News

New Key Design!

For our 4th birthday, we got new keys! The newer key is a bit sleeker, lighter, easier to get onto your keychain, and is designed to hold up longer. Check the picture out below.

PLEASE NOTE: These new keys will be distributed to new members. Your existing key (a sense of pride, right?) will continue to work as they always have.


[Metro Boston] Hubway celebrates fourth anniversary, plans extentions

The following article was originally published by Kayla Sweeney in Metro Boston on July 28th, 2015.

Today marks four years since Hubway launched in Boston, and the bike sharing system is celebrating with a massive expansion.

Hubway has more than 139 stations, but the officials said they plan to add 20 more throughout Boston and Cambridge during the next half of the 2015 season. 

Hubway Spokesman Benjy Kantor told Metro that while the locations of the new stations have not been determined yet, “there will be hub-bub surrounding the extension later in the season,” so bikers should stay tuned.

Kantor told Metro that they weren’t hosting a big celebration for their anniversary because of the extension plans and the buzz that will surround that later this year. However, Hubway officials will plan a collaborative special or celebration within the cities that Hubway resides, he said.

Cyclists may also be looking at new lighter, sleeker bikes, but Kantor said the cities have yet to confirm the upgrade.

Since 2011, Hubway users have offset more than 3 million tons of carbon, the system reported. Bikers can also be collaboratively proud of themselves for burning almost 200 million calories in the past four years.

The website offers an ongoing statistics list on their website along with ways bikers can track their own usage. To join the movement or for more information visit http://www.thehubway.com/home

Hubway Turns Four!

Hubway launched on July 28th, 2011, with 60 stations and 600 bikes. Four trips around the sun* later, and the system is made up of 139 stations (140 really, but one has not been deployed this year due to construction) and 1300 bicycles, with further expansion expected later this year along with Hubway’s 4 millionth trip! If you take that trip, you could win a $250 gift card to New Balance!


*4.6M miles is approximately 1/20th of the way to the sun, though we’d recommend turning back before it gets too hot. We’d still take Boston winters over global warming, which coincidentally Hubway riders are doing their part to fight by offsetting all that carbon.

Today is Ernest Hemingway's birthday. He rode bikes.


Hip Hip...

HOORAY!


[Earth Day Network] What's Holding Back Bike-Share?

The following article was originally published on the Earth Day Network blog on July 14th, 2015.

Bike-sharing programs have been touted internationally as a way to ease the problems urban areas are experiencing. Advocates have claimed that these programs decrease traffic congestion and CO2 emissions while increasing riders health and their connection to the city. However, an article published last month by Miriam Ricci in Research in Transportation Business and Management. Ricci saw a lack of data to back up some of the suspected benefits of bike-share programs.

There is a lack of data on all fronts, which is holding back improvements to bike-share systems. Little data on CO2 emissions prevented by bike-sharing exists, and as Ricci points out, the rebalancing schemes the many programs have made them carbon neutral or even put them in the red. Without better data on where these systems are failing, and what the real benefits are.

People are beginning to notice this lack of data and are taking it into their own hands. Companies such as Ford Motor Company are starting programs to see how bicycles interact in cities by placing small trackers on bike frames. Likewise, the strengths of bike-share programs need to be emphasized instead of using claims that may not be true. Ricci found that many claims bike-share advocates have made were, in fact, true. Programs increase economic development near bike-share locations, as was the case in Washington DC. To take bike-sharing into its next steps, we need to gather more data, use it correctly and substantiate our claims to redefine urban transportation. We are off to a good start, but we need to keep the momentum rolling.

[Next City] Have you heard about that awesome new bike-share diet?

The following article was originally published by Josh Cohen in Next City on July 13th, 2015.

In a survey of 3,100 Capital Bikeshare users in Washington, D.C., 30 percent of riders indicated they lost weight thanks to the program. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)


For the last several years, bike-share has been the darling of U.S. bike advocates and city officials. It has been promoted as a boon to urban transportation that will help reduce congestion, normalize public perceptions of bicycling, improve health, bolster economies, reduce CO2 emissions, improve safety and more.

Though there is likely some truth in those claims, they are often backed up by anecdotal evidence rather than hard data. It’s a problem that has the potential to undermine bike-share’s explosive expansion if the purported benefits turn out to be less than promised.

“Bike-share attracts money … and it’s very popular so every city wants to have one to be cool,” says Miriam Ricci, a researcher at the University of the West of England’s Centre for Transport and Society. “I started to read lots of articles, academic papers and blogs about bike-sharing … and I was perplexed that there was a lot of hype and enthusiasm and lots of claims about CO2 savings and so on but very little or robust evidence to back it up.”

Ricci delved deeper into bike-share claims and evidence in the June issue of Research in Transportation Business and Management. For “Bike sharing: A review of evidence on impacts and processes of implementation and operation,” Ricci analyzed existing studies and surveys for evidence that supported claims that bike-share shifts people’s mode-share choices, creates new cyclists and diversifies cycling, has economic and health impacts, reduces congestion and single-occupancy vehicle use, and reduces carbon emissions. She also looked at the processes by which cities set up and operate bike-share systems.

It turns out that bike-share supporters aren’t grounded in hyperbole. Ricci found evidence that supported many of the claimed benefits including economic and health impact, new cyclist creation, and more. But there’s also a serious lack of proof that bike-sharing programs reduce congestion (in some cases, they may even increase congestion), get people out of their cars or help the environment.

One of the most common reasons cited for launching bike-share is to increase the number of bicyclists in a city. According to Ricci’s paper, a recent survey of London bike-share’s active users found that 78 percent started to ride or ride more as a result of the system. Similarly, 68.4 percent of sampled bike-share users in Dublin claimed, “not to have cycled for their current trip prior to the launch of Dublinbikes” and 63.4 say they purchased a private bicycle after using bike-share.

Ricci also found encouraging evidence that shows bike-share is good for user health, unsurprisingly. A study of Valencia University students commuting with the Valenbisi system found that they got half their recommended weekly exercise on the bikes and saw a small reduction of body mass index. In a survey of 3,100 Capital Bikeshare users in Washington, D.C., 31.5 percent reported stress reduction and about 30 percent indicated they lost weight as a result of bike-share.

Though evidence is limited, there are two studies showing that bike-share can benefit local economies to some extent. Academic research on Capital Bikeshare’s potential economic benefits found 23 percent of surveyed users spent more money because they used CaBi. Another study of Nice Ride Minnesota found that bike-share stations generated “an average of $1.29 per week, which would equate to U.S. $29,000 over the season April to November” for nearby businesses.

Part of the claim that bike-share will increase the number of cyclists is that it will help diversify ridership beyond the white, middle- to upper-class men who often dominate cycling’s demographics. Ricci did not find much supporting evidence. She writes that bike-share systems, “seem to attract a particular profile of user: male, white, employed and … younger, more affluent, more educated and more likely to be already engaged in cycling independently of bike-sharing.”

Congestion reduction is perhaps bike-share’s biggest selling point. If bike-share increases the number of cyclists and frequency with which they ride, it makes sense that it would reduce traffic congestion. But, Ricci found that bike-share users don’t bike instead of driving so much as they bike instead of taking transit or walking. She writes that, “although Dublinbikes users reported considerable behavioral change, the prevailing trend showed a large modal shift (80.2 percent) from sustainable modes of travel to the bicycle, particularly from walking (45.6 percent) and including transfer from bus (25.8 percent) and rail (8.8 percent).” Still, nearly 20 percent of Dublinbikes users say they now drive less. Other European and American cities saw far lower rates of mode shift. In London only 2 percent of users shifted away from cars. In Lyon, France, and Washington, D.C., it’s 7 percent.

Perhaps most surprising, Ricci says bike-share can actually contribute to congestion with the vans and trucks they use to redistribute bikes in the system. Those motorized fleets also harm bike-share’s environmental benefit. Ricci found zero evidence that bike-share leads to any significant reduction of carbon emissions.

Ricci says, “If you put bike-sharing together with policies that strongly discourage car ownership and promote active travel and quality transit then it can be part of that picture and can contribute to the solution. [But] in isolation it won’t solve the pressing problems of air pollution, congestion, climate change … .”

Despite some of the questionable claims, Ricci says, “Bike-sharing can indeed be a good thing for those who use it.”

But, she thinks her study is proof that bike-share is due for more robust research that will provide good data for bike-share supporters to use. It is perhaps unsurprising, given that a lack of good data on ridership and demographics is a problem that continues to plague bike advocacy in general.

Ricci writes, “A commitment to better, consistent and transparent monitoring and evaluation is necessary if bike-sharing is to be considered an effective element of sustainable urban mobility strategies.”

Until then, she thinks that bike-share supporters would be better off sticking to claims for which they have real evidence.

“Bike-sharing can be really good for some aspects, like improved accessibility, better journey experience, faster and cheaper travel. These should be the claims that promoters should focus on.”

[Sampan] Boston Public Market Announces Food Rescue and Composting Programs

The following announcement was originally published in Sampan, a bilingual Chinese-English newspaper, on July 9th, 2015.

Upcoming Local Food Market Will Donate Leftover Food to Community Partners, Compost Food Scraps

BOSTON — The Boston Public Market today announced a set of partnerships with local food rescue organizations, community partners, and a composting company that will allow the upcoming local food market to combat hunger in Boston, ensure convenience for the Market’s farmers and food producers, and reduce food waste.

The Boston Public Market will house over 35 farmers, fishermen, and food producers from Massachusetts and throughout New England, selling items such as farm fresh produce; meat and poultry; eggs; milk and cheese; fish and shellfish; bread and baked goods; flowers; and an assortment of specialty and prepared foods. The Boston Public Market, located at 100 Hanover Street above the Haymarket MBTA station, will be open Wednesday — Sunday, 8 a.m. — 8 p.m, beginning on July 30.

FOOD RESCUE:

Under the newly-announced food rescue program at the Market, vendors can contribute leftover and underutilized food that would otherwise be discarded to the market’s non-profit food rescue partners: The Greater Boston Food Bank and Lovin’ Spoonfuls. The food will then be distributed to places like The Daily Table in Dorchester, Haley House Bakery Café’s weekly “Community Tables” dinner, the New England Center for Homeless Veterans, Boston Rescue Mission, Rosie’s Place, and the Pine Street Inn, which are all GBFB member agencies and receive the majority of their food from them. The food can then be prepared and served to those in need.

“It’s incredibly important to us at the Boston Public Market that everyone in our community has access to healthy, local food,” said Boston Public Market CEO Liz Morningstar. “Through these partnerships, we can make sure that every bit of food in the Market is used by someone who needs it, rather than simply being thrown away.”

The Boston Public Market already enjoys strong, multi-year relationships with several local food rescue organizations, and the Market’s two seasonal outdoor farmers markets currently donate surplus food. The Market plans to continue these existing relationships while adding new ones, rotating the community organizations that receive donations on a monthly basis.

“The Greater Boston Food Bank is pleased to be able to connect several of our local member agencies, including the New England Center for Homeless Veterans, Rosie’s Place and the Pine Street Inn, with the new Boston Public Market,” said Catherine D’Amato, President and CEO of The Greater Boston Food Bank. “Working with like-minded organizations to reduce waste is in keeping with our mission to end hunger here in eastern Massachusetts. Partnerships like this reflect The Greater Boston Food Bank’s longstanding commitment to provide healthy food to those in need while promoting healthy communities.”

“Lovin’ Spoonfuls is thrilled to extend our powerful partnership with The Boston Public Market,” said Ashley Stanley, Founder/Executive Director of Lovin’ Spoonfuls. “Lovin’ Spoonfuls had been rescuing incredible local product from the Dewey Square Farmers Market for many years, keeping it out of landfills and distributing it to those in need. With the exciting addition of the Boston Public Market, we are proud to connect the bounty of fresh, healthy and local fare to underserved communities.”

COMPOSTING:

Food scraps and other organic material from Market vendors that cannot be donated will be composted through a partnership with CERO, a Boston worker-owned cooperative company that offers waste reduction services. CERO delivers organic waste to composting facilities, where it is turned into rich soil for growing tomorrow’s food.

“CERO Cooperative takes pride in our role as environmental stewards creating good jobs supporting green businesses,” said Lor Holmes, a CERO worker-owner. “We appreciate our partnerships with the Boston Public Market, grocers, restaurants, growers and gleaners as we all join together to build prosperous sustainable communities.”

The Boston Public Market is a 28,000 square foot permanent, year-round, self-sustaining market that provides fresh local food to consumers from all income levels and nourishes our community.

The Market is located in downtown Boston’s emerging Market District, next to the Haymarket pushcart vendors and the historic Blackstone Block, and it sits on the Rose Kennedy Greenway and the Freedom Trail. 100 Hanover Street also contains the Boston RMV branch, entrances to the Haymarket MBTA station, and a parking garage. Two Hubway stations are located nearby.

The Boston Public Market is the only locally-sourced market of its kind in the United States. Everything sold at the Market is produced or originates in New England. Boston Public Market vendors are proud to accept SNAP/EBT for all eligible market products.

The Market is a civic resource, educating the public about food sources, nutrition, and preparation. In addition to more than 35 vendor stalls, the Boston Public Market includes a 3,200 square foot demonstration kitchen, programmed by The Trustees of Reservations, the Market’s lead programming partner, with opportunities such as hands-on cooking demos, lectures, family activities, exercise classes, training and community events.

[Boston Globe] Hubway asks naked bike riders to ‘please wear clothes'

The following article was originally published by Steve Annear in the Boston Globe on July 9th, 2015.

photo credit: Dina Rudick / Globe Staff


Hubway has no affiliation with World Naked Bike Ride Boston, but the company is cautiously aware that some participants could use its bikes.

If you’re riding your own bike at this weekend’s sixth-annual naked ride through Boston, feel free to go au naturel. But if you’re taking a Hubway bike, give the next rider a break, the company pleaded Wednesday.

“For the love of all that is decent, please consider the other riders,” a spokesman for the bike-share company harrumphed in a light-hearted statement.

“While there isn’t anything in the Hubway user agreement that explicitly prohibits riding naked, for safety and sanitary reasons we strongly encourage the wearing of clothing while riding,” said spokesman Benjy Kantor.

Hubway has no affiliation with World Naked Bike Ride Boston, but the company is aware that some participants could use its bikes. It happened in 2013.

The ride, hosted by local advocates, is held in 70 cities each year. Attendees ride naked — or mostly so — to “expose the unique dangers” cyclists face during their daily commutes and to protest people’s dependence on cars and oil, according to the event’s website.

Boston’s ride begins Saturday in Cambridge, where participants undress before setting off on the adventure, and winds through Somerville and Boston. The ride’s Facebook event page has garnered more than 500 likes. Last year, 300 people joined the bare-naked brigade.

Noting that nudity is not required, ride organizers underscored Hubway’s plea.

“Wear underwear, they are public bikes, after all,” organizers said in a statement.

#TakeHubway To The Fireworks


#TakeHubway To The Esplanade


#TakeHubway To The Pops


[SYSTEM ALERT] Tonight's (6/30) software update, partial system outage 11pm-1am

SYSTEM ALERT: Beginning Tuesday, June 30th, at approximately 11:00pm, and continuing through Wednesday, July 1st, at 1am, Hubway will be conducting an update to the operational software that powers the system. While key-holding members (annual & monthly) will be able to rent bikes during this 2-hour span, here are how the system will be affected at that time:

  • No card-payment rentals (24-hour & 72-hour memberships) will be available at Hubway stations.
  • Members will not be able to log into their online account. Once the update is complete, you’ll be able to access all of your account history again.
  • Station and dock information may not be accurate on any website, map, or mobile app. Once the update is complete, the accurate info will return.
  • “Time credits” and other features will not be available at Hubway station kiosks.

Every effort will be made to minimize the disruption this may cause, and we do not anticipate this affecting a large volume of riders. We thank you in advance for your patience as we work to improve Hubway.


If you have any questions, please reach Hubway customer service by calling 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929) or writing to customerservice@thehubway.com. Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

[Boston Globe] Public bike counter tracks cyclists cruising through Cambridge

The following article was originally published by Nicole Dungca in the Boston Globe on June 27th, 2015.

photo credit: Matthew J. Lee / Globe Staff


Cambridge has one of the highest percentages of bike commuters in Greater Boston — and now, the city has a way to show it off.

If you find yourself biking down Broadway Street in Kendall Square, you can now check out how many cyclists came before you that day. The city recently installed a bike counter that started on Tuesday displaying the number of cyclists who passed through the area, according to city spokeswoman Cara Seiderman.

The new contraption, which displays in big green numerals the daily count of cyclists who have passed the spot, will supplement the city’s bike census, taken every two years. During those counts, employees spread out over 17 locations for four hours and record the cyclists they see. The city then extrapolates that data to come up with the number who pedal through the area.

Seiderman said they won’t be doing away with the manual count, but officials hope the new bike counter will be more accurate and easier.

“We know that a lot of people are traveling by bicycle in Cambridge and that the numbers have been increasing for more than a decade,” City Manager Richard C. Rossi said in a statement.

Officials think the counter is a way to show how many people are out biking, and making sure people know “bicyclists count.” But Seiderman said they are also excited about the valuable pieces of data they’ll be able to collect.

“If you can get 24/7 data, you have a much better picture of what the patterns are,” she said. “We can see if they’re biking year-round or biking through the rain.”

Officials believe the counter is the first of its kind in the state. With it, Cambridge joins the ranks of such bike-friendly cities as Portland, Ore., and Montreal. The counter from the Montreal-based Eco-Counter company was funded by a $25,000 grant from the Helen and William Mazer Foundation.

In three days, the counter had already ticked off about 6,000 bikes, according to Seiderman. Don’t expect to see that big green number skyrocket into the hundreds of thousands: The machine resets at midnight, ensuring a fresh daily count. A less prominent estimate of the annual bike tally will also be displayed.

MEMBER PERK: $5 off Rock & Blues Concert Cruise tickets!


The best way to see a band on the water in Boston just got even better for Hubway members!

Join us on either (or both!) of the final two Rock and Blues Concert Cruises. If you’ve never been on one of the cruises, now’s your chance to see some of Boston’s best music while enjoying a beautiful day out on Boston Harbor aboard the Provincetown II.

Get your tickets in advance—Hubway members get $5 off by using promo code HUBWAY at checkout!

There are only two cruises remaining this season!


Kingsley Flood and Parsonsfield
Sunday, July 12th
Boarding begins at 2pm, cruise departs at 3pm
from the World Trade Center Pier, Seaport Blvd, Boston
Hubway stations conveniently nearby!

With “signature high energy” (Rolling Stone) and a live show that “could thrill Folsom Prison in ‘58 or CBGB in ‘76” (Boston Herald), Boston and Washington D.C.-based Kingsley Flood began 2015 with lofty goals: release two EPs and a full-length. The ambitious volume of output recognizes that the music business has changed and moved on from the era of the traditional album cycle. It also represents a shift in leader Naseem Khuri’s songwriting, channeling his personal journey as a Palestinian-American trying hard to do good and repeatedly coming up short. Parsonsfield is a five-piece Americana band from Connecticut that infuses a rowdy, rock-’n’-roll spirit into its bluegrass and folk influences, blowing away any preconception of what

Purchase tickets here.


Power of Love w/special guests New York’s Finest
Sunday, July 26th
Boarding begins at 12pm-Noon, cruise departs at 1pm
from the World Trade Center Pier, Seaport Blvd, Boston
Hubway stations conveniently nearby!

Power of Love formed in 2012 with one simple goal: to be the best Huey Lewis & The News cover band you … or anyone else … has ever heard. Featuring a five-piece line-up and a full horn section, The Power of Love boasts an impressive collection of Boston indie rock and punk rock stalwarts (including members and former members of Big D and the Kid’s Table, The Fatal Flaw, This Blue Heaven, Razors in the Night, Mount Peru Lannen and more). PoL’s live show is no ironic, tongue-in-cheek takedown of Huey Lewis, nor is it a slavish tribute act. The band has the pure musicianship to honor the original songs and their arrangements, while still attacking the material with a raw rock and roll ferocity. Police tribute “New York’s Finest” opens.

Purchase tickets here.

Remember to use promo code HUBWAY to receive $5 discount on each ticket.

[Jamaica Plain Gazette] Bikes and Wi-Fi among youth budget priorities

The following article was originally published in the Jamaica Plain Gazette on June 19th, 2015.

More Hubway bikes and free Wi-Fi. A renovated school gym. And more water-bottle refilling stations in parks like the one pioneered at Jamaica Pond.

Those are the City budget priorities chosen by a vote of more than 2,500 Boston youths in Mayor Martin Walsh’s annual Youth Participatory Budgeting Vote, according to a City press release.

Debuting last year with Walsh’s new Youth Lead the Change initiative, the process allows Boston youths ages 12 to 25 to vote on how to allocate $1 million on various budget proposals from a list also developed by youths. Organized in partnership with the New York-based nonprofit the Participatory Budgeting Project, the process allowed for voting at such locations as schools and T stations.

Expansion of the popular Hubway bike-rental system to more neighborhoods is budgeted at $101,600. Expanding the City’s “Wicked Free Wi-Fi” program is budgeted at $119,000.

Renovating the gym at Roxbury’s Boston Latin Academy is another youth priority, budgeted at $475,000.

The youths also like the idea of the water stations in parks. Local City Councilor Matt O’Malley got a combo water fountain and refill station installed by a private corporation at Jamaica Pond Park in 2013. Young voters pegged $260,000 to install more stations on Boston Common and in parks in Roslindale, South Boston and West Roxbury.

[The National] Emirati cyclists hope to inspire women to work out during Ramadan

The following artcile was originally published by Ramola Talwar Badam in The National on June 13th, 2015.

DUBAI // A group of female Emirati cyclists will be on their bikes during Ramadan hoping to motivate others to exercise after breaking their fast.

While many view the holy month as a time to slow their daily routine and even stop working out, bank manager Masooma Ali is turning it up a gear in preparation for a 70-kilometre road race on July 3.

“This is my goal, to get more girls into cycling. I’m trying to promote this sport for girls,” said Ms Ali, who is riding 50km a day as she trains for the Nad Al Sheba cycling championship, a race that takes place in the evening.

“Cycling is not very common in our culture, and girls normally go to the gym or train indoors. So you really have to convince others to take up cycling.”

She advised women not to overeat at iftar and work out to improve fitness and nutrition levels. “Last year, I raced for fun but this year I’m taking it seriously. You become conscious about what you’re eating because it affects training, so I make sure to have salad and proteins. In the UAE we tend to eat fried foods for iftar. I feel we stuff ourselves and this is the wrong way. During Ramadan we need exercise even if it’s a one-hour walk to feel fresh.”

Ms Ali recently attended a nutrition workshop organised by Liv Cycling, a store dedicated to female cyclists. The participants heard valuable tips about eating small meals, the need for hydration, exercising two hours after a meal and adding rice, chicken, fish, whole grains and vegetables to their diet.

More workshops are planned this summer with the next focusing on hydration and electrolyte management, said Emma Woodcock, who represents the store. She cautioned those who do not train regularly not to overdo it.

“This is not a time to be pushing yourself hard. You can do strength training indoors like putting your bike on an indoor trainer for short workouts.”

Asma Al Janahi, an Emirati computer engineering student, hopes women will be encouraged to cycle when they see her group out in Al Barsha park, Jumeirah and around town.

“We are planning to do late evening rides during Ramadan,” said Ms Al Janahi, co-founder of UAE Cycling Girls, which has more than a dozen riders, mostly Emiratis.

“We want to tell other girls there is no reason to stop training during Ramadan if you exercise the rest of the year.

“Some people may be surprised to see us exercise during Ramadan. Some think being a girl you should not exercise or because it’s Ramadan you should not do anything. This is the general culture and we’re doing our best to change this idea. Girls need to eat healthy, stay hydrated and understand the power of cycling.”

Dietician Salma Ganchi said eating small portions at iftar was equally important and cycling outdoors during fasting hours was not recommended.

“Headaches are quite common during Ramadan and if you have a headache don’t go cycling,” she said.

“Tingling, the shivers are other warning signs of dehydration. Feeling dizzy on a bike is dangerous. The key in Ramadan is maintaining fitness, it’s not a time to increase fitness or become stronger.”

#TakeHubwayToPride


Boston’s 45th annual Pride Parade on Saturday, June 13th, begins at noon at Copley Square (Boylston & Clarendon Streets), and heads through the historic South End, north on Berkeley Street into the Back Bay, turning east onto Boylston Street and passing by the Public Garden. It then turns left onto Charles Street, heading north alongside the Boston Common, before turning east on Beacon Street and passing before the Massachusetts State House, then winding around Tremont Street and Cambridge Street to end at Boston City Hall. There are many Hubway stations nearby and adjacent to the parade route. Please allow for extra time to rent or dock bikes, as large crowds are expected.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

Station Alert: MIT Stata Center at Vassar / Main (Cambridge) expands to 35 docks

Station Alert: In response to increased usage, particularly during rush hours, the MIT Stata Center at Vassar Street / Main Street Hubway station in Cambridge has been expanded from 23 docks to 35 docks. The expansion was installed on Wednesday, June 10th, and the station is expected to remain at this size for the remainder of the season.



Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

[Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance] Putting Legacy First: Planning for the Boston 2024 Olympics

The following report was originally published by the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance in June 2015.

Boston’s Olympic bid – like many powerful ideas – carries the prospect of great reward and the risk of great failure. The Metropolitan Area Planning Council, the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance, and Transportation for Massachusetts released a joint report that proposes a framework for protecting the public interest during and after the bid. We believe that our proposal represents a major step toward creating a more transparent and coordinated process that will benefit the region and the state.

One of the key recommendations is for Massachusetts to establish an Olympics Planning Commission to oversee and coordinate the public planning process. Additionally, we propose a series of specific actions to ensure that the Games-whether or not Boston actually hosts them-will have a positive legacy on the region’s housing, transportation, and environment. The unifying message is that all parties must put legacy first.

Click here to read the full report.

[RealEstateRama] Mayor Walsh announces winning projects of youth-participatory budget vote

The following letter was originally published in RealEstateRama on June 10th, 2015.

Mayor Martin J. Walsh on Tuesday announced the winning projects of the Youth Participatory Budgeting Vote. This year’s vote, in which young Bostonians ages 12-25 decided how to allocate $1 million of the City of Boston Capital Budget, is the second time the City has engaged young residents in the budgetary process, and is the first initiative of its kind in the nation.

“We’re involving our youngest and brightest residents in local government, and empowering them to make positive changes in their neighborhoods,” said Mayor Walsh. “I am proud we were able to continue the process, building on last year’s achievements and enable young people to critically think about how to spend taxpayer dollars in a way that better serves the people. This fosters a sense of responsibility and accountability. They walk away knowing their voices matter.”

Voters were able to select up to four projects on the ballot. Projects were divided into the following categories:

  • Public Safety
  • Parks
  • Health and Wellness
  • Community
  • Culture
  • Education
  • Technology

The projected selected for funding were: expanding the Hubway bicycle system; expanding the City’s Wicked Free Wi-Fi system; installing water bottle refill systems at City parks; and renovations to Boston Latin Academy’s gymnasium.

Young people from across the City were instructed by the Mayor’s Youth Council and other supportive partners on how to create guidelines from the voting process and develop a ballot, which included 10 projects.

“This is a process designed by and for young people,” said Shari Davis, Director of the City’s Department of Youth Engagement and Employment. “One big piece of Youth Lead the Change’s success is creating real opportunities for youth participation. We were able to do that by meeting young people where they are, building relationships, and allowing them to be the experts that we know they are in spaces where they are safe and comfortable.”

Voting polls were stationed at local train stations, youth centers and school buildings slated for the city-wide vote. Over 2,500 eligible votes came in from Boston’s youngest populations.

Last year, young people voted to fund seven winning projects that enhanced community parks, installed security cameras, granted Boston Public Schools Chromebooks and funded a skateboard feasibility study.

“I’ve learned a lot! I used to take some of these amenities for granted – like WiFi at school, or different features at parks – but now I know how much thought and work goes into making these things happen,” said Adonis Pitts, a member of the Mayor’s Youth Council. “Spending a million dollars is a lot of fun, but it’s a lot of work, too.”

Youth Lead the Change (YLC) is carried out by the Department of Youth Engagement and Employment, in close collaboration with a steering committee comprised of 26 community and youth serving organizations. The Participatory Budgeting Project facilitates the implementation of participatory budgeting nationwide, and works closely with Youth Lead the Change.

“Youth Lead the Change is the nation’s best example of true collaboration between young people and city administration,” said Pam Jennings of the Participatory Budgeting Project, a nonprofit leading the development of Participatory Budgeting in North America. “Participatory Budgeting empowers our young leaders to understand how government works while giving them the tools to make informed decisions. We are excited to spread the innovations introduced by Youth Lead the Change, to make democracy better for communities around the world.”

“Our mission is to scale up collaboration and decision-making. We envision an era in which large communities can deliberate and brainstorm with one another on important issues with the aid of intelligently designed algorithms and digital communication platforms,” said Ashish Goel, Professor at Stanford University, who leads theStanford Crowdsourced Democracy Team, which developed the digital voting tool used for voting. “We are fortunate to partner with the Boston School District. The forward thinking, the willingness to innovate, and the commitment to inclusive democracy that we see from the city and the district has been a great motivator for our team.”


The winning projects are as follows:

Hubway Extensions
Cost Estimation: $101,600

Hubway, a bicycle sharing transportation system in Boston, helps to provide additional commuting options to local residents. The additional funding will:

Expand the Hubway system into more neighborhoods;
Increase access to this unique transportation system to thousands of residents who are currently underserved by other means of public transportation; and
Provide alternative transit options to those who do not have a driver’s license and/or access to a personal vehicle.


Wicked Free Wifi 2.0
Cost Estimation: $119,000

Mayor Walsh and the City of Boston’s Department of Innovation Technology (DoIT) launched the City’s free Public Wi-Fi in April of 2014. Wicked Free Wi-Fi is available at more than 170 access points within the public wireless network, and this investment aims to increase the number of users across Boston’s neighborhoods. This project will:

Provide young people internet in areas that do not have inexpensive or free Wi-Fi options; and
Increase internet access in target locations, such as at schools and community centers.


Water Bottle Refill Stations at Parks
Cost Estimation: $260,000

Designated refill stations will help encourage the use of reusable water bottles and reduce negative environmental impacts on Boston’s parks system. This project will:

Install water stations in Joe Moakley Park in South Boston, Hynes Field in West Roxbury, Healey Playground in Roslindale, Robert E. Ryan Playground in Dorchester and on the Boston Common
Serve those who need to stay hydrated while enjoying Boston parks and partaking in sporting activities
Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by eliminating fuel needed to package and transport bottled water


Boston Latin Academy Gym Renovations
Cost Estimation: $475,000

The Boston Latin Academy (BLA) gymnasium is intended to serve thousands of BLA students and members of the local community. The gym serves as a safe space for students, and promotes a healthy and active lifestyle within the community. This funding will:

Support cosmetic and safety improvements within the gym, such as painting, addressing flooring issues and bleacher repair.


Youth Lead the Change will launch its third year in September with a call for steering committee members. To learn more about Youth Lead the Change, visit www.bostonyouthzone.com or contact the Department of Youth Engagement and Employment at 617-635-4202. To see a full listing of all the proposed projects, visit youthleadboston.org.

Mayor’s Press Office
617.635.4461

[Boston Globe] Report calls for overseeing Olympics agency

The following article was originally published by Mark Arsenault in The Boston Globe on June 9th, 2015.

State lawmakers should establish and fund a new public commission with the power to impose binding conditions on Boston’s Olympic bid, and the responsibility of overseeing a vast planning effort to guide the long-term legacy of the Games, according to a new report by the Metropolitan Area Planning Council and two other planning organizations.

“It is especially important that a single entity take responsibility for convening . . . interested parties, keeping everyone engaged, raising and addressing key questions, and making sure that the legacy impacts of the Games remain front and center,” according to a copy of the report shared with the Globe. “To date, no one has filled that role.”

The three-month study, scheduled to be released Tuesday, acknowledges potential benefits and possible harms of hosting the Games, but does not directly take a side in the noisy public debate over whether the city should get behind a proposal to bring the 2024 Summer Games to Boston and other venues in Massachusetts.

“The Olympic bid — like many powerful ideas — carries with it the prospect of great reward, and the risk of great failure,” states the report, which was prepared by the Planning Council, Transportation for Massachusetts, and the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance.

The report, which suggests that intensive planning would give the region the best chance of developing a successful legacy from a bid, offers dozens of recommendations for public officials and Olympic planners in the areas of transportation, housing, and the environment. It also makes specific proposals regarding three key venue sites: Widett Circle, Columbia Point, and the Beacon Yards area.

“The first step is to ask the right questions, and the most important question is this: How can we leverage the planning and investment for the Olympic Games to make Greater Boston a more connected, livable, and prosperous region — regardless of whether our bid is chosen, and even after the Games are over?” the report reads.

Marc Draisen, director of the Planning Council, said a new Olympic Planning Commission would not replace or duplicate the role of Boston 2024, a private nonprofit that would remain in charge of finalizing the bid and trying to win the Games. A new public commission, he said, would be better positioned to coordinate permitting for venues, and involve municipal governments in the planning for the Games.

“There is a need for coordination across city lines,” he said in an interview.

In their 50-page report, the planning organizations offered support for public infrastructure spending related to the Games that “would be worthwhile investments even if Boston were not to be awarded the Olympics,” taking a position similar to those of Mayor Martin J. Walsh and Governor Charlie Baker.

The report also calls for Boston 2024 to apply some of its private funding to public infrastructure, such as pedestrian and biking improvements at JFK/UMass Station and nearby Kosciuszko Circle, near the proposed site of an athlete’s village on land owned by the University of Massachusetts Boston.

“The public has a legitimate role to play in repairing, modernizing, and expanding infrastructure that will last beyond the Games, just as the private sector has a role to play in supporting improvements that will advance the Olympic bid and make the Games more successful,” the report states.

The report endorses the use of what it calls “value capture” public financing to pay for infrastructure, which can use future increases in tax revenue created by infrastructure improvements to help pay for those improvements.

“It is the way public infrastructure is financed all around the US and all over the world,” Draisen said.

Boston 2024’s original venue plan proposed this type of financing arrangement to pay for infrastructure in Widett Circle, where the committee wants to build a temporary Olympic stadium. The committee redacted the financing proposal from bid documents released to the public in January, and was heavily criticized for editing the information after the original documents came to light in May through public records requests.

Boston 2024 has pledged to release a new venue plan this month that will provide more detailed revenue and cost estimates for the Games, and explain how the committee intends to finance the two most challenging Olympic facilities: the stadium and the athletes’ village. The bid committee has long said a Boston Olympics would be compact and walkable, though the first venue announced under the new plan moved Olympic sailing from Boston Harbor to Buzzards Bay off New Bedford. The majority of the venues are expected to stay in and around Boston under the new plan.

The report recommended that Boston 2024 do more to encourage bike travel, such as contributing planning expertise and money to “a connected network of high-quality protected bike lanes for spectators to travel between venues and other destinations.” Also, Olympic venues should have ample bike parking and Hubway bike share stations, the report states. The report also suggests Boston 2024 explore a new ferry service to connect Olympic venues along the Charles River — a venture that could live on after the Games as a commuter ferry or water taxi service.

On housing, the report warns that some prior Olympics have resulted in the displacement of residents. To prevent this, the report says, state and city governments should adopt tenant protections, among other recommendations.

“This package should prohibit the following: no-fault evictions during the year preceding the Games, summer surcharges or other temporary rent increases, and/or ‘short-leases’ designed to end before the Games begin,” the report states.

[Worcester Business Journal Online] Planning group lays out Olympics bid recommendations

The following article was originally published in Worcester Business Journal Online on June 9th, 2015.

Seeing great opportunity in the area’s US Olympics bid, a Metro Boston planning group said private dollars should fund a substantial amount of infrastructure upgrades, and the state should protect tenants and the homeless from displacement.

The recommendations from the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), expected Tuesday, arrive just after the nonprofit Olympic backer Boston 2024 claimed $14 million in cash and in-kind contributions is “one of the strongest fundraising starts ever for a bid city.”

Boston 2024, the group driving Boston’s bid to host the Summer Games in nine years, said in January the price tag for the games would be $4.7 billion. No Boston Olympics, which organized to oppose the bid, pegged the cost at $14.3 billion, which includes $5.2 billion in infrastructure improvements.

The MAPC report recommended public dollars be used to fund projects that will have a lasting benefit, while recommending private money chip in for a range of infrastructure expenses. The group also recommended the state establish an Olympic Planning Commission that would coordinate permitting and public input, but would “not supersede” local control.

“A single entity should coordinate the planning and application process for this bewildering set of approvals ̶ and ensure that any proposal submitted to one entity does not contradict proposals submitted to others,” said the report written for MAPC by Jessica Robertson and Tim Reardon.

The group recommended establishing a Social Impact Advisory Committee, and said that when Atlanta hosted the games in 1996 there were reports of “price-gouging” by landlords, evictions, and in the lead-up more than 9,000 arrest citations were issued to homeless people, who were also offered free one-way bus tickets out of the county.

“Whether displacement is caused by direct or indirect means, it is an unacceptable outcome, and planning for the Games and associated public policy must be focused on preventing it,” the MAPC report said, while also noting the construction of an Olympic village and other aspects of the games could increase the amount of affordable housing available in Boston.

Controls on the size of monthly and annual rent increases may be necessary along with a ban on seasonal surcharges and a prohibition on no-fault evictions a year before the games, the report said. MAPC noted temporary deed restrictions intended to make housing units affordable are set to expire in the coming years.

Boston 2024 CEO Rich Davey has said the only transportation upgrade necessary for hosting the games is the purchase of Red and Orange line cars, which is already funded and in the works.

MAPC identified a number of other projects that it said Boston 2024 should help finance, saying that where projects would “principally” benefit the hosting of the games, the group should pay the “lion’s share.”

“We haven’t quantified exactly what the number is,” said MAPC Executive Director Marc Draisen, when asked whether Boston 2024 would be able to afford helping to finance the array of projects promoted in the report. Draisen also said the fundraising report from Boston 2024 - which on Friday reported $2.9 million in fundraising and another nearly $1 million in “in kind” contributions in the first quarter of 2015 ̶ “doesn’t have much to say about funds that may be available over the course of the next decade.”

MAPC floated the idea of a ferry service on the Charles River and recommended increased access to Widett Circle, the proposed site of the Olympic Stadium. Bounded by highway and rails, the site is currently occupied by train yards and businesses, and while Boston 2024 sees it as the beginning of a boulevard toward South Station, MAPC said additional connections should be made to the nearby neighborhoods of South Boston, the South End and Roxbury.

The planning group also said 2024 should fund bikeways, the purchase of rentable Hubway bike stations and seize the opportunity of hosting the Paralympics to upgrade accessibility of the MBTA.

“Hosting the Paralympics should bring added focus on the moral and legal responsibility to ensure that our public infrastructure serves all members of society,” said the report, which said making the T fully accessible would cost $2 billion. Also, the report recommends factoring in climate change when developing the three major portions of Boston 2024’s initial bid, which lie on Boston Harbor, near the Fort Point Channel and by the Charles River.

Draisen noted that the properties acquired for the Olympics would be revenue-generating after the games end, and recommended new financing schemes for transportation projects that leverage the increased value of property with improved transportation. That type of financing was used to help fund the first new MBTA subway station in 27 years at Somerville’s Assembly Square, and the governor’s task force on ways to improve the MBTA recommended greater use of such “value-capture” financing for transit.

MAPC would also like the planned Olympic lanes to be converted into a bus-rapid transit system post-games, which he said would go beyond the Silver Line buses that have some dedicated lanes.

The group said planners “should resist the temptation to scatter venues around the state, which would inevitably defeat the walkable character of the Games,” include bike lanes in their plans and fund pedestrian connections between venue sites.

MAPC is governed by a large board of mostly municipal government representatives, and the report is being issued in conjunction with Transportation for Massachusetts and the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance.

Station Alert: University of Massachusetts Boston scheduled for redeployment this week

Station Alert: The University of Massachusetts Boston Hubway station is scheduled for redeployment on Wednesday, June 10th. This is a 19-dock station that will be located at a new site on University Drive West, adjacent to the newly built Integrated Sciences Complex.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

Station Alert: Two stations redeploying this week in Somerville - Beacon @ Washington/Kirkland, and Summer @ Cutter

Station Alert: The following two Somerville-based Hubway stations are scheduled for redeployment on Wednesday, June 10th:

  • Beacon Street at Washington/Kirkland. This will be a 15-dock station located in front of 402 Washington (Kappa Dental Group), about a quarter-block east of the Beacon/Washington/Kirkland intersection.

  • Summer Street at Cutter Street. This will be a 15-dock station located in front of 366 Summer Street (the old Dole Publishing building), across from the VFW near the intersection with Cutter & Russell.

  • Both stations should be operational as soon as they are fully reinstalled.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Pro-Tip: Use Hand Signals To Indicate Your Intentions, and To Stay Safe In Traffic

    Every Hubway bike is equipped with wheel & sidewall reflectors along with pedal-powered front & rear flashing LED lights and other safety features, but one thing they don’t have is turn signals. That’s up to you as the rider to safely indicate your intentions to traffic around you. The good news is there are only three simple signals you need to know:

    LEFT TURN
    Simply extend your left arm straight out in the direction of the turn.

    RIGHT TURN
    Extend your left arm out but bend it at the elbow with your forearm and hand held up vertically at a 90° angle. As an alternative, it’s also generally accepted to simply extend your right arm straight out in the direction of the turn. Either way is fine, just so long as you deliberately exhibit your intention to turn.

    Fun fact: the left-arm / right-turn is a holdover from before all cars had turn signals and the driver had to use arm signals out of the driver’s side window.

    STOPPING, OR SLOWING DOWN
    Extend your left arm out to the left but bend your elbow so your forearm and hand are pointing vertically downward.

    That’s it! There are also occasional variations for other countries, so if you’re planning on cycling during any international travel, consult this wiki page to check if there are any differences.

    OTHER CYCLING COURTESIES
    It’s common courtesy when passing another rider to let them know on which side you’re passing by loudly but politely announcing “on your right!” or “on your left!” And of course keep your eyes up at any pathway intersections for other cyclists or pedestrians, and give a friendly ding of your bell (all Hubway bikes have them) if you see anyone or if you are going around a corner.


    Check out more about Hubway’s safety features and recommendations on Hubway’s safety page,
    and see what your safety score is by reviewing Hubway’s Perfect 5 safety tips.

