washington D.C. and finding them “quite useful.” “Springfield is about the same size as Fort Collins, and Missouri State is about the size of Colorado State University,” he said. “So I like to think of them as sister cities. Seems to me that what they can do, we can.”

    Is bike sharing right for your community?

    This article was originally published by Micheline Maynard on BridgeMI.com on January 8th, 2014.

    Bike-share programs are becoming more popular in communities across the world. What would make a bike share right for your city or town? Consider these factors:

    An active bicycling community, coupled with bike lanes or paths – Cyclists are often the first ambassadors for bike sharing, and bicycling organizations frequently get involved in hosting “how to ride” clinics and safety programs for bike-sharing systems.

    A supportive city government, and nonprofits that support the environment – Many bike-share programs are partnerships between municipal and environmental groups.

    Sponsors to underwrite bike shares as they get on their feet – These can be universities, corporations, and nonprofits able to make multi-year commitments.

    Places to go – One of the biggest reasons people use bike sharing is to supplement cars or public transportation, a concept often referred to as “the last mile.” Bike sharing can be the bridge between an office and a restaurant for lunch, or the bus and a bar after work. It also can ease parking demand in tourist areas, since bike-share users can park elsewhere and bike in.

    Logical spots for bike racks – Bike-sharing companies like Bixi and B-Cycle regularly consult with communities to choose the locations for racks where bikes will be most used.

    A “complete streets” mindset – In which pedestrians, bikes and cars coexist comfortably.

    Bicycling around Boston: An Eco Friendly Alternative Made Easy!

    This article was originally published by Austin Mallick on Joycott.com on Jan. 3, 2014.

                

    Given the influx in an interest in exercise, bike share programs are entirely popular throughout major metropolitan areas in the U.S. Beyond providing locals with access to a ride, they are also quite beneficial for visitors touring these cities. Biking through a new city certainly has a different feel than renting a car, not to mention that it is both cheaper and more energy efficient.

    An example of one of these successful bike share program is Hubway, located in and throughout the Boston metropolitan area.

    Launched in July of 2011, the Hubway (or officially known as New Balance Hubway) bike sharing system has been on the up and up. It began as 600 bikes and 60 stations throughout the Boston area, including area such as Brookline, Cambridge, and others.

    Even during the winter months of 2011, new users were signing up on the regular in anticipation of when the bike program would reopen. Hubway became the first regional bike sharing program in the U.S. after Boston, surrounding cities, and Alta Bicycle Share signed a collective regional agreement.

    As of Thanksgiving this past year, Hubway users hit the 1.5 million rides mark as the number of bikes and active stations continues to grow.

    Most recently, a majority of the Hubway stations in Cambridge are participating in a pilot program that will allow the bike share program to operate year-round.

    Hubway can be used in a few different ways. First and foremost, users need to choose a membership; these can range anywhere from annual passes to both 24 hour and 72 hour passes. These short term passes are available at any Hubway station through the kiosks, and both annual and monthly memberships can be purchased online.

    To boot, you can also order yourself a helmet (remember, safety first), which can be added to your membership or purchased. All rides underneath 30 minutes are free, and rides over 30 minutes incur additional usage fees depending on your pass.

    The Hubway bike share program falls under the Boston Bikes organization, whose goal is “to make Boston a world-class bicycling city by creating safe and inviting conditions for all residents and visitors”.

    Created in the Fall of 2007 by Boston’s Mayor Menino, Boston Bikes aims to help create a bike-friendly environment for everyone by creating bike lanes, educating the public, and hosting community events, among other projects.

    Some number crunching shows the span of their efforts: bicycle ridership has increased 82% since 2007; Hubway has 72 stations and over 700 bikes in Boston; Boston’s 60th was installed on Massachusetts Ave, a main thoroughfare for Boston’s bike network.

    2013 Boston Bike Counts

    This is an excerpt of the 2013 Bike Count conducted by Boston Bikes. Find the full report by clicking here.

    Since 2007 Boston has seen a 78% increase in cycling. Below you can find data from 2013, as well as data dating back to 2007. Click on each image to view a larger version.

    Counts are conducted each Fall during the hours of 7-9am and 4-6pm. Thank you to all those who have volunteered their time throughout the years.

                

    System Alert: Hubway re-opens at 12pm on Saturday 1/4/14

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway will be re-opened as of Saturday, January 4th, at 12:00PM. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway temporarily shut down on 1/1/14 at 5:00 PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we have
    temporarily closed Hubway at 5:00 PM on Wednesday, 1/1/14, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented during the temporary closure, though any bikes in use can be returned to any Hubway station with an available
    dock.

    We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    Providence moving ahead with bike share program

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Providence is moving ahead with plans to introduce a bike share program linking downtown with Brown University, Federal Hill and other locations on the city’s east and west sides.

    Alta Bicycle Share, of Portland, Ore., submitted the winning proposal to manage the program over two other companies. It runs bike share programs in Boston [Hubway], New York City [CitiBike] and Chicago [Divvy].

    Click here to read the full article, originally published by Erika Niedowski on December 25th, 2013, on Boston.com.

    System Alert: Hubway (all stations in Cambridge) has reopened

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Monday, December 16th, at 1:00PM. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on 12/14/13 at 2:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we will temporarily close Hubway at 2:00PM on Saturday, December 14th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun, though any bikes in use at the time can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    Ho Ho Hubway! Give the gift of bike share!

    THE PERFECT STOCKING-STUFFER
    Gift certificates are available now and through the holidays.
                

    Check someone off your gift list! Visit the Hubway online store right now to purchase gift certificates redeemable for Hubway passes and memberships of all levels! Print them right from your computer!

    There’s a gift level for everyone, whether you’re buying for friends and family who live and work in the metro-Boston area, students, or even out-of-town guests.

    ORDER NOW


    To Close or Not to Close?

    This is a selection of excerpts from an article originally published by Alex Vickers on Bikeshare.com on December 5th, 2013.

    To close or not to close? That is the question… for many bike share operators this winter…

    The cost-benefit analysis of staying open versus closing for the winter varies by city mainly due to the climate variations across cities, physical station locations, and the structure of their bike share contracts. While Denver, Kansas, and Boston’s bike share programs decided to give this winter a shot and stay open for the first time, other programs, like Nice Ride, aren’t afforded that option because of heavy snowfall, unabating low temperatures, and station locations. But perhaps the most obvious factor in determining whether or not a program should remain open for winter is the dip in revenue caused by lower usage combined with the increased costs related to snow removal…

    Of the Hubway stations in Cambridge, only two had to be relocated to accommodate for snow plows. The rest of Hubway’s municipalities primarily rely on street-space for their stations so winter station removal was necessary…

    Another factor that affects the decision of winter operations has to do with the structure of the bike share contract. In Hubway’s case, the city owns the equipment and is on the hook for the costs of removing equipment from the street. In order to remain open for the winter in Cambridge, the program’s operator and the city had to amend their contracts to allow for operation in the winter. In that amended contract, they also had to outline operational strategies for non-corrosive snow removal and bike maintenance…

    While there are drawbacks to remaining open for winter, there are also numerous benefits which don’t necessarily have a dollar amount attached to them. Perhaps the biggest boon to staying open is the level of service operators can provide with a year round system. “It’s difficult for users to become habituated to a public transit system and then expect them to re-habituate again when we reopen in March,” said Nick Bohnenkamp of Denver Bike Sharing…

    The Hubway stations in Cambridge which are remaining open for the winter is an experimental pilot that could be potentially expanded to the rest of Hubway.

    Click here to read the full article.

    Bike-sharing offers big boost to car-free tourists

    This article was originally published by Bill McGee in USA Today on December 4th, 2013.

    A new generation is not buying cars and many are not even getting driver’s licenses, while automobile ownership is down for the first time since production was halted during World War II. But for out-of-town tourists, there are times when mass transit simply can’t fill the void.

    The answer for a growing number of travelers is that 19th-century invention—the bicycle. And more and more communities are finding ways for natives and travelers alike to rent or share bikes.

    Hubway offers 1,000 bikes and 100 stations in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville, as well as 24-hour ($6) or 3-day ($12) passes for travelers.

    Read the full article here.

    New Pilot Program To Keep Hubway’s Cambridge Stations Open Throughout the Winter

    href=“http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2013/12/2/cambridge-hubway-open-winter/” target=“_blank”>The Harvard Crimson on December 2nd, 2013.

    For the first time since the Boston-area bike-sharing company Hubway was founded two and a half years ago, Cambridge will keep its Hubway bikes on the road this winter season.

    The pilot program, announced by Hubway and the City of Cambridge in a joint press release on Nov. 19, will bring year-round Hubway service to almost all of Cambridge’s 26 Hubway stations, including the seven at Harvard. Click here to read the full article.

    Riding a Bike in Winter... How to Beat the Snow and Ice

    This article was originally published by Stephen Kaiser on Cambridge Community Television on December 1st, 2013.

    A majority of bicyclists usually stop riding in the winter. Very few people venture out into snow and ice. There is a way…

    Hubway plans to keep its bike rental program going throughout the winter in Cambridge. Meanwhile, Boston and other cities are shutting their service down. Will the Cambridge experiment work?

    Click here to read the full article.

    Hubway to pilot year-round program in Cambridge

    This article was originally published in Wicked Local Cambridge on November 28th, 2013.

    Cambridge — Hubway, the public bike share system, will continue to be available to riders throughout winter at almost all Cambridge-based stations. While Hubway has always operated on a seasonal basis in its two-and-a-half-year history, this year the city is piloting a plan to provide year-round Hubway service.

    Almost all stations in Cambridge will remain operational throughout the winter, though the station at Lafayette Square/Main Street will be removed from the street for the season. The Lechmere station will be moved to the sidewalk just east of Lechmere Station. Station updates will be posted on the station map at www.thehubway.com/stations, www.hubwaytracker.com, and on the Spotcycle app for smart phones, www.spotcycle.net. Annual members can continue to use the Cambridge stations during the season at no additional cost. Twenty-four-hour, three-day passes and monthly passes will be available for purchase as usual.

    As part of the pilot program, snow removal will become part of the daily responsibilities of the Hubway field team. The team, coordinated by Hubway’s dispatch office, is on the street from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day, and is stocked with equipment to keep stations clear of snow and ice.

    Users should bear in mind that the regular seasonal closing of stations in Boston, Brookline and Somerville city/town limits began Nov. 18. Most stations remained open through Nov. 27.

    Somerville named among most walkable U.S. cities

    This article was originally published by Dana Guth in The Tufts Daily on December 2nd, 2013.

    The City of Somerville was earlier this month voted the seventh most walkable city in the nation — up from its previous position in 10th place — as a result of successful ongoing initiatives by the city to encourage walking and biking…

    ...Tufts works with the surrounding community to facilitate easy transit through programs like Hubway, a Boston-based bike share.

    “All the squares around us, including Davis, Packard and Powderhouse, have Hubway stations owned by the City of Somerville,” she said. “The area is really good about making all of these options available.” Click here to read the full article.

    Still riding this winter? Ride safely, friends... here's how

    This winter, Hubway stations in Cambridge will remain operational. This marks the first time that the Hubway system will be open year-round. Whether you’re riding a Hubway or your own bike, there are a number of things you should keep in mind to prepare for cold-weather bicycling:



    Wear layers, but remember that riding will warm you up. If you get hot as you ride, pull over and remove a layer, but always keep your ears and hands shielded.



    Wear gloves or mittens to keep your hands warm. Just make sure you’re still able to work the brakes, gears, and bell.



    Local bike shops offer bike-appropriate gloves and earmuffs that do not obstruct the use of your helmet. Make sure you can hear what’s going on around you.



    Your core will stay warm as you ride, but make sure you’ve got your extremities covered. Wear shoes with enough room for thick, warm socks.



    The weather can change quickly here, so make sure you have a back-up plan if you don’t feel comfortable on a bike. Plan your route ahead of time. If the weather isn’t good for biking, take the train, bus, or a cab.



    It’s important to decide for yourself when you’re comfortable riding and when you’re not. Each rider has a different comfort level in inclement weather, so don’t let a riding partner push you past your comfort zone. If you are uncomfortable for any reason while biking, stop riding and walk your bike to the nearest docking station. If you are cold, make your way indoors to warm up.



    Visibility is particularly limited during the winter, with fewer daylight hours, glare, and foggy conditions. Hubway bikes have 24-hour lights, but it is also a good idea to wear light colored clothing and reflective materials if possible. Always make sure you can be seen by vehicles.



    Use extra caution under wintry conditions, as roads may not be completely cleared of snow and ice. You are always permitted to ride in the general travel lane (not only the bike lane) and should do so if the bike lane is snowy or icy. Keep your eyes open for piles of leaves of patches of ice. It’s better to continue straight through these obstacles than turn or lean through them. Also be careful to avoid using your front brakes, as it could cause you to lose control.



    Hubway bikes can hold up to cold weather. They’re checked regularly by our bike mechanics, so leave your bike at home and let us worry about hardware wear & tear.



    The system will only shut down in the event of severe weather conditions. In those cases, we’ll notify the public via press release and social media. We’ll also notify our Members via email. Find out more about the Hubway system, extensions, station outages/closures at thehubway.com, on Twitter, and on Facebook.

    Hubway winter service provides welcome experiment

    This article was originally published as an editorial in The Boston Globe on November 25th, 2013.

    Hubway Service in Cambridge this Winter Provides Welcome Experiment for Entire System

    Though wintertime is hardly prime cycling season in the Boston area, the annual shutdown of Hubway comes as a disappointment to devoted users who rely on the bike-sharing system for basic transportation. So, it’s encouraging that Hubway and Cambridge announced last week that the service will stay open in the city through the winter.

    Putting more bikers on potentially icy roads raises obvious safety concerns, especially if snow drifts choke Cambridge’s already narrow streets. Riders must use common sense, and Hubway and Cambridge officials should keep apprised of accidents and injuries.

    Other challenges are more prosaic: Hubway will have to remove the bikes from kiosks before blizzards, and hire contractors to plow the stations in case of heavy snowfall. To remove corrosive road salt, the bikes will need to be cleaned more frequently. Still, bike sharing systems in other cold-weather cities, such as Toronto and New York, are offering year-round service, and it’s vital to ascertain whether the entire Hubway network can follow suit in the future.

    Station Alert: Station Removal Schedule for November 23-27

    SYSTEM ALERT: The final day of 2013 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 27th*. Stations in Cambridge will remain open through winter, and the rest will relaunch again in spring 2014.

    Here are the scheduled station removals for November 23rd through November 27th:

    Saturday, 11/23 (5 stations)

  • Hyde Square at Barbara St
  • JP Centre - Centre St at Myrtle St
  • JP Monument - South St at Centre St
  • Green St T
  • Jackson Square T at Centre St
  • Sunday, 11/24 (0 stations)

  • No stations are scheduled for removal on Sunday, November 24th.
  • Monday, 11/25 (5 stations)

  • Yawkey Way at Boylston St
  • Beacon St / Mass Ave
  • Newbury St / Hereford St
  • Boylston / Mass Ave
  • BIDMC - Brookline at Burlington St
  • Tuesday, 11/26 (4 stations)

  • Charlestown - Main St at Austin St
  • Hayes Square at Vine St
  • ** Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main St / Columbia St
  • *** Lechmere Station at Cambridge St
  • * All remaining stations will be operational through Wednesday, November 27th, until 11:59pm. Please make sure to dock your bike prior to that time.
    ** The Lafayette Square station is the only Cambridge-based location being removed for the season.
    *** The Lechmere Station is being moved off the street but will still be accessible on that block. Exact location to be determined.

    Please note: this schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 1.5 million rides… and counting!

