News

System Alert Update: Washington St at Waltham St, South End has been reinstalled

UPDATE: Thursday, June 23rd, 11am
The station has been reinstalled and is fully operational! Thank you for your patience during this outage.


UPDATE: Tuesday, June 21st, 4pm
Washington Street has been repaired and is awaiting lane-striping. Striping is scheduled to be complete by the evening of Wednesday, June 22nd. We are expecting the Hubway station to be redeployed by Friday afternoon, June 24th. Thank you for your patience.


UPDATE: Monday, June 13th, 1pm
To accommodate security of the area, ground settling, and other general safety issues, there will be a delay of at least one week before the station can be reinstalled at Washington / Waltham. We understand this is an inconvenience, and we will work with Boston Public Works and Boston Police to make sure this station can return as soon as possible after safety inspections are completed. Please stay tuned for updates.


UPDATE: Wednesday, June 8th, 3:30pm
The station will be out of order through this weekend. It is tentatively scheduled to return at an adjacent site on Monday, June 13th, pending cooperative weather conditions. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please stay tuned for updates.


Due to a water main break (see images below), the Hubway station located at Washington St at Waltham St, in Boston, will be closed, effectively immediately, Wednesday, June 8th, 7:30am, to enable police & service access. We expect the station to return following resolution of the issue, but there is currently no estimated timeline.

We apologize for the inconvenience. Please check the Hubway websitefacebook, or twitter pages for updates.

Please use a free app (search for “hubway” on a smartphone) or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute information on system availability.


photos: Kyle Gates

[Boston Business Journal] Hubway bike-sharing program expanding to East Boston

The following article was originally published by David L. Harris in Boston Business Journal, on June 15th, 2016.

The Boston Transportation Department said Tuesday that it plans to bring the New Balance Hubway bike-sharing program to 10 locations in East Boston this year.

The soon-to-be-added stations are in addition to 10 new stations opening this summer in Roxbury and northern Dorchester, according to the city.

The New Balance Hubway system is a bike-sharing system that’s owned by the municipalities of Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville.

The Boston Transportation Department said it will work alongside the public to help plan the new stations.

According to the city:

Everyone is welcome to attend a community workshop on June 30 at the East Boston Public Library to talk about what makes a good location for a Hubway station and work together to identify general locations for new stations. People will be able to prioritize specific locations via a survey conducted by street teams from the Neighborhood of Affordable Housing and the East Boston Social Center, via an online version of the survey, and by dropping by an open house on July 28.

Get ready to #takehubway in East Boston!

Key dates:
Community Workshop – June 30 6:30-8:00 p.m., East Boston Public Library
Community Open House – July 28, 6:00 - 8:00 p.m., East Boston Public Library

[Press Release] City of Boston Expands Bike Share to East Boston

Ten New Balance Hubway Stations to be Established in the Neighborhood this Year

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to view City of Boston site release.
June 14, 2016

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
Tracey Ganiatsos, BTD@cityofboston.gov

The Boston Transportation Department announced plans to bring the popular New Balance Hubway bike share program to 10 locations in East Boston this year. These stations are in addition to 10 new stations opening this summer in Roxbury and northern Dorchester.
“By expanding Hubway across the harbor to East Boston, we are giving more of our residents access to bike-sharing, which is good for our economy, our environment and our health,” said Mayor Walsh. “We will continue to work to provide residents with a diverse range of transportation options.”
The New Balance Hubway system is regional public transportation by bike, owned by the municipalities of Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville. With more than 13,000 annual members and over 100,000 short-term passes sold each year, the Hubway system will celebrate its 5th birthday this July and 5 million trips this fall.

“Bringing Hubway to East Boston is a major milestone for the program,” said Boston Transportation Commissioner Fiandaca. “With these new stations, East Boston residents and visitors will have an active, fun way to get around the neighborhood.”
The Boston Transportation Department will work alongside the public to help plan the new stations. Everyone is welcome to attend a community workshop on June 30 at the East Boston Public Library to talk about what makes a good location for a Hubway station and work together to identify general locations for new stations. People will be able to prioritize specific locations via a survey conducted by street teams from the Neighborhood of Affordable Housing and the East Boston Social Center, via an online version of the survey, and by dropping by an open house on July 28.
Get ready to #takehubway in East Boston!