    [PeopleForBikes] 6 Bike Share Cities You Should Watch (Because We Just Gave Them Grant Money To Focus On Equity)

    The following article was originally published by April Corbin, equity writer for in PeopleForBikes on June 1st, 2015.

    Equity in bike share isn’t going to happen on its own.

    Innovators will have to experiment with strategies and efforts in order to find best practices. Luckily, there are at least half a dozen cities in the United States ready to do this.

    We would know. The Better Bike Share Partnership announced today that it has awarded nearly $375,000 in grants to bike share operators and community organizations that are working to make bike share programs more equitable. The Partnership has also funded an academic research team that will look at data and equity outcomes in Philadelphia, which launched their bike share system Indego in late April.

    This first round of grant money is part of $900,000 that The JPB Foundation-funded Better Bike Share Partnership will award over the course of three years.

    We will be reporting more about these projects on this blog in the future,so stay tuned,but for now here are the details:

    Austin Bike Share Equity Project: $50,000
    Austin, TX
    Austin B-cycle will use this grant award to address barriers of cost, safety, comfort with bicycling, and language through a bilingual outreach and education campaign along with subsidized membership and cash payment options. A report with best practices on implementing a fully bilingual bike share system is one key deliverable of this project.

    Boston Bikes Hubway Equity Project: $51,760
    Boston, MA
    Boston Bikes will build on their successful membership subsidy program and Prescribe-a-Bike collaboration with the Boston Medical Center to reach more diverse city residents with the help of this grant funding. Expansion of these two programs will join with plans to understand, reinforce and replicate the system’s best referral sources, align with other Boston Bikes programs, and develop more effective peer marketing tools through storytelling.

    Building Up Bike Share in Bedford Stuyvesant: $75,000
    Brooklyn, NY
    The Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation (Restoration) will capitalize on Citi Bike’s addition of 26 stations to their neighborhood with several targeted interventions to increase use. Restoration will focus their grant funding on tailored community outreach, education about riding bicycles and using bike share, membership promotion campaigns, and integration with other community services to introduce more Bedford-Stuyvesant residents to bike share.

    Capital Bikeshare Outreach Resources for Community Organizations: $25,000
    Washington, DC
    The District of Columbia’s Department of Transportation (DOT) will strengthen and expand its network of local community service organizations as ambassadors for Capital Bikeshare with this grant award. In addition to initiating partnerships and developing best practices based on previous community partner experiences, the DOT will also create resources including a training curriculum and manual, multi-lingual demonstration video on how to use bike share, new member kits, and an ambassador network that links and supports community partners.

    Charlotte B-cycle Free Wheelin’ Fridays: $20,000
    Charlotte, NC
    Charlotte B-cycle is working with an extensive roster of community partners to help people from neighborhoods across the city try using bike share for their Friday morning commutes. This targeted program will use experienced riders, incentives, and origination points in communities with less bike share use to boost ridership.

    Divvy for Everyone: $75,000
    Chicago, IL
    The Chicago Department of Transportation (DOT) is using their award and match funding from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois to implement a citywide program of subsidized memberships and facilitated enrollment through the Local Initiatives Support Coalition (LISC) - Centers for Working Families. Chicago DOT will also partner with Slow Roll Chicago on targeted outreach, education and engagement in the Southside neighborhood of Bronzeville along with general outreach and engagement citywide.

    Equity Outcomes and Potential for Better Bike Share: $74,986
    Portland, OR
    Researchers at Portland State University will collect and examine data such as perceptions of bike share, barriers to use, success of specific interventions to increase use, and the impact of station siting decisions in Philadelphia’s Indego Bike Share System. The key deliverable is a report that will help new and existing bike share systems identify and implement interventions that will help them reach and engage more riders.

    [Boston Globe] Op-Ed: Cambridge tries to provide transportation options

    The following letter was originally published as an Op-Ed in The Boston Globe on May 24th, 2015.

    Robert Weisman raises many critical issues about transportation in Kendall Square, particularly the need to prevent congestion from damaging this area’s role in driving innovation and economic growth (“As tech hub grows, so do the traffic jams,” A1, May 19). The City of Cambridge has been working diligently over the past two decades to implement policies and programs that enable this growth, while managing impacts and recognizing that we cannot build our way out of congestion.

    Working with public and private partners, we have invested in bicycle facilities like Hubway, supported transit improvements like the EZRide bus, and advocated for regional investments in sustainable transportation. Eric Moskowitz’s July 2012 article detailed how successful promotion of sustainable transportation through the Parking and Transportation Demand Management Ordinance and other tools has led to a commuting modal share of 53% for walking, cycling, and transit.

    We have modified zoning to encourage development of a true mixed-use neighborhood and made strategic infrastructure investments to enhance mobility. While construction on the Longfellow Bridge and Main Street have short-term impacts, they are critical to this area’s future. As with all of Cambridge, Kendall Square is a work in progress, and we remain committed to working collaboratively to enable the continued success of this global center for innovation.

    Joseph E. Barr
    Director of Traffic, Parking and Transportation
    Cambridge

    [The Washington Post] Boston was just named the top city in the country for saving energy. Here’s why

    The following is an excerpt from an article originally published by Chelsea Harvey in The Washington Post on May 20th, 2015.

    It’s report card season — and not just for grade-school students. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) published the 2015 edition of its biennial City Energy Efficiency Scorecard today, ranking U.S. cities based on their local energy policies and initiatives. And for the second time in a row, Boston is top of the class.

    It was a close competition, with each of the top five cities scoring within a 10-point range. Boston took first place with a total of 82 and was the only city to get more than 80 percent of the possible points. How did the city manage to do so well?

    The scorecard’s authors attribute Boston’s success to a number of strong city-wide energy policies and local initiatives, which helped it score well broadly across the board. But the city really took the cake as a top scorer in the buildings policies category and the energy and water utility policies category, which assesses energy efficiency targets, spending on electric and natural gas efficiency and water efficiency efforts.

    Boston’s Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance requires large and medium-sized buildings to report their energy and water use, as well as complete an energy assessment every five years. And, the report states, buildings are required to improve their efficiency if they’re not ENERGY STAR certified or showing improvements. And the city’s Renew Boston initiative earned it points in the utility policies category. Introduced in 2009, the program aims to reduce electricity demand by 200 megawatts by 2017. Efforts to meet this goal included the launch of Renew Boston Solar, a program that encourages the widespread adoption of solar technology throughout the city. And Renew Boston also targets homeowners and small business owners by offering free energy assessments and providing incentives to adopt efficiency improvements, such as insulation.

    Boston also has a climate action plan, which aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Part of this plan involves reducing vehicles miles traveled (VMT) by 7.5 percent by 2020. Hubway, the city’s bike-sharing system, is one way the city government is tackling that goal, helping the city earn a relatively high score for transportation policy.

    And Boston was also among the top scorers in the community initiatives category, thanks to its Greenovate Boston campaign. This program aims to help the city meet its emissions reduction goals by engaging citizens in the city’s climate and sustainability initiatives. Engagement opportunities include community summits, personal carbon challenges, bike weeks and guidelines to help citizens improve energy efficiency in their own homes. “Community outreach is really the key element,” said Austin Blackmon, Boston’s chief of environment, energy and open space, during the Wednesday press conference. “One thing that we’re really focusing on is making sure that when we are communicating with our residents and businesses, we’re making sure we’re reaching out to those people who haven’t heard the message already.”

    Thanks to these broad-scale initiatives, Boston was able to lead the pack with 82 points. But the other cities in the top five weren’t too far behind. Click here for a quick look at how they stacked up.

    [SYSTEM ALERT] Software upgrade complete, thanks for your patience

    You may not have even noticed. It was only for a few hours, and most riders were able to continue using Hubway as usual, but the big news is we upgraded Hubway’s back-end software today!

    While the majority of changes will not be visible to Hubway riders, the updates to the system software will provide members with additional trip history details and an easier-to-read account redesign, and will provide automated tools for communicating mechanical issues with Hubway technicians (for example, when a rider marks a bike for repair)! The updates will also greatly improve the tools used by the company that operates the system, Motivate International Inc, and will allow for testing new equipment for Hubway expansion.

    This was a major system upgrade for Hubway. While every effort was made to minimize the disruption it may have caused, we do apologize to any riders who were inconvenienced. We thank you for your patience as this work to improve Hubway for all riders was going on.


    If you have any questions, please reach Hubway customer service by calling 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929) or writing to customerservice@thehubway.com. Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    Station Move Alert: Harvard University River Houses / Plympton St at Memorial Drive, Cambridge

    Station Move Alert: On Friday, May 22nd, the Harvard University River Houses / Plympton Street Hubway station will be moved approximately 1-2 blocks northeast from its current location along Memorial Drive in Cambridge to its new seasonal location on Grant Street, between DeWolfe & Banks Streets. This will be an on-street (not sidewalk) location.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: Kendall T at Main St, Cambridge

    Station Move Alert: On Friday, May 22nd, the Kendall T at Main Street Hubway station, located in Kendall Square, Cambridge, will be relocated to the Ames Street sidewalk at the southwest corner of Ames & Main Street. This station is scheduled to remain in the new location throughout the spring & summer.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: North Station Hubway

    Station Move Alert: Due to planned sidewalk construction, this evening, Tuesday, May 19th, at 6pm, the North Station Hubway station will be relocated to a temporary location to the left of Portal Park, against the wall that abuts the Route 93 underpass, as pictured in the image below.

    Because there are two station terminals at North Station, the relocation will be made without a break in service. There will be a Hubway representative to help you with docking during the move, but please allow for a little extra time.

    PLEASE NOTE: this is a temporary move expected to last a few days, and plans are for the station to return to its permanent location on Causeway Street after construction is completed.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [SYSTEM ALERT] Software Upgrade, Partial System Outage, Improvements on May 19-20

    SYSTEM ALERT: Beginning Tuesday, May 19th, at approximately 7:00pm, Hubway will be conducting a significant upgrade to the operational software that powers the system.

    While the majority of the changes will not be visible to Hubway users, the updates to the system software will provide members with additional trip history details and an easier-to-read account redesign, and will provide automated tools for communicating mechanical issues with Hubway technicians. The updates will also greatly improve the tools used by the company that operates the system, Motivate International Inc, and will allow for testing new equipment for Hubway expansion.

    The upgrade will last approximately 16 hours during which there will be an impact on users of the system. During the upgrade: 

    • Key holding members (annual & monthly) will be able to rent bikes from one station and dock them at the same or another station. However, you will not be able to rent bikes from the same station twice while the upgrade is underway.
    • Members will not be able to log into their online account. Once the update is complete, you’ll be able to access all of your account history.
    • No new memberships, renewals, or gift certificates will be available for purchase on the Hubway website (www.thehubway.com).
    • Station and dock information will not be accurate on any website, map, or mobile app. Once the update is complete, the accurate info will return.
    • “Time credits” and other features will not be available at Hubway station kiosks.
    • No card-payment rentals (24-hour & 72-hour memberships) will be available at Hubway stations.

    While this is a major system upgrade for the Hubway system, every effort will be made to minimize the disruption this may cause. We thank you in advance for your patience as we work to improve Hubway for all riders.


    If you have any questions, please reach Hubway customer service by calling 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929) or writing to customerservice@thehubway.com. Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    [Mentor Blogs - Colin Walls] Go Bike!

    The following article was originally published by Colin Walls in Mentor Blogs on May 14th, 2015.

    There is an old cliché, which says that the point of traveling is not to reach a destination, but to experience the journey. And I think there may be a lot of truth in that. This is the reason why driving a car is my least favorite way of getting around. When driving, almost all one’s attention is needed to control the car, so there is little opportunity to look around. Public transportation [bus, train, airplane or even taxi] is better because someone else is doing the driving. The best way to fully appreciate an environment is to walk – and I do a lot of that. However, there are limits to the distance one can cover in a limited time. So, the ideal compromise, IMHO, is a bicycle …

    I have a bike at home, but I rarely use it. My usual excuses are that the roads around here are not very bicycle friendly [traffic and hills] and my bike is a bit old and clunky – only some of the gears work. For some time, I have been promising myself that I’ll get an new bike, which will motivate me to get out on it.

    When we are on vacation, renting bicycles is something we have done in a number of places. I believe the first time was in San Francisco. I have walked over the Golden Gate Bridge lots of times – but cycling was a great new experience. On another occasion we were on Formentera [a small island off of Ibiza] and the rep told us that a bike was a great way to go anywhere on the island, except “up there” – she pointed towards La Mola, the one hill at the end of the island. I took this as a challenge, instead of a warning, and decided to give it a go. My wife was very supportive and took the bus to meet me at the top. I made it. Halfway up I thought that I was going to die, but, after a rest, I was fine. The highlight was coming down again, when I met a group of much younger cyclists pushing their bikes up the hill.

    Another vacation was a cycling tour of Syria – sadly not an option any more. That country made sense for bikes, as there were not too many hills. Touring in cities, like Berlin, is also great if they have cycle lanes etc. and are reasonably flat. Last week we were in Boston [which is quite level]. I was there for work, but I had some free time. My wife looked at bike availability and suitability and made a great discovery …

    It seems that, some years ago, Boston was cited as the least bike-friendly city in North America [or something along those lines]. The mayor decided to fix that. Lots of cycle lanes and routes were set up and an automated, short-term bicycle renting system installed, called Hubway. [Many other cities have similar systems, with varying success.]

    The system is based around a great number of bike parking stations, each of which accommodates around 10-20 bikes. Although they are not immediately noticeable, wherever you are in Boston, it appears, you are not far from a Hubway station. The easiest way to work with the system is to get the free smartphone app. This shows a map, indicating your location as a blue blob in the center of the screen.


    Nearby Hubway stations are shown by little markers. Initially, the nearest one is colored orange. At the bottom of the screen it shows how far away this station is and in what direction. It also indicates how many bikes are parked there and how many empty slots are available. Touching one of the other [green] stations makes it turn orange and its information is displayed.


    An alternative display gives you a simple pointer to guide you to the nearest station. This would work well if you could clip the phone to the handlebars and follow its guidance. [It would be rather handy if the bikes had a little dynamo with a USB power outlet …]

    To rent a bike, you just need to go to a station and buy a pass for, say, 24 hours. This costs $6 – longer durations are cheaper pro rata. You do not actually get a pass – the system simply uses the credit card as ID thereafter. Incidentally, it requests a phone number and ZIP code, which we did not have; I found that any numbers entered would keep it happy. When you are ready to take a bike, you swipe the card and receive a 5-digit code. You select a bike, enter the code and the bike is released. Just adjust the saddle height and you are off.

    The loan period is up to 30 minutes, which is fine for hopping from one station to another, even at quite long distances across the city. If you exceed the time, an extra $2 is charged, but this is not very likely to occur. When you arrive at the station, returning the bike is just a question of pushing it firmly into the stand. You can take and return bikes as many times as you like over the term of your pass.

    We really enjoyed using this facility and would recommend it, if you are visiting Boston at an appropriate time of year. Although people said that the traffic was unfriendly, I had no problems at all. We were staying in the center of the city, which is a $12 cab ride from the Convention Center, where I was working. One morning, I realized that I still had some time on my bike pass, so I cycled there [only 2.5 miles] – there is a station right outside the entrance. I hope that my employers appreciate my money saving activity!

    BTW, I just checked the app on my phone from the comfort of my desk. It tells me that the nearest Hubway station is 3200 miles West.

    updated MEMBER PERK: FREE tix for WGBH BostonTalks: The Bicycle Revolution, Thursday, May 14th


    BostonTalks: The Bicycle Revolution

    May 14, 2015, 7-9pm
    WGBH Studios



    A Smarter Happy Hour
    Grab your friends and join us for WGBH’s take on happy hour — inspiring conversation plus wine and local craft brews for $5 a glass. Hear from and connect with local experts in a variety of fields while enjoying the great company of your neighbors from Boston and beyond.


    Click here to get your FREE tickets!
    Hubway members get FREE tickets—make sure to use promo code HAPPYHOUR


    BostonTalks: The Bicycle Revolution
    Now bigger than ever in Boston — where the “Car is no longer the king” — bicycling is a hot topic in and outside the city. Cambridge Hubway and Transportation Program Manager Cara Seiderman will discuss the popularity of cycling and bike sharing — the new way to get around. Co-Founder and CEO, Slava Menn, tells the story of how Fortified Bicycle got their start. And the founder of the bike tourism company Bikabout, Megan Ramey, will share why she believes biking is the best way to see a city and help its economy. Join Cara, Slava and Megan for an in-depth look at the bicycle revolution.
    Meet the Host
    Edgar Herwick is the guy behind WGBH’s Curiosity Desk, where the quest is to dig a little deeper into (and sometimes look a little askew at) topics in the news, and search for answers to questions posed by the world around us. His features can be seen on WGBH’s Greater Boston and heard on 89.7 WGBH’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered. He also appears regularly with Jim Braude and Margery Eagan on Boston Public Radio. Follow him on Twitter @ebherwick3.
    More About the Series
    BostonTalks is throwing the formal panel discussion out the window. Each event combines short speaking programs, drinks, and a chance for you to join the conversation. Think happy hour, but smarter.

    [Boston Globe Magazine] A Bike Ride a Day Keeps the Doctor Away

    The following is an excerpt from an article that was originally published by in the Boston Globe Magazine on May 8th, 2015.

    Cutting-edge medical procedures and novel prescriptions for health

    New drugs and cancer treatments aren’t the only medical breakthroughs. Surgeons are using 3-D printers, dentists are using lasers, and Boston Medical Center is prescribing bikes.

    A BIKE RIDE A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY

    At Boston Medical Center, doctors write prescriptions for medications, groceries, and, now, bicycles. The hospital and the City of Boston launched a “Prescribe a Bike” program last spring, offering low-income patients a $5 a year pass to access the Hubway bike-sharing system. BMC says doctors can prescribe inexpensive exercise to patients with diabetes, high cholesterol, heart disease, and other chronic conditions. Patients are allowed an unlimited number of rides of up to 60 minutes.

    “This is a very innovative and cost-effective way to help our patients get exercise,” says BMC’s Dr. Alan Meyers, who spearheaded the program.

    BMC has pioneered the idea of unorthodox prescriptions. Similarly, doctors also give prescriptions for fruits, vegetables, and other healthy foods that patients pick up at a food pantry twice a month.

    [Scout Somerville] Rush Hour Race Will Answer The Question: Whose Commute Is Quickest?

    The following article was originally published by Emily Cassel in Scout Somerville Beat on May 7th, 2015.


    Driving, biking, the MBTA—there are plenty of ways for Boston’s commuters to get to and from the office, but which is the fastest? The 2015 Rush Hour Race, which returns to Boston for the third time this year, will attempt to determine just that, by pitting a cyclist and a Hubway rider against a T rider and a driver to see who can make the shortest trip from downtown Boston to Union Square in Somerville.

    The race kicks off at the Howard Stein Hudson building on the corner of Beacon and Tremont Street, where participants will sit at desks until 6 p.m. as if this was an average workday. When the clock strikes six, they’ll slip downstairs, find their mode of transportation and race one another to Union Square Plaza.

    “The idea really is to promote alternative transportation and try to get people thinking about different ways of traveling in Boston,” says Somerville Bicycle Committee secretary Ken Carlson, who brought the Rush Hour Race to the city in 2012. “I think people who bike and people who already take alternative modes know that driving is the most frustrating way to get around Boston. It’s a much smaller city on a bicycle.”

    According to Carlson, the race is an attempt to encourage people who aren’t yet bike commuters to embrace their bicycles by showing them examples of ordinary people who get around the city on two wheels. In fact, this year’s cycling representative is a woman who’s relatively new to bike commuting. “We’re not looking to have Lycra-clad young men zipping through the streets,” he says with a laugh. “She’s a great example of … a person who just took up bike commuting and really loves this.”

    Unofficial riders are welcome to race alongside the participating riders, and you don’t have to race to join in on the fun—stop by Union Square Plaza from 5:30 until 9 p.m. to enjoy Pretty Things beer and food from local vendors. The 6 p.m. start of the 2015 Rush Hour Race sets it apart from the first two competitions, which began at Redbones Barbecue and tackled the morning commute. Wrapping up the race in the evening in the evening gives commuters and community members a chance to talk transportation modes over brews and food. Carlson explains that this is a great opportunity for those who don’t yet travel by bicycle to talk to members of the cycling community. “You start realizing, ‘Wow, there are other people doing this,’” he says. “And then you start talking about, ‘Oh, what do you wear when it rains? You biked all winter, how do you do that? You bike at night? What kind of lights do you have?’ That makes it all much more manageable and makes it much more accessible.”

    Carlson isn’t making any predictions about who will win—history has shown that the race will be tight—though he admits that between traffic and having to find a parking space, the driver’s chances are slightly worse. The cyclist won the first Rush Hour Race, and the MBTA rider took home bragging rights in the second one (but only because the MBTA rider “walked right out and, boom, caught a T,” says Carlson). The driver has always finished dead last, though Carlson is quick to point out that the race isn’t an attempt to shame motorists. Encouraging people to use other modes of transportation benefits drivers too—the more people who opt to take the T or ride their bike, the less congested the roadways will be.

    Ultimately, the goal is to dispel the idea that cyclists in the city are “college kids who have a death wish,” says Carlson, who adds that he knows people from retirees to young parents and their children who cycle through the city.

    “You don’t have to have specialized muscles or a death wish to be a bike commuter,” he says.

    The 2015 Rush Hour Race departs from 1 Beacon St. Plaza at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, May 12 and wraps up at Union Square Plaza in Somerville. Find more information on the race here, and check out bios of this year’s participants below.

    Kristjan Varnick, Hubway rider: Any day I get to ride, is a good day. Cycling has been part of my commute for over 8 years. I currently ride from Somerville to downtown Boston. Everything thing in the area is only a few miles apart, and cycling is the best way to get around. Watching the number of riders, bike lanes and events in the area take off, has been unbelievable. Living near Hubway is a huge plus.  I’ve taken over 300 rides with Hubway. In the wintertime, I take Hubway to the Red Line from Inman Square.  In the summertime, Hubway is my favorite way to zip around Boston. There is tons of great cycling in the Boston area. Do Hub on Wheels. Try Hubway. Go. Ride. More.

    Jeremy Mendelson, transit rider: Jeremy is a transit service planner and co-founder of Transit Matters, an organization dedicated to improving public transportation system by making the MBTA more effective, convenient and affordable. He has designed bus and rail networks for transit agencies, toured dozens of cities and towns to study their transportation networks, and written extensively about transit planning, street design, bicycle and pedestrian safety, and social and environmental justice.

    When not waiting for a bus at Dudley Square, you can find Jeremy transporting things by bike, exploring new neighborhoods or scheming to make bus travel fast and easy. Follow him on Twitter @CriticalTransit.

    Mark Gravallese, motorist: Mark has over 14 years of experience in managing the development and sequencing of roadway, tunnel, facility and bridge projects. As the former MassDOT District 6 Projects Engineer, Mark’s expertise lays in the review, examination, and approval/ disapproval of complex and diversified engineering data, such as design plans, specifications, contracts, and bids. During his tenure at MassDOT, he routinely demonstrated his ability to work collaboratively with all engineering disciplines within the Highway Districts, MassDOT headquarters, MBTA, municipalities, contractors, design consultants, and other Federal and State agencies and authorities.

    As HSH’s Manager of Public Infrastructure, Mark provides guidance to communities relating to MassDOT policies, engineering standards, planning, and funding to design cost-effective and context-sensitive projects. He specializes in managing complex urban infrastructure projects focusing on progressive designs that fit today’s transportation landscape and are sustainable for the future.

    Ariel Horowitz, cyclist: Ariel Horowitz is a relatively new bike commuter riding a really old bike. Ariel just finished her doctorate in chemical engineering at Tufts. Her normal cycling turf is in Greater Camberville. She restarted cycling as an adult after being charmed by the Google bikes during a visit to the Googleplex in Mountain View, CA, and has been delightedly tooling around ever since. Ariel lives in Somerville with her fiance and two cats.

    [Somerville Beat] Cycling in the City: Somerville Shops & Resources

    The following article was originally published by Elyse Andrews in Somerville Beat on April 29th, 2015.

    It took me a while to get really comfortable riding a bike in the city after I moved to Somerville. I had little (OK, no) city biking experience and was really intimidated by the other cyclists, pedestrians and cars. After lots of local rides, I got confident enough to venture farther and farther from home. That was until I got in a bike/pedestrian accident nearly two years ago.

    With my confidence shaken, I sort of gave up biking for a while. But I last summer I got back on the wagon bike and I’m so glad I did! Being a cyclist in the city can be scary at times, but it’s also really liberating (you can always find a parking spot), it’s good exercise, it’s environmentally friendly and it’s fun. So if you’re looking to start biking or get back on your bike after a hiatus, here are some resources in Somerville to get you started.

    Bike Shops
    Ace Wheelworks (145 Elm St.): With two locations in the area (the other is in Belmont), Wheelworks has lots of bikes, gear, a repair shop and friendly service to get you going. This is a great place to get started if you’re new to biking or get your bike tuned up if it’s been stashed for a while.

    Bicycle Belle (368 Beacon St.): Opened in 2013, Bicycle Belle sells bikes specifically for use in the city with accessories like kickstands and racks for carrying cargo. And the shop has a big focus on biking with kids.

    Bike Boom (389 Highland Ave.): Located in Davis Square, Bike Boom specializes in restoring used, high-quality commuter and recreational bikes. The shop also offers repairs and tune-ups.

    Paramount Bicycle (104 Bristol Road): Blink and you’ll miss this small shop in Ball Square, but make sure you don’t because owner Tyler has lots of great biking knowledge to share. He helped my husband build some custom wheels a few years ago and provided some helpful advice to go along with them.

    Somervelo (361 Somerville Ave.): The new kid on the block in the Somerville cycling scene, this Union Square shop does repairs and tune-ups, builds wheels and sells bikes. And you can book your next appointment online.

    Resources
    Artisan’s Asylum Bicycle Building and Maintenance Classes: Somerville’s makerspace Artisan’s Asylum (10 Tyler St.) offers a plethora of classes in a variety of subjects including bike building and maintenance. Learn the basics of taking good care of your bike, build your own wheel, get a handle on winter biking and more.

    Hubway: With the introduction of the Hubway bike-sharing system in Boston it’s easy to get around on two wheels even if you don’t actually own a bike. Hubway has pick-up and drop-off locations all over the city and a variety of membership options, which makes getting around by bike extra easy.

    Minuteman Bikeway: This 10-mile long path starts at the Alewife MBTA Station in Cambridge and winds through Arlington and Lexington before ending in Bedford. Somerville residents can pick up the path in Davis behind the College Avenue MBTA stop. The paved, gently rolling bikeway makes a great place to ride with plenty of places to stop along the way for a picnic or break.

    Somerville Bicycle Committee: This group works to improve biking conditions in Somerville, help implement policy and programs and promote cycling as a means of transportation in the city, among other things. The Somerville Bicycle Committee puts on all kinds of events, like group rides that happen several times a year, and has meetings on the third Tuesday of the month from 7 p.m.-9 p.m. in the basement conference room at City Hall (93 Highland Ave.) that are free and open to the public.

    Pedal Power: Why Biking Is A Public Health Winner

    The folks at Online Masters in Public Health have recently produced an infographic, Pedal Power, included below, that we thought you might find interesting. Click here to see the original article and learn more about Online Masters in Public Health.


    Courtesy of Online Masters in Public Health.

    Station Alert: Newbury / Hereford station is open in Back Bay

    Station Alert: Effective Tuesday afternoon, April 28th, the Newbury St / Hereford St Hubway station is open and operational. This is a 19-dock station located on the northeast corner of the intersection of Newbury & Hereford, across the street from the Boston Architectural College.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Boylston / Berkeley station is open in Back Bay

    Station Alert: Effective Tuesday afternoon, April 28th, the Boylston St / Berkeley St Hubway station is open and operational. This is a 15-dock station located on the south side of Boylston, just west of Berkeley Street.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Mobilizing the Region] Can Philadelphia's Bike Share Be an Example for Citi Bike's New Leadership?

    The following article was originally published by Matthew Norris in the Mobilizing the Region on April 28th, 2015.

    Philadelphia’s Indego bike share network was officially launched last week with over 600 bicycles connecting various corners of the city. Mayor Michael Nutter and hundreds of bicycle enthusiasts came out to celebrate the opening of the system with a ceremonial ride from the Philadelphia Museum of Art to many of the 60 docking stations scattered across various neighborhoods.

    Indego is unique in that it is the first system in the United States that was launched from the start to allow riders to utilize the system without needing to have a credit card (Boston’s Hubway and Washington D.C.’s Capital Bikeshare now offer limited cash payment options, but there are geographic and income-level restrictions for this privilege). Over a third of Indego’s docking stations are located in low-income neighborhoods, and those without credit cards can sign up for a $15 30-day membership, which allows for unlimited one-hour rides. Cash users receive a key fob in the mail that grants access to bike share stations, and payments can be made at any local 7-Eleven or Family Dollar store.

    Philadelphia already has by far the highest bicycle commuting rate of the ten largest US cities—2.3 times higher per capita than New York City’s bike commute rate. With a planned threefold expansion of Indego’s network in the next three years, along with the continuing growth of area bike lanes and the Circuit regional trail network, many pieces are coming into place to make Philadelphia a world class bicycling city. If Indego is successful, the program may offer a number of lessons for cities across the country in how to implement a truly equitable bike share system. Especially New York City.

    Since its launch, New York City’s Citi Bike program has suffered its fair share of criticism for failing to to make itself more accessible to low income residents of the five boroughs, who often have the longest commutes and fewest transit options. And while it is in the process of doubling the size of its network and expanding beyond lower Manhattan and brownstone Brooklyn over the next two years, unlike Indego, Citi Bike program receives no public subsidies—a sore spot for many, as it has resulted in greater reliance on corporate sponsorship and membership cost increases and has been an impediment to the program’s expansion. Citi Bike currently offers a $60 discounted membership for qualifying users, as long as they have a credit card. And those who don’t want to pay the annual membership rate must still use a credit card to pay for hourly or daily passes and have a $101 security deposit placed on the card until the bike is returned.

    The good news is that Citi Bike’s new leadership is prioritizing a system overhaul and technology and design upgrades, in addition to focusing on private local sponsorship opportunities and corporate collaborations to promote the brand and bring in more revenue. While these changes will increase confidence in Citi Bike and encourage more widespread use, the next focus should be on how to match Philly’s efforts to make bike share an affordable option in low-income neighborhoods.

    Station Alert: Washington Square station returns to Brookline

    Station Alert: Effective Tuesday morning, April 28th, the Washington Square Hubway station is open and operational. This is a 15-dock station located on the median on Beacon Street at Washington. Please note: the docks are facing the opposite direction from previous years.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: Harvard Square's Gund Hall station crosses the plaza

    Station Move Alert: Effective Tuesday morning, April 28th, the Harvard Square - Gund Hall Hubway station has moved to the Cambridge Street side of the plaza at Quincy St & Kirkland St. The new location for this 15-dock station is visible from the former location.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Red Sox to Offer Free Bike Valet Service, Presented by New Balance, for Every Home Game Starting May 19

    The following press release was originally published on RedSox.com on April 27th, 2015.

    BOSTON, MA - Beginning Tuesday, May 19, the Red Sox will offer bike valet service for ticket holders who ride their two-wheelers to Fenway Park for games.

    “Fenway Park Bike Valet,” presented by New Balance, was successfully piloted at weekend home games in July, August, and September of 2014. The service has now been expanded to include all home games this season.

    Those who wish to bike to the ballpark can drop off their bikes with a valet attendant outside Gate D on the corner of Yawkey Way and Van Ness Street. Bike Valet is available 1 ½ hours before the game and closes a half hour after the game. The service is free for all ticketed fans.

    The Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition (MassBike) will oversee the operation, providing a safe, fenced-off area for bikes to be stored. Fans will be given a claim check for easy retrieval. 

    May 19 begins a six-game homestand against the Texas Rangers and the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

    The Red Sox are one of five Major League Baseball teams providing bike valet service. Other clubs include the San Francisco Giants, Miami Marlins, Washington Nationals, and the Chicago Cubs.

    Station Alert: Three stations return to the Back Bay

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 24th, the following three stations in Boston’s Back Bay are now open and fully operational:

  • Boylston at Fairfield: This is a 15-dock station near the Apple Store on Boylston.


  • New Balance Store: This is a 15-dock station between Dartmouth & Clarendon, across Boylston from Copley Square, and directly in front of New Balance store at 583 Boylston Street.


  • Boston Public Library: This is a 25-dock station directly in front of the Boston Public Library across Dartmouth from Copley Square.


  • Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Kenmore Square station is back

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 24th, the Kenmore Square Hubway station is open and operational. This is a 19-dock station located on the eastbound side of Commonwealth Avenue, near its intersection with Brookline Avenue and Beacon Street.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Go the Safe Way on Hubway: tips for safe cycling

    #TakeHubway for a safe ride! Some reminders, as sent via mail to all new Hubway members:

    Click here to read about safety features on a Hubway bike and more safety tips! Thanks for using Hubway safely!

    [San Jose Mercury News] Travel Top 10: Bike-share Cities

    The following list was originally published in the San Jose Mercury News on April 22nd, 2015.

    Bike hikes

    Sometimes the best way to see a city is on foot—and sometimes, with feet planted happily atop bicycle pedals. More than 50 U.S. cities offer bicycle-sharing programs these days, and these 10 make it particularly easy for travelers to borrow a bike and hit the road, according to USA Today:

    1. New York City’s Citi Bike
    2. Washington, D.C.‘s Capital Bikeshare
    3. Chicago’s Divvy
    4. Texas’ Austin B-cycle
    5. Minneapolis-St. Paul’s Nice Ride Minnesota
    6. Boston’s Hubway
    7. San Francisco and the South Bay’s Bay Area Bike Share
    8. Denver B-cycle
    9. North Carolina’s Charlotte B-cycle
    10. Tennessee’s Bike Chattanooga

    Station Alert: Dudley Square station returns to Roxbury

    Station Alert: Effective Tuesday afternoon, April 21st, the Dudley Square Hubway station in Roxbury, is open and operational. This is a 15-dock station.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Franklin St / Arch St station returns today

    Station Alert: Effective Tuesday morning, April 21st, the Franklin St / Arch St Hubway station in Boston, is open and operational. This is a 23-dock station, located downtown.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Boston Globe] Hubway bike-share program returns amid growing popularity

    The following article was originally published by Catherine Cloutier in The Boston Globe on April 17th, 2015.

    Boston’s Hubway bike-sharing program began its fifth season of full operation Friday, offering residents and visitors an active alternative for public transportation.

    The program never really shut down for the winter, though. It kept its 32 stations in Cambridge open, along with some in Boston, citing high demand.

    Since its creation in July 2011, the bike-sharing program has grown steadily in its annual number of members, trips, and miles traveled.

    Originally just in Boston, the program expanded as far as Somerville and Brookline, and more than doubled the number of its stations and bicycles. By the end of its third season, the system covered about 20 square miles, according to Hubway.

    Users can sign up for a membership online or purchase a day pass at a station’s machine. From there, they can take the bike to commute or run errands, and when they are finished, return it to any station.

    In 2014, the system had 12,673 members, up from 7,042 two years prior, according to Hubway.

    The growth in Boston is part of a larger trend: more US cities and residents are using bike-sharing programs.

    In 2010, there were five bike-sharing programs in the United States, according to data from the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center. By this year, 47 cities and regions had bike sharing.

    Many bike-sharing operators have programs in multiple cities. Hubway’s operator Motivate, for example, also oversees bike-sharing programs in the nine other cities, including New York, Washington, and Chicago.

    The type of program, which has been around in other countries since the middle of the 20th century, saw particular growth in the United States in 2012 and 2013, according to a study on bike sharing by the Mineta Transportation Institute.

    In all, public bike-sharing programs exist on five continents and 712 cities.

    In the United States and elsewhere, universities and colleges also operate bike-sharing programs. Three institutions in Massachusetts — Hampshire College, University of Massachusetts Lowell, and Wellesley College — have a combined 50 bicycles for student use.

    The Metropolitan Area Planning Council, which coordinates the Hubway system, said a large proportion of Hubway trips are taken in conjunction with public transit.

    For cities, bike-sharing programs can reduce traffic, use of fossil fuels, and pressure on the parking supply, a report by the Federal Highway Administration found. On top of that, the report found, the implementation and operational costs of these programs are fairly low.

    In the United States, most of the bike-sharing programs are operated in larger cities or tourist destinations. For most of them, there are 3½ to five bike-sharing stations per square mile of the service area, according to the Federal Highway Administration report.

    The number of bicycles per 100,000 residents is higher in most touristy areas, like Aspen, Colo., and Long Beach, N.Y., whereas the country’s largest cities, like New York and Chicago, offer the greatest numbers of bicycles and stations.

    The cost and cost structures of these program vary, but most offer both an annual membership and a day pass.

    Hubway is continuing to expand in the area. Boston and Cambridge have plans for new stations later this season, the system reported.

    In a statement last week, Mayor Martin J. Walsh called the program’s growth “a testament to its importance in moving people around the area.”

    “The return of the bikes has become a real sign of spring for the region,” Walsh added.


    Three Cambridge Station Alerts: Dana Park, Lafayette Square, Kennedy School

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 17th, the Hubway station at Dana Park in the Cambridgeport region of Cambridge, which had been removed for the winter season, has been redeployed and is open & operational. The Dana Park Hubway station is a 19-dock station, located on Lawrence Street between Pearl and Magazine, adjacent to Dana Park.


    Station Move Alert: Beginning Friday, April 17th, the Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main St / Columbia St Hubway station in Cambridge will move across the street, returning to its seasonal on-street location. Please note: This station has also expanded from 15 to 19 docks.



    Station Move Alert: On Friday, April 17th, the Harvard Kennedy School Hubway station was relocated to JFK Street, behind the MBTA bus shelter, against the building.



    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: Faneuil Hall [Boston]

    Station Move Alert: Beginning Friday, April 17th, the Faneuil Hall Hubway station in Boston, previously located at the intersection of Union and North Streets, will be placed in its new location on the backside of Government Center on Congress Street. The station will also be expanded the following week to its original 19 docks.

    During the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.


    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    Hubway reopens system-wide today!


    #TakeHubway system-wide, as of Friday, April 17th!

    Click here to view the station map of all available stations, docks, and bikes, or use the Spotcycle app from your tablet or phone.

    It’s a little wet out there—ride safely!

    Sign up to get an alert the moment the full-system reopens!

    Hubway is about to formally reopen full-system operations for its 5th season, as Boston-, Brookline-, and Somerville-based stations rejoin Cambridge on Friday, April 17th!

    Want to be the first to know when you can #TakeHubway system-wide? Click here to sign up to receive an email system alert the moment stations open.

    As usual, we’ll also publish specific station and system alerts here on the Hubway website, as well as Hubway’s facebook page and twitter profile. And you can always visit our Station Map or use Spotcycle to see which stations are currently open and have dock/bike availability.

    [Boston Business Journal] 5 Things You Need To Know Today (the bikes are back)

    The following excerpt is from an article originally published by Doug Banks in Boston Business Journal on April 15th, 2015.

    Good morning, Boston! Here are the five most important things you need to know to help start your busy business day:
    The bikes are back: Hubway start date is this week
    One more sign spring may actually be here: The appearance of Hubway bike docks in Boston. The bike-sharing system is set to start up again on Friday in the city. The Boston stations had been closed since Dec. 31, 2014. The Cambridge portion of the Hubway system — 32 stations in total — was open year-round for the second year in a row.

    [Boston Business Journal] Hubway prepares for April 17 start date

    The following was originally published by W. Marc Bernsau as a slideshow in Boston Business Journal on April 15th, 2015.



    One more sign spring may actually be here is the appearance of Hubway bike docks around the area. Station technicians Lindsey Daman and Tom Langelier set up a station on Pearl Street in Post Office Square. Now that spring is here, Hubway bike stations are starting to appear around the area. The Cambridge part of the Hubway system — which includes 32 stations — was open year-round for the second year in a row. The Boston-based stations have been closed since Dec. 31, 2014. Some facts: > In the summer of 2012, the system expanded to the Cities of Cambridge and Somerville, and to the Town of Brookline. > By the end of 2013, the system footprint covered approximately 20 square miles. > Hubway is owned by the governments of the Cities of Boston, Cambridge, and Somerville, and by the Town of Brookline. The Metropolitan Area Planning Council oversees the interaction and use between municipalities. > Hubway is operated by Motivate, which operates bikeshare systems around the world, including Capital Bikeshare in the D.C.-metro area, San Francisco’s Bay Area Bike Share, and Chicago’s Divvy Bikes. Each system has a different operating profile based on the scale.



    Hubway station technician Tom Langelier makes an adjustment to one of the bike docks at the station being set up on Pearl Street in Post Office Square.



    Hubway station technicians Tom Langelier and Lindsey Daman check the pay center at the station they set up on Pearl Street in Post Office Square.



    Each Hubway bike dock has to be calibrated -as Lindsey Daman places a bike in the dock Tom Langelier checks the pay center at the station set up on Pearl Street in Post Office Square.



    Can it be biking season is actually here? Hubway Station Technician Lindsey Daman calibrates a bike dock at the station on Pearl Street in Post Office Square in preparation for bicycle availability starting April 17th.

    Updates to User Agreement & Privacy Policy


    We’re updating the Hubway Privacy Policy and Bicycle Rental Agreement, Liability Waiver and Release to clarify that Hubway is owned by a number of municipalities (currently Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville)(the “Municipalities”) and operated by Motivate International Inc. (“Motivate”). As the owners of Hubway, the Municipalities are also the owners of the data that Motivate collects on their behalf. The changes provide that Motivate may share Hubway user data with, or as directed by, the Municipalities for the purposes explained in the updated Privacy Policy and Bicycle Rental Agreement, Liability Waiver and Release.

    View the new Privacy Policy here.
    View the new User Agreement here.

    These updates go into effect Monday, April 20, 2015, for current members, and immediately for new annual and monthly members who join beginning April 15, 2015.

    [Boston Herald] As You Were Saying... Steering Boston toward safe biking

    The following article was originally published by Emily Garr Pacetti in The Boston Herald on April 11th, 2015.

    As a bike commuter in Washington, D.C., Cleveland and now Boston, I have witnessed growing animosity between drivers and cyclists that is misplaced. Cyclists are frustrated with the perceived lack of respect by drivers. Drivers complain that cyclists do not respect the rules of the road.

    We each miss the point. Today’s roads and the rules that govern them were designed for a different era. It’s time that roads accommodate both cars and cyclists, and protected bike lanes are a good start.