    Hubway tests out winter service in Cambridge

    This article was originally published by Martine Powers in The Boston Globe on November 20th, 2013.

    When it comes to hardy New Englanders unfazed by the prospect of bitter cold and wintry weather, Cambridge may have the rest of the region beaten.

    The city and the Hubway bike-sharing program said Tuesday that they will debut winter-weather service in Cambridge as part of a pilot program to test whether all-season service could be possible for the whole system.

    It is a significant undertaking for Hubway, which has closed up shop each winter since its summer 2011 launch.

    Hubway administrators said snow removal had been the primary obstacle to year-round service. But as leaders in Brookline, Boston, and Somerville felt it wise to pack away their cities’ bike-sharing program for winter hibernation, Cambridge officials sought for the city to serve as a winter guinea pig.

    “It’s become pretty clear that there’s an expectation that if this is going to be a real transportation system, we should be able to access it as much of the year as possible,” said Cara Seiderman, Cambridge transportation program manager.

    Only one Cambridge station will be removed for the winter, at Lafayette Square on Massachusetts Avenue.

    Hubway administrators are steeling themselves for the prospect of tending to the 26 Cambridge Hubway stations through the harshest months, and they will face plenty of challenges. Shorter days mean that the bike-sharing kiosks’ solar-powered batteries may peter out, requiring staff to swap in fully-charged replacements. Road salt is corrosive, so bikes will have to be cleaned regularly.

    Hubway staff will be responsible for snow removal. If there is a blizzard warning, they will attempt to evacuate all the bikes. Afterward, they will hire contractors to plow the stations.

    Aside from the salt, the bikes themselves are designed to withstand extreme weather, said Emily Stapleton , Hubway general manager. “The bikes are meant to be out in all seasons,” she said.

    Seiderman said she expected plenty of demand for Hubway bikes in winter months.

    “We already know that people bike year-round in Cambridge,” Seiderman said. “Just look out at the streets any day that’s not a blizzard.”

    Stapleton said Hubway staff will use data collected this winter to help determine whether, and where, year-round service could be successful.

    “We want to see what riding through the winter would look like,” Stapleton said.

    Hubway is one of several bike-sharing systems around the country, including Chicago’s Divvy and Denver’s B-Cycle, that have announced in recent weeks that they will now be available all four seasons. New York City’s bike-sharing system, which debuted this summer, has been year-round from the get-go. Hubway staff have visited Toronto’s Bixi, which runs through the winter.

    “People think of winter and they think the whole winter is going to be like their memory of three days where there was a frigid snap or a blizzard,” said Seiderman. “That’s not three or four months; that’s just a few days or a week. And we don’t want to design a system around a couple of days when the rest of the season is great.”

    Few people were more excited by Hubway’s news than Corey Watts, 25, who moved this year to Porter Square. A Hubway member since May, he had been dreading a winter without bike-sharing.

    Though his daily commute to Longwood Medical Area will have to occur via the T, he said he was relieved to learn he could still use bike-sharing for his Cambridge errands and his daily journey to his girlfriend’s apartment near Harvard Square.

    “It will be good for our relationship,” he said.

    Station Alert: Station Removal Schedule for November 20-24

    SYSTEM ALERT: The Hubway system’s seasonal phased station closures began on Monday, November 18, 2013. The final day of 2013 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 27th. Stations in Cambridge will remain open through winter, and the rest will relaunch again in spring 2014.

    Here are the scheduled station removals for November 20th through November 24th:

    Wednesday, 11/20 (7 stations)

  • Washington St at Waltham St
  • Washington St at Rutland St
  • Washington St at Lenox St
  • Boston Medical Center -  East Concord at Harrison Ave
  • South Bay Plaza
  • E. Cottage St at Columbia Rd
  • West Broadway at Dorchester St
  • Thursday, 11/21 (6 stations)

  • Cambridge St at Joy St
  • Charles Circle - Charles St at Cambridge St
  • Charles St at Beacon St
  • Boylston at Fairfield
  • Boylston St at Berkeley
  • Boylston St at Arlington St
  • Friday, 11/22 (6 stations)

  • Faneuil Hall - Union St at North St
  • Franklin St / Arch St
  • Post Office Square
  • Milk St at India St
  • Congress / Sleeper
  • Boylston St / Washington St
  • Saturday, 11/23 (5 stations)

  • Hyde Square at Barbara St
  • JP Centre - Centre St at Myrtle St
  • JP Monument - South St at Centre St
  • Green St T
  • Jackson Square T at Centre St
  • Sunday, 11/24 (0 stations)
    No stations are scheduled for removal on Sunday, November 24th.

    Please note: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 1.5 million rides… and counting!

    Cambridge to test year-round Hubway operations this winter

    This article was originally published by Brock Parker in Boston.com on November 19th, 2013.

    Fair weather fans of cycling take note: Cambridge is about to test its bicycling mettle against a Massachusetts winter.

    Hubway stations in Cambridge will remain open this winter, when stations throughout the rest of the regional bike-sharing system have closed for the season.

    The City of Cambridge and Hubway announced the year-round pilot program Tuesday and Cara Seiderman, the city’s transportation program manager, said just how much snow and freezing temperatures will interfere with ridership remains to be seen.

    “We would like to try it,” Seiderman said. “We’ll definitely be tracking how much use it gets.”

    Hubway’s shutdown for winter months in Boston, Somerville and Brookline, began Monday, but most stations will remain open in those communities through Wednesday, Nov. 27, according to Hubway.

    Of the 27 Hubway bicycle docking stations in Cambridge, however, only one, in Lafayette Square, will be closed for the winter, Seiderman said. Another dock at the Lechmere station will be moved onto a sidewalk.

    Seiderman said it’s easier to test Hubway during the winter months in Cambridge because almost all of the city’s bicycle docking stations are off-street and would not interfere with snow plows.

    Hubway may temporarily close some of the stations in Cambridge during extreme inclement weather. But as part of the pilot program, snow removal will be part of the daily responsibilities of the Hubway field team that will ensure that docking stations are stocked with bikes and cleared of snow and ice.

    Seiderman said the winter pilot has been made possible in part by money generated by the popularity of Hubway in Cambridge that is being reinvested in the system.

    About 2,000 annual Hubway members are from Cambridge, and more who work in the city use the system, Seiderman said. In October, about 1,400 Hubway rides a day originated in Cambridge, she said.

    In a joint press release with Hubway, Cambridge City Manager Richard Rossi said Cambridge is pleased to offer the year-round pilot program, but asked that cyclists use care when riding in winter conditions.

    Seiderman said the city and Hubway will be working to ensure that Hubway users realize that once the docking stations close in Boston, Somerville and Brookline, they will only be able to dock the bicycles within Cambridge.

    More information about the pilot program, and tips for cycling in the winter can be found online on the city’s website and on Hubway’s website.

    Press Release: Hubway to pilot year-round operations in Cambridge











    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to download PDF.
    November 19, 2013

    CONTACT:
    Benjy Kantor, Hubway
    benjykantor@altabicycleshare.com, 617.968.0361

    Cara Seiderman, City of Cambridge Development Department
    cseiderman@cambridgema.gov, 617.349.4629

    HUBWAY TO PILOT YEAR-ROUND OPERATIONS IN CAMBRIDGE
    Cambridge-based Hubway Bike Share Stations Will Remain Available through the Winter


    Hubway, the metro-Boston area’s public bike share system, will continue to be available to riders throughout winter at almost all Cambridge-based stations. While Hubway has always operated on a seasonal basis in its two and a half year history, this year the City of Cambridge is piloting a plan to provide year-round Hubway service. 

    “We are pleased at the opportunity to pilot Hubway service year-round,” said Cambridge City Manager Richard C. Rossi. “We’re committed to supporting sustainable transportation options, and we are excited to continue the program this winter season. We do ask for everyone to use care when riding under winter conditions and also request your patience and understanding as we work with whatever nature brings us in terms of weather.”

    Almost all stations in Cambridge will remain operational throughout the winter, though the station at Lafayette Square/Main Street will be removed from the street for the season. The Lechmere station will be moved to the sidewalk just east of Lechmere Station. All station updates will be posted on the station map at www.thehubway.com/stations, www.hubwaytracker.com, and on the Spotcycle app for smart phones (www.spotcycle.net). Annual members may continue to use the Cambridge stations during the season at no additional cost. 24-hour, 3-day passes, and monthly passes will be available for purchase as usual.

    As part of the pilot program, snow removal will become part of the daily responsibilities of the Hubway field team. The team, coordinated by Hubway’s dispatch office, is on the street from 6am to 10pm every day, and is stocked with equipment to keep stations clear of snow and ice.

    Users should bear in mind that the regular seasonal closing of stations in Boston, Brookline, and Somerville city/town limits began on Monday, November 18th. Most stations will remain open through Wednesday, November 27th. Station closures are posted in advance on Hubway’s website at www.thehubway.com/news, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    During extreme inclement weather conditions, Hubway may temporarily close the system, and public announcements will be made via social media and the Hubway website. Station alerts will also be emailed to annual and monthly Hubway members, and all riders can consult the Spotcycle app to learn whether or not bicycles are available. In the event of a system closing, riders will be able to return bikes to all stations securely, but will not be able to check bikes out.

    To prepare for cold-weather bicycling, there are a number of things riders should keep in mind:

  • Wear layers, but remember that riding will warm you up. If you get hot as you ride, pull over and remove a layer, but always keep your ears and hands shielded.
  • Local bike shops offer bike-appropriate gloves and earmuffs that do not obstruct the use of your helmet.
  • Plan your route ahead of time.
  • Always plan for an alternative mode of transportation in case a blizzard hits or if you simply decide that riding is no longer comfortable for you.
  • Each rider has a different comfort level in inclement weather. If you are uncomfortable for any reason while biking, stop riding and walk your bike to the nearest docking station. If you are cold, make your way indoors to warm up.
  • Be aware that visibility is particularly limited during the winter, with fewer daylight hours, glare, and foggy conditions. Hubway bikes have 24-hour lights, but it is also a good idea to wear light colored clothing and reflective materials if possible.
  • Use extra caution under wintry conditions, as roads may not be completely cleared of snow and ice. You are always permitted to ride in the general travel lane (not only the bike lane) and should do so if the bike lane is snowy or icy.

  • Find out more about the Hubway system, extensions, station outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    ###

    Hubway is a top perk offered by Massachusetts Companies

    This article was originally published by Sarah Shemkus The Boston Globe on November 17th, 2013.

    Top perks offered by Massachusetts Companies

    Some Massachusetts companies offer their employees more than the standard benefits. Here are 10 notable perks offered in firms in the state.

    A two-wheeled commute

    Every day when he finishes work in Chinatown, NaviNet digital marketing manager Shawn O’Brien grabs a Hubway bicycle for his 6-mile commute home to Somerville.

    “I actually get home faster than if I was to take the T and the bus home,” he said.

    O’Brien’s healthy and efficient commute is made possible by his employer, which offers its workers free memberships in the bike-share program. In fact, the health care communications company was so eager to offer the benefit that it contacted Hubway before the service was even rolled out to corporate accounts and volunteered to be a guinea pig.

    Members get free 30-minute blocks of time per bike, a structure that has spurred some employees to make a game out of beating the system, riding for 20 minutes and then switching bikes.

    “I don’t think anyone at NaviNet has ever actually paid for Hubway,” said Steven Rotman, vice president of human resources at NaviNet. “They’re a pretty creative bunch.”

    Read the full article here.

    Station Alert: Station Removal Schedule for November 18-20

    SYSTEM ALERT: The Hubway system will begin seasonal phased station closures on Monday, November 18, 2013. The final day of 2013 regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 27th. Stations will relaunch again in Spring 2014.

    Here are the scheduled station removals for November 18th through November 20th:

    Monday, 11/18 (5 stations)

  • Andrew Station - Dorchester Ave at Humboldt Pl
  • Upham’s Corner - Ramsey St at Dudley St
  • Mt Pleasant Ave / Dudley Town Common
  • Dudley Square
  • Brigham Cir / Huntington Ave
  • Tuesday, 11/19 (6 stations)

  • Buswell Park
  • Kenmore Sq / Comm Ave
  • B.U. Central - 725 Comm. Ave
  • Agganis Arena - 925 Comm Ave
  • Allston Green District - Comm Ave@ Griggs St
  • New Balance - Guest St at Life St
  • Wednesday, 11/20 (7 stations)

  • Washington St at Waltham St
  • Washington St at Rutland St
  • Washington St at Lenox St
  • Boston Medical Center -  East Concord at Harrison Ave
  • South Bay Plaza
  • E. Cottage St at Columbia Rd
  • West Broadway at Dorchester St

  • Please note: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 1.5 million rides… and counting!

    BU Released a Bike Safety App...

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno Streetwise on November 14th, 2013.

    Boston University’s Bike Safety Committee unveiled its own safety app, letting users become both reporter and police officer.

    The Bike Accident Toolkit, is enabled with a GPS system that allows users to “efficiently capture important information following and accident.” The app has been designed to streamline the aftermath process of an accident; when one occurs the app “provides users a simple and intuitive tool to thoroughly document an accident.”

    Available on iTunes, the Bike Accident Toolkit app features a GPS, pinpointing the time, date and location of an accident; a built in ability to call the police or EMS; the ability to create an accident report including all the driver’s information; and the option to take accident photos and audio record witness statements.

    The app is compatible with iOS iPhone and Android operating systems.

    Nearly a year ago, BU graduate student, 23-year-old Chris Weigl, was killed after his bike collided with a 16-wheeler at the St. Paul Street and Commonwealth Avenue intersection, near the BU campus.

    Boston Debuts Helmet Dispenser For Its Bike Share

    This article was originally published by Mark Lebetkin in The Active Times on November 14th, 2013.

    Bike share becomes first in North America to rent helmets

    This June we brought news that Boston’s Hubway bike share was to pilot a helmet-sharing scheme. The program, called HelmetHub, officially launched this week, making Boston the first city in North America to offer helmet rentals with its bikes, according to Hubway’s website.

    Boston Mayor Thomas Menino revealed the new helmet vending machine Tuesday at a Hubway kiosk near the intersection of Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue, reports Reuters.

    The machine will dispense helmets for $2 for a 24-hour period, or $20 for purchase, according to Hubway. Helmets can be returned to the solar-powered station, where they will be collected and sent to a sanitation facility for cleaning between rentals. Each machine can hold up to 36 helmets in three sizes, according to HelmetHub’s website.

    Boston is testing the program with a single machine, and plans to expand it in 2014 after gathering more data, reports Reuters.

    Other cities are likely to watch Hubway’s helmet experiment closely. Encouraging helmet use has been a tricky issue for cities with bike shares. New York City chose not to require helmets when it launched Citi Bike in May, largely out of the fear that it would deter potential riders—but still encourages all cyclists to wear them. Washington, D.C., Chicago and Denver all have similar problems.

    If Boston’s program is a success, we might start seeing similar vending machines across the country.

    One City Finally Solved Bike Sharing's Big Safety Problem

    This article was originally published by Jon Marcus in Time Magazine on November 14th, 2013.

    The solution: helmet vending machines

    It’s not every day that the mayor of a major city hails the installation of a vending machine. But the automated dispenser that has just debuted in Boston is likely to merit the fanfare.

    At a time when bike-sharing programs are among the hottest trends around the world, this machine promises to solve a vexing and potentially dangerous problem by finally letting riders not only check out bicycles from kiosks to commute, ride across town, or sightsee, but also to cheaply rent the helmets they need to protect themselves from traffic.

    Short-term bike rental programs have been sprouting in cities across the country since Washington D.C. launched the nation’s first large-scale urban network in 2008, with 34 now in operation—not including countless more on university campuses. That’s just a fraction of the 535 bike-sharing programs worldwide, according to the Earth Policy Institute, which collectively loan out an estimated half-million bicycles in cities, on campuses, and at resorts.