    Key dates:
  • Community Workshop – June 30 6:30-8pm, East Boston Public Library
  • Community Open House – July 28, 6-8pm, East Boston Public Library


###



About Hubway: New Balance Hubway is metro-Boston’s bike-sharing system with more than 1,600 bikes at 160 stations in Boston, Cambridge, Brookline and Somerville.  The City of Boston has the longest-running subsidized bike-share membership program in the country, offering Hubway memberships to low-income residents for just $5 per year.  For more information about subsidized memberships please visit http://www.bostonbikes.org/ or call #617-635-1470.  Find out more about the New Balance Hubway system, station expansions, deployments, and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter and on Facebook.

[El Planeta] ¡FINALMENTE! Planean abrir estaciones de Hubway en East Boston este año

El siguiente artículo fue publicado originalmente en El Planeta, el 14 de junio de 2016.

El Departamento de Transporte de Boston anunció esta semana sus planes para extender el popular programa de bicicletas públicas Hubway a 10 localidades en East Boston este año.

No se ha especificado cuándo exactamente van a ser abiertas estas nuevas estaciones, pero se han convocado dos reuniones públicas en junio y julio para discutir con el público detalles sobre sus planes, y pedirles ayuda, sugerencias y comentarios.

“Al llevar el sistema de Hubway a East Boston estamos dando a más de nuestros residentes el acceso a bicicletas públicas, lo cual es bueno para nuestra economía, nuestro medio ambiente y nuestra salud”, dijo el alcalde Martin Walsh. “Vamos a seguir trabajando para proporcionar a los residentes una amplia gama de opciones de transporte”.

El sistema de Hubway funciona en los municipios de Boston, Brookline, Cambridge y Somerville. Con más de 13.000 miembros anuales y más de 100.000 pases de corto plazo que se venden cada año, Hubway va a celebrar su quinto cumpleaños este mes de julio, con 5 millones de viajes realizados hasta los momentos.

“Traer Hubway a East Boston es un hito importante para el programa”, dijo la comisionada de Transporte de Boston Gina Fiandaca. “Con estas nuevas estaciones, los residentes de East Boston y los visitantes tendrán una forma activa y divertida de moverse por la zona”.

MassDOT quiere tu opinión

El Departamento de Transporte de Boston trabajará junto con el público para ayudar a planificar las nuevas estaciones. Los residentes están invitados a asistir a un taller comunitario el 30 de junio en la Biblioteca Pública de East Boston para hablar sobre posibles ubicaciones para las estaciones de Hubway.

Las personas podrán dar prioridad a localizaciones específicas a través de una encuesta online realizada por Neighborhood of Affordable Housing and the East Boston Social Center.

También podrán asistir a un Open House el 28 de julio.


    Reuniones públicas sobre Hubway en East Boston:
  • Community Workshop. 30 de junio. 6:30pm-8pm. East Boston Public Library.
  • Community Open House. 28 de julio. 6pm-8pm. East Boston Public Library.

MEMBER PERK! First 30 Hubway riders to RSVP get free tickets to WGBH's Boston Talks Happy Hour on June 16th


Boston Talks Happy Hour: Olympics of Bust

Thursday, April 16, 2016, 7-9pm
WGBH Studios, One Guest Street, Brighton


A Smarter Happy Hour
Grab your friends and #TakeHubway for WGBH’s take on happy hour — inspiring conversation plus wine and local craft brews. Hear from and connect with local experts in a variety of fields while enjoying the great company of your neighbors from Boston and beyond.


Tickets are regularly $10 each, but the first 30 Hubway riders to RSVP will receive free admission!

Act now!
Click here to RSVP!
USE PROMO CODE HUBWAY TO GET THE FREE TIX
(again, free tix only available to first 30 who RSVP with that code).


Boston Talks: Olympics or Bust
Hear from rower Andrew Campbell, who is set to represent the United States in the Men’s Lightweight Double Scull at the upcoming 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Investigative and enterprise sports reporter for the Boston Globe, Shira Springer gives us the inside story on what it’s like to cover the Olympics, and lets us know what to watch for this summer. And Special Olympics VP of Philanthropy Nick Savarese explains how sports unite communities. Join Andrew, Shira, Nick, and others for a smarter happy hour celebrating the Olympics.

Meet the Host
Edgar runs WGBH’s Curiosity Desk, where he digs a little deeper into topics in the news, explores the off-beat, and searches for answers to questions posed by the world around us. His radio features can be heard on 89.7 WGBH’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and his television features can be seen on WGBH’s Greater Boston. Follow him on Twitter @ebherwick3.