    More bikes will roll onto the roads this spring, continuing an upward trend in the Boston area and around the country. According to Boston Bikes, the city has seen the number of estimated daily bike trips double since 2007, to about 80,000 people on bikes in 2014.

    Cyclists like me will once again squeeze by you drivers at red lights, zip past you in traffic jams and roll by you at stop signs. You might wait patiently to pass, or whiz by without a second thought.

    Unfortunately since 2010, 11 cyclists have died from clashes with motor vehicles, as reported by the mayor’s office last fall. And according to an analysis by the state Department of Transportation last year, 70 percent of bike-related collisions resulted in injuries.

    Kate Albertin, 29, was one of those cyclists. Last October she was riding from her home in Dorchester to school one morning when she was hit by an SUV that rolled through a stop sign. Albertin was thrown onto the hood of the car, sustaining severe knee and leg injuries. She is still recovering from those injuries. Albertin said that sometimes she just wished that drivers would treat her as if she were their son or daughter.

    “I’m a person. I don’t have a metal cage around me,” she said.

    Legally, however, she might as well have. Her bike was treated as a vehicle from the stop sign to the accident report.

    Albertin doesn’t plan to ride in Boston again.

    One way to make the roads safer for her and others is for cities to construct more protected bike lanes, such as the one Boston Mayor Marty Walsh is proposing for a section of Commonwealth Avenue. Protected bike lanes use physical barriers like parked cars or flex-posts to separate bikes from car traffic. They are a safer, more inviting option for cyclists — and less of a nuisance to drivers.

    And they work.

    A study of 30 miles of protected bike lanes in New York City credits them with reducing serious injuries to cyclists by 75 percent.

    A growing inventory of protected bike lanes is tracked by the charitable foundation PeopleForBikes, which also lists lanes on Western Avenue and Mount Vernon Street in Boston, and Concord, Vassar and Ames streets in Cambridge. According to the PeopleForBikes’ recent report, “Boston has more potential for bike improvements than any other large city in the United States.”

    Protected bike lanes are an opportunity for drivers and cyclists alike to make commuting safer and more enjoyable.

    Let’s make it safe for people like Kate Albertin to get on their bikes again — and welcome others to do the same.

    [WBUR] Hubway bike sharing system to reopen April 17

    The following article was originally published on WBUR.org on April 9th, 2015.

    Hubway, the Boston area’s bike sharing system, is set to reopen for spring on April 17.

    All stations with the exception of 13 along the Boston Marathon route will be ready for the morning commute next Friday. Those 13 will reopen after the April 20 race.

    Most of the 140 stations Hubway operates were closed for the winter, except for 32 stations in Cambridge.

    Hubway says those 32 stations averaged about 1,900 trips per week between January and March, despite four separate shutdowns due to the winter’s record-setting snowfall.

    The number of stations in operation this season — 140 — is the same as last year, though Hubway says plans are in the works to add new stations in Boston and Cambridge.

    “The return of bikes has become a real sign of spring for the region, and we’re eager for system expansion later in the season that will continue to improve the way people move about the city,” Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said in a statement.

    Hubway says details about new stations will be released later.

    [Boston Globe] Hubway returns April 17

    The following article was originally published by Nicole Dungca in The Boston Globe on April 9th, 2015.

    Most of the stations of Hubway, the region’s bike-share system, will reopen April 17 after many closed for the winter. Thirteen stations along or adjacent to the Boston Marathon route will remain closed until after the April 20 race. Hubway began operating in the region in 2011 and now includes 140 stations and more than 1,300 bikes in Boston, Cambridge, Brookline, and Somerville. Hubway regularly shuts down most of its operations for the winter, when riders are less likely to take advantage of the system. The system closed most of its stations in November, though for the past two winters, Cambridge has kept most of its stations open. This past winter, Boston also started keeping some stations open. Officials from Somerville have also said they are considering whether to keep stations open year-round.

    [Harvard Sustainability News] Biking Her Own Path

    An interview with Harvard alum and Hubway General Manager Emily Stapleton

    The following interview was originally published by Jahred Liddie on Harvard Sustainability News on April 3rd, 2015.

    The Hubway bike share system has grown in popularity and size since its inception in 2011. Its General Manager, Emily Stapleton, earned her undergraduate degree in psychology at Harvard in 2005, and later completed her MBA at Harvard Business School in 2011. She has also held positions at RelayRides, a peer-to-peer car sharing service and Bauer’s Intelligent Transportation, a motor coach company. Jahred Liddie, College ‘16, recently interviewed Emily about her interest in sustainable transportation and her journey out of the College and into the professional world.

    Jahred: Let’s start broad. What motivates your interest in sustainability and transportation?

    Emily: To me, transportation is fundamental. People need to get to work, to school, to the grocery store, to visit family and friends, and to explore the communities around them. Instead of being a source of major frustration, I think transportation can be active, enjoyable, and sustainable. Transportation is a sector that can have one of the largest impacts on reduction of the use of fossil fuels. 

    Jahred: Give us a little more information about your professional life. Where has your professional trajectory taken you since graduating from the Business School?

    Emily: When I left HBS, I took a summer internship at the start-up of a fellow HBS’er, Shelby Clark (HBS ’10). He had founded RelayRides while a Business School student and by the time I joined the team full-time, the company was headed for a nation-wide launch of a service that began only in Boston-metro and San Francisco. My primary focus at RelayRides was Trust and Safety, including vetting of riders and establishing a rating system for car renters and car owners.

    Jahred: Why Hubway?

    Emily: I personally am a bicycle commuter, and I see the huge benefit in riding a bicycle around the city. The bicycle is often the fastest way to get around, and riding also helps improve fitness and engagement with the physical environment. Hubway bicycle sharing has added a new dimension to the metro-Boston transportation network. It is an efficient mode of transportation that allows people the freedom to take one-way trips, ditch their cars in favor of linking commuter rail or T with Hubway, or take a leisurely ride along the Esplanade.

    Jahred: What’s a day in the life of the General Manager at Hubway?

    Emily: My days consist of collaborating with my clients, my team, and the rest of the Motivate staff operating bike share across the country. Hubway is a program owned by the municipalities of Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline, so as the operator of Hubway, I coordinate with the municipalities on strategic questions for the system, such as expansion planning. I coordinate with my team on staffing plans, inventory management, operations plans, and marketing plans; I manage the system’s budget and address its legal needs, such as creating license agreements with private property holders in order to operate on their property. Motivate operates bike share systems across the country, so I regularly share best practices with my peers in other markets.

    Jahred: How do you think Harvard has equipped you in your professional life? What resources did you find useful at Harvard (and beyond) in navigating the working world?

    Emily: In both my undergraduate studies as a psychology concentrator and as a business school student, the importance of data analysis was always emphasized—the ability to substantiate a hypothesis with facts gained through a combination of quantitative analysis and experimentation. Further, psychology taught me how to build successful teams and better understand others’ working styles and motivations; business school taught me how to incorporate many different perspectives into one constructive conversation.

    Jahred: If you had to give one bit of advice to a student interested in a career in sustainability, transportation, or business, what would it be?

    Emily: It is helpful to have exploratory conversations with many different people. In my time at Harvard College and Harvard Business School, I really utilized the resources available in Career Services and the advising programs. I also utilized Crimson Compass to reach out to alumni in my industry, who were very generous with their time and advice. Further, I cross-registered for a transportation class at the Kennedy School during grad school and took a class on cities at the Design School during undergrad. Utilize all the resources this great university has to offer, and do not underestimate the value of volunteering in your industry in addition to seeking internships and full time jobs.

    Bonus Tip: Harvard offers a discounted Hubway membership for all Harvard affiliates. LEARN MORE.

    [Mother Nature Network] 12 Reasons to Start Using a Bicycle for Transportation

    The following editorial was originally published by Chris Baskind on Mother Nature Network on March 18, 2010.

    We’re continuing our look at smart ways to start saddling up and using bicycles for real transportation.
    We’ve always taken the greenness of bike transport as a given. But if you’re just getting started — or perhaps trying to convince an employer that bicycle commuting is a good thing — we’ve rounded up a dozen reasons to leave that car in the driveway and start covering pavement on two wheels. Let’s ride!
    1) It’s easier to finance a new bicycle than a new car. Thanks to the recession, auto loans are hard to find these days — even if you have good credit. But for the price of a single car payment, you can buy a well-made bicycle that should outlast most cars. Add a few hundred dollars more for rain gear, lights and accessories, and you have all-weather, anytime transportation.
    2) A bicycle has a tiny manufacturing footprint when compared to a car. All manufactured goods have environmental impact, but bicycles can be produced for a fraction of the materials, energy and shipping costs of a car.
    3) Bicycles produce no meaningful pollution when in operation. Bikes don’t have tailpipes belching poisonous fumes into the atmosphere. They also eliminate the oil, fuel and hydraulic fluids dripped by automobiles onto the road surface — which means less toxic runoff into local waterways.
    4) Bikes save taxpayers money by reducing road wear. A 20-pound bicycle is a lot less rough on the pavement than a two-ton sedan. Every bicycle on the road amounts to money saved patching potholes and resurfacing city streets.
    5) Bicycles are an effective alternative to a second car. Perhaps you’re not in a position to adopt a bicycle as primary transportation. But bikes make great second vehicles. You can literally save thousands of dollars a year using a bicycle for workday commuting and weekend errands in households which might otherwise be forced to maintain two cars.
    6) Using a bike for transportation can help you lose weight and improve your overall health. The health benefits of regular aerobic exercise are well-known. Depending on your riding style and local road conditions, you could easily burn 600 calories an hour through brisk cycling. Most bike commuters report losing 15 to 20 pounds during their first year in the saddle without changing their eating habits.
    7) You can store a dozen bicycles in a single automobile-sized parking place. Parking lots have enormous environmental and financial impact, particularly in urbanized areas. The more bikes you can get on the road, the fewer parking spaces you need to build.
    8) Bicycles don’t burn gasoline. Fuel is cheap compared to last year, and the economic downturn is likely to keep a lid on petroleum demand for a while. But we’re not producing any more oil today than we were when it was more than $100 a barrel. A healthy bike culture will help ease pressure on supply once demand returns.
    9) Bicycling may be faster and more efficient than taking a car. We’re not talking about the crazy — and illegal — antics of New York bicycle messengers. But bikes are often faster than cars in urban areas, especially when city designers have set aside proper bike lanes. There’s nothing more satisfying as a bicycle commuter than breezing past a long line of gridlocked traffic.
    10) Bikes cost much less to maintain and operate than automobiles. You’ll never throw a rod on a bicycle, and dropping a transmission on a bike usually means replacing a bent derailleur hanger or worn-out chain. Bicycles do require service, but you can learn to perform most of it yourself. Even if you have a shop do things for you, costs will be trivial compared to a car.
    11) Bicycles provide mobility for those who may not qualify or afford to drive. Not everyone can get a driver’s license (or wants one), and the cost of purchasing, insuring and maintaining a car is out of reach for a lot of people. Almost everyone can afford some sort of bike. Other than walking, bicycles are the most cost-effective transportation on the planet.
    12) Studies show that bicycle commuters are healthier, more productive, and require less time off at work. This is why most enlightened employers are eager to accommodate commuting cyclists. Healthy workers are better workers — and that’s good for the bottom line. Bikes are smart business.
    So there are 12 reasons to dust-off that bicycle in your garage in time for Bike to Work Day (the third Friday in May).

    [Health.com] 5 Ways Your Commute Is Hurting Your Health

    The following article was originally published by Amanda MacMillan on Health.com on March 31st, 2015.

    The average American commute to work lasts 25 minutes, according to U.S. Census data, but many workers travel far above and beyond that number. In Los Angeles, drivers spend an average of 90 hours a year stuck in traffic alone, and employees in New York City spend an average of 48 minutes a day getting to their jobs, often switching trains or busses along the way.

    Commuting is rarely anyone’s favorite time of day, but it can be more than just an inconvenience: All those hours spent in home-work limbo can have physical and mental health implications, as well. Here are five ways your car, train, or bus ride to the office can affect your well-being, plus what to do about it.

    It may contribute to weight gain
    A 2012 study published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine found that the farther Texas residents commuted every day, the more likely they were to be overweight. Unsurprisingly, the farthest commuters were also less likely to get the recommended amount of daily physical activity. “It’s not so easy to move or change your job, so if you do have a long commute it’s important that you make a bigger effort to be active during the day,” says lead study author Christine Hoehner, PhD. “Take walking breaks, get up from your desk often, take the stairs, and make it a priority to exercise whenever you do have time.”

    If you can, it might also be a good idea to try public transportation: men and women who drove to work weighed about 6.6 and 5.5 pounds more, respectively, than their peers who walked, cycled, or took trains or buses, a 2014 study in The BMJ found.

    It’s a pain in the neck—literally
    A third of people with commutes of more than 90 minutes say they deal with ongoing neck and back pain, according to a 2010 Gallup poll. While back pain is one of the most common health complaints, only one in four people who commute 10 minutes or less reported pain in the same poll.

    The extra time spent sitting slumped forward in the driver’s seat or on the train could contribute to these issues, says Andrew Wolf, exercise physiologist at Miraval Resort and Spa in Tucson, Arizona. But making an effort to sit up straight—with a lumbar support behind your lower back, and your head evenly over your shoulders—can help you reverse bad habits. “It’s a lifestyle choice that requires that you think about it a bit every day,” he says. “Do enough of this and it will become automatic.”

    It affects your mood
    People who drove, carpooled, or took public transportation to work were less able to enjoy daily activities and had more trouble concentrating compared to walkers or cyclists in a 2014 study from the University of East Anglia. Interestingly, the researchers found that wellbeing scores decreased for car commuters as time spent behind the wheel increased. But for walkers, the opposite held true: Those who traveled farther to work on foot had better mental health scores.

    If there’s no getting around public transportation for you, one thing you might try is talking to strangers. According to a 2014 study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, bus and train commuters reported more positive experiences when they connected with other riders than when they kept to themselves.

    It stresses you out
    People who commute by private car (no matter how long the trip)—or those whose trips lasted longer than 30 minutes by train, bus or on foot—had higher anxiety levels compared to people who made shorter trips, according to a 2014 report from the U.K.’s Office of National Statistics.

    Hoehner’s research also found that the longer people’s car commutes were, the more likely they were to have elevated blood pressure—even when she controlled for physical activity level. “That finding suggested that there’s something going on independent of the fact that people are less active, potentially something related to stress,” she says. (Other risk factors for hypertension, like lack of sleep, poor diet, and social isolation, could also play a role.)

    “One way to combat this could be for employers to allow people to commute at different times of the day, so they’re not spending so much time in traffic,” Hoehner adds. Can’t switch up your schedule? Turn on a soothing playlist or practice slow, deep breathing when you feel yourself tensing up.

    It exposes you to more pollution
    In a 2007 study of Los Angeles residents, up to half of their exposure to harmful air pollution occurred while they traveled in their vehicles. Driving with the windows up, using recirculated air, and driving slower than 20 miles per hour can reduce exposure, say the study authors, but not as much as cutting back on driving time.

    Cycling to work increases exposure to pollutants, as well, according to a 2010 Dutch study—but the same research also found that its health benefits of getting your heart rate up on your ride still outweigh its risks by at least nine times.

    [Jamaica Plain Gazette] Editorial: Farewell to Bike Czar

    The following editorial was originally published in the Jamaica Plain Gazette on March 27th, 2015.

    We will miss Nicole Freedman, the JP resident who long served as the City’s pioneering Bike Program leader.

    Freedman’s hiring was a legacy of the late Mayor Menino’s unexpected conversion to the bicycling gospel. She got Boston up to speed at a velocity one would expect from a former Olympian. A plethora of bike lanes and the Hubway bike share system are among her obvious contributions to a city that was once a virtual enemy to bicyclists.

    From the JP perspective, it was a benefit to have the Bike Program director riding our streets on a daily basis to know bike issues first-hand.

    Mayor Walsh is showing a commitment to continuing the bike improvements and pushing them close to the cutting edge, and also to making more transparent decisions on such roadway infrastructure. Meanwhile, thank you, Nicole, for getting Boston started on that journey.

    System Alert: seasonal station deployment begins Thursday, March 26th, full-system reopening to follow within a few weeks

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway will begin deploying stations in Boston, Brookline, and Somerville beginning today, Thursday, March 26th, 2015.

    PLEASE NOTE: While the Cambridge operations are still taking place as normal, at this time Boston / Brookline / Somerville stations are not operational, they will not accept bicycle returns and bikes should not be docked at those stations until the full system is opened. Plans are to fully connect all deployed stations within the next few weeks. Sign up to receive the reopening announcement by entering your email on the Hubway homepage.

    If you have any question about whether a particular station is open or closed, please check Hubway Tracker or download Spotcycle for your smartphone for the most up-to-date information, or call to speak with a Member Services Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    Still riding in Cambridge, spring full-system reopening date still TBD

    photo credit: Alex Nenopoulos.

    We’re excited and anxious to get you pedaling into spring. The season-change is just around the corner, and Hubway’s full-system station deployment will follow soon after. The specific date, however, is still to be determined, and is dependent to some extent on remaining snow & ice conditions at station locations.

    We thank you for your patience after the record-setting winter we experienced. As with last year, the system remains open and operational at all Cambridge-based stations.

    Want to be the first to know when stations are opening?

    Follow Hubway on Twitter & Facebook, and sign up to receive Hubway’s email announcements by clicking here.

    [Bike League] Why Bike? It makes us happy, researchers say

    The following article was originally published by Liz Murphy of The League of American Bicyclists on March 16th, 2015.

    Why do we bike?

    As advocates, we’re quick to point out the benefits we can measure: It burns calories, reduces air pollution, relieves traffic congestion and costs less than car ownership. But, for those of us who ride, we know there are even bigger upsides to cycling: Biking makes us feel good. And now there’s data to prove it.

    Thanks to researchers at Clemson and the University of Pennsylvania, a study released in 2014 made it official: Folks who bike to their destinations are the happiest. Using the American Time Use Survey, collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Eric Morris and Erick Guerra were able to determine the average mood felt by people during different types of travel — and the demeanor of cyclists was significantly better than car drivers, passengers or public transit riders. Talk about a selling point for cycling.

    “Happiness is one of the most ancient subjects researchers have thought about: how do you live the good life?” Morris told us. “With modern data gathering, we can finally get some empirical answers with evidence rather than just speculation. Happiness is very widely studied in economics and psychology, but the study of happiness has come late to the field of transportation, urban planning and cities.”

    Morris isn’t a bicyclist himself, and, honestly, didn’t go into the research with any sense that cycling would play significantly into the findings. And while the magnitude of the results — the far more positive moods of bicyclists even when controlling for the physical health of the traveler — was surprising, the notion that bikes give us a mental boost is backed by other research.

    “First, exercise really elevates your mood,” Morris said. “But also, I think you’re probably made happier on a bicycle because you feel you’re achieving something. It’s been shown that people don’t like tasks that are way too hard for them — but they do like a task that is difficult and they can just accomplish it. From bicycling, you get that sense of mastery and proving to yourself that you’re skilled, rather than just sitting and riding in a bus or a car.”

    What does that mean for marketing biking to the masses? While cycling has plenty of perks, this type of research helps advocates make the ultimate pitch.

    “Bicycling has got a lot going for it,” Morris said. “Finding that people are also quite happy while doing it is one more thing that suggests we should put more effort into promoting it.” Thanks to researchers like Morris we can say with a straight, er, smiling face that bikes make us healthier and happier.

    The Patriots won, which means Hubway won the #BikeShareSuperBowl

    ICYMI: Our beloved New England Patriots won the big game (again)! In case that wasn’t enough to get us through the bitter winter, we’re extra happy because it meant Hubway won the Bike Share Super Bowl, too! We had a little wager riding on The Game with our friends at Seattle’s Pronto! Cycle Share: the system whose team lost had to pedal around their town wearing the jersey of the winning team.

    We almost felt bad sending them a Pats’ Tom Brady #12 jersey and asking them to make good. Almost. But let’s put it this way—you can’t say they’re not good sports in the Pacific Northwest. Pronto’s Biz Dev guy, Sean, bit the bullet for their crew, donned the jersey, ignored the jeers, and rode out to the Space Needle. PIC TO PROVE!

    Brady willing, we’ll see you guys in the Bowl again next year ;)

    In Seattle? #GoPronto!
    Near Boston? #TakeHubway!
    As always, ride safe & have fun.

    Now that it’s getting warmer, we want to see you repping your local teams! Break out your favorite hometown jersey (Hideo Nomo’s Sox jersey, anyone?), grab a Hubway, and post your pics with the hashtag #TakeHubway.

    System Alert: Hubway has reopened (all stations in Cambridge)

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Tuesday, February 16th, at 6pm. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather and ongoing station cleanup. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Saturday, February 14th, at 7PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a Blizzard Warning from the National Weather Service (NWS), Hubway will temporarily close all stations at 7:00PM on Saturday, February 14th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun. Any bikes in use at the time of closure can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We expect Hubway to remain closed for the duration of the NWS Blizzard Warning and thereafter until conditions have improved. Annual and monthly members will be informed of re-opening plans via email. Closure and re-opening information will also be posted here on the Hubway website, Facebook, and Twitter. We will also email riders to inform them of closures and re-openings. Register for Hubway’s email list by clicking here.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway has reopened (all stations in Cambridge)

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Tuesday, February 10th, at 5pm. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather and ongoing station cleanup. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Sunday, February 8th, at 9:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a Storm Warning from the National Weather Service (NWS), Hubway will temporarily close all stations at 9:00AM on Sunday, February 8th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun. Any bikes in use at the time of closure can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We expect Hubway to remain closed for the duration of the NWS Blizzard Warning and thereafter until conditions have improved. Annual and monthly members will be informed of re-opening plans via email. Closure and re-opening information will also be posted here on the Hubway website, Facebook, and Twitter. We will also email riders to inform them of closures and re-openings. Register for Hubway’s email list by clicking here.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway has reopened (all stations in Cambridge)

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Tuesday, February 3rd, at noon. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather and ongoing station cleanup. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Monday, February 2nd, at 8:00AM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a Storm Warning from the National Weather Service (NWS), Hubway will temporarily close all stations at 8:00AM on Monday, February 2nd, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun. Any bikes in use at the time of closure can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We expect Hubway to remain closed for the duration of the NWS Blizzard Warning and thereafter until conditions have improved. Annual and monthly members will be informed of re-opening plans via email. Closure and re-opening information will also be posted here on the Hubway website, Facebook, and Twitter. We will also email riders to inform them of closures and re-openings. Register for Hubway’s email list by clicking here

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway has reopened (all stations in Cambridge)

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Wednesday, January 28th, at 4PM. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather and ongoing station cleanup. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Monday, January 26th, at 7:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a Blizzard Warning from the National Weather Service (NWS), Hubway will temporarily close all stations at 7:00PM on Monday, January 26th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun. Any bikes in use at the time of closure can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    Please note: throughout the day, Hubway field staff will be applying covers to some of the docking points at many stations to protect them from snow accumulation. This will reduce the actual number of docks available in the system and will impact the accuracy of dock availability numbers displayed on Spotcycle and other Hubway-related apps.

    We expect Hubway to remain closed for the duration of the NWS Blizzard Warning and thereafter until conditions have improved. Annual and monthly members will be informed of re-opening plans via email. Closure and re-opening information will also be posted here on the Hubway website, Facebook, and Twitter. We will also email riders to inform them of closures and re-openings. Register for Hubway’s email list by clicking here

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    SYSTEM ALERT: December 31st is final day for Boston-based stations

    SYSTEM ALERT: The final day of 2014 winter operations for all Boston-based stations will be Wednesday, December 31st! Though you may continue to see the Boston-based stations during the first week of January, they will not be operational, and riders will not be able to rent or return bikes to these stations. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. All closed Boston stations, in addition to those based in Brookline & Somerville, are expected to relaunch again in March or April 2015.

    Click here to register for email system alerts. If stations you typically use are within Boston city limits, we recommend making alternative arrangements for your trips beginning on the 31st.

    Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for almost 3 million rides… and counting!

    Give Yourself a Hubway Gift for the New Year


    There’s one person you forgot from your holiday list: YOU!
    Get your new year’s resolutions started
    by purchasing or renewing your Hubway membership today.



    Already a member? Why wait until your membership expires? Make your Hubway renewal a new year’s resolution by logging into your account and pre-purchasing your membership extension!

    New to Hubway? Awesome! Start here to register and order your key, or visit the Hubway online store to grab some 24-Hour or 72-Hour passes. Passes start at only $6. Plus, each pass you purchase in December gets YOU a free ice cream cone from Ben & Jerry’s Boston!

    Of course you can always still grab passes as gifts for friends, too :).
    Visit the Hubway online store today!


    [About Travel] Boston Holiday Gift Guide 2014

    Hubway has been featured in this gift guide (excerpt below) by Sarah Pascarella, originally published on About.com.

    Holiday shoppers — or should I say holiday procrastinators — it’s not too late to snag an ideal gift for the Bostonian (or frequent Boston visitor) on your list. I’ve put together five options that will please foodies, families, and fans. And with many of my gift ideas focusing on experiences (rather than stuff), these presents will be appreciated—and memorable—all the year through.

    In the spirit of the season, Happy Hanukkah, Merry Christmas, Joyous Kwanzaa, and Happy New Year to you and yours! Here are my picks for this year’s Boston Holiday Gift Guide.

    Hubway Membership

    A membership to Hubway, the popular bike-share service in greater Boston, is a great gift for both locals and visitors. Hubway memberships start at $6 for a day rental and go up to $85 for an annual pass. And if you’re one of the first 100 people to purchase a Hubway gift membership, you’ll get a free cone from Ben & Jerry’s to add as a stocking stuffer (or to keep for yourself).

    [UPDATE} Reinstalled Station Alert: Boston Medical Center

    [UPDATE: 12/15/14] Reinstallation of the Boston Medical Center station is awaiting seasonal licensing, and has not yet been installed. Station installation and removal schedules are subject to change. We apologize for any confusion or inconvenience.

    REINSTALLED STATION ALERT: The Boston Medical Center Hubway station is scheduled for reinstallation by the end of the day on Friday, December 12th, and is expected to remain open and operational through the end of December, weather permitting. The 15-dock station will be placed in its new location on the West side of Mass Ave between Albany Street and Harrison Ave.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway!

    Reinstalled Station Alert: Charles Circle - Charles St at Cambridge St

    REINSTALLED STATION ALERT: The Charles Circle - Charles St at Cambridge St Hubway station is scheduled for reinstallation by the end of the day on Friday, December 12th, and is expected to remain open and operational through the end of December, weather permitting. The 15-dock station will be placed in its new seasonal location on the north side of Cambridge Street (heading towards Cambridge), just as it splits into the entry ramps for Storrow, the Longfellow, and Charles Street.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway!

    Reinstalled Station Alert: JP Monument - South St at Centre St

    REINSTALLED STATION ALERT: The JP Monument - South St at Centre St Hubway station is scheduled for reinstallation by the end of the day on Friday, December 12th, and is expected to remain open and operational through the end of December, weather permitting. The 15-dock station will be placed in its new seasonal location in front of Curtis Hall, 20 South Street, across the street from its previous location.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway!

    Exclusive for Hubway Members: 20% off tickets to see Irving Berlin's White Christmas

    Dreaming of a White Christmas? Get one with a special ticket offer for Hubway members only! Start with a timeless tale of joy & goodwill, fill it with classic Irving Berlin songs, and top it off with glorious dancing and lots of snow!

    Hubway members receive 20% off select tickets to select performances.
    Visit citicienter.org/merry for tickets, and use code HOLIDAYS for available tickets for these performances:

    • Tuesday, 12/16, 7:30pm
    • Wednesday, 12/17, 7:30pm
    • Thursday, 12/18, 7:30pm
    • Friday, 12/19, 8:00pm
    • Sunday, 12/21, 6:30pm
    • Tuesday, 12/23, 7:30pm
    • Wednesday, 12/24, 2pm
    • Sunday, 12/28, 6:30pm
    • Happy Holidays!

    [TimeOut] The 50 best things to do in Boston

    The following is an excerpt of an article that was originally published by Jessie Rogers on TimeOut.com.

    Your ultimate guide to things to do in Boston—from the city’s best restaurants and shops to museums and sightings

    Ride the Hubway

    While driving around Boston can be, at times, both mystifying and terrifying, biking is a really great way to zip around the city. The city’s bike-sharing system, Hubway, offers up affordable bikes for the commitment-phobic: you determine your level of involvement, choosing between one-day, three-day or annual memberships. You can pick up a bike at one kiosk and leave it at another at your leisure—it’s so convenient that we’d love to see this system used for other things. See you later, pants.


    The Perfect Stocking-Stuffer


    THE PERFECT STOCKING-STUFFER
    Gift certificates are available now and through the holidays.


    There’s a gift level for everyone, whether you’re buying for friends and family who live and work in the metro-Boston area, students, or even out-of-town guests. And for a limited time, each gift certificate you purchase gets YOU a free ice cream cone from Ben & Jerry’s Boston!

    ORDER NOW

    Check someone off your gift list! Visit the Hubway online store right now to purchase gift certificates redeemable for Hubway passes and memberships of all levels! Print them right from your computer!


    Station Move Alert: MIT Stata Center at Vassar St / Main St [Cambridge]

    STATION MOVE ALERT: On Friday, December 5th, the MIT Stata Center at Vassar St / Main St Hubway station in Cambridge will be placed in its new permanent location across the street from the entrance/exit to the Stata Center. This 23-dock station is expected to remain open and operational all winter, weather permitting. For a brief period during the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway.

    Reinstalled Station Alert: Kenmore Square / Commonwealth Ave

    REINSTALLED STATION ALERT: The Kenmore Square / Comm. Ave Hubway station is scheduled for reinstallation by the end of the day on Friday, December 5th, and is expected to remain open and operational through the end of December, weather permitting. The 15-dock station will be placed in its new seasonal location across the street on the sidewalk on the inbound side of Commonwealth Avenue in front of 540 Commonwealth Ave, adjacent to the intersection of Commonwealth Avenue, Brookline Avenue, and Boylston Street.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway!

    Reinstalled Station Alert: Charlestown - Main St at Austin St relaunching on Friday

    REINSTALLED STATION ALERT: The Charlestown - Main St at Austin St Hubway station is scheduled for reinstallation by the end of the day on Friday, December 5th, and is expected to remain open and operational through the end of December, weather permitting. The 11-dock station will be placed in its new seasonal location on the sidewalk adjacent to the intersection of Main & Austin Streets.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway!

    Station Removal Alert: Northeastern University / North Parking Lot

    STATION ALERT: On Friday, December 5th, the Northeastern University Hubway station located in the school’s North Parking Lot, will be removed for the winter season. If you were planning on using that station, we recommend making alternative arrangements.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway.

    The perfect stocking stuffer comes with free ice cream!

    We’ve extended this offer through the entire month of December!

    Purchase a Hubway gift certificate today and you’ll receive a coupon for a complimentary Ben & Jerry’s cone!


    Click here to purchase your gift certificates now!

    Station Move Alert: Jackson Square [Boston]

    Station Move Alert: Beginning Thursday, December 4th, the Jackson Square T at Centre St Hubway station in Boston will be placed in its new seasonal location across the street from the entrance/exit to the Jackson Square T station. The station is expected to remain open and operational through December, pending favorable weather conditions.

    For a brief period during the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: Milk St at India St [Boston]

    Station Move Alert: Beginning Wednesday, December 3rd, the recently removed Milk St at India St Hubway station in Boston will be placed in its new seasonal location at the triangle of Franklin St, India St, and the John F. Fitzgerald Surface Road. The station is expected to remain open and operational through December, pending favorable weather conditions.

    During the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    Two Station Alerts: Cambridge station updates (Dana Park, Lafayette Square)

    Station Alert: The Dana Park Hubway station located on Lawrence Street between Pearl and Magazine, and adjacent to the Dana Park, will be removed for the winter season on Wednesday, December 3rd.

    The station is the only Cambridge-based station scheduled for removal for the season, and it is expected to return by April 2015.


    Station Move Alert: Beginning Wednesday, December 3rd, the Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main St / Columbia St Hubway station in Cambridge will move across the street to its new seasonal location at 402 Massachusetts Avenue. The new location is being considered permanent through the remainder of the winter season.

    During the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    Your Hubway CyberMonday deals are here!

    Click here to purchase your gift certificates now!

    HUBWAY MEMBERS: here’s an extra CyberMonday deal just for you!

    Click here today to unlock up to 20% off Citi Bike passes for your next trip to NYC!

    Station Alert: UPDATED Station Removal Schedule for November 24-26 2014

    UPDATED STATION ALERT: Seasonal phased station closures have begun. The final day of 2014 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 26th. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. Click here to register for email system alerts on days when stations are removed.

    Here is the schedule for station removals (subject to change) for November 24th through November 26th:

    Monday, 11/24 (7 stations)

  • Boylston at Fairfield
  • Boylston St / Berkeley St
  • Beacon St / Mass Ave
  • Newbury St / Hereford St
  • New Balance Store - Boylston at Dartmouth
  • Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main St / Columbia St (Cambridge)
  • Washington Square at Washington St (Somerville)
  • Tuesday, 11/25 (6 stations)

  • E. Cottage St at Columbia Rd
  • Upham’s Corner - Ramsey St at Dudley St
  • Mt Pleasant Ave / Dudley Town Common
  • Brigham Circle / Huntington Ave
  • Hyde Square at Barbara St - Jamaica Plain
  • JP Center - Centre St at Myrtle St, Jamaica Plain
  • JP Monument - South St at Centre St Jamaica Plain
  • Boylston / Mass Ave
  • Charles Circle
  • Wednesday, 11/26 (7+ stations*)

  • Post Office Square
  • Charlestown - Main St at Austin St
  • Kenmore Square / Comm. Ave
  • Milk St at India St
  • BMC - E Concord at Harrison Ave
  • Allston Green District - Commonwealth Ave & Griggs St
  • BIDMC - Brookline at Burlington St
  • *PLEASE NOTE: Brookline- and Somerville-based stations may physically remain in the field beyond Wednesday, 11/26, but after that date they will no longer be in operation, and riders will not be able to rent or dock bikes at these station. Again, all closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015.

    ALSO NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 3 million rides… and counting!

    Member Perk: Unlock NYC with this Citi Bike discount, now through December 1st

    Our bikeshare friends to the South, Citi Bike, launched last year and will double in size by 2017, but you can ride NYC now! As a Hubway member, you have access to purchase Citi Bike casual passes and annual memberships at a discount.

    Planning a trip to the Big Apple? Pick up a 24-Hour or 7-day pass for yourself!

    Have friends in NYC? Grab passes or a membership as a holiday gift.
    They make great stocking stuffers!


    Citi Bike Membership/Pass
    New Yorkers pay
    Hubway members pay
    YOU SAVE…
    24-Hour
    $9.95
    $7.95
    $2 (20%)
    7-Day
    $25
    $20
    $5 (20%)
    Annual
    $149
    $139
    $10 (6%+)

    This offer ends on CyberMonday, December 1st, 2014.
    Here’s how to grab your Citi Bike passes now:

    1) Email Citi Bike Sales Manager, Meghan Leys, at meghanleys@nycbicycleshare.com.
    2) Include your Hubway member number. Log in to get it from your profile page.
    3) Include the types of passes and quantity you’d like to buy.

    You’ll receive a response within two business days with your personalized codes to purchase the passes online or at a Citi Bike station kiosk.

    Station Alert: UPDATED Station Removal Schedule for November 20-23, 2014

    UPDATED STATION ALERT: Seasonal phased station closures have begun. The final day of 2014 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 26th. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. Click here to register for email system alerts on days when stations are removed.

    Here is the updated schedule for station removals (subject to change) for November 20th through November 23rd:

    Thursday, 11/20: No stations are scheduled for removal today.

    Friday, 11/21 (6 stations)

  • University of Massachusetts - Boston
  • Andrew Station - Dorchester Ave at Humboldt Pl
  • Franklin St / Arch St
  • Congress / Sleeper
  • Hayes Square at Vine St
  • Washington St at Waltham St
  • Saturday, 11/22: No stations are scheduled for removal today.

    Sunday, 11/23: No stations are scheduled for removal today.

    Please note: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 3 million rides… and counting!

    Here are the stations that will be open this winter

    If you haven’t heard the news that Hubway’s winter operations have expanded this season, check it out! All Cambridge-based stations will once again be open throughout winter, and approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Plus, all closed stations are expected to reopen in March or April 2015.

    Click here to view the list of stations (subject to change) that will be open during some or all of the winter season

    Station Alert: Station Removal Schedule for November 20-23, 2014

    PLEASE NOTE! The schedule below has been updated. Click here to view the latest schedule, updated on Thursday, 11/20.


    STATION ALERT: Seasonal phased station closures have begun. The final day of 2014 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 26th. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. Click here to register for email system alerts on days when stations are removed.

    Here are the scheduled station removals (subject to change) for November 20th through November 23rd:

    Thursday, 11/20 (4 stations)

  • Andrew Station - Dorchester Ave at Humboldt Pl
  • Congress / Sleeper
  • Franklin St / Arch St
  • Hayes Square at Vine St
  • Friday, 11/21 (6 stations)

  • University of Massachusetts - Boston
  • JFK / UMass
  • Day Boulevard - DCR
  • E. Cottage at Columbia Rd
  • Upham’s Corner - Ramsey St at Dudley St
  • Mt Pleasant Ave / Dudley Town Common
  • No stations are scheduled for removal on Saturday, November 22nd, and Sunday, November 23rd.

    Please note: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 3 million rides… and counting!

    System Alert: station locations to move on November 17 & 18

    SYSTEM ALERT: Prior to seasonal phased station closures, some Hubway stations will move this week from their on-street locations to adjacent or nearby off-street locations.

    *Here is the current station move schedule for Monday & Tuesday:

    Monday, November 17th (4 stations):

  • B.U. Central: moved 2 blocks north
  • Agganis Arena - 925 Commonwealth Ave: moved 1 block south
  • Yawkey Way at Boylston St: moved around corner on Boylston
  • Boylston St at Arlington St: moved 1 block east (toward the Common), onto the median
  • Tuesday, November 18th (2 stations):

  • Faneuil Hall - Union St at North St: moved onto Congress St, behind City Hall
  • Cambridge St at Joy St: moved to median strip across street

  • UPDATE (11/18): This week’s originally scheduled moves for the following stations have been postponed. A new date for the moves has not yet been set. Station Alerts will be made when more information is available:

  • Boston Medical Center -  East Concord at Harrison Ave
  • Charlestown - Main St at Austin St
  • Jackson Square T
  • Kenmore Square / Commonwealth Ave

  • *Please note: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. These stations are being moved in close proximity to their current stations, though the new location may not be visible from the prior location.

    The Hubway system will begin seasonal phased station closures on Thursday, November 20, 2014. The final day of 2014 regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 26th. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. All closed stations will relaunch again in March or April 2015. Click here to receive email system alerts on the days that stations are removed.

    Hubway will post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 3 million rides… and counting!

    Sign up to get station-specific seasonal closure alerts

    Hubway will begin its regular season-end station closures on Monday, November 17th, with Brookline and Somerville concluding operations on Wednesday, November 26th. For the second year in a row, Hubway will continue to be available to riders throughout winter at almost all Cambridge-based stations. And for the first time, a reduced number of stations in Boston will remain open through December. The entire system is expected to re-open in March or early April, depending on weather conditions.

    And now you may find yourself asking:

    “Will my station close for the year? And if so, when?”


    To keep you up-to-date on the latest news & seasonal station closures, you can sign up to receive email system alerts on the days that stations are removed. That way you can easily get the latest info and develop a contingency plan for routes that involve your favorite stations. And as usual, we’ll publish specific station closure and system alerts on the Hubway website, as well as Hubway’s facebook page and twitter profile.

    Click here to sign up for station closure alerts!

    [Press Release] Hubway to continue year-round operations in Cambridge











    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to download PDF.
    November 6, 2014

    CONTACT:
    Benjy Kantor, Hubway
    benjykantor@altabicycleshare.com, 617.968.0361

    Cara Seiderman, City of Cambridge Development Department
    cseiderman@cambridgema.gov, 617.349.4629

    HUBWAY TO CONTINUE YEAR-ROUND OPERATIONS IN CAMBRIDGE
    Cambridge-based Hubway Bike Share Stations Will Remain Available through the Winter


    For the second year in a row, Hubway, the metro-Boston area’s public bike share system, will continue to be available to riders throughout winter at almost all Cambridge-based stations. Last year, the City of Cambridge piloted year-round Hubway service, which was very successful with over 35,000 rides from December through March, despite the exceptionally harsh winter.

    “Cambridge broke new ground last year with our first- in- the- region winter operation of a bike share system,” said Cambridge City Manager Richard C. Rossi. “We are pleased to be able to build on last year’s success by continuing to offer this sustainable transportation option throughout the coming winter season.”

    Almost all stations in Cambridge will remain operational throughout the winter, though stations located at Lafayette Square/Main Street and Dana Park will be removed from the street for the season to accommodate snow plowing operations. All station updates will be posted on the station map at www.thehubway.com/stations, www.hubwaytracker.com, and on the Spotcycle app for smart phones (www.spotcycle.net). Annual members may continue to use the Cambridge stations during the season at no additional cost. 24-hour, 72-hour, and monthly passes will be available for purchase as usual.

    As was the case last year, snow removal will be part of the daily responsibilities of the Hubway field staff in addition to the daily rebalancing of the system in order to meet peak demand cycles.

    Users should bear in mind that only Cambridge-based stations will be in operation throughout winter. Closures of other stations will begin in mid-November, with Brookline and Somerville concluding operations on Wednesday, November 26th. For the first time, a reduced number of stations in Boston will remain open through December. The entire system is expected to re-open in March or early April, depending on weather conditions.

    During extreme inclement weather conditions, Hubway may temporarily close the system, and public announcements will be made via social media and the Hubway’s website. Station alerts will also be emailed to annual and monthly Hubway members, and all riders can consult the Spotcycle app to learn whether or not bicycles are available. In the event of a system closing, riders will be able to return bikes to all stations securely, but will not be able to check bikes out.

    Find out more about the Hubway system at www.thehubway.com.

    ###

    #HappyHubwayHalloween Treat Photos!

    We’re excited to present some of our favorite photos from participants in the #HappyHubwayHalloween Treat or Treat promotion! Thank you to our awesome prize partners listed here, and thanks to everyone who participated and rode this Halloween!

    Pro-Tip: Always Double-Check Your Docking

    Didn’t see a green light when you docked? Lift the bike ever-so-slightly by the seat and give a tug to make ensure that it is fully secure and that your trip has closed.