    Trouble is, more than four out of five people who borrow bike-share bikes don’t wear helmets, according to a study of cyclists in Washington and Boston by the Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center—increasing by an estimated 88 percent the likelihood that they will suffer head injuries if they’re in an accident, compared to riders who do, the researchers said. But figuring out a way to make helmets easily available has taken years, and even when planners in Boston thought they had it solved, a last-minute glitch caused another two-month delay.

    So while the fast-growing bike-share programs may cut down on traffic and emissions, they’ve created another problem: millions of cyclists riding around on city streets worldwide with unprotected heads.

    “It’s been a huge frustration,” says Andy Clarke, president of the advocacy organization the League of American Bicyclists. “The beauty of bike-share is that it’s simple, quick and intuitive to grab a bike and ride,” Clarke says. “To worry about whether you can find a helmet or not, it takes the spontaneity out of the process. So it’s been a real hindrance” not having a way to offer helmets easily and cheaply.

    In some cities, this has proven more than just an inconvenience. A bike-share program in aggressively green Vancouver was thwarted for years by a British Columbia law requiring cyclists of all ages to wear helmets. In Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia, which also require helmets by law, the bike-share programs were so underused that the government gave away 200 helmets for free.

    Hunting for a better solution, planners have toyed with the idea of inflatable helmets, foldable helmets, and rental helmets with plastic liners for each new user. None worked out. What bike-share programs really needed was a vending machine from which users could rent helmets at the same location where they borrowed bikes.

    “It was always clear what the solution should be,” says Nicole Freedman, Boston’s bicycle coordinator. So two years ago, Freedman brought that challenge to an MIT class in mechanical engineering.

    The obstacles were numerous: helmets are an awkward shape, and hard to stack, and people don’t like putting things on their heads that have previously been on other people’s heads. And while it was possible to sanitize the helmets using intense heat, which requires a lot of energy, Boston’s machines would have only a limited amount of power from solar panels, which they need to run the credit-card scanners.

    The toughest obstacle, surprisingly, was figuring out a way for users to return the helmets. An open receptacle on a city street might attract trash. So the designers came up with the idea of putting RFID, or radio-frequency identification chips, in loaner helmets, which activate a door on the machine. They will then be picked up, cleaned, and rented out again.

    “Being able to design a low-power, compact dispensing mechanism that could handle the supply of helmets was a major engineering challenge,” says Chris Mills, one of the MIT students who was assigned the project and decided to keep working on it after graduating last year.

    “This is the kind of stuff we love to do,” Mills says. “Many, many prototypes were made. Lots of chalk and coffee was consumed.” The designers kept helmets around their workspace, he says, to put on and literally bang their heads against the wall.

    The eventual result was the HelmetHub, which was initially planned to be attached to four of Boston’s 130 Hubway bike-share stations where the Beth Israel Deaconess researchers found riders were least likely to wear helmets. Ten more have been ordered, at a cost of more than $10,000 apiece. Each can hold 36 unisize helmets with adjustable straps. A 24-hour rental will cost $2 on a credit card.

    Proving just how complicated this was, problems with the credit-card reader caused a two-month delay in the launch, just hours before Boston Mayor Tom Menino was to appear at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the machines in September.

    And when what the city says is the nation’s first helmet dispenser finally debuted at Massachusetts Avenue and Boylston Street this week, the observance was limited to a written statement from the mayor while planners set about using the lone machine to do real-world tests of the technology through the rest of the Boston bicycle season, which ends around Thanskgiving. They’ve already discovered that, in some locations, the return slot in the back of the device may be blocked by walls or fences.

    “When you put something on the street, it’s got to work, and it’s got to work from the start,” says Freedman.

    Still, says Mills, “There was nothing like this in the world, and now we’re happy to have something that works.” The HelmetHub, echoes Freedman, is “a huge step forward.”

    It’s also potentially hugely lucrative. Vancouver has already inspected a prototype, according to that city’s manager of streets activities, Scott Edwards. There has been interest from companies that supply bike-share bikes. And there are applications for the same technology at ski resorts and for mountain-climbing, Clarke says.

    “I don’t think there’s been a visible market for it in a way bike-sharing has clearly created,” he says. “But I don’t think I would stop at bikes.”

    Mills and Breanna Berry, his fellow MIT graduate and business partner, have found investors and gotten manufacturing advice from Big Belly Solar, a Massachusetts company that makes solar-powered public trash compactors.

    “This vending machine idea could be big,” says Jim Sebastian, “active transportation manager” for Washington, D.C., whose Capital Bikeshare program gave bike-sharing its first foothold in the United States just five years ago. “We’re definitely watching the Boston project closely. It could be a big help in getting more helmets on more bike-share users’ heads.”

    Boston unveils first bicycle helmet vending machine

    This article was originally published in Crain’s Chicago Business on November 13th, 2013.

    (Reuters) — Boston Mayor Thomas Menino has unveiled a vending machine that dispenses bicycle helmets for users of the city’s bike sharing service, a street kiosk he said was the first of its kind in the country.

    Menino said the so-called HelmetHub machine, attached to one of the city’s Hubway bike rental stations at the intersection of Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue, will allow users to rent and return helmets, adding a measure of safety to the service.

    “Our goal is to make Hubway a great and safe way to get around town,” he said in a statement released on Tuesday evening.

    The machines were designed by HelmetHub, a company founded by MIT engineering graduates that won a contract from the city in May, the statement said.

    The company plans to test the first machine and gather data during the remainder of the year before introducing HelmetHub machines more widely in 2014.

    The machine dispenses helmets for a rental fee of $2, if they are returned within 24 hours, or for purchase at $20. Returned helmets will be removed from the machine to be inspected and sanitized, the statement said.

    Boston’s bike sharing service was launched in July 2011, and users took its 600 bicycles on more than 100,000 rides in the first 10 weeks, according to the service’s website. By the end of November, it had more than 3,600 annual members.

    The service is similar in concept to other bike sharing programs launched in Paris, London and New York City, which kicked off a massive bike sharing program earlier this year.

    Hubway Launches First Helmet Rental Station

    This article was originally published on WBUR.org on November 13th, 2013.

    BOSTON — Boston’s bike sharing system has added its first helmet rental station.

    Riders can now rent helmets from a HelmetHub machine at the Boylston Street/Mass Ave. Hubway station for $2 for 24 hours. The helmets can also be purchased for $20.

    The city of Boston’s bikes director, Nicole Freedman, says the single machine is a test run and that the city expects to add more in 2014.

    “What we’re doing is testing the system out right now, seeing how it works,” Freedman said. “We’ll have the off season to make tweaks and then we can come in strong in the next season.”

    Hubway says Boston is the first city in North America to offer helmet vending machines for its bike share program.

    Helmet vending machine comes to Hubway services

    This article was originally published by Alice Bazerghi and Felicia Gans in The Daily Free Press on November 13th, 2013.

    Boston Mayor Thomas Menino announced the installation of the first helmet vending machine in the United States Tuesday to allow residents and tourists to rent a helmet before the use of Hubways, the popular bike sharing service.

    Nicole Freedman, director of Boston Bikes, said HelmetHub was created when a professor from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology asked her if there were any projects she wanted him to work on.

    “We had just launched bike-share, [and we had] no solution for helmets,” she said. “Students from MIT designed a helmet vending machine. They then followed up when they graduated that year, and turned it into the company HelmetHub.”

    Boston is the first city in the United States to install this kind of machine, located at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Boylston Street.

    Freeman said she hopes to dramatically increase the use of bike helmets and bike-share, as well as reduce head injuries.

    “I am thrilled to introduce another Boston biking first,” Menino said in a Tuesday release. “This is the first bike-share helmet vending machine in the country. Our goal is to make Hubway a great and sage way to get around town, and HelmetHub is a step in the right direction for our growing cycling culture in the City of Boston.”

    Greenovate, an umbrella initiative that encompasses bike-share, energy programs and other green programs throughout the city, has worked closely with Boston Bikes to get the community engaged around sustainability, said Greenovate Fellow Enita Hussain.

    “We want to engage community and encourage them to take small actions to help reduce the city’s carbon footprint by reducing our own carbon footprint,” she said. “If we encourage people to bike … we’re inherently encouraging people to live a greener life. By adding the helmet system, by making it safer and more convenient for people to bike, it makes people want to take that extra step and get out of their cars.

    Pete Stidman, executive director of Boston’s Cyclists Union, said he supports the helmet machines because biking in Boston should be made safer.

    “The more access you can provide to helmets, especially for Hubway users and other casual riders, clearly the better,” he said. “A helmet is like an insurance policy. You probably aren’t going to need it, but if you do, you really need it. There’s no substitute.”

    Freeman said since the project is brand new, there is still a lot to work on.

    “We will identify a lot of things we want to work on,” she said. “One thing we know instantly is right now, when you pull a helmet, it comes from the front end, and then you return it on the back side. In future designs, we’ll look at a way so that 100 percent of locations work for bike-share.”

    Freeman said more helmet machines would go up in the spring and they would run tests to make sure the ratio of helmet machines to bike-share is correct.

    Some residents said they supported the helmet machine because it makes biking safer and Boston a more environmentally friendly city.

    Kathryn Hashey, 32, of the South End, said the helmet machine is a great idea and she has been waiting for helmets to be publicly accessible since she started using Hubway.

    “I use Hubway for commuting between Boston and Cambridge regularly,” she said. “It’s dangerous to bike without a helmet in Boston. The roads are really bad and people are really bad drivers. I use Hubway because of the convenience of it. It’s one thing I really like about it, but I don’t always have a helmet for it.”

    Jason Henrichs, 40, of Boston, said he always wears a helmet when he rides a Hubway bike and he hopes this initiative will get other residents to do the same.

    “People need to appreciate how frequently accidents do happen,” he said. “I’ve been hit twice on a bike in the city. It’s too easy to get hit.”

    Regina Galea, 36, of Boston, said if you can rent a bike, you should be able to rent a helmet.

    “It’s a good idea to have a rental helmet system,” she said. “Otherwise, people are going to ride without helmets and it’s obviously not as safe. It reinforces the use of the bike system and gets cars off the road. With helmets, more people will start using Hubway.”

    System Alert: Hubway begins seasonal station closures on Monday, November 18th

    SYSTEM ALERT: Please note! The Hubway system will begin seasonal phased station closures on Monday, November 18, 2013. The final day of 2013 regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 27th. Stations will relaunch again in Spring 2014.

    Stay tuned to the Hubway website, as well as Hubway’s facebook page and twitter profile, for station alerts and specific closure info.

    Thank you for 1.5 million rides… and counting!

    HelmetHub finally makes its Boston debut

    This article was originally published by Morgan Rousseau in the Boston Metro on November 13th, 2013.

    A city-wide bike helmet rental system that has been twice delayed since its anticipated August launch officially debuted Wednesday at the Hubway station at Boylston and Mass Avenue, according to HelmetHub, a company that supplies helmet vending machines.

    HelmetHub was first scheduled to open on Aug. 26, but was delayed until Sept. 5. The September launch, however, was also pushed back due to a “technical glitch,” according to the company.

    Plans have been underway since the spring to install the helmet vending machines. The helmet station is the first of its kind in the country, and was installed as a trial as the Hubway season winds down, according to the company.

    “I am thrilled to introduce another Boston biking first. This is the first bike share helmet vending machine in the country,” said Mayor Thomas M. Menino. “Our goal is to make Hubway a great and safe way to get around town, and HelmetHub is a step in the right direction for our growing cycling culture in the City of Boston.”

    The HelmetHub machine is a street kiosk built into the Hubway platform that allows users to rent and return helmets when they rent Hubway bicycles. Returned helmets are removed from the machine and taken for inspection and sanitization.

    Helmets cost $2 to rent if returned within 24 hours, or $20 to buy.

    The company said it will “take lessons learned from the trial” and implement them into a wide-scale installation next year.

    “HelmetHub’s team hopes to garner significant data during the rest of the 2013 season, and staff will be on-site at the machine to help answer questions and provide support to users,” the company said in a statement.

    Hubway adds first bicycle helmet machine

    This article was originally published by Nicholas Jacques in The Boston Globe on November 13th, 2013.

    For the first time Tuesday, users of Boston’s Hubway bike-sharing program were able to rent helmets with their bicycles, Mayor Thomas M. Menino announced. The first HelmetHub machine was installed at the Hubway location near the intersection of Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue in the Fenway, Menino’s office said. The new machine, which the city called the only one of its kind in the United States, will act as a trial during the remaining weeks of the Hubway season. More machines will be added in 2014, the mayor’s office said. Helmets will cost $2 to rent for up to 24 hours and $20 to buy, the city said.

    Helmet Hub FAQ

    On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, HelmetHub launched operations with its first helmet vending machine, located at the Boylston / Mass Ave Hubway station.

    HelmetHub - Hubway FAQs


    What is HelmetHub? HelmetHub is a machine that allows bike riders to rent and return helmets at kiosks placed next to bikeshare stations throughout the city.

    How does the HelmetHub Work? The HelmetHub machine attaches to the Boston Hubway bike docks.  Users can go through the touchscreen to rent and then later return a helmet.  The machines work with HelmetHub’s software to keep track of helmet rentals and purchases. Returned helmets are taken from the machine back to HelmetHub’s headquarters where they are inspected for damage and sanitized, and then reloaded to go back into machines.

    Are the helmets new or used? HelmetHub stocks both new and used helmets - meaning that a rental helmet is one that someone has probably used previously.  No worries: all helmets are cleaned and sanitized before they are returned to the machine for being dispensed.

    Where is HelmetHub Located? HelmetHub is a Boston based company.  Their current office is 12 Channel Street, Suite 202 in the Boston Innovation District - close to the Boston Design Center.

    How does the HelmetHub rental work? HelmetHub allows users to rent helmets over a 24 hour period.  If a helmet is out longer than 24 hours, users can keep the helmet and will be charged the purchase price.

    How much does it cost to rent or buy a HelmetHub helmet? It costs $2/24 hour helmet rental, and it costs $20 to purchase a helmet from a HelmetHub machine.

    Where are the HelmetHub Machines Located? The first HelmetHub machine is located at the Mass Ave and Boylston Street Hubway Station. More units will be installed with the spring program.

    What if I can’t get back to the one machine within my 24 hour window for a rental? HelmetHub’s customer service is happy to make sure your rental experience is painless. We’ll take care of any inability to return a rented helmet - or you can hang on to the helmet if you’d rather purchase it.

    When did this program begin? The Helmet Rental System began in Boston on November 11, 2013.

    Is HelmetHub a part of Hubway? HelmetHub is a completely separate entity than Hubway and Alta Bicycle Share.  HelmetHub has been working with the City of Boston to bring this helmet rental program to Boston.  Hubway has been offering support and information as the HelmetHub team begins implementation of this Program.

    For more information, click here to visit the HelmetHub website.

    HelmetHub launches

    Boston becomes first city in North America to offer helmet vending machines for bike share.

    On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, HelmetHub launched operations with its first helmet vending machine, located at the Boylston / Mass Ave Hubway station. Riders, whether using a Hubway or their own bike, can now rent (or purchase) and return helmets at the kiosk. It costs $2 for a 24-hour helmet rental, or $20 to purchase a helmet from a HelmetHub machine.

    Hubway does not operate HelmetHub. Rather, HelmetHub is a completely separate entity that has been working with the City of Boston to bring the helmet rental program to Boston. Hubway offers support and information during HelmetHub’s implementation of the program. For more details on HelmetHub and plans for expansion throughout the city, click here.