    If you ever have that “left-the-oven-on” feeling later in the day that perhaps you didn’t see that green light, log into your Hubway member account here and click the “Rentals” tab to confirm your trip was successfully closed.

    Of course, you can always reach the Hubway customer support team, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, by calling 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    A Tip of the Cap (Helmet) to Mayor Menino

    With heavy hearts, we mourn the passing of Thomas M. Menino, Boston’s longest serving mayor. The following letter from Hubway General Manager, Emily Stapleton, was distributed to all Hubway staff yesterday afternoon. Some pictures follow.


    All,

    As a tribute to Mayor Menino, here are some words from the mayor himself almost exactly one year ago during a Climate Sustainability speech:

    “The mayor acknowledged that ‘climate work is unending’ and will require a total team effort in order to engage all of Boston’s communities in implementing environmental strategies…Boston’s Hubway program has been a big part of this [green house gas emission] reduction. Hubway bikes have provided 675,000 rides to people around the city, Menino said, preventing 230 tons of carbon gas from entering the atmosphere.” [Boston-specific #s as of 2013.]

    Mayor Menino’s choice to champion bike share in Boston was purposeful and forward-thinking at a time when the feasibility and popularity of bike share in the United States was still considered uncertain and untested. After all, Capital Bikeshare, which launched in 2010, was the only other large-scale bike share program in the U.S. that—only slightly—preceded Boston’s launch in 2011.

    Hubway has certainly been a trailblazer in demonstrating the viability of bike share in a large urban environment in the United States, and I would venture to say that biking in general became more safe, pleasant, and accepted by pedestrians, cyclists, and motorists alike in Boston as a result of Mayor Menino’s leadership.

    “The car is no longer king,” indeed.

    Members of our staff locked down the Mayor’s Bike at City Hall today with respect.

    Emily Stapleton,
    General Manager
    Alta Bicycle Share, Inc.
    Operator of Hubway Bicycle System




    Get Spokey This Halloween! Win Ghoul Stuff!

    Post Your #HappyHubwayHalloween Photo

    and you could win one of more than 50 Scary-Good Treats!


    Nothing is more ghoulishly fun than Greater Boston on Halloween. This year we’re making it extra spo(o)key with some #HappyHubwayHalloween photo fun! You could win a super-sweet Treat from one of our prize providers below.


    HERE’S HOW TO ENTER:

    (1) Snap a photo that includes you in your costume with or near a Hubway bike or station (no need for an action shot). Please be safe! No in-motion selfies while riding, unbikeable costumes, or things dangling in spokes.

    (2) Between October 30th and November 2nd, EITHER upload your photo to Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook (make sure we see it by including the #HappyHubwayHalloween hashtag or by tagging @Hubway), OR email it to socialmedia@thehubway.com (include your permission for us to post it on social media).


    On November 3rd, more than 50 winners will be randomly selected from entries to receive one* of these prizes below. Plus, we’ll be posting our favorites on the Hubway blog! So be scary, funny, clever, and creative! Most of all, be spokey! Group photos are welcome, though only the user who submits the photo is eligible for the prize! Start snapping your #HappyHubwayHalloween now for your chance to win one of these delicious treats:

  • $10 Gift Certificate from Boloco. (5 available)

  • $10 Gift Certificate from Bon Me. (5 available)

  • $5 Gift Certificate from Burger King. (10 available)

  • Pair of Tickets to the Coolidge Corner Theatre. (5 available, $22 value each)

  • $5 Gift Certificate from El Pelon Taqueria. (8 available)

  • $10 Gift Certificate from Flat Top Johnny’s. (3 available)

  • Hubway Annual Membership ($85 value). (1 available)

  • Pair of Tickets to Improv Asylum. (2 available, $50 value each)

  • Pair of Tickets to Laugh Boston. (2 available, $50 value each)

  • $10 Gift Certificate from New Balance. (5 available)

  • $10 Gift Certificate to Passim. (5 available)

    BUT WAIT… THERE ARE TWO GRAND PRIZES!
  • Free One-night stay at the Lenox Hotel in Boston’s Back Bay (a $555 value)!

  • $150 restaurant Gift Certificate for either City Table or Solas at the Lenox.

    Both grand prizes come with a new bike helmet, courtesy of Bern Unlimited!

    *PLEASE NOTE: Post as many #HappyHubwayHalloween pics as you like, but since we want to spread the Halloween spirit around, you can only win once.

    Treats provided by:



  • [Press Release] Bikeshare Holdings LLC Signs Agreement to Acquire Alta Bicycle Share

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Oct. 28, 2104
    Click here to read release from Alta Bicycle Share.

    You're Invited to the Hubway "Unicorn" Launch this Thursday, October 23rd

    Please note: This event has been moved inside 1350 Mass Ave, in the Harvard Information Center room just off the Smith Campus Center arcade.


    HUBWAY’S “EMERALD EXPLORER” UNICORN LAUNCH DAY
    Thursday, October 23, 2014—Rain or Shine!
    Harvard’s Forbes Plaza
    Outside the Smith Campus Center
    1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
    Noon-1pm

    Over 2,000 people voted, and your choice, “the Emerald Explorer,” designed by artist and Hubway member Amy Fater, will enter our fleet as the newest, limited edition, one-of-a-kind Hubway bike this Thursday at noon!

    Come join us, together with Harvard’s CommuterChoice, as the bike is unveiled for its inaugural ride! Be the first to see the Emerald Explorer in person. While you’re there, grab a complimentary 24-hour Hubway pass courtesy of CommuterChoice, enter to win a free helmet, chat with Hubway reps and dignitaries from Hubway member municipalities, and say hi to Amy!

    This event is brought to you by:


    Station Alert: Beacon/Charles station returns today, fully operational

    Station Alert: The Beacon/Charles Hubway station has returned to its previous location adjacent to Beacon Hill and the Boston Public Garden, as of Tuesday morning, October 14th. The station had been temporarily removed in late August for city sidewalk construction, but is now back and fully operational.

    Thank you for your patience. Station updates are posted on Hubway’s Twitter & Facebook pages. For up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit Hubway Tracker or the Hubway website station map.

    Thank you for using Hubway.

    Mayor's Cup Mascot Race 2014

    What happens when you take 9 of the Boston-area’s sports & company mascots,
    and put ‘em all on Hubway bikes for a race around City Hall? Watch the video and find out!

    The TD Bank Mayor’s Cup is an annual bicycle race that is hosted by the City of Boston’s Mayor Martin J. Walsh. Boston Bikes, a department of the City takes the lead with the organizing and TD Bank graciously sponsors the event. Hubway provided the bikes for the mascot race. Enjoy the video!

    When to Mark a Bike for Repair: The Wrench Button

    Ever wonder what this button is for?

    Hubway wants to make sure all riders have a safe, enjoyable experience riding our bikes, so rest assured that we are constantly tuning the fleet for optimal performance. We have dedicated Bike Mechanics at our warehouse who conduct a wide variety of bike repairs, and we also have a field-based Bike Technician team to check each bike in the system at least once per month and can make many adjustments in the field.

    Even so, you may sometimes encounter a a bike that requires some extra TLC. If you’re ever riding a Hubway bike that has a low or flat tire, skipping gears, a dragging chain, or otherwise in need of maintenance, return it to a dock and press the wrench button.

    This does three things. First, it locks the bike into the dock, so that no one else can ride it before we fix it. Second, it activates a red light so other riders know they won’t be able to use it until it’s been checked by our mechanics. Lastly, it lets our dispatch office know where to send our field staff to get it fixed.

    Hubway’s Field Bike Technicians can make minor tune-ups on the spot, but sometimes they hit the wrench button again if the bike needs more work. These bikes are then scooped up by our Rebalancers, who bring them into the garage for repair.

    You might ask:

    Can someone just come by and press all the wrench buttons? No worries! The wrench buttons can only be activated for a minute after a bike is docked, so only the most recent rider will be able to mark it for repair. If you check out a bike and immediately notice something wrong, dock it and press the wrench button. One minute later you’ll be able to check out another bike.

    Can someone “reserve” a bike by pushing the wrench button to lock it in place and then come later to unlock it? Nope. Once a bike is locked in with the wrench button it takes a special staff key to unlock it again.

    When I press the wrench button do you automatically know what’s wrong with the bike? Unfortunately not. All we can tell is that there’s something that needs fixing. Each bike in our shop will be thoroughly checked by our mechanics to make any necessary repairs and adjustments, but you can help! When you push the button, you’ll automatically receive an email from us—just reply to that email and let us know more about the issue you had with the bike. You can also tweet at us or contact customer service with the bike number. You can find the bike number on a bar code sticker on the bike frame just below the seat.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Brisk fall weather approaching: some tips for riding in the colder temps

    The brisk New England fall weather will be upon us soon. We’re not happy about it, either, but it does provide for some lovely leaves-changing-color rides and viewing. If you’re going to be out biking as the temperatures get colder, here are a few things to keep in mind to prepare for your outings:



    Wear layers, but remember that riding will warm you up. If you get hot as you ride, pull over and remove a layer, but always keep your ears and hands shielded.



    Wear gloves or mittens to keep your hands warm. Just make sure you’re still able to work the brakes, gears, and bell.



    Local bike shops offer bike-appropriate gloves and earmuffs that do not obstruct the use of your helmet. Make sure you can hear what’s going on around you.



    Your core will stay warm as you ride, but make sure you’ve got your extremities covered. Wear shoes with enough room for thick, warm socks.



    The weather can change quickly here, so make sure you have a back-up plan if you don’t feel comfortable on a bike. Plan your route ahead of time. If the weather isn’t good for biking, take the train, bus, or a cab.



    It’s important to decide for yourself when you’re comfortable riding and when you’re not. Each rider has a different comfort level in inclement weather, so don’t let a riding partner push you past your comfort zone. If you are uncomfortable for any reason while biking, stop riding and walk your bike to the nearest docking station. If you are cold, make your way indoors to warm up.



    Visibility is particularly limited during the winter, with fewer daylight hours, glare, and foggy conditions. Hubway bikes have 24-hour lights, but it is also a good idea to wear light colored clothing and reflective materials if possible. Always make sure you can be seen by vehicles.



    Use extra caution under wintry conditions, as roads may not be completely cleared of snow and ice. You are always permitted to ride in the general travel lane (not only the bike lane) and should do so if the bike lane is snowy or icy. Keep your eyes open for piles of leaves of patches of ice. It’s better to continue straight through these obstacles than turn or lean through them. Also be careful to avoid using your front brakes, as it could cause you to lose control.



    Hubway bikes can hold up to cold weather. They’re checked regularly by our bike mechanics, so leave your bike at home and let us worry about hardware wear & tear.



    In cases where the system is shut down due to severe weather conditions, we’ll notify the public via press release and social media. We’ll also notify our Members via email. Find out more about the Hubway system, extensions, station outages/closures at thehubway.com, on Twitter, and on Facebook.

    Station Alert: Boston Public Library station closed Sunday, September 28th, 1-7pm

    Station Alert: Due to film production, the Boston Public Library Hubway station located at 700 Boylston Street, will be temporarily closed and inaccessible on Sunday, September 28th, between the hours of 1pm and 7pm. During this time, the station will be unavailable for renting or docking bikes. If you are planning to use Hubway in the area during this period, please make arrangements to use alternate stations. The closest stations are:

    • New Balance Store - Boylston at Dartmouth
    • Boylston St / Berkeley St
    • Back Bay / South End Station
    • Boylston at Fairfield

    The station is expected to reopen and be fully operational at 7pm on Sunday evening. For station map and up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this planned outage, and thank you for using Hubway.

    [AUDIO] RadioBoston, 90.9 WBUR: 8 Ways To Diversify Transportation In Neighborhoods Like Somerville's Union Square

    “What I think people haven’t really taken into account is this really is a mobility revolution we’re in the middle of. And it’s not just about the green line. Right behind you there’s Hubway bikes… and all those bikes are gone, somebody’s taken all of them somewhere else. We are going to have more and more car sharing here. There’s a Zipcar…station right behind us over there. We have people walking here, biking here, taking the train. There’s a huge amount of change [that’s] going to be happening in the way we use our cars in the future. [The] millennial generation — fewer and fewer of them are getting driving licenses now. People don’t want to use cars, they don’t want to own cars.” Click here to read and hear more.

    Station Move Alert: Beacon Street at Washington / Kirkland [Somerville]

    Station Move Alert: Beginning Thursday, September 11th, the Beacon Street at Washington / Kirkland Hubway station in Somerville will move around the corner onto Washington Street, directly across from the Wine & Cheese Cask. The move is due to a large-scale road improvement project along Beacon Street. The new location is being considered permanent through the end of the 2014 riding season.

    During the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    These 12 "Don'ts" of Bicycling still apply 45 years later!

    Increased safety isn’t the sole responsibility of any one party or group of individuals. The responsibility for increasing safety for bicycles, drivers, and pedestrians alike lies in the concerted efforts from (and respect for) all parties & individuals, and each of us can take responsibility for the safety of both ourselves and others.

    That being said, we thought the image below from a 1969 bicycle safety manual, found in a 2012 blog post by Maria Popova in Brain Pickings, was pretty spot on. Click the image to view the full post and other fantastic images from the manual.

    System Alert: Cambridge Road Closure, Sunday, September 7th

    SYSTEM ALERT: CAMBRIDGE ROAD CLOSURES ON SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7th, DURING CAMBRIDGE CARNIVAL INTERNATIONAL PARADE

    The Cambridge Carnival celebration, to be held on Sunday, September 7th, is the largest festival in Cambridge, and we strongly recommend taking an extra moment to review stations which may be affected by temporary road closures and detours beginning at 8am that day. It is possible that some closures will affect Hubway staff’s ability to access and balance stations, and we ask for your patience during this time.

    The following stations in Cambridge, along or adjacent to the Parade route, may especially be affected:

    • Central Square at Mass Ave / Essex Street
    • Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main Street / Columbia Street
    • MIT Stata Center at Vassar Street / Main Street
    • Kendall T at Main Street
    • One Broadway / Kendall Square at Main Street / 3rd Street

    To view the City of Cambridge Traffic Management Plan for the event, including specific road closures, please click here.

    You can find more information about the parade at CambridgeCarnival.org Please use Spotcycle or Hubway Tracker for up to the minute system information and bike/dock availability.

    New Station Alert: Rindge Ave, Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, August 29th, the new Hubway station, Rindge Avenue, is open & operational in North Cambridge. This station is a 19-dock station, located on Rindge Avenue at the intersection of Yerxa Road, along a parking lot serving the O’Neill Branch of the Cambridge Public Library. This is Hubway’s 140th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Exclusive for Hubway Members: 10% off Charles River Bistro Weekend Soul & Jazz Brunches

    Saturday Soul Brunches & Sunday Jazz Brunches are held every weekend through October from 8am-1pm (music starts at 10am) along the Charles River. View the menu here.

    Find the Bistro’s tree-lined Parisian style seating and outdoor lounge areas just off the banks of the Charles River lagoon, in front of the DCR Memorial Hatch Shell, and just across the Fiedler Bridge from Hubway’s Esplanade station at Beacon & Arlington Streets.

    Bike to brunch and show your Hubway keyfob or your Hubway receipt at the register for 10% off your meal!

    Exclusive for Hubway Members: $5 Discount for Hub On Wheels

    Join us for the 10th Annual Hub On Wheels citywide bike ride on Sunday, September 21st.

    Experience a car-free Storrow Drive, explore hidden pathways and historic neighborhoods, and take in views of the Boston Harbor that you’ve never seen before.

    The ride starts and finishes on Boston City Hall Plaza, with three different routes to choose from: 10, 30 and 50 miles.

    Sign up online using discount code HUBWAY5 by Friday, September 19th, to receive $5 off the registration fee!

    Exclusive for Hubway Members: $5 Discount on Boston Duck Tours

    There’s one place Hubway can’t go. The water!
    But Boston Duck Tours can.


    If you’ve never been on a Boston Duck (or even if you have), Hubway is making it easier for you by giving you $5 off the price of each ticket! Use promo code HUBWAY to purchase your tickets on the Boston Duck Tours website and claim your discount, or show your Hubway keyfob along with this coupon on your smartphone to purchase in person!


    Take the ride of your life!
    This offer is good through November!

    New Station Alert: Channel Center - A Street / Richards Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, August 8th, the new Hubway station, Channel Center, is open & operational in Boston. This is a 19-dock station, located at the intersection of A Street and Richards Street, adjacent to the State Street Channel Center building.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New/Returning Station Alert: Charles Circle, Charles Street at Cambridge Street redeployed

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, August 8th, the new Hubway station, Charles Circle, is open & operational in Boston. This is actually a returning station, being redeployed following a period of construction near the Longfellow Bridge. It is a 15-dock station, located near the base of the Bridge, on Charles Street at Cambridge Street.

    During the 2013 season, the Charles Street station was the 3rd busiest Hubway station.

    Photo by Wade Roush.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: West Broadway at Dorchester Street, South Boston (now on sidewalk)

    Station Move Alert: The station located on West Broadway at Dorchester Street, in South Boston, will be moved today, Friday, August 8th, to the sidewalk, adjacent to its former location. This is a 17-dock station. There will be no additional changes to the station, though there may be a short period during the move when it will be inaccessible. An extended outage is not expected.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: JP Centre station redeployed

    Station Move Alert: Effective Friday, July 25th, the JP Centre Hubway station has been returned to its original location at the intersection of Centre and Myrtle Streets. This is a 15-dock station, adjacent to the Post Office and JP Licks.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map have been updated. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Allston Green District station at Commonwealth Ave & Griggs St, redeployed and active

    Station Alert: Effective Friday morning, July 25th, the Hubway station, Allston Green District, is open & operational in Boston. This station is a 15-dock station, located at Commonwealth Avenue & Griggs Street.

    Thank you for your patience during the construction.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Video] Fox 25 Morning News: Hubway launches 'design a bike' contest

    This morning, Hubway Marketing Manager, Benjy Kantor, joined MyFoxBoston’s Lilly Hopkins to discuss the #HubwayEveryday Bike Design Contest.

    Boston News, Weather, Sports | FOX 25 | MyFoxBoston

    Hubway Pro Tips: Safety Reminders

    There’s a lot of traffic on the roads of metro-Boston, and while you can’t control the actions of other riders and drivers, there are some simple day-to-day and ride-to-ride things you can do to keep yourself and others as safe as possible when riding Hubway.

    We recently affixed these stickers to the frames (just below the handlebars in front of the rider) on each Hubway bike. Have you seen ‘em?

    On your next Hubway ride, take a moment before you start pedaling to review these reminders.

    • Stop at lights.
    • Yield to pedestrians.
    • Ride with traffic.
    • Avoid sidewalks.
    • Watch for doors.
    • Wear a helmet.

    Hubway bicycles are easily identifiable everywhere on the streets of metro-Boston, and we hope that our riders will continue to be model citizens when it comes to safe riding practices.

    Thanks for riding Hubway safely!

    New Station Alert: Alewife, Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, July 11th, the new Hubway station, Alewife at Russell Field, is open & operational in North Cambridge. This station is a 23-dock station, located near the entrance to the Alewife T station on the east side of Alewife Brook Parkway (routes 2 & 16), adjacent to the Alewife Linear Path and Russell Field, and north of Jerry’s Pond. Please note the placement of the station in the image below.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: construction adjacent to Faneuil Hall Hubway station throughout July

    Station Alert: We have been informed by the City of Boston that construction will take place on Union Street, near Faneuil Hall, Mondays through Thursdays between the hours of 7am and 4pm, beginning the week of July 7th and continuing throughout the month.

    Access to Union Street will be limited to delivery vehicles, including Hubway staff, but Hubway riders can still access the Faneuil Hall - Union Street at North Street station by letting a representative from the construction team know that they would like access. Please note that while riders will be allowed access, you may have to wait a few moments due to safety concerns. Thank you for your patience during the construction.

    Updates will be posted when available on Hubway’s Twitter & Facebook pages. For station map and up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused by the construction, and thank you for using Hubway.

    System Alert: July 4th Weekend High Traffic, Road Closures, etc.

    SYSTEM ALERT: With July 4th weekend approaching, Hubway reminds you to take an extra moment to review stations which may be affected by temporary road closures, detours, and high traffic. In past years during this holiday weekend, some closures have affected Hubway field staff’s ability to access and rebalance stations. We ask for your patience during this time, and recommend reviewing the information below and planning accordingly.

    The following stations in the Back Bay, along the Charles, and near MBTA stations may especially be affected:

    • Esplanade, Boston
    • Beacon/Charles, Boston
    • Mass/Beacon, Boston
    • Boylston/Arlington, Boston
    • Mass/Amherst, Cambridge
    • 1 Broadway, Cambridge
    • Kendall T, Cambridge
    • Lechmere, Cambridge
    • EF - North Point Park, Cambridge [new in 2014]
    • Magoun Square @ Trum Field, Somerville

    Please note that the Somerville fireworks celebration is Thursday, July 3rd, at Trum Field, and the adjacent roadway will be closed, with access to the Hubway station prohibited from 5pm-10:30pm.

    In conjunction with festivities occurring with July 4th, there are also events in the Seaport area of Boston. Boston Harborfest is taking place from July 3rd through July 6th. South Station and all Hubway stations in and around the Seaport area could be affected. Please visit the Boston Harborfest website for event details.

    Road closures for the City of Cambridge can be found here.

    Road closures for the City of Boston can be found here.

    [Video] Hubway Everyday PSA


    Thanks to our friends at

    Station Alert: Temporary removal of Allston Green District station at Commonwealth Ave & Griggs St, beginning July 7th

    Station Alert: Due to planned construction, the Allston Green District Hubway station located at Commonwealth Avenue & Griggs Street, in Boston, will be temporarily removed, beginning Monday, July 7th.

    Plans are to redeploy the station in the same location after construction has been completed. During this time, the station will not be available for renting or docking bikes. If you are planning to use Hubway in the area during this period, please make arrangements to use alternate stations. The closest stations are:

    • JFK Crossing at Harvard & Thorndike Streets, Brookline
    • Union Square, Brighton Avenue at Cambridge Street, Boston
    • Packard’s Corner, Commonwealth at Brighton Avenue, Boston

    Updates will be posted when available on Hubway’s Twitter & Facebook pages. For station map and up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this planned outage, and thank you for using Hubway.

    Hubway's 2 millionth rider will win!

    As of Thursday morning, June 26th, Hubway riders have taken 1,982,092 trips since the system launched on July 28, 2011. Two million rides in less than three years is cause for celebration, and our friends at New Balance have graciously added to the party! The rider who takes Hubway’s ride #2,000,000 will receive a gift certificate for $130 of gear from New Balance so you can outfit yourself for ride 2,000,0001 and beyond! We recommend the New Balance Experience store at 583 Boylston.

    The winner will ride sometime this weekend, so make sure to grab a Hubway bike today! Will you be the lucky rider?!?

    Thank you to:
    New Balance

    Hubway Pro Tips: Use real time data to plan your trips

           

    HUBWAY PRO TIPS: USE REAL TIME DATA TO PLAN YOUR TRIP

                           

    There are a number of bikeshare-related applications available for mobile use. We recommend Spotcycle, available on both iPhone and Android devices. With Spotcycle, you can locate nearby stations and see how many bikes and docks are available at each. If bikes are unavailable at one station, easily find the next closest station that has a ride ready for you (or a dock to park the one you’ve got)! And since Spotcycle is powered by the same software that operates Hubway stations, you know you’ll be getting the most up-to-date information.

     

    And for those of you who absolutely LOVE data, you’ll want to check out Hubway Tracker from your desktop computer. The Tracker not only gives you real-time bike & dock availability, but can give you a sense of what times will be best for bike/dock availability, which comes in handy if you have a little wiggle room in your commute times. The Tracker will also show you how many Hubway bikes are currently in use, trends and historical data for every single station, and a list of every system “outage” (that’s what we call a station that is either completely full or completely empty). There is a ton of data available. Click here and dive in! 

    New Station Alert: EF North Point Park, East Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday morning, June 25th, the new Hubway station, EF North Point Park, is open & operational in Cambridge. This station is a 23-dock station, located on the south side of North Point Boulevard just west of Education Street, adjacent to North Point Park in eastern Cambridge. You’ll find the station right near the base of the North Bank Bridge to Charlestown.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Congress / Sleeper station out of service, Saturday, June 14, 8am-4pm

    Station Alert: Due to construction, the Hubway station located at Congress & Sleeper Streets, near the Boston Children’s Museum between the Fort Point and Seaport areas, will be out of service on Saturday, June 14th, beginning at 8am. The station is expected to be back in service by 4pm that day.

    If you were planning to use that station on Saturday, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this planned outage, and thank you for using Hubway.

    Next time you ride a Hubway, you might get something extra!

    Each month, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum hosts a special evening event as part of their Third Thursdays series. The next one is a Garden Party on Thursday, June 19th, and Hubway has an exciting way for you to attend. All Hubway members will receive $5 off the cost of admission (just bring your key fob), and 20 lucky (or savvy) Hubway riders will also find a pair of free tickets attached to their bike baskets!

    The bikes with the special prizes are being distributed into the Hubway system today (some are already out), so hurry out to your nearest station to check! They’re attached in weather-proof baggies. If you find one, let us know!






    More about Third Thursdays
    Third Thursdays is a chance to gather in the evening at the Gardner, soak up the atmosphere of the historic Courtyard garden, and explore the light-filled spaces of the Museum’s new wing. The evening features free music and a cash wine bar, plus artist and spotlight talks in the galleries. Join in clever gallery games, sketching, and a chance to get a little messy in the Gardner’s new art studio too. Even if you’ve been to the Museum recently, Third Thursdays are a unique way to spark conversation and delight.

    Member Benefit: $5 off Rock and Blues Cruise Opening Night with John Brown's Body, Friday, June 6th

    Hubway riders recently broke the single-day trips record, and we’re celebrating with a scenic boat ride along Boston Harbor this Friday night, June 6th, aboard the Provincetown II for opening night of this season’s Rock and Blues Cruise concert series.

    And we want you there with us! As a member of Hubway, you’ll receive $5 off the price of your ticket when you book online with promo code HUBWAY.

    Join us for the night, and be treated to performances from roots/reggae band John Brown’s Body and special guests The Nth Power and Van Gordon Martin!

    Book your cruise now by clicking on the Rock and Blues Cruise image.

    Station Move Alert: Buswell Street at Park Drive [Boston]

    Station Move Alert: As of Wednesday afternoon, May 28th, the Buswell Street Hubway station at Park Drive has moved across the intersection to its new location on the sidewalk along Park Drive.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map have been updated. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Cambridge rolls out spring station poster campaign

      Take Hubway...
    • out for coffee
    • to the park
    • to the library
    • to work
    • to save time
    • to the market
    • to class

    You can take Hubway almost anywhere, and the Cambridge Community Development Department (CDD) wants to remind you with its release of a series of spring posters, designed by boutique creative agency Allen Creative Group, and displaying now at Hubway station kiosks throughout the city. Scroll below for larger versions, and spread the word!

    Hubway included in BostInno's list of romantic (and inexpensive) dates in Boston

    This is an excerpt of an article that was originally published by Caroline Earle on BostInno on May 19th, 2014.

    6 Active and Romantic Date Ideas in Boston (and you won’t have to spend your whole paycheck)

    #5: RENT A HUBWAY
    You’ve seen them parked all around the city, but we’re sure you haven’t thought about them as a date idea. Hopping on a Hubway will give you and your date the flexibility to ride to your hearts’ content and then find a station to park it while you grab a quick bite to eat. Cruising the Charles never seemed so sexy.

    Check out the other date ideas here.

    Planning has Begun for the Cambridge Bicycle Network Plan

    Cambridge has a Bicycle Friendly City GOLD rating but we are continuing to improve our city for bicycling!

    Here is your chance to say what you would like the future to look like. What would make this the most bicycle friendly city on the planet? What are the ways, small or large, short-term or long-term, that would make a difference for you?

    Towards a Bikeable Future (Cambridge’s Bicycle Master Plan, currently in process) will use your input to guide bicycle planning in Cambridge. This plan is intended to be a visionary document that will help Cambridge be a true “8-80” City, one where everyone—whether they are eight or 80 years old—will be able to choose to bicycle comfortably and safely throughout the city.

    The Bicycle Network Plan is a core component of the broader ambition in Towards a Bikeable Future, and the City wants to hear from you!. Click here to visit the cambridge bicycle network plan website for ways to provide your input.

    New Station Alert: BioMed - Kendall Street, Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday morning, May 14th, the new Hubway station, BioMed - Kendall Street, is open & operational. This station is a 15-dock station, located on the sidewalk of Kendall Street off of Third Street in Cambridge.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Exclusive for Hubway Members: National Bike Month Discount at City Sports

    May is National Bike Month! Now that it’s warmed up, we’ll be celebrating all month long, and City Sports has joined in to make the month even more of a party for Hubway members!

    Bring your Hubway key fob into any Boston-area City Sports store this month, and you’ll receive 20% off on all cycling apparel, footwear, and equipment!

    Happy Bike Month!

    [The Somerville Times] Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone: Hubway, regional bike investments build community

    This article is an op-ed that was originally published by Joseph A. Curtatone, Mayor of Somerville, MA, in the Somerville Times on May 1st, 2014.

    Hubway, regional bike investments build community
    By Joseph A. Curtatone

    In early April I joined in the reopening celebration of Hubway, one of the smartest bicycle infrastructure investments our region has made—and one of the most telling when it comes to understanding how our city and our nation are evolving. The country is undergoing the greatest demographic shift since the 1950s when people fled cities for the suburbs. Today that trend is reversing. People are returning to the urban core at historic levels as they seek the vibrancy and connectivity of bikeable, walkable, transit-oriented urban neighborhoods. Somerville, and the Boston region, are experiencing this shift too as we seek to make Greater Boston the most bikeable and walkable region in the country. But it’s about far more than sustainable transit. I believe what’s driving this trend is also a desire for community, which is at the heart of what makes Somerville the city we love.

    People today demand neighborhoods where they can walk or bike to public transit, work, stores and services. Families want options for getting to work that don’t include sitting in traffic, and want to live where it’s easy for their children to lead active lifestyles. Young professionals crave walking routes and bike lanes, along with access to public transit. Retirees want to walk to the neighborhood store and the local coffee shop. Ultimately, all of these groups want to live in the kind of vibrant, close-knit communities that are created when faces aren’t blurs seen through car windows, but people out on sidewalks and in the streets and paths, walking, pushing strollers and biking.

    Somerville is working to meet that demand by making it easier, safer and more appealing to bike and walk. On the biking side, we have doubled our bike network that now has more than 30 miles of bike lanes in a 4.1 square mile city, and added more than 300 new bike parking spots to city streets since 2011. Two years ago, we joined the Hubway bikeshare system with 12 stations, garnering thousands of rides monthly. And the soon-to-be completed Community Path extension will connect it to the future Lowell Street Green Line station and eventually to Cambridge, Boston and beyond.

    Meeting that demand cannot be incumbent on a single city, though, and fortunately Somerville is not alone. MassDOT’s rehabilitation of the Longfellow Bridge between Boston and Cambridge will make this heavily trafficked commuter route better and safer for bicyclists and pedestrians, and plans for the Cambridge Street bridge in Allston now include a cycle track with dedicated bike lanes and barriers separating them from the car lanes. Elsewhere in the metro region, a 4.1 mile stretch of the Northern Strand Community Trail has been paved from Malden to Everett, bringing us closer to a true seamless bike and walking connection from Malden to Somerville’s own Community Path. And MetroWest communities are getting closer to turning a 23-mile abandoned rail line into a bike and walk path that could reach the Waverly commuter rail station in Belmont—not too far from where it could also eventually connect to our Community Path.

    Greater Boston is creating a biking and walking network, and we’re seeing the effects of investment. In Somerville, biking has risen by 56 percent over two years. Biking and walking to work continues to increase according to the Alliance for Biking and Walking’s biennial report released this past month, most noticeably in cities, and Boston has the highest share of walking commuters. Meanwhile, the long-term trend for bicycling and pedestrian fatalities is downward, and biking is safer in larger cities where roads are evolving to accommodate all forms of travel.

    We need to seize this opportunity because developing our pedestrian and bike infrastructure, along with building near transit, can eliminate traffic impacts and over time shift more commuters from the roads onto our sidewalks, subways and bike routes. It helps achieve environmental justice: a recent study by the University of Minnesota found that non-white people inhale 38 percent higher levels of air pollution than whites, and Greater Boston has the fourth highest pollution disparity between whites and nonwhites. That’s particularly important to Somerville, where approximately 38,000 of our residents live within environmental justice zones, shouldering a disproportionate burden of environmental impacts caused by traffic and industry.

    Building routes for bikes and pedestrians also brings community because it builds the vibrancy that comes when increased foot traffic helps the stores, restaurants, cafes and services in our neighborhoods flourish. And when our businesses flourish our squares and nearby parks are filled—with our neighbors. Making our region walkable, bikeable and transit-oriented creates urban rooms—active streetscapes supported by workers during the day and residents during the night.

    This isn’t just about biking. This is about the kind of community we want to build—equitable, connected, healthy and convenient for residents—and a place where you bump into friends on a street corner, chat with other parents at the neighborhood park, or wave to your barber when you walk by his shop. Economic health then follows suit. Thriving squares filled with busy businesses creates a resilient, self-sufficient economic base for cities and the region. And when we make connections that move pedestrians and cyclists between neighborhoods, we create the growth and vitality that will help us bring back historic neighborhoods such as Brickbottom and Inner Belt. Hubway is one of a number of invaluable tools to make and increase those connections. I’m pleased that a new Hubway station is now open at Magoun Square and I look forward to the expansion of Hubway eastward in our city. Spring is here—let’s get out and ride.

    Station Alert: Summer/Cutter station (Somerville) is back

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 25th, the Hubway station located at Summer Street and Cutter Avenue is back, fully deployed, and operational. This is an 11-dock station, located on the outskirts of Davis Square in front of the VFW at the intersection of Summer St and Cutter Ave, near the intersection of Elm and Russell. Please note: Summer/Elm is where Russell becomes Cutter.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: remaining Brookline stations return today

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 25th, the Hubway stations listed below, located along the Boston Marathon route in Brookline, have returned, and are fully deployed and operational:

    • Washington Square: This is a 15-dock station, located along Beacon Street inbound just east of Washington Street.
    • Coolidge Corner: This is a 19-dock station (pictured below), adjacent to the T tracks (between inbound/outbound Beacon) between Centre Street and Winchester Street.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Two more Back Bay stations return today

    Station Alert: Effective Thursday afternoon, April 24th, the following Hubway stations located in the Back Bay close to the Boston Marathon route, have returned, and are fully deployed and operational:

    • Newbury Street / Hereford Street: This is a 13-dock station, located on the northwest side of the intersection of Newbury and Hereford.
    • Charles Street at Beacon Street: This is a 15-dock station, located where Charles meets Beacon, near the intersection with River Street. Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability. Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Four Boylston Street stations return today

    Station Alert: Effective Thursday afternoon, April 24th, the following four Hubway stations located along the Boston Marathon route, have returned, and are fully deployed and operational:

    • Boylston at Berkeley: This is a 15-dock station, located on the south side of Boylston between Berkeley and Clarendon.
    • Boylston at Fairfield: This is a 19-dock station, located on the north side of Boylston between Fairfield and Gloucester.
    • Boston Public Library - 700 Boylston: This is a 25-dock station, located in front of the Boston Public Library entrance on Dartmouth.
    • New Balance Experience Store - Boylston / Dartmouth: This is a 15-dock station, located in front of the New Balance store at 583 Boylston between Dartmouth and Clarendon.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Hubway's new customer support phone number

    EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY: Hubway’s new customer support phone number is 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929)

    We only changed one digit, but it’s an important one. Starting today, Tuesday, April 22nd, Hubway Customer Support has a new phone number. Hubway’s keys, docks, bikes, and stations are designed to be intuitive, but if you ever need any help, ignore the old number on your key fob, drop us a line here, and we’ll be happy to help.

    1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929)
    24 hours a day / 7 days a week
    in English and Spanish.

    If you have suggestions for future station locations, please continue to use our Station Locator Tool to tell us exactly where you want to see them. Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Hubway Everyday,

    The Hubway Team

    Station Relocation Alert: Harvard University Housing & Harvard University Transportation Services stations in slightly different locations

    Station Alert: The following two Hubway stations were deployed today, Thursday, April 17th, but the locations are slightly different than last year:

    • Harvard University Housing - 111 Western Ave at Soldier’s Field Park This is a 15-dock station that is now closer to Soldier’s Field.
    • Harvard University Transportation Services - 175 North Harvard St This is a 19-dock station that was formerly located in the parking lot at the intersection of N Harvard and Western and has now moved around the corner onto N Harvard.

    Both stations are open & operational.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [PeopleForBikes] Protected bike lanes coming to town will make biking easy on big streets

    The following is a guest post by PeopleForBikes, a movement to improve bicycling in the U.S.

    Great news for comfortable biking: Boston is one of six cities recently selected to receive two years of free expertise and support for building a network of protected bike lanes that physically separate bike and auto traffic. The PeopleForBikes Green Lane Project will help the city build the Connect Historic Boston project, which starts construction this fall on a family-friendly figure-eight bike loop around and through downtown.

    New York City’s network of protected bike lanes, currently the country’s biggest, has been a big part of making Citi Bike bikeshare so popular there: in a recent Manhattan bike count, 45 percent of Citi Bike users were using the protected lanes. We’re eager to see more of this modern bike infrastructure hit the streets. The image above is an artist rendering from Connect Historic Boston of what the protected lanes might look like on Causeway Street at Haverhill Street.

    To join PeopleForBikes and support its programs like the Green Lane Project, visit peopleforbikes.org/hubway.

    Station Alert: List of station deployments delayed until after Boston Marathon

    Station Alert: As requested by the City of Boston, the following stations will not be deployed until late April, after the Boston Marathon:

      BROOKLINE
    • Coolidge Corner - Beacon St @ Centre St
    • Washington Square at Washington St. / Beacon St
      BOSTON
    • Newbury St / Hereford St
    • Boylston at Fairfield
    • Boylston St / Berkeley St
    • Boston Public Library - 700 Boylston St.
    • New Balance Experience Store - Boylston / Dartmouth
    • Charles St at Beacon St

    These stations are expected to be deployed the week of April 22nd, but the schedule is subject to change. Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Charles Circle / MGH station expected to return late April

    Station Alert: Due to Longfellow Bridge construction, the deployment of Hubway’s Charles Circle / MGH location is delayed as a location is finalized near the previous location. The station is expected to be deployed in April but the exact timing has yet to be determined.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Day Boulevard, South Boston

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday morning, April 11th, the new Hubway station, Day Boulevard, in South Boston, is open & operational. This is a 19-dock station, located on a wide sidewalk alongside Day Boulevard, just north of the rotary intersection with Broadway.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Dana Park, Cambridgeport

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday morning, April 10th, the new Hubway station, Dana Park, in the Cambridgeport region of Cambridge, is open & operational. This station is a 19-dock station, located on Lawrence Street between Pearl and Magazine, adjacent to Dana Park.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: New (temporary) location for JP Centre Station, Jamaica Plain

    Station Alert: Effective Wednesday morning, April 9th, the JP Centre Hubway station located on Centre Street at Myrtle Street in front of the post office, has been deployed down the block to Centre Street at Seaverns. This station is a 15-dock station, adjacent to the Bank of America, and is fully operational. This is a temporary location, pending a community meeting later this spring.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Boston Globe] Public-Private Funding for Hubway paying off

    This article was originally published by Martine Powers in the Boston Globe on April 7th, 2014.

    PUBLIC-PRIVATE FUNDING FOR HUBWAY PAYING OFF
    City in line for more profit in Year 4

    For some bike-share programs in North America, it was a winter of discontent.

    In January, Montreal’s bike-share program Bixi filed for bankruptcy. Then, last month, reports surfaced that the operators of New York’s Citi Bike had asked for tens of millions of dollars in aid from the City of New York.

    But in Boston last week, Hubway opened for its fourth season with a rosy financial prognosis, a fresh contract between the City of Boston and bike-share operators, an expectation that the system will continue turning a profit, and plans for 10 new stations.

    “We’re in a very, very solid financial place,” said Nicole Freedman, director of the city’s Boston Bikes program. “We’re in a position to fund expansion.”

    Some have attributed Hubway’s success to its more conservative choices — closing for winter and launching with a compact system that spread cautiously — as well as its dependence on both public and private money.

    “Bike share systems in Boston, Denver, Chicago, Minneapolis, and Washington, D.C., all of which started relatively small and relied on public sector funds, were able to launch with success, iron out kinks, stabilize, and expand quickly,” said Mia Birk, Hubway Bike Share vice president.

    Now, Boston will pay a lower rate for bike-share operations with a new contract that stands to allow the city to collect larger profits.

    Previously Boston divided the costs of operating the system 50-50 with Alta Bicycle Share, the contractor that operates and maintains the system’s bikes, stations, software, and memberships. Boston uses public grant money, along with private sponsorships, to pay the city’s share without dipping into municipal coffers — and up until now, Alta and Boston have split the profits in half. It was a risk-sharing model favored by former mayor Thomas M. Menino, who was wary of placing the city on the hook if forays into bike share fell flat, Freedman said.

    Now, Boston will pay Alta for the full operations cost, but in turn, the city will take all of the profits from membership fees and advertising — a sign that city officials are confident in the bike-share program’s continued profitability. And the city is getting Alta’s services at a new, lower rate: Boston will pay the company about $70 per bike dock per month for maintenance and operations, about a 30 percent reduction from previous operation rates, and well below the average price for other bike-share systems, such as the $111 rate paid by Capital Bikeshare in Washington, D.C.

    The cities of Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline — some of which use municipal dollars to help pay their share — are considering whether to switch to Boston’s funding model.

    Hubway’s diversified funding approach has been championed by some as the most stable option.

    In January, Bixi, the company that operated bike shares in Montreal and Toronto and also manufactures bike-share equipment, filed for bankruptcy protection. The City of Montreal, which is owed about $30 million from Bixi, has seized the company’s Montreal assets. The City of Toronto has taken over its own bike-share operations.

    And New York’s Citi Bike — widely touted for being funded entirely through private sponsorships and membership fees — is now seeking tens of millions of dollars from the City of New York to maintain and expand operations, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal. Citi Bike, also operated by Alta, has proven popular with residents, but a faulty software system and sparse winter ridership incited financial concerns.

    “As with any new industry, there are challenges,” Alta officials said in a statement, adding that the challenges are fixable “and we are working diligently to fix them.”

    But some, such as Caroline Samponaro, senior director for campaigns and organizing at Transportation Alternatives, a New York City transit advocacy group, think that Citi Bike should adopt Hubway’s model, incorporating corporate sponsorships and public money.

    Starting the system without public funding was necessary in a city where naysayers threatened to prevent the bike share from getting off the ground, she said. But, she continued, government funding is now necessary to ensure stations spread evenly across the city’s neighborhoods.

    “It’s a new thing to think about bike share as a public transit system, but now that’s where we are, and it’s important to bring some amount of subsidy so our program can grow to a scale that’s equitable,” Samponaro said.

    Encouraging an equitable distribution of bikes and stations is also a problem in Boston, where large swaths — East Boston, Dorchester, Roxbury, Mattapan, and Hyde Park — have few or no stations.

    This year, Cambridge embarked on a pilot to test how the system would fare during the winter. Emily Stapleton, Hubway general manager, said ridership in Cambridge was 15 to 20 percent of regular season averages. And there were no Hubway crashes through the winter — a sign of success, said Cara Seiderman, Cambridge’s transportation program manager.

    “It was a very tough winter, and counter to what you might expect, we were very happy about it,” Seiderman said. “It gave us the opportunity to do exactly what we wanted to do with this pilot, figuring out what happens when you have cold and difficult winter.”

    Still, Cambridge officials have not decided whether year-round service will be permanent. Likewise, Freedman said a decision has not been made on whether Boston will experiment with an all-seasons operation. With fewer winter riders, she said, each ride becomes more expensive, and that is money that could also be used to expand the system into other neighborhoods. Instead of going year-round, she conjectured, the off-season could be shortened to just January and February.

    “It really comes down to cost and benefit,” Freedman said. “And if we have a limited amount of money, how do we use that money?”

    [Boston Globe] Boston's bike share program thrives, official says

    This article was originally published in the Boston Globe on April 7th, 2014.

    BOSTON (AP) — Boston’s bicycle sharing program, which just opened for its fourth season, is thriving, the program’s director said, at a time when similar programs in other cities are struggling financially.

    Hubway opened last week with a positive financial prognosis, a fresh contract between the city and bike-share operators, an expectation that the system will continue turning a profit and plans for 10 new stations, The Boston Globe reported (http://b.globe.com/1mU7vFD ).

    ‘‘We’re in a very, very solid financial place,’’ said Nicole Freedman, director of the city’s program. ‘‘We’re in a position to fund expansion.’’

    Montreal’s bike-share program filed for bankruptcy in January. Last month, reports surfaced that operators of New York’s program had asked for tens of millions of dollars in aid from the city.

    Some have attributed Hubway’s success to more conservative choices — closing for winter and launching with a compact system that spread cautiously — as well as its dependence on both public and private money.

    Boston will now pay a lower rate for bike-share operations with a new contract that could allow the city to collect larger profits.

    Previously Boston divided the costs of operating the system 50-50 with Alta Bicycle Share, the contractor that operates and maintains the system’s bikes, stations, software and memberships. Boston uses public grant money, along with private sponsorships, to pay the city’s share without dipping into municipal coffers. Up until now, Alta and Boston have split the profits in half.

    Now, Boston will pay Alta for the full operations cost, but in turn, the city will take all of the profits from membership fees and advertising.

    PRESS RELEASE: Hubway Reopens System-Wide Operations Wednesday, April 2nd








    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to download PDF.
    April 1, 2014

    CONTACT:
    Nicole Freedman, Boston Bikes / City of Boston
    nicole.freedman@boston.gov,617.918.4456

    Joe Viola, Town of Brookline Community Planning
    jviola@brooklinema.gov, 617.730.2125

    Cara Seiderman, City of Cambridge Development Department
    cseiderman@cambridgema.gov, 617.349.4629

    Sarah Spicer, City of Somerville Transportation & Infrastructure
    sspicer@somervillema.gov, 617.625.6600 x2519

    Benjy Kantor, Hubway
    benjykantor@altabicycleshare.com, 617.968.0361

    HUBWAY REOPENS SYSTEM-WIDE OPERATIONS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2nd
    Mayor Walsh to officially “flip the switch” at New Balance Experience Store
    as Boston, Brookline, Somerville rejoin Cambridge after successful winter operations.


    Hubway, metro-Boston’s public bike share system, will formally reopen system-wide operations with a special reopening day party hosted by New Balance at the New Balance Experience Store in Boston (583 Boylston Street), on Wednesday, April 2nd, from Noon to 2pm. Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh is scheduled to speak at 12:30pm and will officially reopen Boston, Brookline, and Somerville’s stations by docking the first bike of the season at the New Balance Hubway station on Boylston Street.

    “Mayor Walsh is thrilled to be reopening Hubway,” said Nicole Freedman, Director of the city’s Boston Bikes program. “It’s really become part of the transportation fabric of Boston.”

    In addition to Mayor Walsh, speakers at the event will include Somerville Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone; Brookline Selectman, Neil Wishinsky; New Balance President & CEO, Rob DeMartini; Boston Bikes Director, Nicole Freedman; and Hubway General Manager, Emily Stapleton. The event will feature special guests including Red Sox mascot Wally the Green Monster and “Newbie” the New Balance mascot, who will be taking pictures with attendees in the Hubway photo booth. There will also be giveaways of New Balance shoes, Hubway memberships, Hub On Wheels registrations, gift certificates, and other bike-related gear, and free food will be provided by Boloco and Ben & Jerry’s.

    The Hubway bike share is a regional partnership between Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville. Wednesday’s system-wide reopening connects seamlessly with a Cambridge year-round operations pilot that saw an average of approximately 2,000 Hubway trips per week during the winter season with no incidents or injuries reported. “Cambridge is very excited for the return of Hubway to other points in the network,” says Cambridge Mayor David Maher. “Our pilot program kept Hubway available throughout the winter and has shown the incredible strength of this program. I know that both residents and visitors benefit a great deal from this car-free solution, and our city is committed to continue encouraging this type of mode-shift for commuters.”

    This season, 1,300 shared Hubway bicycles will be distributed throughout the system’s 140 stations across the region. While station expansions last fall brought service to neighborhoods in Jamaica Plain and Dorchester, 10 new expansion stations are planned for 2014.

    The City of Cambridge has announced plans to add six new Hubway stations, including one on Kendall Street donated by BioMed Realty. “We congratulate the City of Cambridge on the opening of new Hubway stations across the city, including the Kendall Street station,” said Bill Kane, Vice President, Leasing and Development at BioMed Realty. “We are excited to be a part of the Hubway program and the bike share initiative which is consistent with our sustainability efforts throughout Cambridge.” The other five Cambridge locations will be announced in April as they are deployed.

    The City of Boston has added two new stations in the Seaport District on the campus of station sponsor Design Center, as well as two additional sites to be announced.

    Four stations in Brookline are expected to reopen in the same locations as last year. “We’re excited to begin our third year as a member of the bike share program,” says Betsy DeWitt, Chairwoman of the Brookline Board of Selectmen. “Hubway has provided Brookline residents with a great addition to the regional transit system. Hubway stations are located in the Town’s major commercial areas – Coolidge Corner, Washington Square, Brookline Village – with direct access to public transportation so that riders can easily travel intercity.  Brookline residents are strong supporters, as the continued increase in ridership has shown.  We look forward to another successful season.”

    Somerville will be reopening its 12 stations in 2014, with two location changes; one from Ball Square to Magoun Square, and the other to be announced. “Bicycle infrastructure connects people with mass transit and jobs,” says Somerville Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone. “It brings more customers to local businesses and attracts developers with vibrant, active streets filled with faces seen on foot or bicycle rather than through the windows of cars. Hubway is one of the best investments our administration has taken on.”

    By April 2nd, approximately 100 stations will have been deployed and will be activated for customer use. The remaining 40 stations are expected to be deployed in the coming days and weeks. Stations in Brookline and Boston that are located along the Boston Marathon route, for example, will not be deployed until after the running of the marathon, which is scheduled to take place Monday, April 21. Customers can view the Hubway website or use the Spotcycle app to confirm station availability.

    Since opening in 2011, the Hubway system has logged over 1.7 million bicycle miles, and Hubway riders have burned 67 million calories and offset 500 tons of CO2 emissions. Hubway has nearly 10,000 annual subscribers and last year sold more than 79,000 24-Hour subscriptions, 9,000 72-Hour subscriptions, and 2,000 monthly subscriptions.

    Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    ###

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Hubway Launches World's First Unicycle-Share

    Does the Hubway garage have a unicycle? YES!
    Does our mechanic, Mary, know how to ride it? YES!
    Is Hubway rolling out the first unicycle-share in the country? ABSOLUTELY NOT!

    If we didn’t have an actual, very cool announcement about tomorrow’s (April 2, 2014) system-wide reopening, we’d take this April Fool’s joke a bit further. But we don’t want to tease you too much, so for now enjoy the picture of the unicycle docked safely at a Hubway station, and read the real, complete press release by clicking the headline or image below:

    HUBWAY REOPENS SYSTEM-WIDE OPERATIONS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2nd
    Mayor Walsh to officially “flip the switch” at New Balance Experience Store
    as Boston, Brookline, Somerville rejoin Cambridge after successful winter operations.

    Add a description

    [WBUR - NPR] Hubway Set To Reopen With 10 New Stations

    This article was originally published by Martin Kessler on WBUR.org on April 1st, 2014.

    BOSTON — The Boston-area bike-sharing program Hubway reopens Wednesday.

    Most of the 140 stations operated by Hubway — a program that allows riders to pick up and drop off rented bikes at stations in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville — were closed for the winter. About 100 stations, including 10 new ones, will open Wednesday.

    The remaining stations will reopen throughout April. Stations along the Boston Marathon route will not reopen until after the April 21 race.

    Four of the new stations will be located in Boston; the other six will be in Cambridge.

    In a pilot program to test the feasibility of yearlong service, stations in Cambridge were open throughout the winter. According to Hubway, approximately 2,000 trips were made per week throughout the winter.

    “The fact that we were able to pilot running year-round operations turned out to be one of the most popular things that we’ve done,” Cambridge Transportation Program Manager Cara Seiderman told WBUR. “Everything really went smoothly.”

    Hubway came to Boston in 2011. Last summer, it expanded to Brookline, Somerville and Cambridge.

    In an effort to address health disparities, Boston last week announced the creation of the “Prescribe-a-Bike” program, which allows Boston Medical Center physicians to refer low-income patients for a $5 Hubway membership. A typical annual membership costs $85.

    [Metro Boston] Cambridge cyclists took 32,000 Hubway trips this winter

    This article was originally published by Morgan Rousseau in Metro Boston on March 31st, 2014.

    Despite the bitter, seemingly endless cold and snow that wore away at New Englanders in recent months, Hubway is reporting that the winter blues didn’t keep Cambridge’s cyclists off the roads.

    Last year, Hubway announced that it would test a pilot program in Cambridge. Most stations operated throughout the winter to test year-round feasibility.

    Due to the positive reception, Cambridge cyclists can expect year-round operations to continue.

    “We received a considerable amount of positive feedback from Hubway users about keeping the system open year-round and the team did a great job of managing operations including through the various storm events,” said Seiderman.

    Although no formal decision has been made, the city anticipates that it is likely it will continue with year-round operations.

    “The other municipalities are [sic] considering what they will do and I expect an announcement will be forthcoming, although their focus right now is on spring re-opening and getting new stations out,” she said.

    The busiest Cambridge stations this winter generally were the MIT stations, Central Square, Kendall Square and Inman Square.

    Hubway is set to open its spring operations Wednesday.

    [Video: CBS Boston] Hubway Gears Up For Bike Share Program's Spring Launch

    This piece originally aired on CBS Boston on March 28th, 2014.


    BOSTON (CBS) – On the streets of downtown Boston, pedal power is returning from hibernation

    So inside a Charlestown warehouse, mechanics are going full tilt on the tuneups to make sure the Hubway fleet is roadworthy.

    Hubway is the public bike-share program whereby you can grab some wheels at docking stations around town, pedal to your destination and drop it off at another station.

    The service comes with online trackers and mobile apps.

    “So there is some planning and thinking involved to starting your trip,” said Hubway’s Emily Stapleton.

    Next week 1,300 bikes now in the warehouse will be out on the streets when about two-thirds of Hubway’s 140 stations will open up in Boston, Cambridge, Brookline and Somerville.

    Roughly 9,700 folks now pay an annual fee of $85 to Hubway, which entitles riders to unlimited trips under 30 minutes.

    But a new program will let doctors at Boston Medical Center actually prescribe a membership to low-income patients as part of an exercise regimen for just $5.

    “For the mayor it’s very important that this program is for all Boston residents regardless of income,” said Nicole Freedman, Boston’s bike czar.

    Believe it or not, some Hubway bike stations were open all winter long in Cambridge to test snowy ridership — and people still made 2,000 trips per week.

    But the lion’s share of docking stations – and bikes – spend the winter inside and have to be hauled back outside each spring.

    Hubway’s spring launch is actually earlier this year than last, despite our nasty winter.

    So the next several days are going to be kind of crazy in the repair shop.

    [Boston Herald] Soon-to-reopen Hubway pedals 10 new stations

    This article was originally published by Marie Szaniszlo in the Boston Herald on March 28th, 2014.

    In what may be the surest sign yet that spring has arrived, the Hubway bike-share program is set to reopen next week with 10 new stations and new, subsidized memberships for low-income patients of one Boston hospital.

    After a year-round Cambridge pilot program that averaged 2,000 trips per week during the winter, nearly 100 of the 140 stations in that city, as well as in Boston, Brookline and Somerville, are expected to be operational by April 2, with most of the remaining ones to be rolled out in early April.

    Eight stations that are along the marathon route will be deployed after the April 21 race, said Emily Stapleton, general manager of Alta Bicycle Share, the Oregon-based company Boston hired to run the program in 2011.

    Since then, Hubway has logged about 1.6 million trips and 9,700 annual members among the four communities, Stapleton said.

    “Mayor (Martin J.) Walsh is thrilled to be reopening Hubway,” said Nicole Freedman, the city’s director of bicycle programs. “It’s really become part of the transportation fabric of Boston.”

    Two of the 10 new bike stations will be at the Boston Design Center, which is sponsoring them, Stapleton said.

    The exact locations of two other new Boston stations and six new Cambridge stations are expected to be announced next month.

    Walsh and Boston Medical Center this week also announced the launch of “Prescribe a Bike,” a new program that allows BMC doctors to write prescriptions for $5 Hubway annual memberships, which normally cost $85, to low-income residents.

    You're invited to Hubway's Official System-wide Reopening Day Party, Wednesday, April 2nd

    This is no April Fool’s joke! System-wide Hubway begins anew as Boston, Brookline, and Somerville rejoin Cambridge operations. Join us to celebrate at the official reopening day party!

    Wednesday, April 2nd, Noon-2pm
    New Balance Experience Store
    583 Boylston Street, Boston
    RSVP here!


  • FOOD: Free burritos from Boloco & ice cream provided by Ben & Jerry’s Boston.

  • FREE STUFF: Giveaways & discounts from New Balance, Hubway, Hub on Wheels, and more.

  • DIGNITARIES: Speakers from Hubway member municipalities.

  • MASCOTS EVERYWHERE: Wally the Green Monster & Newbie!

  • PHOTO BOOTH: Get your picture taken Wally, Newbie, and friends!

  • FREE PASSES: Grab a free Hubway 24-Hour pass.

  • Music, merriment, special announcements, and more!

    More details to be announced on March 31st.
    RSVP here to let us know you’re coming!

    Thank you to:

    Add a description      Add a description




    Add a description      Add a description

  • System Alert: System-wide Hubway operations reopen Wednesday, April 2nd

    Boston, Brookline, Somerville rejoin Cambridge as Hubway reopens system-wide on Wednesday, April 2nd.

    “Spring must be on its way if Hubway is setting up shop!”
    “I get so excited when I see Hubway stations back again #springishere”
    “Yaaaaasss can’t wait for Hubway season #suchatease.”


    Snow may be on the way this week, but we have something for you to look forward to! Consider yourself the first to know: After a successful year-round pilot program in Cambridge, Hubway’s system-wide operations begin anew with an official reopening on Wednesday, April 2nd.

    The Hubway team has been hard at work deploying stations, and nearly 100 stations (out of 140) are expected to be operational by April 2nd, with most remaining stations to be rolled out in early April. Please note: stations along Boylston Street in Brookline and Boston will not be deployed until after the Boston Marathon.

    For up-to-the-minute station, bike, and dock availability, we recommend using the Spotcycle smartphone app, or Hubway Tracker from a desktop computer.

    Get ready to ride.

    New(ish) Station Alert: Lafayette Square station returns

    New(ish) Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, March 21st, the Hubway station located at Lafayette Square in Cambridge, has been re-deployed in the same location as last year, and is fully operational. This station is a 19-dock station on Mass Ave at Lafayette Square adjacent to Main & Columbia Streets.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    System Alert: deploying stations for full system reopening

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has begun deploying stations in Boston this week in preparation for the spring season. Somerville and Brookline stations will follow shortly.

    PLEASE NOTE: While the Cambridge winter pilot is still taking place as normal, at this time Boston / Brookline / Somerville stations are not operational and they will not accept bicycle returns. Plans are to fully connect all deployed stations within the next few weeks. Sign up to receive the reopening announcement by entering your email on the Hubway homepage.

    If you have any question about whether a particular station is open or closed, please check Hubway Tracker or download Spotcycle for your smartphone for the most up-to-date information, or call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929).

    [Boston Magazine] Boston selected for national project to create cycletracks

    This article was originally published by Steven Annear in Boston Magazine on March 11th, 2014.

    The country’s “leading bicycle movement” has selected Boston as one of just six cities in the country to get new bike lanes designed to help keep cyclists separated from vehicles on the roadways.

    Nicole Freedman, director of the city’s Boston Bikes program, sent out an email Monday announcing that The PeopleForBikes Green Lane Project will work with officials to implement “its intensive two-year program to build protected bike lanes” on city streets.

    Under the terms of the partnership program, Boston will get strategic, technical assistance from The Green Lane Project, an initiative run by the non-profit PeopleForBikes, to speed up the installation of protected bike lanes—also known as cycle tracks—already in the works. The lanes will keep cyclists and cars in two different sections of the roadways by using either raised curbs, planters, parked cars, or posts “to make riding a bike an appealing option for more people.”

    Freedman said the projects vary. Some of the proposed tracks can be done by repainting roadways, while others are still in the design phase. The tracks are city-funded, but will most likely be paid for through grant money. The Green Lane Project helps push the projects forward in a timely manner. “We proposed a specific number of projects in our application all in various levels of design, from early concept to advanced design. Implementation is subject to the public process,” she said.

    Boston was picked from a pool of 100 cities across the country and will join Atlanta, Denver, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, and Seattle as the test cities for the program. The folks at PeopleForBikes said it was a tough decision sifting through the various cities that applied for the installation project, but because Boston has a reputation for getting certain things done in record time, it made the area an obvious choice for the grant.

    “It was extremely difficult to narrow down our selection to just six cities; we are seeing an upsurge of interest in accommodating bikes on busy city streets,” said Martha Roskowski, PeopleForBikes’ vice president of local innovation. “Boston has ambitious goals and a strong vision supported by the elected officials and the community. They are poised to get projects on the ground quickly and will serve as an excellent example for other interested cities.”

    Boston leaders will join the Green Lane Project at an official kickoff event in Indianapolis in late April, according to Freedman.

    “This is just what Boston needs to jumpstart the expansion of protected bike lanes here,” said David Watson, executive director of the Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition, or MassBike. “We sent a letter of support for the city’s application to the Green Lane Project, and we are looking forward to seeing more people of all ages and abilities biking safely in Boston.”

    The announcement comes just days after the city hosted a meeting to outline the design plans for a new network of bike paths that will loop around the historic monuments Boston has to offer, as part of the “Connect Historic Boston” project.

    According to project details, a four-mile track will circle the downtown area after modifications to busy streets are made to better connect cyclists with regional paths and T stations. The bike trail will include a two-way, elevated bicycle track along Staniford, Causeway, and Commercial Streets, as well as Atlantic Avenue. It will also require the reconstruction of Lowell Square and Keany Square.

    “Over the next six years, I want to take Boston from one of the best bicycling cities in the country to one of the best in the world. Investing in protected bike lanes is a critical path to that success,” Mayor Marty Walsh said in a statement Monday.

    Since 2007, Boston has added 82 miles of bike lanes to city streets and 1,500 bike racks. The city also launched one of the first bike share systems in the country, Hubway, which has grown to 130 stations and more than 1,100 available bicycles.

    “With Connect Historic Boston planning underway, we are on track to see some incredible improvements over the next few years, not just for people on bikes, but for all road users, ” Freedman said.

    [Boston Cyclists Union] Boston selected for national project to create cycletracks

    This article was originally published by the Boston Cyclists Union on March 10th, 2014.

    The PeopleForBikes Green Lane Project has selected Boston as one of six new U.S. cities to join its intensive two-year program to build protected bike lanes. Boston will receive financial, strategic and technical assistance to create protected bike lanes, also known as cycletracks. The Boston Cyclists Union helped support the city’s application this year, and also helped the city apply for the first year of the program in 2012. Boston, Atlanta, GA, Denver, CO, Indianapolis, IN, Pittsburgh, PA and Seattle, WA.,were chosen from more than 100 U.S. cities that submitted letters of interest for the program.
    Cycletracks are separated from traffic by curbs, planters, parked cars or posts to make riding a bike an appealing option for more people.

    “It was extremely difficult to narrow down our selection to just six cities; we are seeing an upsurge of interest in accommodating bikes on busy city streets,” said Martha Roskowski, PeopleForBikes Vice President of Local Innovation. “Boston has ambitious goals and a strong vision supported by the elected officials and the community. They are poised to get projects on the ground quickly and will serve as an excellent example for other interested cities.”

    “Over the next six years, I want to take Boston from one of the best bicycling cities in the country to one of the best in the world. Investing in protected bike lanes is a critical path to that success,” Boston’s Mayor Martin Walsh said.

    Since 2007, Boston went from the worst bicycling city in the country, according to Bicycling Magazine, to one of the best. Boston launched one of the first bike share systems in the country, the New Balance Hubway system, which has since grown to 130 stations and more than 1100 bicycles. Boston has added 82 miles of bike lanes and1500 bike racks and created one of the most successful community bike programs in the country, donating 1,000 bikes to low income residents and training 5,000 youth in 2013.

    Under Mayor Walsh’s leadership, Boston will begin investing in protected bike lanes consistent with the recently completed Bike Network Plan, implement a women’s cycling program and expand Hubway into the neighborhoods. “With Connect Historic Boston planning underway, we are on track to see some incredible improvements over the next few years, not just for people on bikes, but for all road users, “said Boston Director of Bicycle Programs, Nicole Freedman.

    In the first two years of the program (2012 and 2013), the Green Lane Project worked closely with other major U.S. cities – Austin, TX, Chicago, IL, Memphis, TN, Portland, OR, San Francisco, CA and Washington, DC – to build protected bike lanes. Since then, the number of protected bike lanes on city streets nationwide has nearly doubled from 80 to 142 – with more than half of all growth coming from the Project’s six focus cities. The founding cities will continue as mentors to the new class while continuing to build their bicycling networks with the momentum driven by the Project.

    Boston leaders will join the Green Lane Project at an official kickoff event in Indianapolis in late April.

    #WinterWonderHubway Photo Contest Winners Receive Their Prizes

    When Hubway teamed up with the awesome crew at Timbuk2 to present the #WinterWonderHubway photo contest, we knew we would be introduced to some of our most creative and dedicated Hubway riders! So it was a special treat for us to gather together with them last month at Cambridge City Hall Annex to hand them their very cool custom bag prize and talk with them about why they plan to #hubwayeveryday.

    We captured their first reactions to their new bags! Check out the video!

    And click here to view the winning contest entry photos!

    [BostInno] Boston Among 6 Cities Selected to Create More Green Bike Lanes

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno on March 11th, 2014.

    The PeopleForBikes Green Lane project has chosen Boston to join an intensive two-year program to build protected, green cycling lanes throughout each city. During the course of the project, Boston will receive financial aid, strategic and technical assistance to create cycletracks.

    “Over the next six years, I want to take Boston from one of the best bicycling cities in the country to one of the best in the world. Investing in protected bike lanes is a critical path to that success,” Boston’s Mayor Martin Walsh said in a statement.

    Boston, along with Atlanta, GA.; Denver, CO.; Indianapolis, IN.; Pittsburgh, PA.; and Seattle WA.; were the six cities chosen this year out of 100 applicants.

    Boston’s application to the Green Lane Project was backed by the Boston Cyclist Union, which also helped the city apply in 2012.

    “It was extremely difficult to narrow down our selection to just six cities; we are seeing an upsurge of interest in accommodating bikes on busy city streets,” said Martha Roskowski, PeopleForBikes Vice President of Local Innovation, in a statement.

    Programs such as Connect Historic Boston and the possibility of expanding Hubway service into neighborhoods, Boston Bikes Director Nicole Freedman said, indicates the city is “on track to see some incredible improvements over the next few years, not just for people on bikes, but for all road users.

    The Green Lane Project is entering its third year. Since 2012, the project has nearly doubled the amount of bike lanes nationwide, from 80 up to 142.

    [Montreal Gazette] Bike-sharing has health benefits, study finds

    This is an excerpt of an article that was originally published by Jill Barker in The Montreal Gazette on March 2nd, 2014.

    In one study, most of the users of a bike-share program were men 15 to 44. Bixi could maximize health benefits by trying to boost ridership among women and older cyclists. Men benefit from a decrease in heart disease, while women have a reduction in depression, the study, in London, showed.

    When all factors were considered, including the risks associated with cycling, the boost in physical activity among bike-share users resulted in significant health gains at the population level. Men benefited from a decrease in heart disease while women had a reduction in depression. Because women used the service less than men, though, they realized fewer health benefits.

    At the individual level, however, the health benefits were small, due mainly to the infrequent use of the bikes. Researchers estimated a reduced death rate of 3.3 — 10.9 deaths per million users per year.

    As for the effects of air pollution on urban cyclists, the researchers estimated that exposure levels were small and of little effect as compared to other modes of transportation.

    When it came to road injuries, the rate of injury was lower than for cycling in general, despite the lack of compulsory helmets. It was hypothesized that the heavier, sturdy bikes resulted in reduced speeds, which when combined with designated bike paths and built-in lights, made the use of city bikes safer than traditional road bikes.

    Overall, the researchers concluded, the benefits of using bike-share programs outweighed any risk. This is especially true as cyclists got older. In a younger population, 30 to 44 years old, where the risk of chronic disease is lower, the health effects were minimal. But for bike-share users 45 to 59 years of age, the extra physical activity had a far greater impact on health.

    To read the full article, click here.

    Press Release: Data Geeks: Rejoice! 2013 Comprehensive Hubway Trip Data Released













    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 27, 2014
    Click here to download PDF.

    CONTACT: Jessica Robertson, Transportation Coordinator, MAPC
    JRobertson@mapc.org

    DATA GEEKS: REJOICE!
    Metropolitan Area Planning Council and Hubway
    Release New Comprehensive Hubway Trip Data


    Boston – The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), in partnership with Hubway, the City of Boston, the City of Cambridge, the City of Somerville, and the Town of Brookline, today released new and comprehensive trip data from the Hubway bike-share system. Taken as a whole, these data can illustrate major travel patterns, help Hubway plan new stations and optimize rebalancing, and even show where new transit connections might be needed.

    The data include information on Hubway trips from the July 2011 launch through the end of the regular 2013 season. Information includes the starting and ending time and date of every Hubway ride; which Hubway bike was used and from which station; whether the rider was an annual or monthly member or was using a one-day pass; and the gender and zip code of the rider.

    This release updates the data on which the 2012 Hubway Data Challenge, MAPC’s public data visualization competition, was based. The new data are available for download at www.hubwaydatachallenge.org, where all the entries from the data challenge are still available.

    STAY TUNED: MAPC will be announcing another transportation-related data challenge in early March.

    For more information about the Hubway data release, please contact Jessica Robertson, Transportation Coordinator at MAPC, at JRobertson@mapc.org.

    ###

    ABOUT MAPC
    The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning agency serving the people who live and work in Greater Boston. Our work is guided by our regional plan, “MetroFuture: Making a Greater Boston Region.”

    Find out more about the Hubway system, extensions, station outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Saturday, February 15th, at 5:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we will temporarily close Hubway at 5:00PM on Saturday, February 15th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun, though any bikes in use at the time can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    #WinterWonderHubway Photo Contest Winners Announced!

    We’re excited to present the winning photos in our #WinterWonderHubway contest! Each of the savvy photogs/posters below will make a visit to Cambridge City Hall to receive a winter-Hubway-customized bike bag from the fantastic folks at Timbuk2! Thanks to everyone who participated and rode. You can customize your own Timbuk2 bag HERE. Scroll over the images below to reveal the winning photos, and click to see each post!

    New Cambridge Station Posters

    Short days, short commute.
    Slow down and see what you’re missing.
    Get cozy, share a lane.
    Brighten up your nights, remember your lights.

    The people you share the road with are your friends, neighbors, etc., and the Cambridge Community Development Department (CDD) wants to remind you with its release of a series of winter public service posters. You’ll see them displayed at Hubway station kiosks throughout the city beginning next week. Scroll below for larger versions, and spread the word!

    [The Transit Wire] Hubway trying something different

    This piece was originally published on TheTransitWire.com on February 7th, 2014, and is based on an article by Martine Powers in the Boston Globe.

    News on three bikeshare programs: Biking through the New England winter, crowd-funding in Kansas City, and a new program in Cincinnati.

    Most bicycle-sharing programs operating in colder climates take a winter break, but Hubway (MA) is trying something different.  Although the program has shut down for the winter in Boston and neighboring Brookline and Somerville, Cambridge officials have decided to keep service running year-round.

    And then it snowed.  “It’s been an opportunity for us to experiment every time we’ve had a snowstorm this winter,” said Hubway general manager Emily Stapleton.  She said that staff has become adept at protecting some 250 bikes from the elements. When a storm is on the way, Hubway declares a temporary shutdown to prevent users from removing a bike from its dock. Sometimes officials remove the bikes and store them off site; at other times they leave the bikes on the street.  So far, the bicycles have survived everything that Mother Nature can throw at them. And in the winter of 2014, that’s been a lot.

    [BostInno] Boston-Area Universities Among Best in U.S. at Reducing Campus Driving

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno on February 6th, 2014.

    Collaboration between Hubway and four Boston-area colleges and universities has become a template for other communities around the country to reduce their reliance on driving, according to a new report.

    Released by MASSPIRG, the report, dubbed, “A New Course: How Innovative University Programs Are Reducing Driving on Campus And Creating New Models for Transportation Policy,” concluded that Harvard, MIT, Northeastern and UMass Boston are leading national efforts to limit the amount of cars on the road.

    Specifically, the report touts Harvard and UMass Boston as “trailblazers,” leading the shift away from driving, and encouraging student innovation in transportation policy.

    “Across America, colleges and universities are showing that efforts to meet increased demand for transportation options deliver powerful benefits for their community and surrounding areas,” said Kirstie Pecci at MASSPIRG Education Fund in a statement. “Partnerships like that seen between the cities of Cambridge and Boston, Hubway and local colleges are saving money for universities and improving the quality of life on campus.”

    Research by the Federal Highway Administration concluded that Americans aged between 16 and 34 managed to reduce their annual driving miles by 23 percent per person between 2001 and 2009.

    “What we design today and build tomorrow is going to define how we live for decades. Many people, especially millennials, are owning fewer cars and traveling differently from previous generations,” said Cambridge City Councilor Craig Kelley in a statement. “Realizing this is crucial to making sure the world we’ll be living in tomorrow reflects the reality being created today.”

    With millennials now America’s largest generation, future government investments in infrastructure will correspond to Millennials transportation preferences.

    “University and college campuses are at the forefront of encouraging new ways to get around that don’t depend on personal cars. Public officials who want to stay ahead of the curve should be taking notes,” added Pecci.

    For access to the full article and a download of the report, click here.

    System Alert: Hubway (all stations in Cambridge) has reopened

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Thursday, February 6th, at Noon. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    [Boston.com] In brutal winter, Hubway perfects the art of snow removal

    This article was originally published by Martine Powers on Boston.com on February 5th, 2014.

    Hubway announced in November it planned to operate all-seasons in Cambridge.

    This season’s onslaught of snowfall may elicit groans of dread from public works departments and state transportation officials, but there’s one organization benefiting from each wintry downpour: Hubway.

    “It’s been an opportunity for us to experiment every time we’ve had a snowstorm this winter,” said Emily Stapleton, general manager of the bike-share program.

    The announcement last November that Hubway would try its hand at operating Cambridge’s 26 bike stations straight through the winter prompted some trepidation. Who would want to bike in the snow? And what would happen to the bikes when clouds inevitably dumped inches of snow on the region?

    Stapleton said Tuesday that Hubway staff have learned to deal with snow and ice, refining their strategy for protecting the approximately 250 bikes in circulation from becoming damaged by the elements. When the National Weather Service announces a winter storm warning, Hubway officials declare a temporary system shutdown, which prevents users from removing a bike from the docks.

    But when it comes to deciding what happens to the bikes during the storm, the answer is less clear.

    Sometimes, Stapleton said, Hubway staff has removed all the bikes from the streets and stored them inside a warehouse to ride out the storm, using custom-made canvas covers to protect some of the docks.

    But other times, they’ve left some of the bikes out in the elements — and so far, she said, they have not noticed any ill-effects. Keeping the bikes parked in their spots on sidewalks and curbs can also prevent ice from becoming lodged in the docks.

    Usually, it takes four to five hours for the Hubway staff to remove all the bikes, though it can take longer if the approaching storm coincides with afternoon rush hour, prompting a mass exodus from Cambridge.

    “We’ve been perfecting that lead time,” Stapleton said.

    And when it comes to snow removal, she said, Hubway staff have been able to handle the more minor flurries by themselves, hiring outside contractors to help plow after more significant winter storms. Stapleton said Hubway has been communicating with public works departments to ensure that the bike-share stations don’t end up as a dumping ground for plowed snow.

    “Where possible, we’ve tried to be mindful of one another, so we’re not creating more work for the other person,” Stapleton said.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Tuesday, February 4th, at 7:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we will temporarily close Hubway at 7:00PM on Tuesday, February 4th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun, though any bikes in use at the time can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    There is a winter storm warning in effect until Wednesday, February 5th, at 6:00PM. We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    City "Actively Pursuing" Hubway Station for Magoun Square

    This article was originally published on Ward5Online.com on January 29th, 2014.

    Last night’s Housing and Community Development meeting brought some exciting news for Magoun Square businesses and residents as it was revealed that the City will “actively pursue” a Hubway Bicycle Station for the business district when they enter into negotiations with the company this Spring.

    While discussing legislative item number 195173, a representative from the Administration revealed that the city is “actively pursuing” a station for the Magoun Square/Trum Field area, but that Hubway does have specific criteria for locations before they agree to install a station. Hubway began a phased launch of the bicycle-renting stations in Somerville in July of 2011, eventually becoming fully expanded in the Fall of 2012.

    As the sponsor of this item, I thought it would be a great addition to the area considering the increased bicycle lanes and visibly improved traffic markings. The completion of the Community Path Extension to Lowell Street (and eventually to Boston), however, was my main leverage for wanting the station near Magoun. Currently, Magoun Square does have some bicycle parking including one directly next to Olde Magoun’s Saloon that’s installed from the Spring to early Winter.

    After sending the great news through my Twitter feed last night (@Ward5Online), one person also recommended Winter Hill as an ideal location for Hubway, calling it a “lost opportunity.”

    Hubway does provide a location map that has an interactive tool feature to suggest locations. I encourage all to suggest locations where they feel Hubway would be best utilized.

    The City will enter into these negotiations this Spring with Director of Transportation and Infrastructure Hayes Morrison stepping up to the plate for Somerville.

    System Alert: Hubway (all stations in Cambridge) has reopened

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Wednesday, January 22nd, at 3:00PM. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    Two new Hubway stations slated for South Boston Waterfront

    This article was originally published by Patrick Rosso on Boston.com on January 22nd, 2014.

    The South Boston Waterfront will welcome two new Hubway stations this spring.

    The new stations, sponsored by Jamestown Properties, will be placed outside the real estate investment firm’s Innovation and Design Building on Drydock Avenue. The building, located near the Black Falcon Cruise Terminal, was purchased by the Atlanta-based firm in 2013 and is expected to be fully operational this spring.

    “The addition of Hubway will provide alternative transportation options that are important to our tenants and others working in the Marine Industrial Park,” said Michael Phillips, chief operating office of Jamestown.

    The company has committed $100,000 to sponsor the two stations, as well as pledged $50,000 for the construction of the concrete pads, access ramps, and striping necessary to install the new stations.

    “The new bike stations are just one example of many improvements we are making at The Innovation and Design Building to support the growing base of innovation and the manufacturing companies in this eastern corner of the Seaport District,” Phillips added.

    Hubway, a short-term bike rental program, has over 100 stations throughout the city of Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville.

    Stations in Boston are expected to reopen in the spring.

    More Hubways Springing Up in Boston's Innovation District

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno on January 21st, 2014.

    Come spring time, Innovation District residents and work commuters could have more Hubway stations at their disposal.

    Real estate firm Jamestown Properties plans to install two additional Hubway stations outside of the Innovation and Design Building. According to a press release announcing the firm’s plans, the bike-share stations are slated to be up and fully operational by spring. When the new stations open, the area will be home to five Hubway locations.

    Seaport Hotel, Seaport Square, and the Boston Convention Center Hubway stations are currently closed for the winter.

    More than 100 Hubway stations and 1,000 bikes are scattered around Boston during the spring, summer and fall, before winter removal. Currently, Cambridge is in the midst of a one-year pilot program, which allows ambitious customers to rent bikes from more than 25 Hubway locations in that city during the winter.

    Jamestown Properties has invested $100,000 to sponsor the two additional Innovation District stations, and an extra $50,000 in infrastructure costs.

    The Seaport’s IDB is located on the corner of Drydock Ave and Design Center Place, just a short bike ride away from the Harpoon Brewery.

    Snapping Hubway pics could earn you free winter swag

    This is an excerpt of an article originally published by Nate Boroyan on BostInno on January 21st, 2014.

    Chances are, unless you’re a diehard cyclist hellbent on trekking through the city during the most adverse conditions, rain, snow, frigid temperatures, and slick roads probably offer enough incentive for you to opt for a T ride.

    With bike-sharing ridership down during the winter, Hubway is offering customers an excuse to brave the elements, hop on a bike, and leave any fears at the door.

    So, if you’re in the market for some fresh winter gear, snap a picture featuring a Hubway station or bike, post it to your social network – Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter – of choice, and include #WinterWonderHubway.

    Ten winners will be selected to receive some fresh winter swag, courtesy of San Francisco-based Timbuk2 (see: below). The last day to submit a photo is January 31.

    Click here for the full article and more contest details.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Tuesday, January 21st, at 1:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we will temporarily close Hubway at 1:00PM on Tuesday, January 21st, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun, though any bikes in use at the time can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    There is a winter storm warning in effect until Thursday, January 23rd, at 1:00PM. We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    Alternate Mobility Choices

    These are excerpts from an article originally published in the Beacon Hill Times on January 21st, 2014.

    Beacon Hill gives residents a head start when it comes to adopting greener lifestyles. It’s a neighborhood whose convenient location and MBTA accessibility spawns walkers and transit users alike; its limited parking spaces often make Zipcars and taxis seem preferable to vehicle ownership…

    Boston’s Climate Action Plan gives communities like Beacon Hill a framework for building greener, healthier and more sustainable neighborhoods.  The BHCA Green Committee, chaired by West Cedar Street resident Eve Waterfall and Lime Street resident Diana Coldren, also supports and encourages sustainable living, with transportation as one of its primary focuses…

    The New Balance Hubway Bike Share System impact on Beacon Hill is “awesome,” said Boston Bikes director Nicole Freedman. Its stations at Charles Circle, the Charles and Beacon intersection, the Arthur Fiedler footbridge and Whole Foods are among the busiest of Boston’s 72 stations.

    In September alone, 6163 trips taken by visitors and residents originated or ended at the Charles Circle station, making it the third most popular station in Boston. The Fiedler Bridge station ranked ninth with 4113 trips and the Whole Foods station had 3783 trips. Those trips translated to substantially fewer cars driving through or parking in the neighborhood…

    “Top on my list of issues with bikes on Beacon Hill is figuring out a way for northbound traffic on Charles Street,” said Chestnut Street Gordon Burnes, an avid bike rider himself. “There’s hardly a time when I am biking southbound that I don’t see another biker heading upstream against the traffic. It’s quite dangerous.”

    Freedman acknowledged the need to give bicyclists heading toward Mass General Hospital and the Longfellow Bridge a route that does not threaten the safety of pedestrians crossing Charles Street but said there are no discussions planned in the near future. Installing a two-way cycle track around the Public Garden to allow bicyclists easier transitions to existing cycle lanes across the city is a higher priority at this time, she said…

    “Right now there’s a wild west mentality out there, a survival of the fittest,” said Waterfall. “Walkers, bikers and drivers need to work together to stress the benefits of each mode of transportation and then to build an infrastructure safe enough so people will consider which mode of transportation to use each time they head out the door,” urged Waterfall…

    Click here to read the full article.

    Best of the New: Bike Helmet Vending Machine and other Bostonian ideas

    This is an excerpt of an article originally published in the “Best of the New: People & Ideas” section of theBoston Globe Magazine on January 19th, 2014.

    24 movers, shakers, and AHA! moments.

    Bike Helmet Vending Machine

    Somerville-based HelmetHub tested its first machine on the [Hubway station at the] corner of Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue this past fall. The compact kiosk can dispense 36 helmets and accept 25 returns; everything is solar-powered. Expect more of the machines [at stations] around Boston this spring, and with other cities interested, around the world after that.

    To read the other great Bostonian ideas, click here.

    Christopher Robin Rides His Bike

    “The things that make me different are the things that make me.” - Winnie the Pooh

    This week marks the 132nd anniversary of the birth of A.A. Milne, the creator of Winnie the Pooh, and so we celebrate his sentiment above, voiced through the tenderness of a little, stuffed, yellow, honey-loving bear in the imagination of a small child. It’s a simple recognition of childlike innocence and wonder, an attitude we see on the faces of other riders going the opposite direction on the bike-path, a respect in the nod of a helmet or a ding of a bell (or a smile or “excuse me”) that Hubway riders give to let others know they’re about to pass by. Happy birthday, A.A.

    #WinterWonderHubway Photo Contest! Win a custom bike bag!