    November 19th Community Meeting: proposed Hubway location in Cambridgeport near Dana Park

    WHEN? Tuesday, November 19th, 7PM
    WHERE? Cambridgeport Baptist Church, 459 Putnam Ave. (corner of Magazine and Putnam)

    Hubway Riders and Friends:

    The Cambridge Community Development Department is seeking your input on a proposed Hubway location near Dana Park in the Greenport/Cambridgeport area.

    Do you live in Cambridgeport? Visit people in Cambridgeport? Would join Hubway if there were a station nearby? This is an opportunity to learn about opportunities for siting a Hubway station near Dana Park to be easily accessible to people who live in or travel to the neighborhood.

    For more information about the meeting, email Steve Wineman.

    Mayor Menino Announces Installation of First HelmetHub Helmet Vending Machine

    CITY OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
    Office of the Mayor
    Thomas M. Menino


    For Immediate Release: Tuesday, November 12, 2013
    For More Information Contact: Press Office, 617-635-4461

    Mayor Menino Announces Installation of First HelmetHub Helmet Vending Machine

    Street Kiosk Allows Users to Rent Helmets for New Balance Hubway Bicycles

    Mayor Thomas M. Menino today announced the installation of the first HelmetHub vending machine on the streets of Boston.

    The machine is the first of its kind in the country and is located at the Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue Hubway Station. It will allow users to rent a helmet before they use the popular bike sharing service.

    “I am thrilled to introduce another Boston biking first. This is the first bike share helmet vending machine in the country,” Mayor Menino said. “Our goal is to make Hubway a great and safe way to get around town, and HelmetHub is a step in the right direction for our growing cycling culture in the City of Boston.”

    The HelmetHub machine is a street kiosk built right into the Hubway platform that allows for users to rent and return helmets at the same time that they rent Hubway bicycles. Returned helmets are removed from the machine and taken for inspection and sanitization.

    HelmetHub won a contract with the City in May to design, test, and implement this kind of helmet rental system in Boston, which Hubway riders have been asking for since the sharing service began in Boston.

    The first machine will be installed as a trial as the Hubway season winds down. HelmetHub will take lessons learned from the trial and implement it into a more wide-scale implementation next year. HelmetHub’s team hopes to garner significant data during the rest of the 2013 season, and staff will be on-site at the machine to help answer questions and provide support to users.

    Helmets will cost just $2 to rent if returned within 24 hours or $20 to buy.

    Improvements and expansions to the Hubway system also support the Mayor’s Greenovate Boston initiative, which encourages residents to help reduce the City’s greenhouse gas emissions by taking actions like biking, walking and using public transit.

    About Greenovate Boston:

    Greenovate Boston is a collective movement to ensure a greener, healthier and more prosperous future for the city by meeting Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050. Propelled by creativity and drive, Greenovate Boston will encourage continued sustainable growth within the city, making Boston the greenest in the United States. Visit GreenovateBoston.org for details.

    ###

    Figures of Progress: Emily Stapleton and Eric Gilliland, General Managers, Alta Bicycle Share

    This article was originally posted on GOOD as part of their “Figures of Progress” series, on November 11th, 2013.

    For Stapleton, the general manager of Boston’s bike share, Hubway, her transportation journey started in 2007.  The deciding moment came as she waited for a late bus in San Francisco feeling stranded, not knowing when—or if—it would show up. ”I wanted to be part of the movement to improve transportation service offerings and to increase availability of real-time decision-making data…” Read the full article here.

    Vending Machines In Boston Will Dispense Bike Helmet Rentals

    This article was originally published by Jon Marcus on Forbes.com on November 8th, 2013.

    A green solution to traffic congestion and carbon emissions, bike-sharing programs have become ubiquitous in crowded cities worldwide, letting users check out bicycles from kiosks to commute, ride across town, or sightsee.

    But even as it’s helping solve one problem, bike-sharing has created another: It’s put bicycle riders on city streets without figuring out a way to loan them helmets.

    That’s created legal and promotional problems in cities like Vancouver, where provincial laws require cyclists to wear helmets, a requirement that’s delayed the bike-share program for years. In Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia, which also require helmets by law, the bike-share programs were so underused that the government offered 200 helmets to riders for free to boost business.

    Trouble is, creating a vending machine to dispense and retrieve bicycle helmets has proven a significant technological trial.

    “It’s a very difficult challenge because of the shape and bulk of helmets,” says Andy Clarke, president of the League of American Bicyclists advocacy group and a former city bicycle planner. “We’ve heard all kinds of stories about inflatable or foldable helmets. And the cleanliness issue is something that comes up. Every bike-rental fleet in the country has to deal with this issue.”

    Now there may be a solution. After two years of design work that started in a mechanical engineering class, a team of recent MIT grads has designed a bicycle helmet vending machine that will be launched this month in Boston.

    The machines, dubbed HelmetHubs, will be attached to four of the city’s 108 Hubway bike-share stations where records show riders are least likely to wear helmets. Another 10 are scheduled to be installed over the next few months. Each machine can hold 36 unisize helmets with adjustable straps, and a 24-hour rental will cost about $2 on a credit card.

    The toughest obstacle for the designers was figuring out a way for users to return the helmets. An open receptacle on a city street, they feared, might attract trash. So they put RFID, or radio-frequency identification chips in loaner helmets, which activate a door on the machine.

    The devices can’t sanitize the helmets; that would require a more significant power source than it uses to run the credit-card reader. So, once they’ve been returned, the helmets will be picked up and brought to a warehouse to be cleaned. But the engineers hope that future incarnations of the machines will disinfect the helmets automatically.

    The long slog from problem to solution started when Boston’s bicycle coordinator appealed to an MIT mechanical-engineering class two years ago to prototype a helmet dispenser.

    It was a thankless assignment.

    “There were a lot of conversations about how the hell are we going to do this,” says one of the students, Breanna Berry.

    But they took it on anyway.

    “The challenge was one of the things that attracted us to it. Helmets are really awkward. They’re an awkward shape. So the dispensing and the return were hard to figure out. And how do you get a lot of helmets in a small space?”

    After they came up with their proposal, satisfying their academic obligation, Berry and a classmate, Chris Mills—an ardent cyclist—decided to keep working on it when they graduated last year.

    “A couple of us thought, ‘Maybe we should keep going with this,’” Berry says. “It was very apparent that this wasn’t a bad business model to get involved in, and that bike-sharing was growing worldwide.”

    There are 535 bike-sharing programs worldwide, according to the Earth Policy Institute, collectively loaning out an estimated half-million bicycles. That’s twice as many as when Mills and Berry began to work on the vending-machine problem.

    Yet fewer than one in five people who use bike-share bikes wear helmets, compared to more than half of those who own their own bicycles, according to researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. And cyclists who don’t wear helmets are as much as 88 percent more likely to suffer head injuries in crashes than those who do. In Boston, half the cyclists in crashes to which paramedics have had to be called weren’t wearing helmets.

    After graduation, Mills and Berry moved to a startup accelerator lab; neither drew a salary, and Berry worked in a restaurant to pay the bills. Eventually, they found investors and a manufacturer—Big Belly Solar, which makes solar-powered public trash compactors.

    Each of their helmet dispensers costs $10,000, and there’s been interest from companies that supply bike-share bikes and cities that are pushing them. That’s an enormous worldwide market. And there are potential uses at ski resorts and elsewhere.

    “It’s an intriguing project,” says Clarke, the cycling advocate. “And it’s a fascinating design and engineering issue.”

    National Association of City Transportation Officials add Somerville its list of members

    This article was originally posted by Juan Cajigas Jimenez on Boston.com on November 7th, 2013.

    The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) added the City of Somerville, MA to its affiliate member list last week, including Somerville in its prestigious list of just 18 member cities and 12 affiliate members nationwide that includes Boston, Denver, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Washington, D.C., among others. In a press release, NACTO officials lauded Somerville for its “[commitment] to sustainable transportation initiatives, aiming to strengthen cities and improve quality of life through better street design and transportation policy.” Earlier this month, Somerville was also recognized by the League of American Cyclists with a Silver level Bicycle Friendly Community Award, recognizing a significant step up from Bronze in only two years.

    “It is an honor to be included with such prestigious larger cities across the nation for our focus on increasing or improving sustainable transportation,” said Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone. “Whether it’s walking, biking, driving or using alternate transportation, Somerville has a demonstrated commitment to increasing access and maintaining safe opportunities for all residents. In the last three years we have added more than 25 miles of bike lanes, updated or added pedestrian safety infrastructure such as street trees, curb bump-outs and ADA-accessible ramps, and we are on the crux of a tremendous expansion of public transportation with the addition of Orange and Green Line stations across the City. I want to thank NACTO for this great recognition.”

    While the City was recognized with this honor as because of its implementation of numerous progressive projects and initiatives over the past few years, the membership also recognizes its future promise: the goals outlined in the SomerVision plan and the City’s groundwork towards reaching them. Programs and initiatives such as the Somerville by Design series, Safe Routes to School, Hubway, and Somerstreets have demonstrated the City’s ability to plan and program towards a future vision. Somerville’s membership in NACTO is a learning opportunity to join with the most progressive cities in exchanging concepts to reach new levels of access and sustainability.

    Boston after Menino: losers and winners

    This article was originally published by Shirley Leung in the Boston Globe on November 6th, 2013.

    Trending up . . .

    Pedestrians & T riders The Big Dig gave drivers new tunnels, and Menino later added 65 miles of bike lanes and launched the Hubway bike-share program. With Boston relaxing parking construction requirements and kids today going car-less, Walsh will push for more public transit and urge us to hoof it. Click here to read the full article.

    Hubway Tours Firefly Bicycles, Dorchester, MA

    Yesterday, the Hubway team was provided with a tour of the Firefly Bicycles custom bike shop in Dorchester. With an average cost of around $7,500 and a wait list of over 11 months, a Firefly bike may not be on every bicyclists shopping list, but there’s no disputing the quality of their work. Of the 300 custom bikes that have been sold by the shop to riders all over the world in just over two and a half years, only 1 has had to come into the shop for repair. As their site says, the Firefly team (Director of R&D Jamie Medeiros, Creative Director Tyler Evans, and Lead Frame Designer Kevin Wolfson) is intelligent & passionate about their craft. Firefly is continuing Boston’s long history of handmade bikes, with each carbon- and titanium-tubing cycle made here in Boston.

    Interested in designing your own two-wheeled ride? Firefly can be reached here.

    Panorama shot of frame-building shop at Firefly.
    The Hubway team at Firefly.
    Firefly’s Lead Frame Designer Kevin guides the tour.


    Check out more pictures from our trip here.

    Somerville EUA - SILVER BICICLETA simpática cidade

    This article was originally published in Portuguese on Portal RR4 on November 5th, 2013. Click the link for the original article in Portuguese.

    Honor comes just two years after the city called a community level Bronze, demonstrating continued progress City of Somerville

    SOMERVILLE - If you are on a bicycle in Somerville, you can get there from here. The League of American Bicyclists recognized the City’s ongoing commitment to creating bikeable community with a bike silver-Friendly designation, just two years after the city won the Bronze level designation. Somerville now joins a number of cities, including New York, Philadelphia and Boston to receive this level of recognition for their efforts to promote cycling.

    The City of Somerville has installed more than 25 miles of bike lanes and sharrows in the last three years and in May held a ceremony for the Somerville Community Path extension of your current order on Cedar Street to Lowell Street, with the city strongly advocating for future extension of the Path to Boston. In 2012, Somerville joined the system with 12 Hubway Bikeshare stations garnering thousands of trips monthly, and since 2011 has added more than 200 new parking spaces for bikes to city streets as part of a regional program for bicycle parking. Investment in infrastructure was complemented by security programming, including a poster and information campaign PSA, higher education and policing cycling in schools.

    “We have seen the impact of our investments in bicycle infrastructure, bicycle tours with up to 56 percent in the past two years in Somerville according to our account,” said Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone said. “It’s not just social infrastructure, however, which makes it easier to get around, to live a healthy life and be kinder to the planet. It is economic infrastructure. Bicycle infrastructure connects people with mass transit and jobs. He brings more customers to local businesses. In turn, it also attracts developers who see a vibrant, active, with no busy streets filled with faces seen through the windows of the car, but on foot or by bicycle. We have gained recognition as the 10th most walkable city and the eighth most bikeable city in the country, but we will not be satisfied until we’re number one.”

    Since 2002, the League of American Bicyclists has received 600 applications for designation as a Bicycle Friendly Community, and Somerville is among 291 bicycle friendly communities in 48 states across the country received the honor. The program assists communities to assess network quality of life, sustainability and transportation, giving them a way to measure your progress toward improving their bicycle-friendliness.

    “Somerville is playing a key role in creating a truly bicycle friendly America,” said Andy Clarke, president of the League of American Bicyclists. “We know that investing in cycling of Somerville will be returned many times in the health, environment and quality of the benefits of a thriving community of life.”

    Station Alert: Red Sox World Series Championship Parade, Saturday, November 2nd

    Station Alert: The Red Sox World Series victory parade is scheduled for Saturday, November 2nd, beginning at 10am. The city will block off roads from Fenway Park through Back Bay and across the Charles River during the event. Large crowds are expected, and station rebalancing along the parade route will be restricted, so riders are encouraged to use the spotcycle app or check Hubway Tracker for up to the minute system information and bike/dock availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway, and Go Sox!

    New Station Alert: New Balance Store - Boylston at Dartmouth

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday, October 31st, the new Hubway station, New Balance Store - Boylston at Dartmouth, is open. This 19-dock station is located directly in front of the New Balance store across Boylston from Copley Square, between Dartmouth and Clarendon Streets.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Mayor Menino Talks Climate Sustainability [crazy images]

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno’s Streetwise Media on October 29th, 2013.

    The decorative bats hovering over Mayor Tom Menino were ominous, yet comical, when he stepped to the podium just after 1 p.m. Tuesday inside the the New England Aquarium’s Imax Theater.

    Tuesday, October 29 marked the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. It also likely marked Menino’s last speech on energy and the environment. The winged decorations seemed to flutter in anticipation.

    “It’s like being in church,” Menino joked, as the crowd quieted upon his arrival.

    After a brief introduction from Brian Swett, chief of environment and energy for the City of Boston, Menino – aided by his cane – stepped to the mic for a series of announcements about the progress made, and future plans for Boston’s work on sustainability and climate issues.

    As applause erupted, Menino said quietly, “I hope we’re all clapping tomorrow night.”

    “If Sandy struck just five hours earlier [Boston] would have experienced a 100-year flood,” he began, stressing the importance of preparing Boston’s homes, businesses and transportation infrastructure if and when the next storm hits. Sandy missed high tide by mere hours.

    “We can’t predict [when the next storm will hit], but we can prepare for it,” Menino said.

    Despite reminding those in attendance how Boston narrowly missed Sandy’s full impact, Menino’s announcements were positive across the board.

    The mayor acknowledged that “climate work is unending” and will require a total team effort in order to engage all of Boston’s communities in implementing environmental strategies.

    Boston has experienced a 27 percent reduction in annual greenhouse gas emissions between 2005 and 2012, Menino said, referencing a “Climate Ready Boston: Municipal Vulnerability to Climate Change” report prepared by the City’s Climate Preparedness Task Force. The reduction in greenhouse emissions is equal to taking 10,000 cars off the road, he said.

    Boston’s Hubway program has been a big part of this reduction.

    Hubway bikes have provided 675,000 rides to people around the city, Menio said, preventing 230 tons of carbon gas from entering the atmosphere.

    Before stepping down from the podium, Menino said the time is now to turn “science-talk t0 street-talk,” so that environmental issues become a part of daily conversations throughout the City.