    We’re super excited to be teaming up with San Francisco-based Timbuk2 to hook you up with a chance to win one of these sweet winter-customized Hubway-green bike bag (over $149 value). To get your name in the proverbial hat, simply:

    (1) Snap a photo that includes Hubway (bonus points if you’re in it)!

    (2) Upload your photo #WinterWonderHubway photos to Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook between now and January 31st! Make sure to include the hashtag!

    (3) There is no step 3. You’re done! 10 winners will be selected by the end of the month. Points for clever & creative! Get your #WinterWonderHubway photos up now!


    Need some creative inspiration? Click here for some Hubway user photos, or scroll down for some more examples! Make sure to tag your pics with #WinterWonderHubway

    instagram.com/meaghano9


    instagram.com/rh_moreno


    instagram.com/mistakwigz


    Hubway staff photo

    Beware: Latest evidence suggests that bike sharing is contagious

    This article was originally published by Michael Anderson, Green Lane Project staff writer, on PeopleForBikes.org on January 9th, 2014.

    The first week of 2014 brought the latest chilling sign that public bicycle sharing in North America has reached a new level of virulence.

    Far from slowing their recent epidemic, bike sharing systems now seem likely to spread from major metro areas into college towns and dozens of smaller cities across the continent.

    Since their emergence from central France in 2007, electronic bike sharing systems have spread rapidly around the world. Though experts have identified a few factors that can slow their advance, such as excisions of on-street bike infrastructure and occasional mutations within the organism itself, there is no known cure for modern dock-based bike sharing once it becomes operational.

    Now, a list of subscribers to a webinar series that discusses how to secure funding for such systems offers a peek at 21 cities that face a high risk of contracting bike sharing in the near future.

    Perhaps clearly than ever before, this map suggests that when a bike sharing program infects a major metro area, all nearby cities are at risk. From Charlotte, it can leap quickly to Raleigh and Norfolk; from New York City, to Newark and Hartford; from San Francisco, to Reno and Santa Cruz; from Portland, to Bend and Eugene.

    Even Texans, long thought to be inoculated against urban bicycling, have seen sharing systems spread rapidly since 2011 from San Antonio to Houston, Austin, Fort Worth and El Paso. The participation of Texas A&M University in this week’s webinar suggests that even the vulnerable youngsters of College Station, Tex., may now be at risk.

    There is also continuing evidence that cities with bike sharing tend to develop other troubling comorbidities such as protected bike lanes, another highly infectious variety of urban infrastructure.

    Here’s the latest list of cities that have begun to show early symptoms of interest in bicycle sharing:

    Albuquerque, NM
    Bend, OR
    Calgary, AB
    Canmore, AB
    College Station, TX
    Columbia, MO
    Dayton, OH
    Edmonton, AB
    Eugene, OR
    Greeley, CO
    Hartford, CT
    Nanaimo, BC
    Newark, NJ
    Norfolk, VA
    Peterborough, ON
    Raleigh, NC
    Reno, NV
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Springfield, MO
    Tucson, AZ
    Winooski, VT

    In addition to these 21 cities without bikesharing that sent government employees to join the webinar, participants also came from cities such as Columbus and Indianapolis, already known carriers of bike sharing that seem now to have been seized with a fever to expand their existing systems into more neighborhoods; and cities such as Honolulu and Greensboro, where local retail associations and bicycling advocates — two risk factors that strongly correlate to future bicycle sharing — seem to be taking the lead.

    “Albuquerque has been infected,” Julie Luna, a trail planner for the Mid-Region Council of Governments, said in an interview Wednesday. “The downtown business organization is interested in bikesharing. The university is interested in bikesharing. Some people at the city are interested in bikesharing.”

    David Hutchison, a city engineer in Springfield, Mo., said he’d joined the seminar after being exposed to bikesharing systems in Boulder, Colo, Fort Collins, Colo., and Washington D.C. and finding them “quite useful.” “Springfield is about the same size as Fort Collins, and Missouri State is about the size of Colorado State University,” he said. “So I like to think of them as sister cities. Seems to me that what they can do, we can.”

    Is bike sharing right for your community?

    This article was originally published by Micheline Maynard on BridgeMI.com on January 8th, 2014.

    Bike-share programs are becoming more popular in communities across the world. What would make a bike share right for your city or town? Consider these factors:

    An active bicycling community, coupled with bike lanes or paths – Cyclists are often the first ambassadors for bike sharing, and bicycling organizations frequently get involved in hosting “how to ride” clinics and safety programs for bike-sharing systems.

    A supportive city government, and nonprofits that support the environment – Many bike-share programs are partnerships between municipal and environmental groups.

    Sponsors to underwrite bike shares as they get on their feet – These can be universities, corporations, and nonprofits able to make multi-year commitments.

    Places to go – One of the biggest reasons people use bike sharing is to supplement cars or public transportation, a concept often referred to as “the last mile.” Bike sharing can be the bridge between an office and a restaurant for lunch, or the bus and a bar after work. It also can ease parking demand in tourist areas, since bike-share users can park elsewhere and bike in.

    Logical spots for bike racks – Bike-sharing companies like Bixi and B-Cycle regularly consult with communities to choose the locations for racks where bikes will be most used.

    A “complete streets” mindset – In which pedestrians, bikes and cars coexist comfortably.

    Bicycling around Boston: An Eco Friendly Alternative Made Easy!

    This article was originally published by Austin Mallick on Joycott.com on Jan. 3, 2014.

                

    Given the influx in an interest in exercise, bike share programs are entirely popular throughout major metropolitan areas in the U.S. Beyond providing locals with access to a ride, they are also quite beneficial for visitors touring these cities. Biking through a new city certainly has a different feel than renting a car, not to mention that it is both cheaper and more energy efficient.

    An example of one of these successful bike share program is Hubway, located in and throughout the Boston metropolitan area.

    Launched in July of 2011, the Hubway (or officially known as New Balance Hubway) bike sharing system has been on the up and up. It began as 600 bikes and 60 stations throughout the Boston area, including area such as Brookline, Cambridge, and others.

    Even during the winter months of 2011, new users were signing up on the regular in anticipation of when the bike program would reopen. Hubway became the first regional bike sharing program in the U.S. after Boston, surrounding cities, and Alta Bicycle Share signed a collective regional agreement.

    As of Thanksgiving this past year, Hubway users hit the 1.5 million rides mark as the number of bikes and active stations continues to grow.

    Most recently, a majority of the Hubway stations in Cambridge are participating in a pilot program that will allow the bike share program to operate year-round.

    Hubway can be used in a few different ways. First and foremost, users need to choose a membership; these can range anywhere from annual passes to both 24 hour and 72 hour passes. These short term passes are available at any Hubway station through the kiosks, and both annual and monthly memberships can be purchased online.

    To boot, you can also order yourself a helmet (remember, safety first), which can be added to your membership or purchased. All rides underneath 30 minutes are free, and rides over 30 minutes incur additional usage fees depending on your pass.

    The Hubway bike share program falls under the Boston Bikes organization, whose goal is “to make Boston a world-class bicycling city by creating safe and inviting conditions for all residents and visitors”.

    Created in the Fall of 2007 by Boston’s Mayor Menino, Boston Bikes aims to help create a bike-friendly environment for everyone by creating bike lanes, educating the public, and hosting community events, among other projects.

    Some number crunching shows the span of their efforts: bicycle ridership has increased 82% since 2007; Hubway has 72 stations and over 700 bikes in Boston; Boston’s 60th was installed on Massachusetts Ave, a main thoroughfare for Boston’s bike network.

    2013 Boston Bike Counts

    This is an excerpt of the 2013 Bike Count conducted by Boston Bikes. Find the full report by clicking here.

    Since 2007 Boston has seen a 78% increase in cycling. Below you can find data from 2013, as well as data dating back to 2007. Click on each image to view a larger version.

    Counts are conducted each Fall during the hours of 7-9am and 4-6pm. Thank you to all those who have volunteered their time throughout the years.

                

    System Alert: Hubway re-opens at 12pm on Saturday 1/4/14

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway will be re-opened as of Saturday, January 4th, at 12:00PM. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway temporarily shut down on 1/1/14 at 5:00 PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we have
    temporarily closed Hubway at 5:00 PM on Wednesday, 1/1/14, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented during the temporary closure, though any bikes in use can be returned to any Hubway station with an available
    dock.

    We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    Providence moving ahead with bike share program

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Providence is moving ahead with plans to introduce a bike share program linking downtown with Brown University, Federal Hill and other locations on the city’s east and west sides.

    Alta Bicycle Share, of Portland, Ore., submitted the winning proposal to manage the program over two other companies. It runs bike share programs in Boston [Hubway], New York City [CitiBike] and Chicago [Divvy].

    Click here to read the full article, originally published by Erika Niedowski on December 25th, 2013, on Boston.com.

    System Alert: Hubway (all stations in Cambridge) has reopened

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Monday, December 16th, at 1:00PM. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on 12/14/13 at 2:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we will temporarily close Hubway at 2:00PM on Saturday, December 14th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun, though any bikes in use at the time can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    Ho Ho Hubway! Give the gift of bike share!

    THE PERFECT STOCKING-STUFFER
    Gift certificates are available now and through the holidays.
                

    Check someone off your gift list! Visit the Hubway online store right now to purchase gift certificates redeemable for Hubway passes and memberships of all levels! Print them right from your computer!

    There’s a gift level for everyone, whether you’re buying for friends and family who live and work in the metro-Boston area, students, or even out-of-town guests.

    ORDER NOW


    To Close or Not to Close?

    This is a selection of excerpts from an article originally published by Alex Vickers on Bikeshare.com on December 5th, 2013.

    To close or not to close? That is the question… for many bike share operators this winter…

    The cost-benefit analysis of staying open versus closing for the winter varies by city mainly due to the climate variations across cities, physical station locations, and the structure of their bike share contracts. While Denver, Kansas, and Boston’s bike share programs decided to give this winter a shot and stay open for the first time, other programs, like Nice Ride, aren’t afforded that option because of heavy snowfall, unabating low temperatures, and station locations. But perhaps the most obvious factor in determining whether or not a program should remain open for winter is the dip in revenue caused by lower usage combined with the increased costs related to snow removal…

    Of the Hubway stations in Cambridge, only two had to be relocated to accommodate for snow plows. The rest of Hubway’s municipalities primarily rely on street-space for their stations so winter station removal was necessary…

    Another factor that affects the decision of winter operations has to do with the structure of the bike share contract. In Hubway’s case, the city owns the equipment and is on the hook for the costs of removing equipment from the street. In order to remain open for the winter in Cambridge, the program’s operator and the city had to amend their contracts to allow for operation in the winter. In that amended contract, they also had to outline operational strategies for non-corrosive snow removal and bike maintenance…

    While there are drawbacks to remaining open for winter, there are also numerous benefits which don’t necessarily have a dollar amount attached to them. Perhaps the biggest boon to staying open is the level of service operators can provide with a year round system. “It’s difficult for users to become habituated to a public transit system and then expect them to re-habituate again when we reopen in March,” said Nick Bohnenkamp of Denver Bike Sharing…

    The Hubway stations in Cambridge which are remaining open for the winter is an experimental pilot that could be potentially expanded to the rest of Hubway.

    Click here to read the full article.

    Bike-sharing offers big boost to car-free tourists

    This article was originally published by Bill McGee in USA Today on December 4th, 2013.

    A new generation is not buying cars and many are not even getting driver’s licenses, while automobile ownership is down for the first time since production was halted during World War II. But for out-of-town tourists, there are times when mass transit simply can’t fill the void.

    The answer for a growing number of travelers is that 19th-century invention—the bicycle. And more and more communities are finding ways for natives and travelers alike to rent or share bikes.

    Hubway offers 1,000 bikes and 100 stations in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville, as well as 24-hour ($6) or 3-day ($12) passes for travelers.

    Read the full article here.

    New Pilot Program To Keep Hubway’s Cambridge Stations Open Throughout the Winter

    href=“http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2013/12/2/cambridge-hubway-open-winter/” target=“_blank”>The Harvard Crimson on December 2nd, 2013.

    For the first time since the Boston-area bike-sharing company Hubway was founded two and a half years ago, Cambridge will keep its Hubway bikes on the road this winter season.

    The pilot program, announced by Hubway and the City of Cambridge in a joint press release on Nov. 19, will bring year-round Hubway service to almost all of Cambridge’s 26 Hubway stations, including the seven at Harvard. Click here to read the full article.

    Riding a Bike in Winter... How to Beat the Snow and Ice

    This article was originally published by Stephen Kaiser on Cambridge Community Television on December 1st, 2013.

    A majority of bicyclists usually stop riding in the winter. Very few people venture out into snow and ice. There is a way…

    Hubway plans to keep its bike rental program going throughout the winter in Cambridge. Meanwhile, Boston and other cities are shutting their service down. Will the Cambridge experiment work?

    Click here to read the full article.

    Hubway to pilot year-round program in Cambridge

    This article was originally published in Wicked Local Cambridge on November 28th, 2013.

    Cambridge — Hubway, the public bike share system, will continue to be available to riders throughout winter at almost all Cambridge-based stations. While Hubway has always operated on a seasonal basis in its two-and-a-half-year history, this year the city is piloting a plan to provide year-round Hubway service.

    Almost all stations in Cambridge will remain operational throughout the winter, though the station at Lafayette Square/Main Street will be removed from the street for the season. The Lechmere station will be moved to the sidewalk just east of Lechmere Station. Station updates will be posted on the station map at www.thehubway.com/stations, www.hubwaytracker.com, and on the Spotcycle app for smart phones, www.spotcycle.net. Annual members can continue to use the Cambridge stations during the season at no additional cost. Twenty-four-hour, three-day passes and monthly passes will be available for purchase as usual.

    As part of the pilot program, snow removal will become part of the daily responsibilities of the Hubway field team. The team, coordinated by Hubway’s dispatch office, is on the street from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day, and is stocked with equipment to keep stations clear of snow and ice.

    Users should bear in mind that the regular seasonal closing of stations in Boston, Brookline and Somerville city/town limits began Nov. 18. Most stations remained open through Nov. 27.

    Somerville named among most walkable U.S. cities

    This article was originally published by Dana Guth in The Tufts Daily on December 2nd, 2013.

    The City of Somerville was earlier this month voted the seventh most walkable city in the nation — up from its previous position in 10th place — as a result of successful ongoing initiatives by the city to encourage walking and biking…

    ...Tufts works with the surrounding community to facilitate easy transit through programs like Hubway, a Boston-based bike share.

    “All the squares around us, including Davis, Packard and Powderhouse, have Hubway stations owned by the City of Somerville,” she said. “The area is really good about making all of these options available.” Click here to read the full article.

    Still riding this winter? Ride safely, friends... here's how

    This winter, Hubway stations in Cambridge will remain operational. This marks the first time that the Hubway system will be open year-round. Whether you’re riding a Hubway or your own bike, there are a number of things you should keep in mind to prepare for cold-weather bicycling:



    Wear layers, but remember that riding will warm you up. If you get hot as you ride, pull over and remove a layer, but always keep your ears and hands shielded.



    Wear gloves or mittens to keep your hands warm. Just make sure you’re still able to work the brakes, gears, and bell.



    Local bike shops offer bike-appropriate gloves and earmuffs that do not obstruct the use of your helmet. Make sure you can hear what’s going on around you.



    Your core will stay warm as you ride, but make sure you’ve got your extremities covered. Wear shoes with enough room for thick, warm socks.



    The weather can change quickly here, so make sure you have a back-up plan if you don’t feel comfortable on a bike. Plan your route ahead of time. If the weather isn’t good for biking, take the train, bus, or a cab.



    It’s important to decide for yourself when you’re comfortable riding and when you’re not. Each rider has a different comfort level in inclement weather, so don’t let a riding partner push you past your comfort zone. If you are uncomfortable for any reason while biking, stop riding and walk your bike to the nearest docking station. If you are cold, make your way indoors to warm up.



    Visibility is particularly limited during the winter, with fewer daylight hours, glare, and foggy conditions. Hubway bikes have 24-hour lights, but it is also a good idea to wear light colored clothing and reflective materials if possible. Always make sure you can be seen by vehicles.



    Use extra caution under wintry conditions, as roads may not be completely cleared of snow and ice. You are always permitted to ride in the general travel lane (not only the bike lane) and should do so if the bike lane is snowy or icy. Keep your eyes open for piles of leaves of patches of ice. It’s better to continue straight through these obstacles than turn or lean through them. Also be careful to avoid using your front brakes, as it could cause you to lose control.



    Hubway bikes can hold up to cold weather. They’re checked regularly by our bike mechanics, so leave your bike at home and let us worry about hardware wear & tear.



    The system will only shut down in the event of severe weather conditions. In those cases, we’ll notify the public via press release and social media. We’ll also notify our Members via email. Find out more about the Hubway system, extensions, station outages/closures at thehubway.com, on Twitter, and on Facebook.

    Hubway winter service provides welcome experiment

    This article was originally published as an editorial in The Boston Globe on November 25th, 2013.

    Hubway Service in Cambridge this Winter Provides Welcome Experiment for Entire System

    Though wintertime is hardly prime cycling season in the Boston area, the annual shutdown of Hubway comes as a disappointment to devoted users who rely on the bike-sharing system for basic transportation. So, it’s encouraging that Hubway and Cambridge announced last week that the service will stay open in the city through the winter.

    Putting more bikers on potentially icy roads raises obvious safety concerns, especially if snow drifts choke Cambridge’s already narrow streets. Riders must use common sense, and Hubway and Cambridge officials should keep apprised of accidents and injuries.

    Other challenges are more prosaic: Hubway will have to remove the bikes from kiosks before blizzards, and hire contractors to plow the stations in case of heavy snowfall. To remove corrosive road salt, the bikes will need to be cleaned more frequently. Still, bike sharing systems in other cold-weather cities, such as Toronto and New York, are offering year-round service, and it’s vital to ascertain whether the entire Hubway network can follow suit in the future.

    Station Alert: Station Removal Schedule for November 23-27

    SYSTEM ALERT: The final day of 2013 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 27th*. Stations in Cambridge will remain open through winter, and the rest will relaunch again in spring 2014.

    Here are the scheduled station removals for November 23rd through November 27th:

    Saturday, 11/23 (5 stations)

  • Hyde Square at Barbara St
  • JP Centre - Centre St at Myrtle St
  • JP Monument - South St at Centre St
  • Green St T
  • Jackson Square T at Centre St
  • Sunday, 11/24 (0 stations)

  • No stations are scheduled for removal on Sunday, November 24th.
  • Monday, 11/25 (5 stations)

  • Yawkey Way at Boylston St
  • Beacon St / Mass Ave
  • Newbury St / Hereford St
  • Boylston / Mass Ave
  • BIDMC - Brookline at Burlington St
  • Tuesday, 11/26 (4 stations)

  • Charlestown - Main St at Austin St
  • Hayes Square at Vine St
  • ** Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main St / Columbia St
  • *** Lechmere Station at Cambridge St
  • * All remaining stations will be operational through Wednesday, November 27th, until 11:59pm. Please make sure to dock your bike prior to that time.
    ** The Lafayette Square station is the only Cambridge-based location being removed for the season.
    *** The Lechmere Station is being moved off the street but will still be accessible on that block. Exact location to be determined.

    Please note: this schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 1.5 million rides… and counting!

    Hubway tests out winter service in Cambridge

    This article was originally published by Martine Powers in The Boston Globe on November 20th, 2013.

    When it comes to hardy New Englanders unfazed by the prospect of bitter cold and wintry weather, Cambridge may have the rest of the region beaten.

    The city and the Hubway bike-sharing program said Tuesday that they will debut winter-weather service in Cambridge as part of a pilot program to test whether all-season service could be possible for the whole system.

    It is a significant undertaking for Hubway, which has closed up shop each winter since its summer 2011 launch.

    Hubway administrators said snow removal had been the primary obstacle to year-round service. But as leaders in Brookline, Boston, and Somerville felt it wise to pack away their cities’ bike-sharing program for winter hibernation, Cambridge officials sought for the city to serve as a winter guinea pig.

    “It’s become pretty clear that there’s an expectation that if this is going to be a real transportation system, we should be able to access it as much of the year as possible,” said Cara Seiderman, Cambridge transportation program manager.

    Only one Cambridge station will be removed for the winter, at Lafayette Square on Massachusetts Avenue.

    Hubway administrators are steeling themselves for the prospect of tending to the 26 Cambridge Hubway stations through the harshest months, and they will face plenty of challenges. Shorter days mean that the bike-sharing kiosks’ solar-powered batteries may peter out, requiring staff to swap in fully-charged replacements. Road salt is corrosive, so bikes will have to be cleaned regularly.

    Hubway staff will be responsible for snow removal. If there is a blizzard warning, they will attempt to evacuate all the bikes. Afterward, they will hire contractors to plow the stations.

    Aside from the salt, the bikes themselves are designed to withstand extreme weather, said Emily Stapleton , Hubway general manager. “The bikes are meant to be out in all seasons,” she said.

    Seiderman said she expected plenty of demand for Hubway bikes in winter months.

    “We already know that people bike year-round in Cambridge,” Seiderman said. “Just look out at the streets any day that’s not a blizzard.”

    Stapleton said Hubway staff will use data collected this winter to help determine whether, and where, year-round service could be successful.

    “We want to see what riding through the winter would look like,” Stapleton said.

    Hubway is one of several bike-sharing systems around the country, including Chicago’s Divvy and Denver’s B-Cycle, that have announced in recent weeks that they will now be available all four seasons. New York City’s bike-sharing system, which debuted this summer, has been year-round from the get-go. Hubway staff have visited Toronto’s Bixi, which runs through the winter.

    “People think of winter and they think the whole winter is going to be like their memory of three days where there was a frigid snap or a blizzard,” said Seiderman. “That’s not three or four months; that’s just a few days or a week. And we don’t want to design a system around a couple of days when the rest of the season is great.”

    Few people were more excited by Hubway’s news than Corey Watts, 25, who moved this year to Porter Square. A Hubway member since May, he had been dreading a winter without bike-sharing.

    Though his daily commute to Longwood Medical Area will have to occur via the T, he said he was relieved to learn he could still use bike-sharing for his Cambridge errands and his daily journey to his girlfriend’s apartment near Harvard Square.

    “It will be good for our relationship,” he said.

    Station Alert: Station Removal Schedule for November 20-24

    SYSTEM ALERT: The Hubway system’s seasonal phased station closures began on Monday, November 18, 2013. The final day of 2013 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 27th. Stations in Cambridge will remain open through winter, and the rest will relaunch again in spring 2014.

    Here are the scheduled station removals for November 20th through November 24th:

    Wednesday, 11/20 (7 stations)

  • Washington St at Waltham St
  • Washington St at Rutland St
  • Washington St at Lenox St
  • Boston Medical Center -  East Concord at Harrison Ave
  • South Bay Plaza
  • E. Cottage St at Columbia Rd
  • West Broadway at Dorchester St
  • Thursday, 11/21 (6 stations)

  • Cambridge St at Joy St
  • Charles Circle - Charles St at Cambridge St
  • Charles St at Beacon St
  • Boylston at Fairfield
  • Boylston St at Berkeley
  • Boylston St at Arlington St
  • Friday, 11/22 (6 stations)

  • Faneuil Hall - Union St at North St
  • Franklin St / Arch St
  • Post Office Square
  • Milk St at India St
  • Congress / Sleeper
  • Boylston St / Washington St
  • Saturday, 11/23 (5 stations)

  • Hyde Square at Barbara St
  • JP Centre - Centre St at Myrtle St
  • JP Monument - South St at Centre St
  • Green St T
  • Jackson Square T at Centre St
  • Sunday, 11/24 (0 stations)
    No stations are scheduled for removal on Sunday, November 24th.

    Please note: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 1.5 million rides… and counting!

    Cambridge to test year-round Hubway operations this winter

    This article was originally published by Brock Parker in Boston.com on November 19th, 2013.

    Fair weather fans of cycling take note: Cambridge is about to test its bicycling mettle against a Massachusetts winter.

    Hubway stations in Cambridge will remain open this winter, when stations throughout the rest of the regional bike-sharing system have closed for the season.

    The City of Cambridge and Hubway announced the year-round pilot program Tuesday and Cara Seiderman, the city’s transportation program manager, said just how much snow and freezing temperatures will interfere with ridership remains to be seen.

    “We would like to try it,” Seiderman said. “We’ll definitely be tracking how much use it gets.”

    Hubway’s shutdown for winter months in Boston, Somerville and Brookline, began Monday, but most stations will remain open in those communities through Wednesday, Nov. 27, according to Hubway.

    Of the 27 Hubway bicycle docking stations in Cambridge, however, only one, in Lafayette Square, will be closed for the winter, Seiderman said. Another dock at the Lechmere station will be moved onto a sidewalk.

    Seiderman said it’s easier to test Hubway during the winter months in Cambridge because almost all of the city’s bicycle docking stations are off-street and would not interfere with snow plows.

    Hubway may temporarily close some of the stations in Cambridge during extreme inclement weather. But as part of the pilot program, snow removal will be part of the daily responsibilities of the Hubway field team that will ensure that docking stations are stocked with bikes and cleared of snow and ice.

    Seiderman said the winter pilot has been made possible in part by money generated by the popularity of Hubway in Cambridge that is being reinvested in the system.

    About 2,000 annual Hubway members are from Cambridge, and more who work in the city use the system, Seiderman said. In October, about 1,400 Hubway rides a day originated in Cambridge, she said.

    In a joint press release with Hubway, Cambridge City Manager Richard Rossi said Cambridge is pleased to offer the year-round pilot program, but asked that cyclists use care when riding in winter conditions.

    Seiderman said the city and Hubway will be working to ensure that Hubway users realize that once the docking stations close in Boston, Somerville and Brookline, they will only be able to dock the bicycles within Cambridge.

    More information about the pilot program, and tips for cycling in the winter can be found online on the city’s website and on Hubway’s website.

    Press Release: Hubway to pilot year-round operations in Cambridge











    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to download PDF.
    November 19, 2013

    CONTACT:
    Benjy Kantor, Hubway
    benjykantor@altabicycleshare.com, 617.968.0361

    Cara Seiderman, City of Cambridge Development Department
    cseiderman@cambridgema.gov, 617.349.4629

    HUBWAY TO PILOT YEAR-ROUND OPERATIONS IN CAMBRIDGE
    Cambridge-based Hubway Bike Share Stations Will Remain Available through the Winter


    Hubway, the metro-Boston area’s public bike share system, will continue to be available to riders throughout winter at almost all Cambridge-based stations. While Hubway has always operated on a seasonal basis in its two and a half year history, this year the City of Cambridge is piloting a plan to provide year-round Hubway service. 

    “We are pleased at the opportunity to pilot Hubway service year-round,” said Cambridge City Manager Richard C. Rossi. “We’re committed to supporting sustainable transportation options, and we are excited to continue the program this winter season. We do ask for everyone to use care when riding under winter conditions and also request your patience and understanding as we work with whatever nature brings us in terms of weather.”

    Almost all stations in Cambridge will remain operational throughout the winter, though the station at Lafayette Square/Main Street will be removed from the street for the season. The Lechmere station will be moved to the sidewalk just east of Lechmere Station. All station updates will be posted on the station map at www.thehubway.com/stations, www.hubwaytracker.com, and on the Spotcycle app for smart phones (www.spotcycle.net). Annual members may continue to use the Cambridge stations during the season at no additional cost. 24-hour, 3-day passes, and monthly passes will be available for purchase as usual.

    As part of the pilot program, snow removal will become part of the daily responsibilities of the Hubway field team. The team, coordinated by Hubway’s dispatch office, is on the street from 6am to 10pm every day, and is stocked with equipment to keep stations clear of snow and ice.

    Users should bear in mind that the regular seasonal closing of stations in Boston, Brookline, and Somerville city/town limits began on Monday, November 18th. Most stations will remain open through Wednesday, November 27th. Station closures are posted in advance on Hubway’s website at www.thehubway.com/news, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    During extreme inclement weather conditions, Hubway may temporarily close the system, and public announcements will be made via social media and the Hubway website. Station alerts will also be emailed to annual and monthly Hubway members, and all riders can consult the Spotcycle app to learn whether or not bicycles are available. In the event of a system closing, riders will be able to return bikes to all stations securely, but will not be able to check bikes out.

    To prepare for cold-weather bicycling, there are a number of things riders should keep in mind:

  • Wear layers, but remember that riding will warm you up. If you get hot as you ride, pull over and remove a layer, but always keep your ears and hands shielded.
  • Local bike shops offer bike-appropriate gloves and earmuffs that do not obstruct the use of your helmet.
  • Plan your route ahead of time.
  • Always plan for an alternative mode of transportation in case a blizzard hits or if you simply decide that riding is no longer comfortable for you.
  • Each rider has a different comfort level in inclement weather. If you are uncomfortable for any reason while biking, stop riding and walk your bike to the nearest docking station. If you are cold, make your way indoors to warm up.
  • Be aware that visibility is particularly limited during the winter, with fewer daylight hours, glare, and foggy conditions. Hubway bikes have 24-hour lights, but it is also a good idea to wear light colored clothing and reflective materials if possible.
  • Use extra caution under wintry conditions, as roads may not be completely cleared of snow and ice. You are always permitted to ride in the general travel lane (not only the bike lane) and should do so if the bike lane is snowy or icy.

  • Find out more about the Hubway system, extensions, station outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    ###

    Hubway is a top perk offered by Massachusetts Companies

    This article was originally published by Sarah Shemkus The Boston Globe on November 17th, 2013.

    Top perks offered by Massachusetts Companies

    Some Massachusetts companies offer their employees more than the standard benefits. Here are 10 notable perks offered in firms in the state.

    A two-wheeled commute

    Every day when he finishes work in Chinatown, NaviNet digital marketing manager Shawn O’Brien grabs a Hubway bicycle for his 6-mile commute home to Somerville.

    “I actually get home faster than if I was to take the T and the bus home,” he said.

    O’Brien’s healthy and efficient commute is made possible by his employer, which offers its workers free memberships in the bike-share program. In fact, the health care communications company was so eager to offer the benefit that it contacted Hubway before the service was even rolled out to corporate accounts and volunteered to be a guinea pig.

    Members get free 30-minute blocks of time per bike, a structure that has spurred some employees to make a game out of beating the system, riding for 20 minutes and then switching bikes.

    “I don’t think anyone at NaviNet has ever actually paid for Hubway,” said Steven Rotman, vice president of human resources at NaviNet. “They’re a pretty creative bunch.”

    Read the full article here.

    Station Alert: Station Removal Schedule for November 18-20

    SYSTEM ALERT: The Hubway system will begin seasonal phased station closures on Monday, November 18, 2013. The final day of 2013 regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 27th. Stations will relaunch again in Spring 2014.

    Here are the scheduled station removals for November 18th through November 20th:

    Monday, 11/18 (5 stations)

  • Andrew Station - Dorchester Ave at Humboldt Pl
  • Upham’s Corner - Ramsey St at Dudley St
  • Mt Pleasant Ave / Dudley Town Common
  • Dudley Square
  • Brigham Cir / Huntington Ave
  • Tuesday, 11/19 (6 stations)

  • Buswell Park
  • Kenmore Sq / Comm Ave
  • B.U. Central - 725 Comm. Ave
  • Agganis Arena - 925 Comm Ave
  • Allston Green District - Comm Ave@ Griggs St
  • New Balance - Guest St at Life St
  • Wednesday, 11/20 (7 stations)

  • Washington St at Waltham St
  • Washington St at Rutland St
  • Washington St at Lenox St
  • Boston Medical Center -  East Concord at Harrison Ave
  • South Bay Plaza
  • E. Cottage St at Columbia Rd
  • West Broadway at Dorchester St

  • Please note: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 1.5 million rides… and counting!

    BU Released a Bike Safety App...

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno Streetwise on November 14th, 2013.

    Boston University’s Bike Safety Committee unveiled its own safety app, letting users become both reporter and police officer.

    The Bike Accident Toolkit, is enabled with a GPS system that allows users to “efficiently capture important information following and accident.” The app has been designed to streamline the aftermath process of an accident; when one occurs the app “provides users a simple and intuitive tool to thoroughly document an accident.”

    Available on iTunes, the Bike Accident Toolkit app features a GPS, pinpointing the time, date and location of an accident; a built in ability to call the police or EMS; the ability to create an accident report including all the driver’s information; and the option to take accident photos and audio record witness statements.

    The app is compatible with iOS iPhone and Android operating systems.

    Nearly a year ago, BU graduate student, 23-year-old Chris Weigl, was killed after his bike collided with a 16-wheeler at the St. Paul Street and Commonwealth Avenue intersection, near the BU campus.

    Boston Debuts Helmet Dispenser For Its Bike Share

    This article was originally published by Mark Lebetkin in The Active Times on November 14th, 2013.

    Bike share becomes first in North America to rent helmets

    This June we brought news that Boston’s Hubway bike share was to pilot a helmet-sharing scheme. The program, called HelmetHub, officially launched this week, making Boston the first city in North America to offer helmet rentals with its bikes, according to Hubway’s website.

    Boston Mayor Thomas Menino revealed the new helmet vending machine Tuesday at a Hubway kiosk near the intersection of Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue, reports Reuters.

    The machine will dispense helmets for $2 for a 24-hour period, or $20 for purchase, according to Hubway. Helmets can be returned to the solar-powered station, where they will be collected and sent to a sanitation facility for cleaning between rentals. Each machine can hold up to 36 helmets in three sizes, according to HelmetHub’s website.

    Boston is testing the program with a single machine, and plans to expand it in 2014 after gathering more data, reports Reuters.

    Other cities are likely to watch Hubway’s helmet experiment closely. Encouraging helmet use has been a tricky issue for cities with bike shares. New York City chose not to require helmets when it launched Citi Bike in May, largely out of the fear that it would deter potential riders—but still encourages all cyclists to wear them. Washington, D.C., Chicago and Denver all have similar problems.

    If Boston’s program is a success, we might start seeing similar vending machines across the country.

    One City Finally Solved Bike Sharing's Big Safety Problem

    This article was originally published by Jon Marcus in Time Magazine on November 14th, 2013.

    The solution: helmet vending machines

    It’s not every day that the mayor of a major city hails the installation of a vending machine. But the automated dispenser that has just debuted in Boston is likely to merit the fanfare.

    At a time when bike-sharing programs are among the hottest trends around the world, this machine promises to solve a vexing and potentially dangerous problem by finally letting riders not only check out bicycles from kiosks to commute, ride across town, or sightsee, but also to cheaply rent the helmets they need to protect themselves from traffic.

    Short-term bike rental programs have been sprouting in cities across the country since Washington D.C. launched the nation’s first large-scale urban network in 2008, with 34 now in operation—not including countless more on university campuses. That’s just a fraction of the 535 bike-sharing programs worldwide, according to the Earth Policy Institute, which collectively loan out an estimated half-million bicycles in cities, on campuses, and at resorts.

    Trouble is, more than four out of five people who borrow bike-share bikes don’t wear helmets, according to a study of cyclists in Washington and Boston by the Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center—increasing by an estimated 88 percent the likelihood that they will suffer head injuries if they’re in an accident, compared to riders who do, the researchers said. But figuring out a way to make helmets easily available has taken years, and even when planners in Boston thought they had it solved, a last-minute glitch caused another two-month delay.

    So while the fast-growing bike-share programs may cut down on traffic and emissions, they’ve created another problem: millions of cyclists riding around on city streets worldwide with unprotected heads.

    “It’s been a huge frustration,” says Andy Clarke, president of the advocacy organization the League of American Bicyclists. “The beauty of bike-share is that it’s simple, quick and intuitive to grab a bike and ride,” Clarke says. “To worry about whether you can find a helmet or not, it takes the spontaneity out of the process. So it’s been a real hindrance” not having a way to offer helmets easily and cheaply.

    In some cities, this has proven more than just an inconvenience. A bike-share program in aggressively green Vancouver was thwarted for years by a British Columbia law requiring cyclists of all ages to wear helmets. In Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia, which also require helmets by law, the bike-share programs were so underused that the government gave away 200 helmets for free.

    Hunting for a better solution, planners have toyed with the idea of inflatable helmets, foldable helmets, and rental helmets with plastic liners for each new user. None worked out. What bike-share programs really needed was a vending machine from which users could rent helmets at the same location where they borrowed bikes.

    “It was always clear what the solution should be,” says Nicole Freedman, Boston’s bicycle coordinator. So two years ago, Freedman brought that challenge to an MIT class in mechanical engineering.

    The obstacles were numerous: helmets are an awkward shape, and hard to stack, and people don’t like putting things on their heads that have previously been on other people’s heads. And while it was possible to sanitize the helmets using intense heat, which requires a lot of energy, Boston’s machines would have only a limited amount of power from solar panels, which they need to run the credit-card scanners.

    The toughest obstacle, surprisingly, was figuring out a way for users to return the helmets. An open receptacle on a city street might attract trash. So the designers came up with the idea of putting RFID, or radio-frequency identification chips, in loaner helmets, which activate a door on the machine. They will then be picked up, cleaned, and rented out again.

    “Being able to design a low-power, compact dispensing mechanism that could handle the supply of helmets was a major engineering challenge,” says Chris Mills, one of the MIT students who was assigned the project and decided to keep working on it after graduating last year.

    “This is the kind of stuff we love to do,” Mills says. “Many, many prototypes were made. Lots of chalk and coffee was consumed.” The designers kept helmets around their workspace, he says, to put on and literally bang their heads against the wall.

    The eventual result was the HelmetHub, which was initially planned to be attached to four of Boston’s 130 Hubway bike-share stations where the Beth Israel Deaconess researchers found riders were least likely to wear helmets. Ten more have been ordered, at a cost of more than $10,000 apiece. Each can hold 36 unisize helmets with adjustable straps. A 24-hour rental will cost $2 on a credit card.

    Proving just how complicated this was, problems with the credit-card reader caused a two-month delay in the launch, just hours before Boston Mayor Tom Menino was to appear at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the machines in September.

    And when what the city says is the nation’s first helmet dispenser finally debuted at Massachusetts Avenue and Boylston Street this week, the observance was limited to a written statement from the mayor while planners set about using the lone machine to do real-world tests of the technology through the rest of the Boston bicycle season, which ends around Thanskgiving. They’ve already discovered that, in some locations, the return slot in the back of the device may be blocked by walls or fences.

    “When you put something on the street, it’s got to work, and it’s got to work from the start,” says Freedman.

    Still, says Mills, “There was nothing like this in the world, and now we’re happy to have something that works.” The HelmetHub, echoes Freedman, is “a huge step forward.”

    It’s also potentially hugely lucrative. Vancouver has already inspected a prototype, according to that city’s manager of streets activities, Scott Edwards. There has been interest from companies that supply bike-share bikes. And there are applications for the same technology at ski resorts and for mountain-climbing, Clarke says.

    “I don’t think there’s been a visible market for it in a way bike-sharing has clearly created,” he says. “But I don’t think I would stop at bikes.”

    Mills and Breanna Berry, his fellow MIT graduate and business partner, have found investors and gotten manufacturing advice from Big Belly Solar, a Massachusetts company that makes solar-powered public trash compactors.

    “This vending machine idea could be big,” says Jim Sebastian, “active transportation manager” for Washington, D.C., whose Capital Bikeshare program gave bike-sharing its first foothold in the United States just five years ago. “We’re definitely watching the Boston project closely. It could be a big help in getting more helmets on more bike-share users’ heads.”

    Boston unveils first bicycle helmet vending machine

    This article was originally published in Crain’s Chicago Business on November 13th, 2013.

    (Reuters) — Boston Mayor Thomas Menino has unveiled a vending machine that dispenses bicycle helmets for users of the city’s bike sharing service, a street kiosk he said was the first of its kind in the country.

    Menino said the so-called HelmetHub machine, attached to one of the city’s Hubway bike rental stations at the intersection of Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue, will allow users to rent and return helmets, adding a measure of safety to the service.

    “Our goal is to make Hubway a great and safe way to get around town,” he said in a statement released on Tuesday evening.

    The machines were designed by HelmetHub, a company founded by MIT engineering graduates that won a contract from the city in May, the statement said.

    The company plans to test the first machine and gather data during the remainder of the year before introducing HelmetHub machines more widely in 2014.

    The machine dispenses helmets for a rental fee of $2, if they are returned within 24 hours, or for purchase at $20. Returned helmets will be removed from the machine to be inspected and sanitized, the statement said.

    Boston’s bike sharing service was launched in July 2011, and users took its 600 bicycles on more than 100,000 rides in the first 10 weeks, according to the service’s website. By the end of November, it had more than 3,600 annual members.

    The service is similar in concept to other bike sharing programs launched in Paris, London and New York City, which kicked off a massive bike sharing program earlier this year.

    Hubway Launches First Helmet Rental Station

    This article was originally published on WBUR.org on November 13th, 2013.

    BOSTON — Boston’s bike sharing system has added its first helmet rental station.

    Riders can now rent helmets from a HelmetHub machine at the Boylston Street/Mass Ave. Hubway station for $2 for 24 hours. The helmets can also be purchased for $20.

    The city of Boston’s bikes director, Nicole Freedman, says the single machine is a test run and that the city expects to add more in 2014.

    “What we’re doing is testing the system out right now, seeing how it works,” Freedman said. “We’ll have the off season to make tweaks and then we can come in strong in the next season.”

    Hubway says Boston is the first city in North America to offer helmet vending machines for its bike share program.

    Helmet vending machine comes to Hubway services

    This article was originally published by Alice Bazerghi and Felicia Gans in The Daily Free Press on November 13th, 2013.

    Boston Mayor Thomas Menino announced the installation of the first helmet vending machine in the United States Tuesday to allow residents and tourists to rent a helmet before the use of Hubways, the popular bike sharing service.

    Nicole Freedman, director of Boston Bikes, said HelmetHub was created when a professor from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology asked her if there were any projects she wanted him to work on.

    “We had just launched bike-share, [and we had] no solution for helmets,” she said. “Students from MIT designed a helmet vending machine. They then followed up when they graduated that year, and turned it into the company HelmetHub.”

    Boston is the first city in the United States to install this kind of machine, located at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Boylston Street.

    Freeman said she hopes to dramatically increase the use of bike helmets and bike-share, as well as reduce head injuries.

    “I am thrilled to introduce another Boston biking first,” Menino said in a Tuesday release. “This is the first bike-share helmet vending machine in the country. Our goal is to make Hubway a great and sage way to get around town, and HelmetHub is a step in the right direction for our growing cycling culture in the City of Boston.”

    Greenovate, an umbrella initiative that encompasses bike-share, energy programs and other green programs throughout the city, has worked closely with Boston Bikes to get the community engaged around sustainability, said Greenovate Fellow Enita Hussain.