    Menino gave way to Mike Davis, president of the Boston Society of Architects, who acknowledged, “To be an architect requires equal parts vision and patience.” Similar, he said, to attributes necessary to excel as a city’s mayor.

    During his address, Davis said making Boston’s buildings resilient to the affects of climate change (rising tides) and storms like Sandy and Nemo will help Boston be ready in the future.

    “The value extends well beyond our lives,” Davis said, touching on the longterm visions for climate-ready infrastructure in Boston – a port city susceptible to climate change.

    Acknowledging the work between the private sector and planning by the Boston Redevelopment Authority, Davis said the warning signs have been seen.

    “There’s a time for patience but when vision compels us, it’s time to act,” said Davis.

    The BRA held a Climate Change Preparedness and Resiliency Guidelines public meeting between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m Tuesday regarding a new Zoning Article 80 Project Review to ensure basic building preparedness and resiliency practices are included in new Boston projects.

    On Long Wharf after the event concluded, the Environmental League of Massachusetts held a small conference as well, complete with large posters of their ominous #bosstorm vision of what Boston could look like after the next Sandy-type storm.

    There’s the old state house:

    And a questionably timed vision of Fenway, as well:

    Head here for all the images, including a TD Garden where hockey skates would get you nowhere.

    Station Alert: Removal of Seaport Hotel station

    Station Alert: Please note—effective Tuesday, October 29th, due to ongoing construction in the area, the station at the Seaport Hotel is being removed until the 2014 Hubway season. The closest two alternative stations are located at (1) Seaport Square - Seaport Boulevard at Boston Wharf and (2) the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center. View the entire Hubway system station map here. Please plan accordingly.

    Use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway.

    Station Alert: Removal of Harvard Real Estate - 219 Western Ave/North Harvard Station

    Station Alert: Please note—effective Tuesday, October 29th, due to ongoing construction in the area, the station at 219 Western Ave/North Harvard is being removed until the 2014 Hubway season. The closest two alternative stations are located at (1) 125 Western Ave and (2) 370 Western Ave. View the entire Hubway system station map here. Please plan accordingly.

    Use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    UMass Media: New bike lanes mean good news for commuters

    There is good news for those who commute to the university by bicycle…

    Bike shares can be perfect!: Solving the commuting algorithm

    In 2006, there were 25 bike share services worldwide. Now there are about 500. Each of those networks, which range in size from a few dozen bikes to several thousand, produces travel information that constitutes what Jon Froehlich, a professor at the University of Maryland and one of the first to study bike share, calls a “digital footprint of where people are.” Read more here.

    Join Hubway at City Feed in Jamaica Plain this Thursday, October 24th, 4-7pm

    Join us at City Feed & Supply, 672 Centre Street in Jamaica Plain, this Thursday, October 24th, from 4-7pm, to celebrate Hubway’s recent expansion in JP! Bring your questions and thoughts for our Hubway reps and learn all about bike sharing in the metro area. Plus, if you register for an annual or monthly membership on site, you’ll receive a voucher (like the one below) good for $5 off your City Feed purchase!

    Already a member? Bring your Hubway key and your bike helmet to get your Bicycle Benefits sticker!

    Somerville named Silver-level Bicycle Friendly Community

    This article was originally published by Brock Parker in Boston.com on October 23rd, 2013.

    Somerville cycling is climbing the friendliness rankings.

    The Washington D.C.-based League of American Cyclists has recognized Somerville this month as a Silver Bicycle Friendly Community for its commitment to creating a bikeable community.

    Mayor Joseph Curtatone’s office said in a press release Wednesday that the designation comes two years after the city first earned a bronze level designation from the non-profit organization.

    The Silver designation puts Somerville on par with the level of recognition received by cities such as Boston and New York City for promoting bicycling. Cambridge was named a Gold-level Bicycle Friendly Community earlier this year.

    Somerville has installed more than 25 miles of bike lanes and sharrows in the last three years and held a groundbreaking in May for the extension of the Somerville Community Path from Cedar Street to Lowell Street according to the city.

    Increasing the bicycle friendliness of the city promotes healthier lifestyles, is kinder to the planet, and brings more customers to local businesses, said Curtatone in a press release about Somerville’s climb in the rankings.

    “We have seen the impact of our investments in bicycle infrastructure, with biking up 56 percent over the past two years in Somerville according to our counts,” said Curtatone.

    Since 2011, the city has also added more than 200 new bicycle parking spots and in 2012 joined the Hubway bikeshare system and now has 12 docking stations in the city.

    According to The League of American Cyclists website, Somerville was one of seven cities in the country to climb from the Bronze to the Silver designation this fall and was the only municipality in Massachusetts to make the jump. The organization has now designated at total of 291 Bicycle Friendly Communities 48 states.

    “Somerville is playing a critical part in creating a truly Bicycle Friendly America,” said Andy Clarke, president of the League of American Bicyclists. “We know Somerville’s investment in bicycling will be returned many times over in the health, environmental, and quality of life benefits of a thriving community.”

    Bike safety is focus of West Roxbury Business and Professional Association Meeting

    This article was originally published by Matt Robare in Wicked Local West Roxbury on October 23rd, 2013.

    WEST ROXBURY — Bike safety and accessibility was the main focus of the West Roxbury Business and Professional Association meeting that took place in the function room of the West Roxbury Pub and Restaurant.

    Nicole Freedman, director of Boston Bikes, answered questions on the city’s efforts in all neighborhoods. She said that the city has two bike lanes planned for West Roxbury: One on Baker Street from the Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway to the Newton line – on which she said work was going to start this year, but had been canceled because of the utility work on that street – and another on the VFW Parkway itself, from Centre Street to Spring Street in the next five years.

    While emphasizing the importance of bikes, Freedman said, “In a neighborhood like West Roxbury, cars are important. It’s about figuring out how all modes can share the road.”

    Association president Mary Mulvey Jacobson said, and many of the people at the meeting agreed, that although bicycling was more popular and more common, there was still confusion about the rules of the road.

    “Education isn’t happening with drivers or bikers,” she said.

    Freedman said that the city is running a program with the assistance of pro-bicycling groups to educate cyclists, focusing on five key safety issues that were revealed in a review of data on all 1,500 traffic accidents involving bikes since 2009: Crashing into open car doors, following the rules of the road, avoiding blind spots and using helmets and lights. The city will also be sending information to registered drivers through the excise tax mailing.

    “We just completed the bike network plan of Boston,” Freedman said. “It puts down a 30-year vision plan and coupled it with a five-year action plan.”

    Ultimately, she said the goal was to connect the city’s major destinations to the existing bike paths, which she said were like bike superhighways, which are already a primary bike network. A secondary network, connecting local destinations, would be made up of cycle tracks (where the bikes get their own lane between parked cars and the sidewalk), bike lanes and shared lanes.

    “Every major city in the United States now has cycle tracks,” she said, adding that introducing them results in an increase in ridership and a decrease in crashes.

    “In Boston we have a long standing tradition of ignoring all rules and regulations,” said one audience member who declined to give his full name. “You’re constantly encouraged to ignore all rules. It’s our way.”

    Freedman said that enforcement is an issue, but Boston Police can give out $50 tickets for violations. Some of the more frequently seen violations include riding without a helmet, riding on a sidewalk in a business district, riding against traffic (i.e. bikes have to travel in the same direction as the travel lane for cars) and ignoring traffic signals.

    Overall, the people at the meeting were receptive to bike infrastructure, although there are still concerns over the safety of bike lanes on the VFW Parkway.

    How do bike-sharing schemes shape cities?

    This article was originally published in The Economist on October 22nd, 2013.

    NEXT month a so-called “brand new means of transport” will be launched in Copenhagen: the bicycle. GoBike, Europe’s latest bike-sharing scheme, will have bicycles with built-in tablet computers that direct cyclists to the best local restaurants, show offers in nearby shops and give the latest train times. Bike-sharing is shifting up a gear: it seems that nearly every self-respecting mayor is either developing a scheme or announcing an expansion to one. What is the impact on cities’ development?

    Bike-sharing began in the 1960s when 50 “free bikes” were scattered around Amsterdam. They were promptly stolen. But after this slow start bike-sharing has blossomed. Over the past decade the number of schemes has increased tenfold. Bike-sharing ventures now exist in more than 500 cities, from Dubai to Hawaii. Each works on the simple principle that a user can borrow a bike at a docking station and then return it to another. The first 30 minutes are usually free. The most successful schemes have large fleets of bikes, lots of small docking stations and a few “superdocks” in busy places, such as train stations. Electronic monitoring of the bikes can show ebbs and flows of bike traffic through cities, allowing better distribution of bikes and planning of new docks.

    Just as mass public transport changed the development of cities’ suburbs, bike-hire schemes are now shaping city centres in subtle ways. A “cycling census” in London found that in the morning rush-hours nearly half of all northbound traffic crossing three of the city’s main bridges was made up of cyclists. Planners have responded by criss-crossing the city with cycle-paths; more are proposed. Some mayors are experimenting with bike-only days: Mexico City, the unlikely home of a highly popular bike-hire scheme, closes its central eight-lane highway to cars every Sunday, to the rage of motorists. Property developers are taking note, too: just as houses near metro stations tend to command higher prices, research now suggests that access to cycle paths and proximity to docking points is linked to higher rents. Finally, bike-sharing opens up parts of cities that were previously hard to access by public transport, especially late at night when bus and train services get thinner. Research by Susan Shaheen at the University of California, Berkeley, found that in Montreal and Toronto four out of ten people shopped more at locations near bike stations. In Washington, DC, more than eight out of ten said they were more likely to visit a business, shop or restaurant with easy access to bike-sharing dock.

    Just as researchers begin to grasp the impact of bike-sharing, the schemes themselves continue to evolve at speed. New developments include much cheaper “dockless” bikes, already in use in Berlin, which can be found by mobile phone. Another promising development is the introduction of electric bikes, for longer or steeper journeys. Such innovations could help broaden the appeal of bike-share schemes beyond their current users, who are mainly young, relatively well-off men. Bike sharing is just one part of a broader movement towards alternative forms of transport in increasingly crowded cities, but it could be an important one. As last year’s United States Conference of Mayors concluded: “communities that have invested in pedestrian and bicycle projects have benefited from improved quality of life, healthier population, greater local real-estate values, more local travel choices, and reduced air pollution.” Time for more of the world to go Dutch.

    Bicyclists invited to annual Tour de Somerville this Saturday

    This article was originally published by Samantha Laine on Boston.com on October 17th, 2013.

    Attention bike and architecture enthusiasts: Get ready for the 21st annual Tour de Somerville, which will take place on Saturday, October 19 at 10 a.m. The 13-mile bike ride will take participants on an bicycle exploration of the city’s many tunnels, bridges, overpasses, and construction sites.

    The free event, themed “Over, Under, Around, and Through,” will start at the Seven Hills Park, take a mid-way break at the Blessing of the Bay boathouse on Shore Drive—where refreshments will be provided by Redbones—and will end in the parking lot behind Rite Aid.

    Ron Newman, this year’s ride organizer, said the “Over, Under, Around, and Through” themed event is a little whimsical, but that people really enjoy seeing different aspects of the city in a fun way. He said the ride has grown from about 20 participants in the beginning years to closer to 100 riders in past tours. He said he is excited that the Somerville Bicycle Committee can provide this fun event to the community.

    ...“This is going to be a good opportunity to explore the progress the city is making in improving facilities for riding bikes,” Newman said. Read more here.

    Bike lanes slated for Freeport Street

    Bike lanes are expected to be added in the coming weeks to Freeport Street from Dorchester Avenue to Tenean Street and on Tenean Street from Freeport Street to Conley Street.

    ...As part of the project, “sharrows,” painted symbols that encourage drivers to share the road, will also be added to Adams Street from Bowdoin Street to Neponset Avenue and to Ashmont Street from Dorchester Avenue to Neponset Avenue.

    ...No parking will be lost with the new additions nor will any vehicle travel lanes be eliminated…

    ...“Number one is always safety,” said [Boston Bikes Director Nicole] Freedman. “When you add bike lanes it tends to slow down cars and increase safety for bicyclists, pedestrians, and motorists.”

    Read more here.

    Dudley Square Bike Club Attracts Flocks of Bicycle-Loving Kids

    This article was originally published by Sacha Pfeiffer on WBUR on October 16th, 2013.

    For several years now, Boston has been working hard to become a more bike-friendly city. It’s constantly expanding its network of bike lanes, rolling out additional Hubway bike-sharing stations, and installing more bike racks. Now there’s another step forward in Mayor Thomas Menino’s goal of making Boston “a world-class bicycling city”: A free bicycle club for young people recently opened in Dudley Square.

    It operates out of the Yawkey Boys and Girls Club on Warren Street and it’s a collaboration of several partners, including the city, the nonprofit group Bikes Not Bombs and Boston Children’s Hospital. And when we visited, the place was packed — not just with kids from Roxbury, but also from surrounding neighborhoods like Dorchester, Roslindale and Hyde Park.

    “Here, we have youth that are actually stripping bikes,” says 18-year-old Tarese Thompson, the club’s “crew chief,” pointing to a bicycle being methodically disassembled by a group of youngsters

    “They’re taking what’s on the bike and they’re going to actually take everything off the bike so that it’s back down to the frame,” explains Thompson, a student at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, “and then we’re going to rebuild them.”

    That deconstruction process is designed to teach bike mechanics. The club also instructs kids how to bicycle, if they don’t know already, and organizes group rides.

    “I think kids always love riding bikes,” Thompson adds, “and a lot of times it’s the parent that says, ‘Oh, don’t go too far.’ But now we’re basically giving them the opportunity where they can ride a bike, ride out on the street, and also ride around with friends.”

    Truthfully, we thought a group bicycle ride would seem way too un-cool to a bunch of middle schoolers to attract much interest. But, boy, were we wrong.

    “They’re going to be heading up Washington,” Thompson says, “cutting on one of the side streets to Martin Luther King Boulevard, and they they’re going to be taking the bike path on Martin Luther King Boulevard to the Southwest Corridor.”

    And, from there, on to Northeastern University. At least a dozen kids very eagerly went on that group outing, including 12-year-old Kaya Andrews, who lives in the South End and is a seventh grader at the Pierce School in Brookline.

    “It feels really safe,” Andrews told us after her ride, “because we have our signals that tell the whole group in chains up and down the line if there’s a car in the back or if there’s a car coming ahead or a biker so that we know when something’s approaching us and it doesn’t come by surprise.”

    When Andrews comes to the Dudley Square club, she rides one of 10 free bikes donated by the bicycle company Giant, which has also given the club an assortment of tools and other equipment for its in-house repair shop. That shop is staffed by high schoolers who service and repair bikes for free or at a discount for people in the community. They also teach younger kids bicycle mechanics and maintenance, like how to patch a flat tire.

    This bike club is trying to do several things: give young people a way to get exercise, encourage biking as alternative transportation, and steer kids away from street violence. It’s also teaching good bicycling citizenship and bicycle safety.

    “Some kids don’t even understand that we have the right to ride on the street,” notes Thompson. “They think that we have to ride on the sidewalk. And this is a way that we can really push and let them know that riding on the street is OK,” and inform them that riding on sidewalks is sometimes illegal.

    And the kids who work in the club’s repair shop get practical, marketable skills.

    “I know a couple people who have gone through the programs who are working in bike shops now,” Thompson says. “So, from what they’ve learned here, they’re going out and they’re making money off of it. But also this is a way where when their bike breaks down it’s not just sitting in their basement for the next three years. They can actually fix it and keep using it.”

    During our visit to the bike club, we watched several kids mentally connect the dots of how a bicycle works, like when they discovered that cutting a certain cable results in the brakes no longer functioning. One of those budding engineers was Gianna McGee, a 15-year-old from Roxbury who goes to Newton South High School.

    “These are the brakes, see?” McGee shows us. “And that little cable that comes this way connects to right here, where it was, and it clamps the tires together. That’s what makes it stop.”

    For now, the Dudley Square bike club is a pilot project. It’s open two afternoons a week, from 4 to 7 p.m., through mid-November and, if it’s judged successful, it may be back again in the spring.

    Shared-use Mobility Summit explores future of urban mobility

    This article was originally published in The City Fix.

    “The 20th century is a century of general, and the 21st century is a century of sharing.” – Lisa Gansky, author of the Mesh

    Shared mobility is the cornerstone of the sharing economy, which is spurred by demographic changes, increased environmental consciousness, and the global economic downturn. Sharing maximizes the use of assets in our society while giving more people the access to the resources they need. The idea that “access trumps ownership” is increasingly popular reflects the explosive growth of shared mobility.

    On October 10 and 11, the Shared-use Mobility Summit brought public policy makers, private sector actors, non-for-profit organizations, and academics together in San Francisco. The conference explored the future of urban mobility by discussing current trends, policies, and opportunities in carsharing, bikesharing, and ridesharing. As the first shared mobility conference ever, it provided a cutting-edge opportunity for various stakeholders to have a direct, open, and timely dialogue on how to better provide urban mobility in an integrated way. Read the full article here.

    City of Kolkata bans bikes to reduce traffic, but India’s environmentalists, workers protest

    KOLKATA, India — For the milkmen and newspaper delivery boys of Kol­kata, navigating the city’s clogged lanes is always a challenge. But now they face a new obstacle: traffic cops waiting to write them a ticket.

    Just for riding a bike. Read more here.

    Taking off the stabilisers: Sharing two wheels is becoming ever more popular

    This article was originally published in the international print edition of The Economist on October 12th, 2013.

    IN MORE than 500 cities in 50 countries, shared bicycles have become a colourful addition to street life. Schemes have increased tenfold since 2004. Most work on the principle that a user hires a bicycle at one of a number of docking stations dotted around a city. The first 30 minutes are usually free for members (annual memberships range from a $35 deposit to a $145 fee), and charges rise the longer users hang on to the bikes. The two-wheelers vary from clanking, no-frills frames in Hangzhou, in China, to the luxury models with built-in GPS and smart tablets that will be launched in Copenhagen next month.

    Bicycle-sharing has come a long way since the 1960s, when 50 white “free bikes” were scattered around Amsterdam, only to be promptly stolen. A second generation of coin-operated bicycles still got nicked. A third generation solved that problem with electronic docking stations and credit-card payments. Susan Shaheen, an expert on sustainable transport at the University of California, Berkeley, thinks that bike-sharing is now heading towards a fourth, less wobbly generation. Innovations such as mobile solar-powered docking stations and IT-based redistribution systems (to get the bikes to the right place at the right time) are already well established. Some cities are now moving on to offer seamless integration with public transport.

    According to a study by the Earth Policy Institute (EPI) in Washington, Europe accounts for most of the programmes, but Asia has the largest number of shared bicycles, with over 350,000 in China alone. Even in often bike-hostile America, which in 2012 had 21 schemes with 8,500 bicycles, the EPI expects the fleet to more than quadruple by 2014, to 37,000. In London, which has 8,000 shared bikes, another 2,000 will be added later this year. In Paris the Vélib scheme, which opened in 2007, has already racked up 173m journeys.

    Many of the larger bike-sharing schemes are public-private partnerships that rely on a combination of user fees, advertising revenue, sponsorship and government money. New York’s 6,000-bike venture, launched this summer and sponsored by Citibank and MasterCard, charges a lot more than other cities ($10.83 for 24 hours against $2.30 in Paris), and hopes to make a profit. In Paris JCDecaux, an advertising firm, pays for the programme in exchange for advertising space on bus stops and billboards.

    London’s “Boris bikes”, named after Boris Johnson, the mayor who introduced the scheme, benefit from a £50m ($80m) sponsorship deal with Barclays bank, but nearly half this year’s running costs will still come from the public purse. Transport for London, which runs the scheme, says that all public transport in the capital is subsidised, and bikes are no exception. No two bike-sharing business models are alike, but for most cities the point of such schemes is not to make a profit but to reduce congestion, ease parking problems and encourage their increasingly flabby inhabitants to take more exercise.

    Ceremony Honors Cyclist Who Broke Barriers

    ...Knox had been a member of Boston’s only black cycling group, the Riverside Cycle Club, before joining the Boston-based National League of American Wheelman in 1893.

    Knox soon found herself at the epicenter of a fight over whether blacks could join the league, he said. After a Southern faction of league leaders successfully politicked in 1894 to make the group for whites only, Knox’s appearance at the league’s 1895 national meet in Asbury Park, N.J., caused an uproar… click here for more.

    New Station Alert: Jackson Square T, Jamaica Plain

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday afternoon, October 9th, the new Hubway station, Jackson Square T, in Jamaica Plain, is open & operational. This station is a 23-dock station, adjacent to the Jackson Square T Station along the SW Corridor close to Centre and Lamartine Streets. This is the 6th station located in Jamaica Plain.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Green Street T, Jamaica Plain

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday morning, October 9th, the new Hubway station, Green Street T, in Jamaica Plain, is open. This station is a 15-dock station, located in front of the Green Street orange line T station between Johnson Park and the SW Corridor Park. This is the 5th station located in Jamaica Plain, and a 6th is planned for the Jackson Square T station area.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Just Sitting Here Watching the Wheels Go Round and Round


    “As a kid I had a dream - I wanted to own my own bicycle. When I got the bike I must have been the happiest boy in Liverpool, maybe the world. I lived for that bike. Most kids left their bike in the backyard at night. Not me. I insisted on taking mine indoors and the first night I even kept it in my bed.” - John Lennon

    John would have been 73 today, October 9, 2013. Happy Birthday, John!

    New Station Alert: Summer Street at Cutter Street, near Davis Square in Somerville

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday morning, October 9th, the new Hubway station, Summer Street at Cutter Street in Somerville, is open. This station is an 11-dock station, located in front of the VFW at the intersection of Summer and Cutter Streets, near the intersection of Elm & Russell. Please note: Summer/Elm is where Russell becomes Cutter.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    How Bike-Loving Mayors Make Bike-Friendly Cities

    ...Boston’s outgoing Mayor Thomas M. Menino launched a cycling program in 2007 and declared in 2009, “the car is no longer the king in Boston,” calling for healthier citizens and communities. This is after seeing his city ranked as one of the country’s worst biking cities in Bicycling magazine. Today, it’s still not in the top 10, but the mayor—and the candidates to succeed him—seems committed to improving the program to make it more expansive and safe.

    Menino’s administration has installed more than 60 miles of bike lanes and 1,000 bike racks and launched the Hubway bike-share system in 2011. Just this year, the mayor released a Cyclist Safety Report, promising to reduce the city’s crash injury rate by 50 percent by 2020 and is supposed to install helmet vending machines at several bike-share kiosks around town any day now.

    Like New York, Boston has doubled its cycling rates in recent years, so the mayors’ efforts are paying off. Click here for the full article.

    Boston offers urban bicycling safety tips

    This article was originally published on Boston.com on 10/6/2013.

    BOSTON (AP) — Boston officials are offering tips they say can help keep urban bicyclists safe as they pedal through the city’s streets.

    Mayor Thomas Menino’s staff says the urban cycling tips were based on a study of more than 1,500 cyclist crashes in Boston since 2009.

    They say there were five fatal bicycle incidents in the summer and fall of 2012 alone.

    The tips tell cyclists to beware of doors, follow rules and yield to pedestrians.

    They also advise bike riders to avoid large vehicle blind spots, and to use helmets and lights at night.

    Cyclists can watch safety videos and take a quiz at www.bostonbikes.org.

    New Position Aims to Strengthen MIT's Sustainability

    ...MIT works closely with the city of Cambridge on a range of sustainability initiatives, including sponsorship of Hubway and electric vehicle charging stations. Faculty members and graduate students are partnering with the city on topics such as solar mapping, infrared imaging, wind and solar analyses and climate preparedness…

    David Price takes a ride on the Hubway

    This is an excerpt of an article originally published by Julian Benbow on Boston.com on 10/4/2013.

    Considering that he has seen his pitcher throw a bullpen session in a Vanderbilt football uniform—helmet included—Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon wasn’t shocked at all that star lefty David Price decided to hop on one of Boston’s Hubway bikes Thursday and go for a ride from the Rays’ workout at Fenway back to the team hotel.

    “It doesn’t surprise me, anything that he does,” said Maddon, who has been known to ride his bike to home games. “Riding the bike’s normally my thing, but that doesn’t surprise me, anything that David does. I love his ways. He’s a young man that’s—he’s Peter Pan. He’s going to be that way forever and I love that about him.

    “I wish more of our guys could be that way. Anything David does, understand, should not surprise you, and if you’re around him more, it would not surprise you.”

    Price had been thinking about it since the Rays came to Boston in July, when he saw the Hubway bicycles in front of the Boston Public Library on the way back from dinner with teammate Chris Archer.

    “I said, ‘I can’t believe I just now saw this for the first time,’ ” Price said. “I would’ve been riding bikes throughout the city, or at least to the field, if I knew that.”

    Since that was the Rays’ last regular-season run through Fenway, he figured he’d have to put off his pedaling until next season.

    But with the Rays back in town for the American League Division Series, he jumped at the second chance.

    Price picked out a bike from the rack on Yawkey and tweeted, “I’m doin it!!!! these can drivers better stay in their own lane!!! #sharetheroad”

    For the most part, the ride went off without a hitch.

    “Only one curb,” Price said. “No cars.”

    Facing the Sox, he said, won’t be so smooth.

    “You know what they’re capable of doing,” said Price, who will start Game 2 Saturday. “Every single year, year in, year out, they are, they’re going to be a postseason team, and you know you’re going to have to come with your best.

    “If you come with your B game, B-plus game, you have a pretty good chance to lose. So it heightens your awareness. You start feeling butterflies probably a day earlier than what you normally would. Pitching in this ballpark, pitching against that team, it makes you want it just a little bit more.”

    New Station Alert: Upham's Corner - Ramsey Street at Dudley Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday, October 3rd, the new Hubway station, Upham’s Corner - Ramsey Street at Dudley Street, is open and operational. This station is a 14-dock station, located on Ramsey next to CVS and across Dudley from the Foot Locker.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Bike Share Programs Are A Huge Success In Metropolitan Areas

    This article was originally published by Andrew Meggison on GAS2.org.

    Bike riding in major U.S. cities has nearly doubled over the past ten years, an one major source of bicycling’s recent resurgence are bike share programs that have sprung up in cities across America. This programs are proving especially popular with the young and hip.

    In the quest to seek out green transportation, it is hard to beat riding a bike and many U.S. cities have recognized this. Bike share programs have taken many American cities by storm over the past two years. A bike share program is a service in which bicycles are made available for shared use to individuals on a short term basis for a small fee, providing cheap and convenient transportation to tourists and locals alike.

    I first experienced a bike share program while I was traveling overseas in 2008. The bike share programs that I experienced at first were unregulated but highly effective; essentially bikes were left in certain parts of the city for riders to take and then drop off at other unofficial drop zones. Sort of an honor system at play but it seemed to work, even though for a while it felt like I was taking someone’s bike.  I did notice as I ventured more into Western Europe the bike share programs became more regulated and thus more organized however there was a fee involved.

    In 2011 I was pleased to learn that a sponsored bike share program was coming to my city of Boston Massachusetts.  Called “The Hub Way” and sponsored by New Balance, the Boston bike share program has been in action now for two years and has been a major success.

    The Hub Way has a number of cost effective use options that seem to be working as well as a strong following – expansion of The Hub Way is underway and the statistics of the past two years are encouraging:

    Hubway statistics:

    • Total trips: 1,069,766
    • Total miles ridden: 1.2 million
    • Total calories burned: 40 million
    • Total pounds of carbon offset: 285 tons

    I have used The Hub Way many times and have found the system convenient, easy to navigate, and incredibly cost effective. Given the talent and innovative spirit found in Boston small business have climbed on board with The Hub way to make the bike sharing experience more enjoyable and even safer.

    Not to be outdone by Boston, in May of 2013 New York City launched Citi Bike NYC’s first bike share program. The program has been a massive success with more than 288,000 subscriptions by September with 80,826 annual members. Citi Bike celebrated its 100th day of operation September 4th. To date the bike share program provides 6,000 bikes at 330 stations in parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn.  Citi Bike is expected to generate $36 million for NYC each year. Bicycling in NYC has continued to grow at a rapid pace since 2007.

    The future of bike sharing in America is strong. Seattle Washington and Aspen Colorado have recently put bike share programs into action. Even smaller American cities like Portland and South Portland Maine are working hard to make a bike share program available for their residence.

    While only 0.61% of all U.S. commuters use bicycles to get to work studies have shown that that number is on the rise. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey an estimated 864,883 people commuted by bicycle in 2012 an increase of around 10% since 2011.

    Zipcar, Hubway Cultivate University Partnerships

    This article was originally published by Caroline C. Hunsicker on TheCrimson.com on 9/30/2013

    Since Harvard partnered with car rental provider Zipcar and bike share company Hubway, students increasingly have taken advantage of these companies’ discounted rates for Harvard affiliates, and the companies have added even more benefits over the years.

    Both programs have allowed for Harvard affiliates to travel to destinations less easily accessible by Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority services.

    Joe A. Paul ’17 said that he and his roommates in Straus Hall rented bikes this fall to visit Market Basket, a grocery store in Somerville.

    Though their ride was fully funded by Hubway using coupons for a 24-hour free trial, Paul said he would use the bikes again for spontaneous trips that are “too far for walking and too short for the T.”

    Harvard has invested largely in Boston’s bike share company since the program’s launch in April 2012. So far, the University has funded 12 Hubway stations in the area, which each cost about $50,000. These stations include a location behind Annenberg, one outside of the Holyoke Center, and most recently, at the Quad.

    While Hubway and Zipcar provide different transportation services, the two companies have similar business models in which users pay a membership fee plus time-based usage fees.

    Since the launch of Hubway’s Harvard affiliate discount in May 2013, 684 members of the Harvard community have taken advantage of the 40 percent reduced price, according to Colin B. Durrant, a spokesperson for the Office for Sustainability. An annual membership for Hubway’s services is discounted for Harvard students and faculty at $50, compared to the normal cost of $85.

    Zipcar, which was founded in Cambridge in 2000, has been offering a student discount since 2003. Membership fees are $15 for Harvard students, plus the hourly rates of $7.43 after joining. Daily fees are $84 for non-members. Both gas and insurance prices are included in the Zipcar rental fees.

    Harvard was the first school in the region to adopt the Under-21 program, which allows students to rent Zipcars at 18, according to Benjamin A. Hammer, Commuter Choice Program coordinator.

    Currently, there are 32 frequently-rented cars on Harvard’s campus eligible for the Under-21 program.

    According to Hammer, there are over 10,000 active Zipcar accounts associated with a Harvard email address, thanks to the partnership between the University and the company. Over 1,100 of those members are under 21, according to Durrant.

    To promote sustainable transportation and encourage more students to join the program, Ana Dorsey, a marketing coordinator at the Boston Zipcar office, said Sidewalk Sam, a street artist, will design parking spaces on Harvard’s campus to be reserved for Zipcar use only.

    The Pros & Cons of Bike Commuting in Boston

    This article was originally published by Caroline Hatano on BostInno on 9/30/2013

    Remember biking as a kid? My childhood memories are pretty foggy, but I still remember riding around my cul-de-sac for the first time, the independence that came with being able to bike to a friend’s house, and that feeling of flying down a hill with the wind in your hair.