    “We want to engage community and encourage them to take small actions to help reduce the city’s carbon footprint by reducing our own carbon footprint,” she said. “If we encourage people to bike … we’re inherently encouraging people to live a greener life. By adding the helmet system, by making it safer and more convenient for people to bike, it makes people want to take that extra step and get out of their cars.

    Pete Stidman, executive director of Boston’s Cyclists Union, said he supports the helmet machines because biking in Boston should be made safer.

    “The more access you can provide to helmets, especially for Hubway users and other casual riders, clearly the better,” he said. “A helmet is like an insurance policy. You probably aren’t going to need it, but if you do, you really need it. There’s no substitute.”

    Freeman said since the project is brand new, there is still a lot to work on.

    “We will identify a lot of things we want to work on,” she said. “One thing we know instantly is right now, when you pull a helmet, it comes from the front end, and then you return it on the back side. In future designs, we’ll look at a way so that 100 percent of locations work for bike-share.”

    Freeman said more helmet machines would go up in the spring and they would run tests to make sure the ratio of helmet machines to bike-share is correct.

    Some residents said they supported the helmet machine because it makes biking safer and Boston a more environmentally friendly city.

    Kathryn Hashey, 32, of the South End, said the helmet machine is a great idea and she has been waiting for helmets to be publicly accessible since she started using Hubway.

    “I use Hubway for commuting between Boston and Cambridge regularly,” she said. “It’s dangerous to bike without a helmet in Boston. The roads are really bad and people are really bad drivers. I use Hubway because of the convenience of it. It’s one thing I really like about it, but I don’t always have a helmet for it.”

    Jason Henrichs, 40, of Boston, said he always wears a helmet when he rides a Hubway bike and he hopes this initiative will get other residents to do the same.

    “People need to appreciate how frequently accidents do happen,” he said. “I’ve been hit twice on a bike in the city. It’s too easy to get hit.”

    Regina Galea, 36, of Boston, said if you can rent a bike, you should be able to rent a helmet.

    “It’s a good idea to have a rental helmet system,” she said. “Otherwise, people are going to ride without helmets and it’s obviously not as safe. It reinforces the use of the bike system and gets cars off the road. With helmets, more people will start using Hubway.”

    System Alert: Hubway begins seasonal station closures on Monday, November 18th

    SYSTEM ALERT: Please note! The Hubway system will begin seasonal phased station closures on Monday, November 18, 2013. The final day of 2013 regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 27th. Stations will relaunch again in Spring 2014.

    Stay tuned to the Hubway website, as well as Hubway’s facebook page and twitter profile, for station alerts and specific closure info.

    Thank you for 1.5 million rides… and counting!

    HelmetHub finally makes its Boston debut

    This article was originally published by Morgan Rousseau in the Boston Metro on November 13th, 2013.

    A city-wide bike helmet rental system that has been twice delayed since its anticipated August launch officially debuted Wednesday at the Hubway station at Boylston and Mass Avenue, according to HelmetHub, a company that supplies helmet vending machines.

    HelmetHub was first scheduled to open on Aug. 26, but was delayed until Sept. 5. The September launch, however, was also pushed back due to a “technical glitch,” according to the company.

    Plans have been underway since the spring to install the helmet vending machines. The helmet station is the first of its kind in the country, and was installed as a trial as the Hubway season winds down, according to the company.

    “I am thrilled to introduce another Boston biking first. This is the first bike share helmet vending machine in the country,” said Mayor Thomas M. Menino. “Our goal is to make Hubway a great and safe way to get around town, and HelmetHub is a step in the right direction for our growing cycling culture in the City of Boston.”

    The HelmetHub machine is a street kiosk built into the Hubway platform that allows users to rent and return helmets when they rent Hubway bicycles. Returned helmets are removed from the machine and taken for inspection and sanitization.

    Helmets cost $2 to rent if returned within 24 hours, or $20 to buy.

    The company said it will “take lessons learned from the trial” and implement them into a wide-scale installation next year.

    “HelmetHub’s team hopes to garner significant data during the rest of the 2013 season, and staff will be on-site at the machine to help answer questions and provide support to users,” the company said in a statement.

    Hubway adds first bicycle helmet machine

    This article was originally published by Nicholas Jacques in The Boston Globe on November 13th, 2013.

    For the first time Tuesday, users of Boston’s Hubway bike-sharing program were able to rent helmets with their bicycles, Mayor Thomas M. Menino announced. The first HelmetHub machine was installed at the Hubway location near the intersection of Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue in the Fenway, Menino’s office said. The new machine, which the city called the only one of its kind in the United States, will act as a trial during the remaining weeks of the Hubway season. More machines will be added in 2014, the mayor’s office said. Helmets will cost $2 to rent for up to 24 hours and $20 to buy, the city said.

    Helmet Hub FAQ

    On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, HelmetHub launched operations with its first helmet vending machine, located at the Boylston / Mass Ave Hubway station.

    HelmetHub - Hubway FAQs


    What is HelmetHub? HelmetHub is a machine that allows bike riders to rent and return helmets at kiosks placed next to bikeshare stations throughout the city.

    How does the HelmetHub Work? The HelmetHub machine attaches to the Boston Hubway bike docks.  Users can go through the touchscreen to rent and then later return a helmet.  The machines work with HelmetHub’s software to keep track of helmet rentals and purchases. Returned helmets are taken from the machine back to HelmetHub’s headquarters where they are inspected for damage and sanitized, and then reloaded to go back into machines.

    Are the helmets new or used? HelmetHub stocks both new and used helmets - meaning that a rental helmet is one that someone has probably used previously.  No worries: all helmets are cleaned and sanitized before they are returned to the machine for being dispensed.

    Where is HelmetHub Located? HelmetHub is a Boston based company.  Their current office is 12 Channel Street, Suite 202 in the Boston Innovation District - close to the Boston Design Center.

    How does the HelmetHub rental work? HelmetHub allows users to rent helmets over a 24 hour period.  If a helmet is out longer than 24 hours, users can keep the helmet and will be charged the purchase price.

    How much does it cost to rent or buy a HelmetHub helmet? It costs $2/24 hour helmet rental, and it costs $20 to purchase a helmet from a HelmetHub machine.

    Where are the HelmetHub Machines Located? The first HelmetHub machine is located at the Mass Ave and Boylston Street Hubway Station. More units will be installed with the spring program.

    What if I can’t get back to the one machine within my 24 hour window for a rental? HelmetHub’s customer service is happy to make sure your rental experience is painless. We’ll take care of any inability to return a rented helmet - or you can hang on to the helmet if you’d rather purchase it.

    When did this program begin? The Helmet Rental System began in Boston on November 11, 2013.

    Is HelmetHub a part of Hubway? HelmetHub is a completely separate entity than Hubway and Alta Bicycle Share.  HelmetHub has been working with the City of Boston to bring this helmet rental program to Boston.  Hubway has been offering support and information as the HelmetHub team begins implementation of this Program.

    For more information, click here to visit the HelmetHub website.

    HelmetHub launches

    Boston becomes first city in North America to offer helmet vending machines for bike share.

    On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, HelmetHub launched operations with its first helmet vending machine, located at the Boylston / Mass Ave Hubway station. Riders, whether using a Hubway or their own bike, can now rent (or purchase) and return helmets at the kiosk. It costs $2 for a 24-hour helmet rental, or $20 to purchase a helmet from a HelmetHub machine.

    Hubway does not operate HelmetHub. Rather, HelmetHub is a completely separate entity that has been working with the City of Boston to bring the helmet rental program to Boston. Hubway offers support and information during HelmetHub’s implementation of the program. For more details on HelmetHub and plans for expansion throughout the city, click here.

    November 19th Community Meeting: proposed Hubway location in Cambridgeport near Dana Park

    WHEN? Tuesday, November 19th, 7PM
    WHERE? Cambridgeport Baptist Church, 459 Putnam Ave. (corner of Magazine and Putnam)

    Hubway Riders and Friends:

    The Cambridge Community Development Department is seeking your input on a proposed Hubway location near Dana Park in the Greenport/Cambridgeport area.

    Do you live in Cambridgeport? Visit people in Cambridgeport? Would join Hubway if there were a station nearby? This is an opportunity to learn about opportunities for siting a Hubway station near Dana Park to be easily accessible to people who live in or travel to the neighborhood.

    For more information about the meeting, email Steve Wineman.

    Mayor Menino Announces Installation of First HelmetHub Helmet Vending Machine

    CITY OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
    Office of the Mayor
    Thomas M. Menino


    For Immediate Release: Tuesday, November 12, 2013
    For More Information Contact: Press Office, 617-635-4461

    Mayor Menino Announces Installation of First HelmetHub Helmet Vending Machine

    Street Kiosk Allows Users to Rent Helmets for New Balance Hubway Bicycles

    Mayor Thomas M. Menino today announced the installation of the first HelmetHub vending machine on the streets of Boston.

    The machine is the first of its kind in the country and is located at the Boylston Street and Massachusetts Avenue Hubway Station. It will allow users to rent a helmet before they use the popular bike sharing service.

    “I am thrilled to introduce another Boston biking first. This is the first bike share helmet vending machine in the country,” Mayor Menino said. “Our goal is to make Hubway a great and safe way to get around town, and HelmetHub is a step in the right direction for our growing cycling culture in the City of Boston.”

    The HelmetHub machine is a street kiosk built right into the Hubway platform that allows for users to rent and return helmets at the same time that they rent Hubway bicycles. Returned helmets are removed from the machine and taken for inspection and sanitization.

    HelmetHub won a contract with the City in May to design, test, and implement this kind of helmet rental system in Boston, which Hubway riders have been asking for since the sharing service began in Boston.

    The first machine will be installed as a trial as the Hubway season winds down. HelmetHub will take lessons learned from the trial and implement it into a more wide-scale implementation next year. HelmetHub’s team hopes to garner significant data during the rest of the 2013 season, and staff will be on-site at the machine to help answer questions and provide support to users.

    Helmets will cost just $2 to rent if returned within 24 hours or $20 to buy.

    Improvements and expansions to the Hubway system also support the Mayor’s Greenovate Boston initiative, which encourages residents to help reduce the City’s greenhouse gas emissions by taking actions like biking, walking and using public transit.

    About Greenovate Boston:

    Greenovate Boston is a collective movement to ensure a greener, healthier and more prosperous future for the city by meeting Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050. Propelled by creativity and drive, Greenovate Boston will encourage continued sustainable growth within the city, making Boston the greenest in the United States. Visit GreenovateBoston.org for details.

    ###

    Figures of Progress: Emily Stapleton and Eric Gilliland, General Managers, Alta Bicycle Share

    This article was originally posted on GOOD as part of their “Figures of Progress” series, on November 11th, 2013.

    For Stapleton, the general manager of Boston’s bike share, Hubway, her transportation journey started in 2007.  The deciding moment came as she waited for a late bus in San Francisco feeling stranded, not knowing when—or if—it would show up. ”I wanted to be part of the movement to improve transportation service offerings and to increase availability of real-time decision-making data…” Read the full article here.

    Vending Machines In Boston Will Dispense Bike Helmet Rentals

    This article was originally published by Jon Marcus on Forbes.com on November 8th, 2013.

    A green solution to traffic congestion and carbon emissions, bike-sharing programs have become ubiquitous in crowded cities worldwide, letting users check out bicycles from kiosks to commute, ride across town, or sightsee.

    But even as it’s helping solve one problem, bike-sharing has created another: It’s put bicycle riders on city streets without figuring out a way to loan them helmets.

    That’s created legal and promotional problems in cities like Vancouver, where provincial laws require cyclists to wear helmets, a requirement that’s delayed the bike-share program for years. In Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia, which also require helmets by law, the bike-share programs were so underused that the government offered 200 helmets to riders for free to boost business.

    Trouble is, creating a vending machine to dispense and retrieve bicycle helmets has proven a significant technological trial.

    “It’s a very difficult challenge because of the shape and bulk of helmets,” says Andy Clarke, president of the League of American Bicyclists advocacy group and a former city bicycle planner. “We’ve heard all kinds of stories about inflatable or foldable helmets. And the cleanliness issue is something that comes up. Every bike-rental fleet in the country has to deal with this issue.”

    Now there may be a solution. After two years of design work that started in a mechanical engineering class, a team of recent MIT grads has designed a bicycle helmet vending machine that will be launched this month in Boston.

    The machines, dubbed HelmetHubs, will be attached to four of the city’s 108 Hubway bike-share stations where records show riders are least likely to wear helmets. Another 10 are scheduled to be installed over the next few months. Each machine can hold 36 unisize helmets with adjustable straps, and a 24-hour rental will cost about $2 on a credit card.

    The toughest obstacle for the designers was figuring out a way for users to return the helmets. An open receptacle on a city street, they feared, might attract trash. So they put RFID, or radio-frequency identification chips in loaner helmets, which activate a door on the machine.

    The devices can’t sanitize the helmets; that would require a more significant power source than it uses to run the credit-card reader. So, once they’ve been returned, the helmets will be picked up and brought to a warehouse to be cleaned. But the engineers hope that future incarnations of the machines will disinfect the helmets automatically.

    The long slog from problem to solution started when Boston’s bicycle coordinator appealed to an MIT mechanical-engineering class two years ago to prototype a helmet dispenser.

    It was a thankless assignment.

    “There were a lot of conversations about how the hell are we going to do this,” says one of the students, Breanna Berry.

    But they took it on anyway.

    “The challenge was one of the things that attracted us to it. Helmets are really awkward. They’re an awkward shape. So the dispensing and the return were hard to figure out. And how do you get a lot of helmets in a small space?”

    After they came up with their proposal, satisfying their academic obligation, Berry and a classmate, Chris Mills—an ardent cyclist—decided to keep working on it when they graduated last year.

    “A couple of us thought, ‘Maybe we should keep going with this,’” Berry says. “It was very apparent that this wasn’t a bad business model to get involved in, and that bike-sharing was growing worldwide.”

    There are 535 bike-sharing programs worldwide, according to the Earth Policy Institute, collectively loaning out an estimated half-million bicycles. That’s twice as many as when Mills and Berry began to work on the vending-machine problem.

    Yet fewer than one in five people who use bike-share bikes wear helmets, compared to more than half of those who own their own bicycles, according to researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. And cyclists who don’t wear helmets are as much as 88 percent more likely to suffer head injuries in crashes than those who do. In Boston, half the cyclists in crashes to which paramedics have had to be called weren’t wearing helmets.

    After graduation, Mills and Berry moved to a startup accelerator lab; neither drew a salary, and Berry worked in a restaurant to pay the bills. Eventually, they found investors and a manufacturer—Big Belly Solar, which makes solar-powered public trash compactors.

    Each of their helmet dispensers costs $10,000, and there’s been interest from companies that supply bike-share bikes and cities that are pushing them. That’s an enormous worldwide market. And there are potential uses at ski resorts and elsewhere.

    “It’s an intriguing project,” says Clarke, the cycling advocate. “And it’s a fascinating design and engineering issue.”

    National Association of City Transportation Officials add Somerville its list of members

    This article was originally posted by Juan Cajigas Jimenez on Boston.com on November 7th, 2013.

    The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) added the City of Somerville, MA to its affiliate member list last week, including Somerville in its prestigious list of just 18 member cities and 12 affiliate members nationwide that includes Boston, Denver, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Washington, D.C., among others. In a press release, NACTO officials lauded Somerville for its “[commitment] to sustainable transportation initiatives, aiming to strengthen cities and improve quality of life through better street design and transportation policy.” Earlier this month, Somerville was also recognized by the League of American Cyclists with a Silver level Bicycle Friendly Community Award, recognizing a significant step up from Bronze in only two years.

    “It is an honor to be included with such prestigious larger cities across the nation for our focus on increasing or improving sustainable transportation,” said Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone. “Whether it’s walking, biking, driving or using alternate transportation, Somerville has a demonstrated commitment to increasing access and maintaining safe opportunities for all residents. In the last three years we have added more than 25 miles of bike lanes, updated or added pedestrian safety infrastructure such as street trees, curb bump-outs and ADA-accessible ramps, and we are on the crux of a tremendous expansion of public transportation with the addition of Orange and Green Line stations across the City. I want to thank NACTO for this great recognition.”

    While the City was recognized with this honor as because of its implementation of numerous progressive projects and initiatives over the past few years, the membership also recognizes its future promise: the goals outlined in the SomerVision plan and the City’s groundwork towards reaching them. Programs and initiatives such as the Somerville by Design series, Safe Routes to School, Hubway, and Somerstreets have demonstrated the City’s ability to plan and program towards a future vision. Somerville’s membership in NACTO is a learning opportunity to join with the most progressive cities in exchanging concepts to reach new levels of access and sustainability.

    Boston after Menino: losers and winners

    This article was originally published by Shirley Leung in the Boston Globe on November 6th, 2013.

    Trending up . . .

    Pedestrians & T riders The Big Dig gave drivers new tunnels, and Menino later added 65 miles of bike lanes and launched the Hubway bike-share program. With Boston relaxing parking construction requirements and kids today going car-less, Walsh will push for more public transit and urge us to hoof it. Click here to read the full article.

    Hubway Tours Firefly Bicycles, Dorchester, MA

    Yesterday, the Hubway team was provided with a tour of the Firefly Bicycles custom bike shop in Dorchester. With an average cost of around $7,500 and a wait list of over 11 months, a Firefly bike may not be on every bicyclists shopping list, but there’s no disputing the quality of their work. Of the 300 custom bikes that have been sold by the shop to riders all over the world in just over two and a half years, only 1 has had to come into the shop for repair. As their site says, the Firefly team (Director of R&D Jamie Medeiros, Creative Director Tyler Evans, and Lead Frame Designer Kevin Wolfson) is intelligent & passionate about their craft. Firefly is continuing Boston’s long history of handmade bikes, with each carbon- and titanium-tubing cycle made here in Boston.

    Interested in designing your own two-wheeled ride? Firefly can be reached here.

    Panorama shot of frame-building shop at Firefly.
    The Hubway team at Firefly.
    Firefly’s Lead Frame Designer Kevin guides the tour.


    Check out more pictures from our trip here.

    Somerville EUA - SILVER BICICLETA simpática cidade

    This article was originally published in Portuguese on Portal RR4 on November 5th, 2013. Click the link for the original article in Portuguese.

    Honor comes just two years after the city called a community level Bronze, demonstrating continued progress City of Somerville

    SOMERVILLE - If you are on a bicycle in Somerville, you can get there from here. The League of American Bicyclists recognized the City’s ongoing commitment to creating bikeable community with a bike silver-Friendly designation, just two years after the city won the Bronze level designation. Somerville now joins a number of cities, including New York, Philadelphia and Boston to receive this level of recognition for their efforts to promote cycling.

    The City of Somerville has installed more than 25 miles of bike lanes and sharrows in the last three years and in May held a ceremony for the Somerville Community Path extension of your current order on Cedar Street to Lowell Street, with the city strongly advocating for future extension of the Path to Boston. In 2012, Somerville joined the system with 12 Hubway Bikeshare stations garnering thousands of trips monthly, and since 2011 has added more than 200 new parking spaces for bikes to city streets as part of a regional program for bicycle parking. Investment in infrastructure was complemented by security programming, including a poster and information campaign PSA, higher education and policing cycling in schools.

    “We have seen the impact of our investments in bicycle infrastructure, bicycle tours with up to 56 percent in the past two years in Somerville according to our account,” said Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone said. “It’s not just social infrastructure, however, which makes it easier to get around, to live a healthy life and be kinder to the planet. It is economic infrastructure. Bicycle infrastructure connects people with mass transit and jobs. He brings more customers to local businesses. In turn, it also attracts developers who see a vibrant, active, with no busy streets filled with faces seen through the windows of the car, but on foot or by bicycle. We have gained recognition as the 10th most walkable city and the eighth most bikeable city in the country, but we will not be satisfied until we’re number one.”

    Since 2002, the League of American Bicyclists has received 600 applications for designation as a Bicycle Friendly Community, and Somerville is among 291 bicycle friendly communities in 48 states across the country received the honor. The program assists communities to assess network quality of life, sustainability and transportation, giving them a way to measure your progress toward improving their bicycle-friendliness.

    “Somerville is playing a key role in creating a truly bicycle friendly America,” said Andy Clarke, president of the League of American Bicyclists. “We know that investing in cycling of Somerville will be returned many times in the health, environment and quality of the benefits of a thriving community of life.”

    Station Alert: Red Sox World Series Championship Parade, Saturday, November 2nd

    Station Alert: The Red Sox World Series victory parade is scheduled for Saturday, November 2nd, beginning at 10am. The city will block off roads from Fenway Park through Back Bay and across the Charles River during the event. Large crowds are expected, and station rebalancing along the parade route will be restricted, so riders are encouraged to use the spotcycle app or check Hubway Tracker for up to the minute system information and bike/dock availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway, and Go Sox!

    New Station Alert: New Balance Store - Boylston at Dartmouth

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday, October 31st, the new Hubway station, New Balance Store - Boylston at Dartmouth, is open. This 19-dock station is located directly in front of the New Balance store across Boylston from Copley Square, between Dartmouth and Clarendon Streets.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Mayor Menino Talks Climate Sustainability [crazy images]

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno’s Streetwise Media on October 29th, 2013.

    The decorative bats hovering over Mayor Tom Menino were ominous, yet comical, when he stepped to the podium just after 1 p.m. Tuesday inside the the New England Aquarium’s Imax Theater.

    Tuesday, October 29 marked the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. It also likely marked Menino’s last speech on energy and the environment. The winged decorations seemed to flutter in anticipation.

    “It’s like being in church,” Menino joked, as the crowd quieted upon his arrival.

    After a brief introduction from Brian Swett, chief of environment and energy for the City of Boston, Menino – aided by his cane – stepped to the mic for a series of announcements about the progress made, and future plans for Boston’s work on sustainability and climate issues.

    As applause erupted, Menino said quietly, “I hope we’re all clapping tomorrow night.”

    “If Sandy struck just five hours earlier [Boston] would have experienced a 100-year flood,” he began, stressing the importance of preparing Boston’s homes, businesses and transportation infrastructure if and when the next storm hits. Sandy missed high tide by mere hours.

    “We can’t predict [when the next storm will hit], but we can prepare for it,” Menino said.

    Despite reminding those in attendance how Boston narrowly missed Sandy’s full impact, Menino’s announcements were positive across the board.

    The mayor acknowledged that “climate work is unending” and will require a total team effort in order to engage all of Boston’s communities in implementing environmental strategies.

    Boston has experienced a 27 percent reduction in annual greenhouse gas emissions between 2005 and 2012, Menino said, referencing a “Climate Ready Boston: Municipal Vulnerability to Climate Change” report prepared by the City’s Climate Preparedness Task Force. The reduction in greenhouse emissions is equal to taking 10,000 cars off the road, he said.

    Boston’s Hubway program has been a big part of this reduction.

    Hubway bikes have provided 675,000 rides to people around the city, Menio said, preventing 230 tons of carbon gas from entering the atmosphere.

    Before stepping down from the podium, Menino said the time is now to turn “science-talk t0 street-talk,” so that environmental issues become a part of daily conversations throughout the City.

    Menino gave way to Mike Davis, president of the Boston Society of Architects, who acknowledged, “To be an architect requires equal parts vision and patience.” Similar, he said, to attributes necessary to excel as a city’s mayor.

    During his address, Davis said making Boston’s buildings resilient to the affects of climate change (rising tides) and storms like Sandy and Nemo will help Boston be ready in the future.

    “The value extends well beyond our lives,” Davis said, touching on the longterm visions for climate-ready infrastructure in Boston – a port city susceptible to climate change.

    Acknowledging the work between the private sector and planning by the Boston Redevelopment Authority, Davis said the warning signs have been seen.

    “There’s a time for patience but when vision compels us, it’s time to act,” said Davis.

    The BRA held a Climate Change Preparedness and Resiliency Guidelines public meeting between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m Tuesday regarding a new Zoning Article 80 Project Review to ensure basic building preparedness and resiliency practices are included in new Boston projects.

    On Long Wharf after the event concluded, the Environmental League of Massachusetts held a small conference as well, complete with large posters of their ominous #bosstorm vision of what Boston could look like after the next Sandy-type storm.

    There’s the old state house:

    And a questionably timed vision of Fenway, as well:

    Head here for all the images, including a TD Garden where hockey skates would get you nowhere.

    Station Alert: Removal of Seaport Hotel station

    Station Alert: Please note—effective Tuesday, October 29th, due to ongoing construction in the area, the station at the Seaport Hotel is being removed until the 2014 Hubway season. The closest two alternative stations are located at (1) Seaport Square - Seaport Boulevard at Boston Wharf and (2) the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center. View the entire Hubway system station map here. Please plan accordingly.

    Use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway.

    Station Alert: Removal of Harvard Real Estate - 219 Western Ave/North Harvard Station

    Station Alert: Please note—effective Tuesday, October 29th, due to ongoing construction in the area, the station at 219 Western Ave/North Harvard is being removed until the 2014 Hubway season. The closest two alternative stations are located at (1) 125 Western Ave and (2) 370 Western Ave. View the entire Hubway system station map here. Please plan accordingly.

    Use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    UMass Media: New bike lanes mean good news for commuters

    There is good news for those who commute to the university by bicycle…

    Bike shares can be perfect!: Solving the commuting algorithm

    In 2006, there were 25 bike share services worldwide. Now there are about 500. Each of those networks, which range in size from a few dozen bikes to several thousand, produces travel information that constitutes what Jon Froehlich, a professor at the University of Maryland and one of the first to study bike share, calls a “digital footprint of where people are.” Read more here.

    Join Hubway at City Feed in Jamaica Plain this Thursday, October 24th, 4-7pm

    Join us at City Feed & Supply, 672 Centre Street in Jamaica Plain, this Thursday, October 24th, from 4-7pm, to celebrate Hubway’s recent expansion in JP! Bring your questions and thoughts for our Hubway reps and learn all about bike sharing in the metro area. Plus, if you register for an annual or monthly membership on site, you’ll receive a voucher (like the one below) good for $5 off your City Feed purchase!

    Already a member? Bring your Hubway key and your bike helmet to get your Bicycle Benefits sticker!

    Somerville named Silver-level Bicycle Friendly Community

    This article was originally published by Brock Parker in Boston.com on October 23rd, 2013.

    Somerville cycling is climbing the friendliness rankings.

    The Washington D.C.-based League of American Cyclists has recognized Somerville this month as a Silver Bicycle Friendly Community for its commitment to creating a bikeable community.

    Mayor Joseph Curtatone’s office said in a press release Wednesday that the designation comes two years after the city first earned a bronze level designation from the non-profit organization.

    The Silver designation puts Somerville on par with the level of recognition received by cities such as Boston and New York City for promoting bicycling. Cambridge was named a Gold-level Bicycle Friendly Community earlier this year.

    Somerville has installed more than 25 miles of bike lanes and sharrows in the last three years and held a groundbreaking in May for the extension of the Somerville Community Path from Cedar Street to Lowell Street according to the city.

    Increasing the bicycle friendliness of the city promotes healthier lifestyles, is kinder to the planet, and brings more customers to local businesses, said Curtatone in a press release about Somerville’s climb in the rankings.

    “We have seen the impact of our investments in bicycle infrastructure, with biking up 56 percent over the past two years in Somerville according to our counts,” said Curtatone.

    Since 2011, the city has also added more than 200 new bicycle parking spots and in 2012 joined the Hubway bikeshare system and now has 12 docking stations in the city.

    According to The League of American Cyclists website, Somerville was one of seven cities in the country to climb from the Bronze to the Silver designation this fall and was the only municipality in Massachusetts to make the jump. The organization has now designated at total of 291 Bicycle Friendly Communities 48 states.

    “Somerville is playing a critical part in creating a truly Bicycle Friendly America,” said Andy Clarke, president of the League of American Bicyclists. “We know Somerville’s investment in bicycling will be returned many times over in the health, environmental, and quality of life benefits of a thriving community.”

    Bike safety is focus of West Roxbury Business and Professional Association Meeting

    This article was originally published by Matt Robare in Wicked Local West Roxbury on October 23rd, 2013.

    WEST ROXBURY — Bike safety and accessibility was the main focus of the West Roxbury Business and Professional Association meeting that took place in the function room of the West Roxbury Pub and Restaurant.

    Nicole Freedman, director of Boston Bikes, answered questions on the city’s efforts in all neighborhoods. She said that the city has two bike lanes planned for West Roxbury: One on Baker Street from the Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway to the Newton line – on which she said work was going to start this year, but had been canceled because of the utility work on that street – and another on the VFW Parkway itself, from Centre Street to Spring Street in the next five years.

    While emphasizing the importance of bikes, Freedman said, “In a neighborhood like West Roxbury, cars are important. It’s about figuring out how all modes can share the road.”

    Association president Mary Mulvey Jacobson said, and many of the people at the meeting agreed, that although bicycling was more popular and more common, there was still confusion about the rules of the road.

    “Education isn’t happening with drivers or bikers,” she said.

    Freedman said that the city is running a program with the assistance of pro-bicycling groups to educate cyclists, focusing on five key safety issues that were revealed in a review of data on all 1,500 traffic accidents involving bikes since 2009: Crashing into open car doors, following the rules of the road, avoiding blind spots and using helmets and lights. The city will also be sending information to registered drivers through the excise tax mailing.

    “We just completed the bike network plan of Boston,” Freedman said. “It puts down a 30-year vision plan and coupled it with a five-year action plan.”

    Ultimately, she said the goal was to connect the city’s major destinations to the existing bike paths, which she said were like bike superhighways, which are already a primary bike network. A secondary network, connecting local destinations, would be made up of cycle tracks (where the bikes get their own lane between parked cars and the sidewalk), bike lanes and shared lanes.

    “Every major city in the United States now has cycle tracks,” she said, adding that introducing them results in an increase in ridership and a decrease in crashes.

    “In Boston we have a long standing tradition of ignoring all rules and regulations,” said one audience member who declined to give his full name. “You’re constantly encouraged to ignore all rules. It’s our way.”

    Freedman said that enforcement is an issue, but Boston Police can give out $50 tickets for violations. Some of the more frequently seen violations include riding without a helmet, riding on a sidewalk in a business district, riding against traffic (i.e. bikes have to travel in the same direction as the travel lane for cars) and ignoring traffic signals.

    Overall, the people at the meeting were receptive to bike infrastructure, although there are still concerns over the safety of bike lanes on the VFW Parkway.

    How do bike-sharing schemes shape cities?

    This article was originally published in The Economist on October 22nd, 2013.

    NEXT month a so-called “brand new means of transport” will be launched in Copenhagen: the bicycle. GoBike, Europe’s latest bike-sharing scheme, will have bicycles with built-in tablet computers that direct cyclists to the best local restaurants, show offers in nearby shops and give the latest train times. Bike-sharing is shifting up a gear: it seems that nearly every self-respecting mayor is either developing a scheme or announcing an expansion to one. What is the impact on cities’ development?

    Bike-sharing began in the 1960s when 50 “free bikes” were scattered around Amsterdam. They were promptly stolen. But after this slow start bike-sharing has blossomed. Over the past decade the number of schemes has increased tenfold. Bike-sharing ventures now exist in more than 500 cities, from Dubai to Hawaii. Each works on the simple principle that a user can borrow a bike at a docking station and then return it to another. The first 30 minutes are usually free. The most successful schemes have large fleets of bikes, lots of small docking stations and a few “superdocks” in busy places, such as train stations. Electronic monitoring of the bikes can show ebbs and flows of bike traffic through cities, allowing better distribution of bikes and planning of new docks.

    Just as mass public transport changed the development of cities’ suburbs, bike-hire schemes are now shaping city centres in subtle ways. A “cycling census” in London found that in the morning rush-hours nearly half of all northbound traffic crossing three of the city’s main bridges was made up of cyclists. Planners have responded by criss-crossing the city with cycle-paths; more are proposed. Some mayors are experimenting with bike-only days: Mexico City, the unlikely home of a highly popular bike-hire scheme, closes its central eight-lane highway to cars every Sunday, to the rage of motorists. Property developers are taking note, too: just as houses near metro stations tend to command higher prices, research now suggests that access to cycle paths and proximity to docking points is linked to higher rents. Finally, bike-sharing opens up parts of cities that were previously hard to access by public transport, especially late at night when bus and train services get thinner. Research by Susan Shaheen at the University of California, Berkeley, found that in Montreal and Toronto four out of ten people shopped more at locations near bike stations. In Washington, DC, more than eight out of ten said they were more likely to visit a business, shop or restaurant with easy access to bike-sharing dock.

    Just as researchers begin to grasp the impact of bike-sharing, the schemes themselves continue to evolve at speed. New developments include much cheaper “dockless” bikes, already in use in Berlin, which can be found by mobile phone. Another promising development is the introduction of electric bikes, for longer or steeper journeys. Such innovations could help broaden the appeal of bike-share schemes beyond their current users, who are mainly young, relatively well-off men. Bike sharing is just one part of a broader movement towards alternative forms of transport in increasingly crowded cities, but it could be an important one. As last year’s United States Conference of Mayors concluded: “communities that have invested in pedestrian and bicycle projects have benefited from improved quality of life, healthier population, greater local real-estate values, more local travel choices, and reduced air pollution.” Time for more of the world to go Dutch.

    Bicyclists invited to annual Tour de Somerville this Saturday

    This article was originally published by Samantha Laine on Boston.com on October 17th, 2013.

    Attention bike and architecture enthusiasts: Get ready for the 21st annual Tour de Somerville, which will take place on Saturday, October 19 at 10 a.m. The 13-mile bike ride will take participants on an bicycle exploration of the city’s many tunnels, bridges, overpasses, and construction sites.

    The free event, themed “Over, Under, Around, and Through,” will start at the Seven Hills Park, take a mid-way break at the Blessing of the Bay boathouse on Shore Drive—where refreshments will be provided by Redbones—and will end in the parking lot behind Rite Aid.

    Ron Newman, this year’s ride organizer, said the “Over, Under, Around, and Through” themed event is a little whimsical, but that people really enjoy seeing different aspects of the city in a fun way. He said the ride has grown from about 20 participants in the beginning years to closer to 100 riders in past tours. He said he is excited that the Somerville Bicycle Committee can provide this fun event to the community.

    ...“This is going to be a good opportunity to explore the progress the city is making in improving facilities for riding bikes,” Newman said. Read more here.

    Bike lanes slated for Freeport Street

    Bike lanes are expected to be added in the coming weeks to Freeport Street from Dorchester Avenue to Tenean Street and on Tenean Street from Freeport Street to Conley Street.

    ...As part of the project, “sharrows,” painted symbols that encourage drivers to share the road, will also be added to Adams Street from Bowdoin Street to Neponset Avenue and to Ashmont Street from Dorchester Avenue to Neponset Avenue.

    ...No parking will be lost with the new additions nor will any vehicle travel lanes be eliminated…

    ...“Number one is always safety,” said [Boston Bikes Director Nicole] Freedman. “When you add bike lanes it tends to slow down cars and increase safety for bicyclists, pedestrians, and motorists.”

    Read more here.

    Dudley Square Bike Club Attracts Flocks of Bicycle-Loving Kids

    This article was originally published by Sacha Pfeiffer on WBUR on October 16th, 2013.

    For several years now, Boston has been working hard to become a more bike-friendly city. It’s constantly expanding its network of bike lanes, rolling out additional Hubway bike-sharing stations, and installing more bike racks. Now there’s another step forward in Mayor Thomas Menino’s goal of making Boston “a world-class bicycling city”: A free bicycle club for young people recently opened in Dudley Square.

    It operates out of the Yawkey Boys and Girls Club on Warren Street and it’s a collaboration of several partners, including the city, the nonprofit group Bikes Not Bombs and Boston Children’s Hospital. And when we visited, the place was packed — not just with kids from Roxbury, but also from surrounding neighborhoods like Dorchester, Roslindale and Hyde Park.

    “Here, we have youth that are actually stripping bikes,” says 18-year-old Tarese Thompson, the club’s “crew chief,” pointing to a bicycle being methodically disassembled by a group of youngsters

    “They’re taking what’s on the bike and they’re going to actually take everything off the bike so that it’s back down to the frame,” explains Thompson, a student at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, “and then we’re going to rebuild them.”

    That deconstruction process is designed to teach bike mechanics. The club also instructs kids how to bicycle, if they don’t know already, and organizes group rides.

    “I think kids always love riding bikes,” Thompson adds, “and a lot of times it’s the parent that says, ‘Oh, don’t go too far.’ But now we’re basically giving them the opportunity where they can ride a bike, ride out on the street, and also ride around with friends.”

    Truthfully, we thought a group bicycle ride would seem way too un-cool to a bunch of middle schoolers to attract much interest. But, boy, were we wrong.

    “They’re going to be heading up Washington,” Thompson says, “cutting on one of the side streets to Martin Luther King Boulevard, and they they’re going to be taking the bike path on Martin Luther King Boulevard to the Southwest Corridor.”

    And, from there, on to Northeastern University. At least a dozen kids very eagerly went on that group outing, including 12-year-old Kaya Andrews, who lives in the South End and is a seventh grader at the Pierce School in Brookline.

    “It feels really safe,” Andrews told us after her ride, “because we have our signals that tell the whole group in chains up and down the line if there’s a car in the back or if there’s a car coming ahead or a biker so that we know when something’s approaching us and it doesn’t come by surprise.”

    When Andrews comes to the Dudley Square club, she rides one of 10 free bikes donated by the bicycle company Giant, which has also given the club an assortment of tools and other equipment for its in-house repair shop. That shop is staffed by high schoolers who service and repair bikes for free or at a discount for people in the community. They also teach younger kids bicycle mechanics and maintenance, like how to patch a flat tire.

    This bike club is trying to do several things: give young people a way to get exercise, encourage biking as alternative transportation, and steer kids away from street violence. It’s also teaching good bicycling citizenship and bicycle safety.

    “Some kids don’t even understand that we have the right to ride on the street,” notes Thompson. “They think that we have to ride on the sidewalk. And this is a way that we can really push and let them know that riding on the street is OK,” and inform them that riding on sidewalks is sometimes illegal.

    And the kids who work in the club’s repair shop get practical, marketable skills.

    “I know a couple people who have gone through the programs who are working in bike shops now,” Thompson says. “So, from what they’ve learned here, they’re going out and they’re making money off of it. But also this is a way where when their bike breaks down it’s not just sitting in their basement for the next three years. They can actually fix it and keep using it.”

    During our visit to the bike club, we watched several kids mentally connect the dots of how a bicycle works, like when they discovered that cutting a certain cable results in the brakes no longer functioning. One of those budding engineers was Gianna McGee, a 15-year-old from Roxbury who goes to Newton South High School.

    “These are the brakes, see?” McGee shows us. “And that little cable that comes this way connects to right here, where it was, and it clamps the tires together. That’s what makes it stop.”

    For now, the Dudley Square bike club is a pilot project. It’s open two afternoons a week, from 4 to 7 p.m., through mid-November and, if it’s judged successful, it may be back again in the spring.

    Shared-use Mobility Summit explores future of urban mobility

    This article was originally published in The City Fix.

    “The 20th century is a century of general, and the 21st century is a century of sharing.” – Lisa Gansky, author of the Mesh

    Shared mobility is the cornerstone of the sharing economy, which is spurred by demographic changes, increased environmental consciousness, and the global economic downturn. Sharing maximizes the use of assets in our society while giving more people the access to the resources they need. The idea that “access trumps ownership” is increasingly popular reflects the explosive growth of shared mobility.

    On October 10 and 11, the Shared-use Mobility Summit brought public policy makers, private sector actors, non-for-profit organizations, and academics together in San Francisco. The conference explored the future of urban mobility by discussing current trends, policies, and opportunities in carsharing, bikesharing, and ridesharing. As the first shared mobility conference ever, it provided a cutting-edge opportunity for various stakeholders to have a direct, open, and timely dialogue on how to better provide urban mobility in an integrated way. Read the full article here.

    City of Kolkata bans bikes to reduce traffic, but India’s environmentalists, workers protest

    KOLKATA, India — For the milkmen and newspaper delivery boys of Kol­kata, navigating the city’s clogged lanes is always a challenge. But now they face a new obstacle: traffic cops waiting to write them a ticket.

    Just for riding a bike. Read more here.

    Taking off the stabilisers: Sharing two wheels is becoming ever more popular

    This article was originally published in the international print edition of The Economist on October 12th, 2013.

    IN MORE than 500 cities in 50 countries, shared bicycles have become a colourful addition to street life. Schemes have increased tenfold since 2004. Most work on the principle that a user hires a bicycle at one of a number of docking stations dotted around a city. The first 30 minutes are usually free for members (annual memberships range from a $35 deposit to a $145 fee), and charges rise the longer users hang on to the bikes. The two-wheelers vary from clanking, no-frills frames in Hangzhou, in China, to the luxury models with built-in GPS and smart tablets that will be launched in Copenhagen next month.

    Bicycle-sharing has come a long way since the 1960s, when 50 white “free bikes” were scattered around Amsterdam, only to be promptly stolen. A second generation of coin-operated bicycles still got nicked. A third generation solved that problem with electronic docking stations and credit-card payments. Susan Shaheen, an expert on sustainable transport at the University of California, Berkeley, thinks that bike-sharing is now heading towards a fourth, less wobbly generation. Innovations such as mobile solar-powered docking stations and IT-based redistribution systems (to get the bikes to the right place at the right time) are already well established. Some cities are now moving on to offer seamless integration with public transport.

    According to a study by the Earth Policy Institute (EPI) in Washington, Europe accounts for most of the programmes, but Asia has the largest number of shared bicycles, with over 350,000 in China alone. Even in often bike-hostile America, which in 2012 had 21 schemes with 8,500 bicycles, the EPI expects the fleet to more than quadruple by 2014, to 37,000. In London, which has 8,000 shared bikes, another 2,000 will be added later this year. In Paris the Vélib scheme, which opened in 2007, has already racked up 173m journeys.

    Many of the larger bike-sharing schemes are public-private partnerships that rely on a combination of user fees, advertising revenue, sponsorship and government money. New York’s 6,000-bike venture, launched this summer and sponsored by Citibank and MasterCard, charges a lot more than other cities ($10.83 for 24 hours against $2.30 in Paris), and hopes to make a profit. In Paris JCDecaux, an advertising firm, pays for the programme in exchange for advertising space on bus stops and billboards.