    Pretty romantic stuff, right?

    While biking in Boston isn’t all warm and fuzzy, it definitely has its perks. I became a bike commuter just over a week ago, so I’m still learning how cycling in a city works. For those of you debating becoming bike commuters, and for those who don’t understand why anyone would ever want to take on the hazards of rush hour on a two-wheeled steel frame, I’ve evaluated the pros and cons of biking in the city with the help of some of Boston’s bike experts.

    The Pros

    Healthy

    It goes without saying that biking is a healthier way to get around than, say, taking the T or driving. Instead of getting sardined into a cramped train car, you get a workout in during your morning commute. That way you don’t have to designate time outside of work to exercise. Or you can more easily justify that second post-lunch latte.

    Green

    You guys have probably heard by now that our planet is undergoing some sort of climate change situation. Biking, rather than opting for a fossil fuel-filled car ride, is a more sustainable way to move around the city. People have already adopted simple alternatives like recycling and buying re-usable water bottles. Biking is another easy change to make.

    Faster

    Boston has a reputation for being a very walkable city thanks to its narrow, compact street network. “In many ways, biking’s the fastest way to get around town. It’s a flat city and it’s a very dense city,” Nicole Freedman, director of the Boston Bikes program, told BostInno. Biking gives you control over your transportation. So instead of waiting endlessly for the green line, you can leave when you want to and ride at your own pace.

    Scenic

    When you pit riding along the Charles River against traveling underground in an overpacked train car, there’s not much competition. I think that, given the choice, everyone would choose the beauty of the outdoors over the T. “Biking to work is its own kind of thing. For me, it makes my commute very pleasant most of the time. It’s definitely led me to appreciate the way I move around the city a lot more than I would if I were trapped in a box,” said local bike activist/celebrity Greg Hum, who’s been biking in Boston for six years.

    Cheaper

    I’m not under the illusion that bikes are cheap, but if you have the patience for Craigslist and other such sites you can definitely find decent bikes for reasonable prices. You’ll have to invest in things like a lock, helmet, lights, and maybe a simple set of tools, but just remember that it’s a one-time expenditure. You’ll never have to pay for a parking spot or a monthly pass again.

    The Cons

    Dangerous

    Biking in Boston has become a lot safer in recent years thanks to the efforts of Boston Bikes, but it’s still hazardous. There’s a bike lane network to some extent—and far more in the works—but unless you’re comfortable getting up close and personal with cars, it can be a little nerve-wracking in high-traffic areas. “We’ve put out a lot of surveys, and it really comes down to having welcoming levels of infrastructure. A lot of it is just getting people to try it,” said Freedman.

    Sweaty

    “Real estate and property owners need to make it possible to have access to showers.” said Hubway General Manager Emily Stapleton. “People carry backpacks and the summer in Boston is super hot.” If you’re carrying a backpack and/or moving at a pace faster than that of a snail, you’re likely to get sweaty. And if you’re a safe biker, you’ll get helmet hair. Coworkers may not appreciate it when you show up to work in such a state.

    Not leisurely

    While you can bike to work at a leisurely pace, you won’t be able to casually sip a cup of coffee, read the paper, or catch up on emails. But then again, relaxing T rides only exist if you can get past crying babies, blaring music, and a lack of personal space.

    Boston Bike Network: An ambitious trek

    This is an excerpt of an article that was originally published as an editorial in The Boston Globe on 9/27/2013

    From Hubway to bike paths, Boston has made great strides towards becoming a more bicycle-friendly city. But even compared to the work that has already been done, the Boston Bike Network Plan — announced last Friday and scheduled to take up to 30 years to fully complete — is very ambitious. If this program is implemented, it has the potential to transform the way Bostonians get around the city.

    New Station Alert: South Boston Library - 646 East Broadway

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday evening, September 26th, the new Hubway station, South Boston Library - 646 East Broadway, is open, and bikes are available. This station is a 15-dock station, located in front of the South Boston Library on East Broadway between I & K Streets.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Hayes Square at Vine Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday evening, September 26th, the new Hubway station, Hayes Square at Vine Street, is open. This station is a 19-dock station, located in Charlestown between Warren/Chelsea and Spaulding.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: East Cottage Street at Columbia Road

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday evening, September 26th, the new Hubway station, East Cottage Street at Columbia Road, is open. This station is a 19-dock station, located on East Cottage near the intersection of Mass Ave, Columbia Road, Boston St, and E.Cottage.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Hubway Expanding Its Presence in Boston with New Stations

    This article was originally published by Caroline Black on MyFoxBoston.com on 9/26/2013

    Hubway, the New Balance bike share system, is adding 18 new stations in Boston, the majority in North Dorchester, South Boston, and Jamaica Plain, Mayor Tom Menino announced Thursday.

    “The New Balance Hubway system has expanded access to biking to thousands of people across the region, and now it will be more inclusive than ever as it grows into Boston’s neighborhoods,” Mayor Menino said.

    Major expansion areas include along West and East Broadway in South Boston, Jamaica Plain stations along the Southwest Corridor, Centre Street and Egleston Square and the Uphams’s Corner area.

    The City partnered with the Department of Conservation and Recreation, MassDOT, and the MBTA to offer the most convenient station locations with direct access to public transit, and bike paths.

    Hubway in Boston was launched in 2011 with 61 stations and 600 bicycles, making Boston one of the first cities in the United States to launch a citywide bike share system.

    Since then, the system has expanded into Cambridge, Brookline and Somerville. With this expansion, Boston will have 90 stations and 900 bicycles. The system will have 132 stations and 1000 bikes.

    New Station locations:

    South Boston – NOW OPEN

    W Broadway - W Broadway /Dot Ave

    S Boston Library - 646 E Broadway

    *Coming shortly 2 stations at Design Center

    Jamaica Plain – NOW OPEN

    Egleston Sq - Columbus/Washington

    Hyde Square - Centre St/ Barbara St

    JP Monument - Centre St / South St

    JP Center-Centre St / Myrtle St

    *Permits pending Jackson Square, Green Street

    Other – Opening Over the Next Few Weeks

    Hayes Square - Bunker Hill St / Vine St, Charlestown

    Milk St - Milk St / India St, Downtown

    BIDMC (3rd station) - Brookline/Burlington, Fenway

    Mass Ave/Columbia Road - Mass Ave / Columbia Rd, Dorchester

    Beacon/Charles - Charles St / Beacon St, Beacon Hill

    *Permits pending Upham’s Corner

    18 Nuevas Estaciones de Hubway en JP y South Boston

    This article was originally published on TuBoston.com on 9/26/2013

    El alcalde Thomas M. Menino anunció que la alcaldía de Boston comenzará oficialmente esta semana su plan de expansión del servicio de bicicletas públicas Hubway, y añadirá 18 nuevas estaciones en Boston, la mayoría de ellas en North Dorchester, South Boston y Jamaica Plain.

    “El sistema Hubway ha permitido a miles de personas en la ciudad a tener acceso a bicicletas, y ahora será más inclusivo que nunca, a medida que crece en los vecindarios de Boston”, declaró Menino.

    Las principales áreas de expansión incluyen East y West Broadway, South Boston, y estaciones en Jamaica Plain a lo largo del Southwest Corridor, Centre Street y Egleston Square, así como también en el área de Uphams Corner.


    La alcaldía de Boston lanzó el servicio de Hubway en 2011, con 61 estaciones y 6000 bicicletas. Desde entonces, el sistema se ha expandido hacia Cambridge, Brookline y Somerville, y hasta la fecha ha contado con casi 20.000 miembros anuales y 160.000 usuarios ocasionales. Con esta nueva expansión, Hubway ahora contará con 132 estaciones y 1000 bicicletas.

    With New Stations, Hubway Is Expanding into the Neighborhoods

    This article was originally published by Eric Randall on BostonMagazine.com on 9/26/2013

    It makes Hubway a more realistic transit option in places like Dorchester and South Boston.

    Hubway, Boston’s bikeshare network, has been opening new stations this week, primarily in neighborhoods where access to the big green bikes has been more limited.

    They’re adding 18 new stations through the city, the majority in North Dorchester, Jamaica Plain, and South Boston, according to a city press release. The usefulness of bike share networks really picks up as the density of stations increases. No one wants to take a bike to their destination if they’re going to have to ride past it to find the nearest station and then retrace their steps on foot. And a glance at the bottom half of this station map shows that there’s some serious need for more station options in the neighborhoods. (New stations are in yellow.)

    So hey, that’s great news. And hey, there are a couple new stations near the Common and the Waterfront, too.

    New Station Alert: Egleston Square at Columbus Ave -- All 4 New JP-area stations operational

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday night, September 25th, the new Hubway Egleston Square at Columbus Ave station is now open. This station is a 15-dock station, located at Atherton and Washington across from the Egleston House of Pizza and just 2 blocks Northeast of the Egleston Square Peace Garden.


    All four of the new Jamaica-Plain area stations are now operational, with 64 docks.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Milk Street at India Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, September 25th, the new Hubway station on Milk Street at India Street is open. This station is a 19-dock station, located on Milk Street newar India Street, just two blocks inland from the Rings Fountain on the Greenway.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Hyde Square at Barbara Street in Jamaica Plain

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday, September 25th, our Hyde Square at Barbara Street station is now open. This station is a 15-dock station, located on Barbara Street one block south of the Hyde Square rotary, one block north of the Connolly Branch Library.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: JP Centre - Centre St at Myrtle St

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday, September 25th, our JP Centre - Centre St at Myrtle St station is now open and operational. This station is a 15-dock station, located on Centre St at Myrtle St adjacent to the Post Office and JP Licks.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Hubway's first station in Jamaica Plain, JP Monument - South Street at Centre Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday, September 25th, our JP Monument - South St at Centre St station is now open. This station is a 19-dock station, located where Centre and South Streets meet in front of the Monument. Please stay tuned for announcements of other JP-area stations.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: BIDMC - Brookline Ave at Burlington Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday, September 24th, 4:30pm, our BIDMC - Brookline at Burlington St station is now open. This station is a 15-dock station, located 2 blocks southwest of Fenway Park. This is a high-traffic area. As always, please be courteous and observe all traffic laws and safety rules.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Charles Street at Beacon Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday, September 24th, our Chalres Street at Beacon Street station is now open. This station is a 14-dock station, located on Beacon just West of Charles Street.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Hubway comes to the heart of Southie with new West Broadway @ Dorchester Ave station

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday, September 24th, our West Broadway and Dorchester Ave station is now open. This station is an 18-dock station, located on West Broadway at the intersection of Dorchester.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    The Cambridge Bicycle Committee's Annual Bow Tie Ride, Sunday, 9/29

    The Cambridge Bicycle Committee presents the 6th Bow Tie Ride

    Ever notice that the city of Cambridge is shaped like a bow tie? Come see for yourself, at the Cambridge Bow Tie Ride!

    The 13-mile tour through Cambridge starts at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway. Meet at 10:00 AM for orientation and leave promptly at 10:30 AM. The ride will finish back where it started, on the library grounds, about two hours later.

    Use a Hubway bike for the ride, and we’ll waive your overage fees (typically for rides over 30 minutes)! Visit the Cambridge Bikes website for more info.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    North End weighs in on new Salem Street bike lane

    This article was originally published by Janet Larsen on Boston.com on 8/28/2013

    Thanks to the work of Mayor Thomas Menino and Boston Bikes Director Nicole Freedman, Bicycling Magazine now rates Boston as one of the best biking cities. Yet, there are no bike lanes that penetrate the heart of one of the city’s top tourist destinations, the North End.

    The city plans to address this in mid-October when new, shared lane markings will be installed over one to three nights and span Salem Street from Cross Street to Charter Street, according to Boston Bikes, a division of the City of Boston founded in 2007 that oversees bicycle-advancement projects.

    Already the North End is bustling with bike traffic. The Cross Street and Hanover Street Hubway stop on Boston’s bike sharing program is one of the most frequented in the city with over 21,000 trips leaving from the station within its first two years, according to Boston Bikes. And a bike line runs around the North End from North Washington Street and Commercial Street to Cross Street and Atlantic Avenue.

    U.S. Bike-Sharing Fleet More than Doubles in 2013

    This article was originally published by Janet Larsen on TreeHugger.com on 8/28/2013

    The opening of the San Francisco Bay Area bike share on August 29, 2013, brings the combined fleet of shared bikes in the United States above 18,000, more than a doubling since the start of the year. The United States is now home to 34 modern bike-sharing programs that allow riders to easily make short trips on two wheels without having to own a bicycle. With a number of new programs in the works and planned expansions of existing programs, the U.S. fleet is set to double again by the end of 2014, at which point nearly 37,000 publicly shared bicycles will roll the streets.

    The largest bike share in the United States is in New York City, where some 6,000 bicycles are available at 332 stations in Manhattan and Brooklyn. The program opened at the end of May 2013, and in less than 3 months hit 2 million trips. On busy days, each bike gets checked out seven times or more, a remarkably high borrowing rate. The city ultimately hopes to expand the program to other boroughs and grow to 10,000 bikes.

    The other large bike-sharing debut in 2013 was in Chicago, where 1,500 Divvy bikes now grace the streets. The program hopes to double to 3,000 cycles by the end of the year, ultimately growing to 4,000 strong—reinforcing the city’s efforts to dramatically boost biking. In addition to making shared bikes readily accessible transit, Chicago plans to extend the path and trail network to within a half-mile of all residences.

    Before New York and Chicago came on the bike-sharing scene, Washington, DC, held America’s top spot. Its program has grown to over 2,000 bikes, spreading into neighboring communities. Transport planners from cities around the country have made the pilgrimage to Washington to ride one of the cherry-red Capital Bikeshare bikes and see firsthand how the popular program works. Since 2007, biking in the nation’s capital doubled to 3.5 percent of all commuter trips, and bike sharing has made it more convenient to travel the expanding web of marked cycle lanes.

    Other large bike shares include Nice Ride in Minneapolis and St. Paul (1,550 bikes), Hubway in the Boston area (1,100 bikes), and DecoBike Miami Beach (1,000 bikes). Aspen, Columbus, Fort Worth, and Salt Lake City are among the more than a dozen programs that opened in 2013, joining a list of cities that have enjoyed bike sharing for longer, including Denver, San Antonio, Chattanooga, Madison, and Fort Lauderdale.

    On the international scene, the United States is just catching Europe and Asia’s bike-sharing tailwind. Worldwide, more than half a million cycles can be picked up in well over 500 cities in 51 countries. Italy and Spain have the greatest number of programs, while China is home to two thirds of the global shared bike fleet.

    New York is the only American city to make it onto the list of the world’s 20 largest bike-sharing programs. In fact, five cities have more shared bikes than the entire U.S. fleet. Four of them are in China, where Wuhan reportedly has some 90,000 shared bikes for its 9 million people. Hangzhou has 69,750 bikes that are well integrated with that city’s mass transit.

    The world’s third largest bike share is Vélib’ in Paris, the first large-scale program to gain worldwide attention. Since its 2007 launch, riders have taken 173 million trips. According to the program, one of the nearly 24,000 Vélib’ bikes gets checked out every second of the day. Vélib’ claims to have the highest bike density among the world’s top programs, with one bike available for every 97 city residents.

    Within the next year, the U.S. bike-sharing fleet will have caught up with Paris. New entries in Florida could push the country past that mark, with launches expected in Miami (500 bikes, an expansion from Miami Beach), St. Petersburg (300 bikes), and Tampa (300 bikes). Phoenix is also hoping to launch a 500-bike program that will double in size as neighboring cities join in. Rollouts hoped for in 2014 include large offerings in Los Angeles (some 4,000 bikes) and San Diego (1,800 bikes), as well as 500+ bike programs in Portland (Oregon), Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and Seattle, along with a number of smaller markets.

    The new San Francisco Bay Area scheme is starting out relatively diffuse, with 700 bicycles split between San Francisco and other cities along the 50-mile rail line south to San Jose. Planners note that it ultimately could grow to a network of 10,000 bikes, better allowing rail riders to travel the first and last mile or so of their commute on two wheels. As communities continue to improve their biking infrastructure and as enthusiasm for an efficient, environmentally friendly, healthy, and enjoyable form of transportation grows, bike sharing has a bright future in the United States.

    How to Spend a Long Weekend in Gay Boston? Ride the Hubway!

    The following is an excerpt from an article originally published by Josh Middleton on Philly Mag on 8/21/2013

    Around the corner is Boston Common, an ideal entry point to the “Emerald Necklace,” a pristinely maintained, 1,100-acre chain of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, the man behind FDR Park. Rent a two-wheeler from Hubway and pedal the seven-mile path that crosses the entire city. You’ll ride over charming stone pedestrian bridges, past lily-padded lagoons and, eventually, find yourself deep in a red-,yellow- and burnt orange-leafed forest.

    Point your spokes toward Tremont Street in the South End for the true gay-Boston experience. Here, you’ll find legendary bars like Boston Eagle and Club Cafe, and the best gay-watching in the city at popular brunch spots Tremont 647 and Francesca’s Espresso Bar. If shopping is on your agenda, Back Bay’s Newbury Street is the promenade.

    Boston is also one of the nation’s premier cultural hubs… Read more at Philly Mag

    Bike-Share Is Key to Closing the Cycling Gender Gap

    This article was originally published by Sarah Goodyear on The Atlantic Cities on 8/19/2013

    Do a lot of women ride bicycles in your city? If so, you’ve probably got a healthy bicycling culture where people in general feel safe getting on the bike to ride for transportation and recreation.

    The importance of women as an “indicator species” for biking has been known for years. But the United States doesn’t look so great when it comes to this particular statistic. Only 24 percent of bike trip were made by women in the U.S. in 2009, compared with 55 percent in the Netherlands and 49 percent in Germany.

    Women Bike, a new initiative from the League of American Bicyclists aims to close the biking gender gap in the U.S. It launched this month with the publication of a report, “Women on a Roll,” [PDF] that puts together the numbers on women biking in a way that hasn’t been done before.

    “There’s been a lack of collective knowledge on key data points,” says Carolyn Szczepanski, director of communications for Women Bike. “We’re really trying to position ourselves as a hub of information.”

    The data in the report shows a lot of pent-up desire for biking among women. Among the statistics:

    • 82 percent of women have a positive view of bicyclists.
    • From 2003 to 2012, the number of women participating in bicycling rose 20 percent.
    • 60 percent of bicycle owners between the ages of 17 and 28 are women.

    So why aren’t more women out there riding? The report focuses on what it calls the “five Cs”: comfort, convenience, confidence, consumer products, and community. The numbers show that the lack of sufficient safe bike infrastructure plays a major role in keeping women off the streets. And in places where bike lanes go in, women use them. Local surveys show dramatic increases in female ridership on streets with dedicated cycling facilities:

    • In New Orleans, female ridership went up 115 percent on South Carrollton Street after a bike lane was installed.
    • In Philadelphia, the presence of a bike lane increased female use by 276 percent.
    • In New York in 2011, 15 percent of riders on a street without bike lanes were women, compared with 32 percent on a street with bike lanes.
    • 53 percent of women say they would ride more if there were more bike lanes and paths.

    The report also looks at the way that women’s travel patterns tend to differ from men, with women making more trips and more multi-stop trips; the importance of better bike parking and confidence-building resources such as bike repair classes; the need for better consumer service for women at bike shops; and the role that a cycling community can play in getting women out on the bike.

    There’s one place where the gender disparity between men and women in cycling is leveling off, and that, tellingly, is bike share.

    A 2012 study showed that 43 percent of bike-share members in North America were women. In Washington, D.C., fully 54 percent of Capital Bikeshare members were women in 2012. In Boston, 47 percent of Hubway members are women.

    Szczepanski says that makes sense because bike-share programs remove many of the barriers that women commonly cite. The systems make biking easy to access and convenient to multiple destinations. You can ride the bikes in regular clothes. They’re simple to adjust and comfortable to ride. And you feel like you’re part of a community when you’re on a bike-share bike. You also don’t have to deal with the frequently off-putting snobbery and machismo still found at too many bike shops.

    Bike-share systems, it turns out, allow Americans a little glimpse of some of the conditions that exist in countries such as Germany and the Netherlands, where the cycling gender gap doesn’t exist. “All of those things are represented in a microcosmic way,” says Szczepanski.

    More and more cities in the U.S. are getting bike-share. Chicago rolled out its 4,000-bike system this summer and the San Francisco Bay Area will be the next to launch, at the end of August (albeit with a mere 700 bikes). As bike share becomes an integrated mode of transportation around the country – and as bike retailers realize that women represent a huge and underserved market—the gender balance just might start to shift here in a real and lasting way.

    Hubway celebrating Earth Day by helping Red Sox present a carbon neutral game

    This press release was originally published on RedSox.com on April 22nd, 2014.

    Red Sox observe Earth Day presented by National Grid, with carbon neutral game

    As a way to observe Earth Day presented by National Grid, and as part of Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s Greenovate Boston initiative to reduce the city’s greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, tonight’s 6:35 p.m. Boston Red Sox game against the Oakland A’s will be carbon neutral.

    In order to achieve a zero carbon footprint of the game, the club will purchase renewable energy credits to offset all emissions generated from the game, including electric and gas consumption, waste disposal, and fan, employee, and player transportation.

    The renewable energy credits will be purchased from New England-based sources including: the Falmouth Academy solar array in Falmouth, MA; Country Curtains solar array in Lee, MA; North Coast Seafood’s solar array in South Boston, MA; and a collection of Maine hydro facilities.

    Additionally, employees from the New England Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will volunteer with Fenway Park’s Poland Spring Green Team during the game. The Poland Spring Green Team is a corps of up to 40 volunteers, typically college students, who collect recyclables throughout the seating bowl and educate fans on the importance of recycling.

    The “greening” of Fenway Park has been ongoing since 2008 when the club created the Poland Spring Green Team and installed solar thermal panels at Fenway Park - the first professional sports team to do so. Even the field maintenance features irrigation timing and diagnostic controls to minimize water and fertilizer use. The grounds crew also uses biodiesel-powered lawn mowers.

    “EPA applauds the Red Sox for making a long-term commitment to applying the lessons of Earth Day to their season-long operations at Fenway Park,” said Curt Spalding, Regional Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s New England office. “Tonight’s effort is especially notable, as the Sox will actually play a carbon-neutral game. Nowadays, saying ‘Go Sox’ refers both to the team on the field, and to the forward-leaning organization behind the scenes.”

    The Red Sox and Greenovate Boston encourage fans to participate in the effort to green Fenway Park by taking public transportation or using Hubway, Boston’s bike sharing system, and making use of blue recycling bins throughout the ballpark.

    “This past week’s events have shown us that Bostonians always stand together,” said Brian Swett, the City of Boston’s Chief of Environment and Energy. “Greenovate Boston is a community-driven movement, and we thank the Red Sox and the EPA for their work and leadership in making this movement stronger.”

    In 2012 the Red Sox were recognized with an Achievement Award from the EPA and Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection for their demonstrated commitment to improving sustainable food management practices. Last year, the club composted more than 100 tons of organic material, and recycled more than 275 tons of plastic, aluminum, and paper. This past offseason, hand dryers were installed in ballpark restrooms in an effort to conserve trees.

    Cities seek solutions amid mandatory helmet law debate

    This article was originally published by Justin Bilow on Bikeshare.com on April 20th, 2013.

    As bike share programs pop up in cities around the world, some places face a serious roadblock to implementing these programs. The problem isn’t a lack of funding, adequate technology, or even public support. The problem, according to some advocates and critics, is bike helmets. Read the full article here.

    Hubway returns

    Boston Bikes Director, Nicole Freedman, discusses the 2013 season relaunch on WGBH News.

    System Alert - Hubway to Reopen Soon

    The Hubway bikeshare network has begun to install stations in preparation of the system relaunch for 2013! Over the coming weeks roughly five stations per day will be installed and when a critical mass of stations are on the ground, the system will reopen. Relaunch date TBD, but likely later in March (weather dependent). Please check out our Twitter feed and Facebook page for up to the minute information and thanks for your support of Hubway!

    A Hubway Tour of Boston with NHL Star

    Boston Bruins player Andrew Ference takes a spin around the City with Kris Carter, interim Director of Mayor Menino’s Boston Bike’s program:

    How to Use the Hubway Bike Share Program (produced by Harvard Commuter Choice)

    Petition Urges Agreement, Compromise on Hubway Decision

    This article was originally published by Matt M. Casey in the the Charlestown Patch on July 31st, 2012.

    Petition on Change.org aims to gather 100 signatories in an effort to get Hubway to come to Charlestown as soon as possible.

    They don’t care who’s wrong, they just want to see Hubway come to Charlestown.

    Charlestown resident Nathan Blanchet started a Change.org petition Monday night to urge the Charlestown Neighborhood Council, Boston Bikes and Hubway to come to an agreement on bringing stations .

    Plans to bring the bike-sharing system to Charlestown this summer last week when members of the council deadlocked on a vote to approve a second location in town. Council members were concerned that the location near the intersection of Warren Street and Chelsea Street would not appropriately serve the entire community.

    Blanchet, in his petition letter, acknowledged those concerns.

    “The two proposed locations are not perfect from all perspectives, and more will be needed in future expansions,” Blanchet wrote. “We understand and applaud the Charlestown Neighborhood Council representatives who voiced these fairness concerns. We also encourage Boston Bikes and Hubway to expand the subsidized membership program, and advertise that program when starting in Charlestown.”

    By 10 p.m. Monday, the petition had already accumulated 29 signatures on its way to gather 100.

    Blanchet, commenting on Charlestown Patch in response to our article covering the decision, called the outcome “very disappointing.”

    “This should have been an easy decision in my view,” Blanchet wrote. “I hope Mr. Whelan and colleagues can find a way to reconsider, and quickly.”

    Update to Bicycle Rental Agreement

    In our efforts to continually improve the Hubway service for our members, several adjustments have been made to our Bicycle Rental Agreement.  We invite you to review the document.

    For any questions you may have, please call us at 1-855-4HUBWAY(448-2929) or email customerservice@thehubway.com.  Thank you for your support!

    Boston to Expand Hubway Bike-Share After Brilliant First Season

    This article was originally published by Angie Schmitt on the DC.StreetsBlog on November 29th, 2011.

    They’ve logged more than 140,000 rides over just four months. And now Boston’s brand new Hubway bike sharing system is packing it in for the cold New England winter.

    Boston’s Hubway bike sharing system is celebrating its successful first season with an expansion. Photo: The Boston Globe
    But when it returns in the spring, it will be expanding, adding stations in Cambridge, Somerville and Brookline. In total, the barely four-month-old bike sharing system will add 30 stations and roughly 300 bicycles — a 50 percent increase, according to a report from The Boston Globe.

    Hubway has come out of the gate roaring, surpassing early ridership figures from some of the country’s most well known bike sharing systems, according to the paper.

    “Its first 2½ months, Hubway recorded 100,000 station-to-station rides, significantly eclipsing the pace of similar systems in Minneapolis (where Nice Ride needed six months to reach that mark) and Denver (where B-cycle needed 7½ months).”

    And it seems Boston’s neighboring cities and towns were feeling left out of the bike sharing excitement. Jeff Levine, director of planning and community development in Brookline, told the Globe that the “number one question” he gets is, “When is Hubway coming to Brookline?”

    Local news site BostInno credited the system with helping make Boston more bike friendly overall. Writer Lisa DeCanio said that despite some lingering ambivalence about biking in Boston, growing enthusiasm cleared the way for the removal of 71 parking spots on Massachusetts Avenue to make way for a bike lane. She called the Hubway a “shining success,” noting that even the Bruins have gotten on board, “with players riding to and from practice.”

    Hearing the news, Network blog Boston Biker was cheerfully smug.

    “Woo! And this after everyone thought the streets would run red with the blood of a thousand dead Hubway cyclists … seems that Boston city streets are not [as] rough and tumble for cyclists as they used to be.”

    Hubway was funded in part with a $3 million grant from the Federal Transit Administration. The Boston region’s Metropolitan Area Planning Council is overseeing the expansion.

    Hubway to branch out next spring

    This article was originally published by Eric Moskowitz in the Boston Globe on November 28th, 2011.

    After recording 140,000 trips in four months, Boston’s European-style bicycle-sharing system is expanding across the Charles River, with stations planned for Cambridge and Somerville after a winter hiatus.

    Cambridge officials said they hope to concentrate 20 stations in the most densely populated swaths of their city, and Somerville expects to usher in eight stations.

    Back on the Boston side of the Charles, Brookline is working on two stations it hopes to open soon after the Cambridge and Somerville expansion.

    “The number one question I get in my office overall is, ‘When is Hubway coming to Brookline?’ ’’ said Jeff Levine, director of planning and community development in Brookline, which intends to introduce stations at Coolidge Corner and Brookline Village.

    Read the full article here.

    The Boston Bruins Love Hubway and You Should, Too

    This article was originally published by Ryan Durling in the BostInno on October 11th, 2011.

    A piece last week by Lisa D about Hubway, the new bike-sharing program in Boston, earned an awful lot of attention, which I’m pretty sure focused more on her unwillingness to carry a helmet than it did on the actual program itself (“It’s so nerdy,” she said about the daunting task - have at her in the comments).

    Being the investigative journalist that I am, I of course set to the streets to find out just how cool or uncool Hubway is, and the verdict - at least according to Boston Bruins defenseman and Assistant Captain Andrew Ference - is that it’s “awesome.”

    Ference, who’s made a name for himself in the NHL as a connoisseur of all things environmental, fully endorses the program.

    “I’ve got a Hubway right across the street from my house,” the Calgary, Alberta native told me. “I’ve got my own bike, but it’s awesome.

    “Some of the guys on the team have used it a lot already, just to see how much it’s being used it proves the point that there’s a desire for it. It used to be just me and Z (Bruins Captain Zdeno Chara) biking after practice but now there’s six or seven guys after practice.”

    Ference admits that maybe Boston isn’t the best place for novice bikers (“It’s not the safest streets for it,” he said), but that nevertheless, it’s great to see the program being utilized by so many.

    And many are using the program. According to a report from Boston Magazine, Hubway had its 100,000th ride last weekend - an average of over 10,000 rides per week. The average ride is just over one mile, and over 115,000 miles (nearly five times the circumference of Earth) have been ridden on Hubway bikes since late July.

    Remarkably, 48 percent of users are not local, which can only mean that the bad news about the MBTA is spreading.

    Hubway isn’t just a great idea, it’s a safe and practical one, too. The design of the three-gear bikes allows riders to carry purses or briefcases, and splash guards are in place to protect the trousers of riders in the event that they get caught in less-than-favorable weather. Additionally, front- and rear-wheel LED flashers make the bikes easy to find in the dark when they’re in use on the roads.

    Hubway’s director of marketing - or as he prefers to call himself, the Hype Master - Brogan Graham couldn’t be happier to hear the reviews.

    “The Bruins do use the program a lot,” he told me as we biked along the Seaport on a brisk fall morning. “We offer some of our users who utilize the program heavily a discount, and I’ve told them that we could take $80 or so off of their costs,” he said before looking down quizzically.

    “Maybe they’re not too concerned about saving $80.”