    London’s “Boris bikes”, named after Boris Johnson, the mayor who introduced the scheme, benefit from a £50m ($80m) sponsorship deal with Barclays bank, but nearly half this year’s running costs will still come from the public purse. Transport for London, which runs the scheme, says that all public transport in the capital is subsidised, and bikes are no exception. No two bike-sharing business models are alike, but for most cities the point of such schemes is not to make a profit but to reduce congestion, ease parking problems and encourage their increasingly flabby inhabitants to take more exercise.

    Ceremony Honors Cyclist Who Broke Barriers

    ...Knox had been a member of Boston’s only black cycling group, the Riverside Cycle Club, before joining the Boston-based National League of American Wheelman in 1893.

    Knox soon found herself at the epicenter of a fight over whether blacks could join the league, he said. After a Southern faction of league leaders successfully politicked in 1894 to make the group for whites only, Knox’s appearance at the league’s 1895 national meet in Asbury Park, N.J., caused an uproar… click here for more.

    New Station Alert: Jackson Square T, Jamaica Plain

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday afternoon, October 9th, the new Hubway station, Jackson Square T, in Jamaica Plain, is open & operational. This station is a 23-dock station, adjacent to the Jackson Square T Station along the SW Corridor close to Centre and Lamartine Streets. This is the 6th station located in Jamaica Plain.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Green Street T, Jamaica Plain

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday morning, October 9th, the new Hubway station, Green Street T, in Jamaica Plain, is open. This station is a 15-dock station, located in front of the Green Street orange line T station between Johnson Park and the SW Corridor Park. This is the 5th station located in Jamaica Plain, and a 6th is planned for the Jackson Square T station area.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Just Sitting Here Watching the Wheels Go Round and Round


    “As a kid I had a dream - I wanted to own my own bicycle. When I got the bike I must have been the happiest boy in Liverpool, maybe the world. I lived for that bike. Most kids left their bike in the backyard at night. Not me. I insisted on taking mine indoors and the first night I even kept it in my bed.” - John Lennon

    John would have been 73 today, October 9, 2013. Happy Birthday, John!

    New Station Alert: Summer Street at Cutter Street, near Davis Square in Somerville

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday morning, October 9th, the new Hubway station, Summer Street at Cutter Street in Somerville, is open. This station is an 11-dock station, located in front of the VFW at the intersection of Summer and Cutter Streets, near the intersection of Elm & Russell. Please note: Summer/Elm is where Russell becomes Cutter.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    How Bike-Loving Mayors Make Bike-Friendly Cities

    ...Boston’s outgoing Mayor Thomas M. Menino launched a cycling program in 2007 and declared in 2009, “the car is no longer the king in Boston,” calling for healthier citizens and communities. This is after seeing his city ranked as one of the country’s worst biking cities in Bicycling magazine. Today, it’s still not in the top 10, but the mayor—and the candidates to succeed him—seems committed to improving the program to make it more expansive and safe.

    Menino’s administration has installed more than 60 miles of bike lanes and 1,000 bike racks and launched the Hubway bike-share system in 2011. Just this year, the mayor released a Cyclist Safety Report, promising to reduce the city’s crash injury rate by 50 percent by 2020 and is supposed to install helmet vending machines at several bike-share kiosks around town any day now.

    Like New York, Boston has doubled its cycling rates in recent years, so the mayors’ efforts are paying off. Click here for the full article.

    Boston offers urban bicycling safety tips

    This article was originally published on Boston.com on 10/6/2013.

    BOSTON (AP) — Boston officials are offering tips they say can help keep urban bicyclists safe as they pedal through the city’s streets.

    Mayor Thomas Menino’s staff says the urban cycling tips were based on a study of more than 1,500 cyclist crashes in Boston since 2009.

    They say there were five fatal bicycle incidents in the summer and fall of 2012 alone.

    The tips tell cyclists to beware of doors, follow rules and yield to pedestrians.

    They also advise bike riders to avoid large vehicle blind spots, and to use helmets and lights at night.

    Cyclists can watch safety videos and take a quiz at www.bostonbikes.org.

    New Position Aims to Strengthen MIT's Sustainability

    ...MIT works closely with the city of Cambridge on a range of sustainability initiatives, including sponsorship of Hubway and electric vehicle charging stations. Faculty members and graduate students are partnering with the city on topics such as solar mapping, infrared imaging, wind and solar analyses and climate preparedness…

    David Price takes a ride on the Hubway

    This is an excerpt of an article originally published by Julian Benbow on Boston.com on 10/4/2013.

    Considering that he has seen his pitcher throw a bullpen session in a Vanderbilt football uniform—helmet included—Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon wasn’t shocked at all that star lefty David Price decided to hop on one of Boston’s Hubway bikes Thursday and go for a ride from the Rays’ workout at Fenway back to the team hotel.

    “It doesn’t surprise me, anything that he does,” said Maddon, who has been known to ride his bike to home games. “Riding the bike’s normally my thing, but that doesn’t surprise me, anything that David does. I love his ways. He’s a young man that’s—he’s Peter Pan. He’s going to be that way forever and I love that about him.

    “I wish more of our guys could be that way. Anything David does, understand, should not surprise you, and if you’re around him more, it would not surprise you.”

    Price had been thinking about it since the Rays came to Boston in July, when he saw the Hubway bicycles in front of the Boston Public Library on the way back from dinner with teammate Chris Archer.

    “I said, ‘I can’t believe I just now saw this for the first time,’ ” Price said. “I would’ve been riding bikes throughout the city, or at least to the field, if I knew that.”

    Since that was the Rays’ last regular-season run through Fenway, he figured he’d have to put off his pedaling until next season.

    But with the Rays back in town for the American League Division Series, he jumped at the second chance.

    Price picked out a bike from the rack on Yawkey and tweeted, “I’m doin it!!!! these can drivers better stay in their own lane!!! #sharetheroad”

    For the most part, the ride went off without a hitch.

    “Only one curb,” Price said. “No cars.”

    Facing the Sox, he said, won’t be so smooth.

    “You know what they’re capable of doing,” said Price, who will start Game 2 Saturday. “Every single year, year in, year out, they are, they’re going to be a postseason team, and you know you’re going to have to come with your best.

    “If you come with your B game, B-plus game, you have a pretty good chance to lose. So it heightens your awareness. You start feeling butterflies probably a day earlier than what you normally would. Pitching in this ballpark, pitching against that team, it makes you want it just a little bit more.”

    New Station Alert: Upham's Corner - Ramsey Street at Dudley Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday, October 3rd, the new Hubway station, Upham’s Corner - Ramsey Street at Dudley Street, is open and operational. This station is a 14-dock station, located on Ramsey next to CVS and across Dudley from the Foot Locker.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Bike Share Programs Are A Huge Success In Metropolitan Areas

    This article was originally published by Andrew Meggison on GAS2.org.

    Bike riding in major U.S. cities has nearly doubled over the past ten years, an one major source of bicycling’s recent resurgence are bike share programs that have sprung up in cities across America. This programs are proving especially popular with the young and hip.

    In the quest to seek out green transportation, it is hard to beat riding a bike and many U.S. cities have recognized this. Bike share programs have taken many American cities by storm over the past two years. A bike share program is a service in which bicycles are made available for shared use to individuals on a short term basis for a small fee, providing cheap and convenient transportation to tourists and locals alike.

    I first experienced a bike share program while I was traveling overseas in 2008. The bike share programs that I experienced at first were unregulated but highly effective; essentially bikes were left in certain parts of the city for riders to take and then drop off at other unofficial drop zones. Sort of an honor system at play but it seemed to work, even though for a while it felt like I was taking someone’s bike.  I did notice as I ventured more into Western Europe the bike share programs became more regulated and thus more organized however there was a fee involved.

    In 2011 I was pleased to learn that a sponsored bike share program was coming to my city of Boston Massachusetts.  Called “The Hub Way” and sponsored by New Balance, the Boston bike share program has been in action now for two years and has been a major success.

    The Hub Way has a number of cost effective use options that seem to be working as well as a strong following – expansion of The Hub Way is underway and the statistics of the past two years are encouraging:

    Hubway statistics:

    • Total trips: 1,069,766
    • Total miles ridden: 1.2 million
    • Total calories burned: 40 million
    • Total pounds of carbon offset: 285 tons

    I have used The Hub Way many times and have found the system convenient, easy to navigate, and incredibly cost effective. Given the talent and innovative spirit found in Boston small business have climbed on board with The Hub way to make the bike sharing experience more enjoyable and even safer.

    Not to be outdone by Boston, in May of 2013 New York City launched Citi Bike NYC’s first bike share program. The program has been a massive success with more than 288,000 subscriptions by September with 80,826 annual members. Citi Bike celebrated its 100th day of operation September 4th. To date the bike share program provides 6,000 bikes at 330 stations in parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn.  Citi Bike is expected to generate $36 million for NYC each year. Bicycling in NYC has continued to grow at a rapid pace since 2007.

    The future of bike sharing in America is strong. Seattle Washington and Aspen Colorado have recently put bike share programs into action. Even smaller American cities like Portland and South Portland Maine are working hard to make a bike share program available for their residence.

    While only 0.61% of all U.S. commuters use bicycles to get to work studies have shown that that number is on the rise. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey an estimated 864,883 people commuted by bicycle in 2012 an increase of around 10% since 2011.

    Zipcar, Hubway Cultivate University Partnerships

    This article was originally published by Caroline C. Hunsicker on TheCrimson.com on 9/30/2013

    Since Harvard partnered with car rental provider Zipcar and bike share company Hubway, students increasingly have taken advantage of these companies’ discounted rates for Harvard affiliates, and the companies have added even more benefits over the years.

    Both programs have allowed for Harvard affiliates to travel to destinations less easily accessible by Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority services.

    Joe A. Paul ’17 said that he and his roommates in Straus Hall rented bikes this fall to visit Market Basket, a grocery store in Somerville.

    Though their ride was fully funded by Hubway using coupons for a 24-hour free trial, Paul said he would use the bikes again for spontaneous trips that are “too far for walking and too short for the T.”

    Harvard has invested largely in Boston’s bike share company since the program’s launch in April 2012. So far, the University has funded 12 Hubway stations in the area, which each cost about $50,000. These stations include a location behind Annenberg, one outside of the Holyoke Center, and most recently, at the Quad.

    While Hubway and Zipcar provide different transportation services, the two companies have similar business models in which users pay a membership fee plus time-based usage fees.

    Since the launch of Hubway’s Harvard affiliate discount in May 2013, 684 members of the Harvard community have taken advantage of the 40 percent reduced price, according to Colin B. Durrant, a spokesperson for the Office for Sustainability. An annual membership for Hubway’s services is discounted for Harvard students and faculty at $50, compared to the normal cost of $85.

    Zipcar, which was founded in Cambridge in 2000, has been offering a student discount since 2003. Membership fees are $15 for Harvard students, plus the hourly rates of $7.43 after joining. Daily fees are $84 for non-members. Both gas and insurance prices are included in the Zipcar rental fees.

    Harvard was the first school in the region to adopt the Under-21 program, which allows students to rent Zipcars at 18, according to Benjamin A. Hammer, Commuter Choice Program coordinator.

    Currently, there are 32 frequently-rented cars on Harvard’s campus eligible for the Under-21 program.

    According to Hammer, there are over 10,000 active Zipcar accounts associated with a Harvard email address, thanks to the partnership between the University and the company. Over 1,100 of those members are under 21, according to Durrant.

    To promote sustainable transportation and encourage more students to join the program, Ana Dorsey, a marketing coordinator at the Boston Zipcar office, said Sidewalk Sam, a street artist, will design parking spaces on Harvard’s campus to be reserved for Zipcar use only.

    The Pros & Cons of Bike Commuting in Boston

    This article was originally published by Caroline Hatano on BostInno on 9/30/2013

    Remember biking as a kid? My childhood memories are pretty foggy, but I still remember riding around my cul-de-sac for the first time, the independence that came with being able to bike to a friend’s house, and that feeling of flying down a hill with the wind in your hair.

    Pretty romantic stuff, right?

    While biking in Boston isn’t all warm and fuzzy, it definitely has its perks. I became a bike commuter just over a week ago, so I’m still learning how cycling in a city works. For those of you debating becoming bike commuters, and for those who don’t understand why anyone would ever want to take on the hazards of rush hour on a two-wheeled steel frame, I’ve evaluated the pros and cons of biking in the city with the help of some of Boston’s bike experts.

    The Pros

    Healthy

    It goes without saying that biking is a healthier way to get around than, say, taking the T or driving. Instead of getting sardined into a cramped train car, you get a workout in during your morning commute. That way you don’t have to designate time outside of work to exercise. Or you can more easily justify that second post-lunch latte.

    Green

    You guys have probably heard by now that our planet is undergoing some sort of climate change situation. Biking, rather than opting for a fossil fuel-filled car ride, is a more sustainable way to move around the city. People have already adopted simple alternatives like recycling and buying re-usable water bottles. Biking is another easy change to make.

    Faster

    Boston has a reputation for being a very walkable city thanks to its narrow, compact street network. “In many ways, biking’s the fastest way to get around town. It’s a flat city and it’s a very dense city,” Nicole Freedman, director of the Boston Bikes program, told BostInno. Biking gives you control over your transportation. So instead of waiting endlessly for the green line, you can leave when you want to and ride at your own pace.

    Scenic

    When you pit riding along the Charles River against traveling underground in an overpacked train car, there’s not much competition. I think that, given the choice, everyone would choose the beauty of the outdoors over the T. “Biking to work is its own kind of thing. For me, it makes my commute very pleasant most of the time. It’s definitely led me to appreciate the way I move around the city a lot more than I would if I were trapped in a box,” said local bike activist/celebrity Greg Hum, who’s been biking in Boston for six years.

    Cheaper

    I’m not under the illusion that bikes are cheap, but if you have the patience for Craigslist and other such sites you can definitely find decent bikes for reasonable prices. You’ll have to invest in things like a lock, helmet, lights, and maybe a simple set of tools, but just remember that it’s a one-time expenditure. You’ll never have to pay for a parking spot or a monthly pass again.

    The Cons

    Dangerous

    Biking in Boston has become a lot safer in recent years thanks to the efforts of Boston Bikes, but it’s still hazardous. There’s a bike lane network to some extent—and far more in the works—but unless you’re comfortable getting up close and personal with cars, it can be a little nerve-wracking in high-traffic areas. “We’ve put out a lot of surveys, and it really comes down to having welcoming levels of infrastructure. A lot of it is just getting people to try it,” said Freedman.

    Sweaty

    “Real estate and property owners need to make it possible to have access to showers.” said Hubway General Manager Emily Stapleton. “People carry backpacks and the summer in Boston is super hot.” If you’re carrying a backpack and/or moving at a pace faster than that of a snail, you’re likely to get sweaty. And if you’re a safe biker, you’ll get helmet hair. Coworkers may not appreciate it when you show up to work in such a state.

    Not leisurely

    While you can bike to work at a leisurely pace, you won’t be able to casually sip a cup of coffee, read the paper, or catch up on emails. But then again, relaxing T rides only exist if you can get past crying babies, blaring music, and a lack of personal space.

    Boston Bike Network: An ambitious trek

    This is an excerpt of an article that was originally published as an editorial in The Boston Globe on 9/27/2013

    From Hubway to bike paths, Boston has made great strides towards becoming a more bicycle-friendly city. But even compared to the work that has already been done, the Boston Bike Network Plan — announced last Friday and scheduled to take up to 30 years to fully complete — is very ambitious. If this program is implemented, it has the potential to transform the way Bostonians get around the city.

    New Station Alert: South Boston Library - 646 East Broadway

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday evening, September 26th, the new Hubway station, South Boston Library - 646 East Broadway, is open, and bikes are available. This station is a 15-dock station, located in front of the South Boston Library on East Broadway between I & K Streets.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Hayes Square at Vine Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday evening, September 26th, the new Hubway station, Hayes Square at Vine Street, is open. This station is a 19-dock station, located in Charlestown between Warren/Chelsea and Spaulding.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: East Cottage Street at Columbia Road

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday evening, September 26th, the new Hubway station, East Cottage Street at Columbia Road, is open. This station is a 19-dock station, located on East Cottage near the intersection of Mass Ave, Columbia Road, Boston St, and E.Cottage.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Hubway Expanding Its Presence in Boston with New Stations

    This article was originally published by Caroline Black on MyFoxBoston.com on 9/26/2013

    Hubway, the New Balance bike share system, is adding 18 new stations in Boston, the majority in North Dorchester, South Boston, and Jamaica Plain, Mayor Tom Menino announced Thursday.

    “The New Balance Hubway system has expanded access to biking to thousands of people across the region, and now it will be more inclusive than ever as it grows into Boston’s neighborhoods,” Mayor Menino said.

    Major expansion areas include along West and East Broadway in South Boston, Jamaica Plain stations along the Southwest Corridor, Centre Street and Egleston Square and the Uphams’s Corner area.

    The City partnered with the Department of Conservation and Recreation, MassDOT, and the MBTA to offer the most convenient station locations with direct access to public transit, and bike paths.

    Hubway in Boston was launched in 2011 with 61 stations and 600 bicycles, making Boston one of the first cities in the United States to launch a citywide bike share system.

    Since then, the system has expanded into Cambridge, Brookline and Somerville. With this expansion, Boston will have 90 stations and 900 bicycles. The system will have 132 stations and 1000 bikes.

    New Station locations:

    South Boston – NOW OPEN

    W Broadway - W Broadway /Dot Ave

    S Boston Library - 646 E Broadway

    *Coming shortly 2 stations at Design Center

    Jamaica Plain – NOW OPEN

    Egleston Sq - Columbus/Washington

    Hyde Square - Centre St/ Barbara St

    JP Monument - Centre St / South St

    JP Center-Centre St / Myrtle St

    *Permits pending Jackson Square, Green Street

    Other – Opening Over the Next Few Weeks

    Hayes Square - Bunker Hill St / Vine St, Charlestown

    Milk St - Milk St / India St, Downtown

    BIDMC (3rd station) - Brookline/Burlington, Fenway

    Mass Ave/Columbia Road - Mass Ave / Columbia Rd, Dorchester

    Beacon/Charles - Charles St / Beacon St, Beacon Hill

    *Permits pending Upham’s Corner

    18 Nuevas Estaciones de Hubway en JP y South Boston

    This article was originally published on TuBoston.com on 9/26/2013

    El alcalde Thomas M. Menino anunció que la alcaldía de Boston comenzará oficialmente esta semana su plan de expansión del servicio de bicicletas públicas Hubway, y añadirá 18 nuevas estaciones en Boston, la mayoría de ellas en North Dorchester, South Boston y Jamaica Plain.

    “El sistema Hubway ha permitido a miles de personas en la ciudad a tener acceso a bicicletas, y ahora será más inclusivo que nunca, a medida que crece en los vecindarios de Boston”, declaró Menino.

    Las principales áreas de expansión incluyen East y West Broadway, South Boston, y estaciones en Jamaica Plain a lo largo del Southwest Corridor, Centre Street y Egleston Square, así como también en el área de Uphams Corner.


    La alcaldía de Boston lanzó el servicio de Hubway en 2011, con 61 estaciones y 6000 bicicletas. Desde entonces, el sistema se ha expandido hacia Cambridge, Brookline y Somerville, y hasta la fecha ha contado con casi 20.000 miembros anuales y 160.000 usuarios ocasionales. Con esta nueva expansión, Hubway ahora contará con 132 estaciones y 1000 bicicletas.

    With New Stations, Hubway Is Expanding into the Neighborhoods

    This article was originally published by Eric Randall on BostonMagazine.com on 9/26/2013

    It makes Hubway a more realistic transit option in places like Dorchester and South Boston.

    Hubway, Boston’s bikeshare network, has been opening new stations this week, primarily in neighborhoods where access to the big green bikes has been more limited.

    They’re adding 18 new stations through the city, the majority in North Dorchester, Jamaica Plain, and South Boston, according to a city press release. The usefulness of bike share networks really picks up as the density of stations increases. No one wants to take a bike to their destination if they’re going to have to ride past it to find the nearest station and then retrace their steps on foot. And a glance at the bottom half of this station map shows that there’s some serious need for more station options in the neighborhoods. (New stations are in yellow.)

    So hey, that’s great news. And hey, there are a couple new stations near the Common and the Waterfront, too.

    New Station Alert: Egleston Square at Columbus Ave -- All 4 New JP-area stations operational

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday night, September 25th, the new Hubway Egleston Square at Columbus Ave station is now open. This station is a 15-dock station, located at Atherton and Washington across from the Egleston House of Pizza and just 2 blocks Northeast of the Egleston Square Peace Garden.


    All four of the new Jamaica-Plain area stations are now operational, with 64 docks.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Milk Street at India Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, September 25th, the new Hubway station on Milk Street at India Street is open. This station is a 19-dock station, located on Milk Street newar India Street, just two blocks inland from the Rings Fountain on the Greenway.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Hyde Square at Barbara Street in Jamaica Plain

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday, September 25th, our Hyde Square at Barbara Street station is now open. This station is a 15-dock station, located on Barbara Street one block south of the Hyde Square rotary, one block north of the Connolly Branch Library.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: JP Centre - Centre St at Myrtle St

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday, September 25th, our JP Centre - Centre St at Myrtle St station is now open and operational. This station is a 15-dock station, located on Centre St at Myrtle St adjacent to the Post Office and JP Licks.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Hubway's first station in Jamaica Plain, JP Monument - South Street at Centre Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday, September 25th, our JP Monument - South St at Centre St station is now open. This station is a 19-dock station, located where Centre and South Streets meet in front of the Monument. Please stay tuned for announcements of other JP-area stations.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: BIDMC - Brookline Ave at Burlington Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday, September 24th, 4:30pm, our BIDMC - Brookline at Burlington St station is now open. This station is a 15-dock station, located 2 blocks southwest of Fenway Park. This is a high-traffic area. As always, please be courteous and observe all traffic laws and safety rules.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Charles Street at Beacon Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday, September 24th, our Chalres Street at Beacon Street station is now open. This station is a 14-dock station, located on Beacon just West of Charles Street.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Hubway comes to the heart of Southie with new West Broadway @ Dorchester Ave station

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday, September 24th, our West Broadway and Dorchester Ave station is now open. This station is an 18-dock station, located on West Broadway at the intersection of Dorchester.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    The Cambridge Bicycle Committee's Annual Bow Tie Ride, Sunday, 9/29

    The Cambridge Bicycle Committee presents the 6th Bow Tie Ride

    Ever notice that the city of Cambridge is shaped like a bow tie? Come see for yourself, at the Cambridge Bow Tie Ride!

    The 13-mile tour through Cambridge starts at the Cambridge Main Library, 449 Broadway. Meet at 10:00 AM for orientation and leave promptly at 10:30 AM. The ride will finish back where it started, on the library grounds, about two hours later.

    Use a Hubway bike for the ride, and we’ll waive your overage fees (typically for rides over 30 minutes)! Visit the Cambridge Bikes website for more info.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    North End weighs in on new Salem Street bike lane

    This article was originally published by Janet Larsen on Boston.com on 8/28/2013

    Thanks to the work of Mayor Thomas Menino and Boston Bikes Director Nicole Freedman, Bicycling Magazine now rates Boston as one of the best biking cities. Yet, there are no bike lanes that penetrate the heart of one of the city’s top tourist destinations, the North End.

    The city plans to address this in mid-October when new, shared lane markings will be installed over one to three nights and span Salem Street from Cross Street to Charter Street, according to Boston Bikes, a division of the City of Boston founded in 2007 that oversees bicycle-advancement projects.

    Already the North End is bustling with bike traffic. The Cross Street and Hanover Street Hubway stop on Boston’s bike sharing program is one of the most frequented in the city with over 21,000 trips leaving from the station within its first two years, according to Boston Bikes. And a bike line runs around the North End from North Washington Street and Commercial Street to Cross Street and Atlantic Avenue.

    U.S. Bike-Sharing Fleet More than Doubles in 2013

    This article was originally published by Janet Larsen on TreeHugger.com on 8/28/2013

    The opening of the San Francisco Bay Area bike share on August 29, 2013, brings the combined fleet of shared bikes in the United States above 18,000, more than a doubling since the start of the year. The United States is now home to 34 modern bike-sharing programs that allow riders to easily make short trips on two wheels without having to own a bicycle. With a number of new programs in the works and planned expansions of existing programs, the U.S. fleet is set to double again by the end of 2014, at which point nearly 37,000 publicly shared bicycles will roll the streets.

    The largest bike share in the United States is in New York City, where some 6,000 bicycles are available at 332 stations in Manhattan and Brooklyn. The program opened at the end of May 2013, and in less than 3 months hit 2 million trips. On busy days, each bike gets checked out seven times or more, a remarkably high borrowing rate. The city ultimately hopes to expand the program to other boroughs and grow to 10,000 bikes.

    The other large bike-sharing debut in 2013 was in Chicago, where 1,500 Divvy bikes now grace the streets. The program hopes to double to 3,000 cycles by the end of the year, ultimately growing to 4,000 strong—reinforcing the city’s efforts to dramatically boost biking. In addition to making shared bikes readily accessible transit, Chicago plans to extend the path and trail network to within a half-mile of all residences.

    Before New York and Chicago came on the bike-sharing scene, Washington, DC, held America’s top spot. Its program has grown to over 2,000 bikes, spreading into neighboring communities. Transport planners from cities around the country have made the pilgrimage to Washington to ride one of the cherry-red Capital Bikeshare bikes and see firsthand how the popular program works. Since 2007, biking in the nation’s capital doubled to 3.5 percent of all commuter trips, and bike sharing has made it more convenient to travel the expanding web of marked cycle lanes.

    Other large bike shares include Nice Ride in Minneapolis and St. Paul (1,550 bikes), Hubway in the Boston area (1,100 bikes), and DecoBike Miami Beach (1,000 bikes). Aspen, Columbus, Fort Worth, and Salt Lake City are among the more than a dozen programs that opened in 2013, joining a list of cities that have enjoyed bike sharing for longer, including Denver, San Antonio, Chattanooga, Madison, and Fort Lauderdale.

    On the international scene, the United States is just catching Europe and Asia’s bike-sharing tailwind. Worldwide, more than half a million cycles can be picked up in well over 500 cities in 51 countries. Italy and Spain have the greatest number of programs, while China is home to two thirds of the global shared bike fleet.

    New York is the only American city to make it onto the list of the world’s 20 largest bike-sharing programs. In fact, five cities have more shared bikes than the entire U.S. fleet. Four of them are in China, where Wuhan reportedly has some 90,000 shared bikes for its 9 million people. Hangzhou has 69,750 bikes that are well integrated with that city’s mass transit.

    The world’s third largest bike share is Vélib’ in Paris, the first large-scale program to gain worldwide attention. Since its 2007 launch, riders have taken 173 million trips. According to the program, one of the nearly 24,000 Vélib’ bikes gets checked out every second of the day. Vélib’ claims to have the highest bike density among the world’s top programs, with one bike available for every 97 city residents.

    Within the next year, the U.S. bike-sharing fleet will have caught up with Paris. New entries in Florida could push the country past that mark, with launches expected in Miami (500 bikes, an expansion from Miami Beach), St. Petersburg (300 bikes), and Tampa (300 bikes). Phoenix is also hoping to launch a 500-bike program that will double in size as neighboring cities join in. Rollouts hoped for in 2014 include large offerings in Los Angeles (some 4,000 bikes) and San Diego (1,800 bikes), as well as 500+ bike programs in Portland (Oregon), Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and Seattle, along with a number of smaller markets.

    The new San Francisco Bay Area scheme is starting out relatively diffuse, with 700 bicycles split between San Francisco and other cities along the 50-mile rail line south to San Jose. Planners note that it ultimately could grow to a network of 10,000 bikes, better allowing rail riders to travel the first and last mile or so of their commute on two wheels. As communities continue to improve their biking infrastructure and as enthusiasm for an efficient, environmentally friendly, healthy, and enjoyable form of transportation grows, bike sharing has a bright future in the United States.

    How to Spend a Long Weekend in Gay Boston? Ride the Hubway!

    The following is an excerpt from an article originally published by Josh Middleton on Philly Mag on 8/21/2013

    Around the corner is Boston Common, an ideal entry point to the “Emerald Necklace,” a pristinely maintained, 1,100-acre chain of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, the man behind FDR Park. Rent a two-wheeler from Hubway and pedal the seven-mile path that crosses the entire city. You’ll ride over charming stone pedestrian bridges, past lily-padded lagoons and, eventually, find yourself deep in a red-,yellow- and burnt orange-leafed forest.

    Point your spokes toward Tremont Street in the South End for the true gay-Boston experience. Here, you’ll find legendary bars like Boston Eagle and Club Cafe, and the best gay-watching in the city at popular brunch spots Tremont 647 and Francesca’s Espresso Bar. If shopping is on your agenda, Back Bay’s Newbury Street is the promenade.

    Boston is also one of the nation’s premier cultural hubs… Read more at Philly Mag

    Bike-Share Is Key to Closing the Cycling Gender Gap

    This article was originally published by Sarah Goodyear on The Atlantic Cities on 8/19/2013

    Do a lot of women ride bicycles in your city? If so, you’ve probably got a healthy bicycling culture where people in general feel safe getting on the bike to ride for transportation and recreation.

    The importance of women as an “indicator species” for biking has been known for years. But the United States doesn’t look so great when it comes to this particular statistic. Only 24 percent of bike trip were made by women in the U.S. in 2009, compared with 55 percent in the Netherlands and 49 percent in Germany.

    Women Bike, a new initiative from the League of American Bicyclists aims to close the biking gender gap in the U.S. It launched this month with the publication of a report, “Women on a Roll,” [PDF] that puts together the numbers on women biking in a way that hasn’t been done before.

    “There’s been a lack of collective knowledge on key data points,” says Carolyn Szczepanski, director of communications for Women Bike. “We’re really trying to position ourselves as a hub of information.”

    The data in the report shows a lot of pent-up desire for biking among women. Among the statistics:

    • 82 percent of women have a positive view of bicyclists.
    • From 2003 to 2012, the number of women participating in bicycling rose 20 percent.
    • 60 percent of bicycle owners between the ages of 17 and 28 are women.

    So why aren’t more women out there riding? The report focuses on what it calls the “five Cs”: comfort, convenience, confidence, consumer products, and community. The numbers show that the lack of sufficient safe bike infrastructure plays a major role in keeping women off the streets. And in places where bike lanes go in, women use them. Local surveys show dramatic increases in female ridership on streets with dedicated cycling facilities:

    • In New Orleans, female ridership went up 115 percent on South Carrollton Street after a bike lane was installed.
    • In Philadelphia, the presence of a bike lane increased female use by 276 percent.
    • In New York in 2011, 15 percent of riders on a street without bike lanes were women, compared with 32 percent on a street with bike lanes.
    • 53 percent of women say they would ride more if there were more bike lanes and paths.

    The report also looks at the way that women’s travel patterns tend to differ from men, with women making more trips and more multi-stop trips; the importance of better bike parking and confidence-building resources such as bike repair classes; the need for better consumer service for women at bike shops; and the role that a cycling community can play in getting women out on the bike.

    There’s one place where the gender disparity between men and women in cycling is leveling off, and that, tellingly, is bike share.

    A 2012 study showed that 43 percent of bike-share members in North America were women. In Washington, D.C., fully 54 percent of Capital Bikeshare members were women in 2012. In Boston, 47 percent of Hubway members are women.

    Szczepanski says that makes sense because bike-share programs remove many of the barriers that women commonly cite. The systems make biking easy to access and convenient to multiple destinations. You can ride the bikes in regular clothes. They’re simple to adjust and comfortable to ride. And you feel like you’re part of a community when you’re on a bike-share bike. You also don’t have to deal with the frequently off-putting snobbery and machismo still found at too many bike shops.

    Bike-share systems, it turns out, allow Americans a little glimpse of some of the conditions that exist in countries such as Germany and the Netherlands, where the cycling gender gap doesn’t exist. “All of those things are represented in a microcosmic way,” says Szczepanski.

    More and more cities in the U.S. are getting bike-share. Chicago rolled out its 4,000-bike system this summer and the San Francisco Bay Area will be the next to launch, at the end of August (albeit with a mere 700 bikes). As bike share becomes an integrated mode of transportation around the country – and as bike retailers realize that women represent a huge and underserved market—the gender balance just might start to shift here in a real and lasting way.

    Hubway celebrating Earth Day by helping Red Sox present a carbon neutral game

    This press release was originally published on RedSox.com on April 22nd, 2014.

    Red Sox observe Earth Day presented by National Grid, with carbon neutral game

    As a way to observe Earth Day presented by National Grid, and as part of Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s Greenovate Boston initiative to reduce the city’s greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, tonight’s 6:35 p.m. Boston Red Sox game against the Oakland A’s will be carbon neutral.

    In order to achieve a zero carbon footprint of the game, the club will purchase renewable energy credits to offset all emissions generated from the game, including electric and gas consumption, waste disposal, and fan, employee, and player transportation.

    The renewable energy credits will be purchased from New England-based sources including: the Falmouth Academy solar array in Falmouth, MA; Country Curtains solar array in Lee, MA; North Coast Seafood’s solar array in South Boston, MA; and a collection of Maine hydro facilities.

    Additionally, employees from the New England Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will volunteer with Fenway Park’s Poland Spring Green Team during the game. The Poland Spring Green Team is a corps of up to 40 volunteers, typically college students, who collect recyclables throughout the seating bowl and educate fans on the importance of recycling.

    The “greening” of Fenway Park has been ongoing since 2008 when the club created the Poland Spring Green Team and installed solar thermal panels at Fenway Park - the first professional sports team to do so. Even the field maintenance features irrigation timing and diagnostic controls to minimize water and fertilizer use. The grounds crew also uses biodiesel-powered lawn mowers.

    “EPA applauds the Red Sox for making a long-term commitment to applying the lessons of Earth Day to their season-long operations at Fenway Park,” said Curt Spalding, Regional Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s New England office. “Tonight’s effort is especially notable, as the Sox will actually play a carbon-neutral game. Nowadays, saying ‘Go Sox’ refers both to the team on the field, and to the forward-leaning organization behind the scenes.”

    The Red Sox and Greenovate Boston encourage fans to participate in the effort to green Fenway Park by taking public transportation or using Hubway, Boston’s bike sharing system, and making use of blue recycling bins throughout the ballpark.

    “This past week’s events have shown us that Bostonians always stand together,” said Brian Swett, the City of Boston’s Chief of Environment and Energy. “Greenovate Boston is a community-driven movement, and we thank the Red Sox and the EPA for their work and leadership in making this movement stronger.”

    In 2012 the Red Sox were recognized with an Achievement Award from the EPA and Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection for their demonstrated commitment to improving sustainable food management practices. Last year, the club composted more than 100 tons of organic material, and recycled more than 275 tons of plastic, aluminum, and paper. This past offseason, hand dryers were installed in ballpark restrooms in an effort to conserve trees.

    Cities seek solutions amid mandatory helmet law debate

    This article was originally published by Justin Bilow on Bikeshare.com on April 20th, 2013.

    As bike share programs pop up in cities around the world, some places face a serious roadblock to implementing these programs. The problem isn’t a lack of funding, adequate technology, or even public support. The problem, according to some advocates and critics, is bike helmets. Read the full article here.

    Hubway returns

    Boston Bikes Director, Nicole Freedman, discusses the 2013 season relaunch on WGBH News.

    System Alert - Hubway to Reopen Soon

    The Hubway bikeshare network has begun to install stations in preparation of the system relaunch for 2013! Over the coming weeks roughly five stations per day will be installed and when a critical mass of stations are on the ground, the system will reopen. Relaunch date TBD, but likely later in March (weather dependent). Please check out our Twitter feed and Facebook page for up to the minute information and thanks for your support of Hubway!

    A Hubway Tour of Boston with NHL Star

    Boston Bruins player Andrew Ference takes a spin around the City with Kris Carter, interim Director of Mayor Menino’s Boston Bike’s program:

    How to Use the Hubway Bike Share Program (produced by Harvard Commuter Choice)

    Petition Urges Agreement, Compromise on Hubway Decision

    This article was originally published by Matt M. Casey in the the Charlestown Patch on July 31st, 2012.

    Petition on Change.org aims to gather 100 signatories in an effort to get Hubway to come to Charlestown as soon as possible.

    They don’t care who’s wrong, they just want to see Hubway come to Charlestown.

    Charlestown resident Nathan Blanchet started a Change.org petition Monday night to urge the Charlestown Neighborhood Council, Boston Bikes and Hubway to come to an agreement on bringing stations .

    Plans to bring the bike-sharing system to Charlestown this summer last week when members of the council deadlocked on a vote to approve a second location in town. Council members were concerned that the location near the intersection of Warren Street and Chelsea Street would not appropriately serve the entire community.

    Blanchet, in his petition letter, acknowledged those concerns.

    “The two proposed locations are not perfect from all perspectives, and more will be needed in future expansions,” Blanchet wrote. “We understand and applaud the Charlestown Neighborhood Council representatives who voiced these fairness concerns. We also encourage Boston Bikes and Hubway to expand the subsidized membership program, and advertise that program when starting in Charlestown.”

    By 10 p.m. Monday, the petition had already accumulated 29 signatures on its way to gather 100.

    Blanchet, commenting on Charlestown Patch in response to our article covering the decision, called the outcome “very disappointing.”

    “This should have been an easy decision in my view,” Blanchet wrote. “I hope Mr. Whelan and colleagues can find a way to reconsider, and quickly.”

    Update to Bicycle Rental Agreement

    In our efforts to continually improve the Hubway service for our members, several adjustments have been made to our Bicycle Rental Agreement.  We invite you to review the document.

    For any questions you may have, please call us at 1-855-4HUBWAY(448-2929) or email customerservice@thehubway.com.  Thank you for your support!

    Boston to Expand Hubway Bike-Share After Brilliant First Season

    This article was originally published by Angie Schmitt on the DC.StreetsBlog on November 29th, 2011.

    They’ve logged more than 140,000 rides over just four months. And now Boston’s brand new Hubway bike sharing system is packing it in for the cold New England winter.

    Boston’s Hubway bike sharing system is celebrating its successful first season with an expansion. Photo: The Boston Globe
    But when it returns in the spring, it will be expanding, adding stations in Cambridge, Somerville and Brookline. In total, the barely four-month-old bike sharing system will add 30 stations and roughly 300 bicycles — a 50 percent increase, according to a report from The Boston Globe.

    Hubway has come out of the gate roaring, surpassing early ridership figures from some of the country’s most well known bike sharing systems, according to the paper.

    “Its first 2½ months, Hubway recorded 100,000 station-to-station rides, significantly eclipsing the pace of similar systems in Minneapolis (where Nice Ride needed six months to reach that mark) and Denver (where B-cycle needed 7½ months).”

    And it seems Boston’s neighboring cities and towns were feeling left out of the bike sharing excitement. Jeff Levine, director of planning and community development in Brookline, told the Globe that the “number one question” he gets is, “When is Hubway coming to Brookline?”

    Local news site BostInno credited the system with helping make Boston more bike friendly overall. Writer Lisa DeCanio said that despite some lingering ambivalence about biking in Boston, growing enthusiasm cleared the way for the removal of 71 parking spots on Massachusetts Avenue to make way for a bike lane. She called the Hubway a “shining success,” noting that even the Bruins have gotten on board, “with players riding to and from practice.”

    Hearing the news, Network blog Boston Biker was cheerfully smug.

    “Woo! And this after everyone thought the streets would run red with the blood of a thousand dead Hubway cyclists … seems that Boston city streets are not [as] rough and tumble for cyclists as they used to be.”

    Hubway was funded in part with a $3 million grant from the Federal Transit Administration. The Boston region’s Metropolitan Area Planning Council is overseeing the expansion.

    Hubway to branch out next spring

    This article was originally published by Eric Moskowitz in the Boston Globe on November 28th, 2011.

    After recording 140,000 trips in four months, Boston’s European-style bicycle-sharing system is expanding across the Charles River, with stations planned for Cambridge and Somerville after a winter hiatus.

    Cambridge officials said they hope to concentrate 20 stations in the most densely populated swaths of their city, and Somerville expects to usher in eight stations.

    Back on the Boston side of the Charles, Brookline is working on two stations it hopes to open soon after the Cambridge and Somerville expansion.

    “The number one question I get in my office overall is, ‘When is Hubway coming to Brookline?’ ’’ said Jeff Levine, director of planning and community development in Brookline, which intends to introduce stations at Coolidge Corner and Brookline Village.

    Read the full article here.

    The Boston Bruins Love Hubway and You Should, Too

    This article was originally published by Ryan Durling in the BostInno on October 11th, 2011.

    A piece last week by Lisa D about Hubway, the new bike-sharing program in Boston, earned an awful lot of attention, which I’m pretty sure focused more on her unwillingness to carry a helmet than it did on the actual program itself (“It’s so nerdy,” she said about the daunting task - have at her in the comments).

    Being the investigative journalist that I am, I of course set to the streets to find out just how cool or uncool Hubway is, and the verdict - at least according to Boston Bruins defenseman and Assistant Captain Andrew Ference - is that it’s “awesome.”

    Ference, who’s made a name for himself in the NHL as a connoisseur of all things environmental, fully endorses the program.

    “I’ve got a Hubway right across the street from my house,” the Calgary, Alberta native told me. “I’ve got my own bike, but it’s awesome.

    “Some of the guys on the team have used it a lot already, just to see how much it’s being used it proves the point that there’s a desire for it. It used to be just me and Z (Bruins Captain Zdeno Chara) biking after practice but now there’s six or seven guys after practice.”

    Ference admits that maybe Boston isn’t the best place for novice bikers (“It’s not the safest streets for it,” he said), but that nevertheless, it’s great to see the program being utilized by so many.

    And many are using the program. According to a report from Boston Magazine, Hubway had its 100,000th ride last weekend - an average of over 10,000 rides per week. The average ride is just over one mile, and over 115,000 miles (nearly five times the circumference of Earth) have been ridden on Hubway bikes since late July.

    Remarkably, 48 percent of users are not local, which can only mean that the bad news about the MBTA is spreading.

    Hubway isn’t just a great idea, it’s a safe and practical one, too. The design of the three-gear bikes allows riders to carry purses or briefcases, and splash guards are in place to protect the trousers of riders in the event that they get caught in less-than-favorable weather. Additionally, front- and rear-wheel LED flashers make the bikes easy to find in the dark when they’re in use on the roads.

    Hubway’s director of marketing - or as he prefers to call himself, the Hype Master - Brogan Graham couldn’t be happier to hear the reviews.

    “The Bruins do use the program a lot,” he told me as we biked along the Seaport on a brisk fall morning. “We offer some of our users who utilize the program heavily a discount, and I’ve told them that we could take $80 or so off of their costs,” he said before looking down quizzically.

    “Maybe they’re not too concerned about saving $80.”