PLEASE NOTE: You must be 21+ to attend.


Station Alert: Boylston at Arlington closed Saturday during Pride Parade

Station Alert: On Saturday, June 11th, from 11:30am until 4pm during Boston’s Pride Parade, the Hubway station at Boylston St at Arlington St, in Boston’s Back Bay, will be temporarily closed and inaccessible. During that time, riders will not be able to rent or return bikes to that station. Please do not attempt to dock your bike there, as the return may not be registered by the system and you will be unable to rent another bike at any station until the station reopens Saturday evening.

We apologize for the inconvenience. Please check the Hubway websitefacebook, or twitter pages for updates.

Please use a free app (search for “hubway” on a smartphone) or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute information on system availability.

Hubway & Pride this Weekend


So many wonderful events this week as part of Boston Pride Month, to celebrate Solidarity Through Pride, culminating in the annual Parade / Festival / Concert on Saturday, June 11th, and block parties throughout the City on Sunday, June 12th. Most events are accessible by Hubway, and stations are nearby or adjacent to the parade route (click for station map).

Due to street closures and other traffic advisories, congestion, and limited parking, we strongly recommend arriving for the Parade on Saturday by “T,” though most Hubway stations, including ones at Boston Public Library and the New Balance Store near Dartmouth St and the starting point, will be open and accessible. Please note: the station at Boylston & Arlington will be closed and inaccessible 11:30am-4pm on Saturday (click here for details). Please allow for extra time to rent or dock bikes, as large crowds are expected.

    Boston’s 46th annual Pride Parade route, Saturday, June 11th:
  • Noon: Start at Boylston St and Clarendon St
  • Turn right onto Clarendon St
  • Turn left onto Tremont St
  • Turn left onto Berkeley St
  • Turn right onto Boylston St
  • Turn left onto Charles St
  • Turn right onto Beacon St
  • Turn left onto Tremont St
  • Arrival at City Hall Plaza on Cambridge St

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!


Station Alert: additional docks added to HMS/HSPH - Ave Louis Pasteur at Longwood Ave

Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, June 8th, the Hubway station at HMS/HSPH - Ave Louis Pasteur at Longwood Ave in Boston has been extended with an additional station plate of 4 docks. We are hoping to alleviate congestion in the Longwood area, particularly during heavy commute times.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

Station Move Alert: Broadway / Mt Pleasant, Somerville, temporary move

Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, June 8th, the Hubway station at Broadway St at Mt Pleasant St, near Lombardi Way in East Somerville, has moved ever-so-slightly, approximately 15 feet to the right. This is a temporary move to accommodate a paving project, and the station is expected to return to its permanent location later in the season.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

Station Move Alert: One Kendall Square temporary move to plaza

Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, June 8th, the Hubway station at One Kendall Square in Cambridge has moved slightly to an adjacent location about 25 feet into the plaza behind the sidewalk and somewhat obscured by a construction fence (see image below). You may remember this new location as being similar to last year’s. This is a temporary move due to a sidewalk repair project, and it is expected to return to its sidewalk location later in the season.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

Sunny Cambridge: Cambridge's Year of Solar featured in New Hubway Posters

It’s the Cambridge Year of Solar, and the City wants you to know about Sunny Cambridge, a city-wide initiative to make it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes.

To spread the word, we’ve launched the Sunny Cambridge poster campaign at Hubway stations throughout Cambridge. #TakeHubway around town, and you’ll see these posters on display. Visit the Sunny Cambridge website at sunnycambridge.org, and learn all about riding bikes in Cambridge at cambridgema.gov/bikes!

Scroll below for larger versions of each individual poster in the campaign!

[Boston.com] The car did not fare well in yesterday’s Somerville-to-Boston Rush Hour Challenge

The following article was originally published by Sanjay Salomon in Metro Boston, on June 7th, 2016.

As the driver in Tuesday’s Rush Hour Challenge, Mark Gravallese was tasked with driving his Toyota Corolla in a race against three types of cyclists, one T rider and two pedestrians from downtown Boston to Davis Square in Somerville.

Gravallese came in sixth place, only beating the participant who was walking. The event was organized by the bicycle advocacy group MassBike to raise awareness of the challenges that all modes of transportation endure during rush hour gridlock.

Lauren LeClaire, communications coordinator for MassBike, said the electric pedal assist bike rider won the race, followed by the regular bike rider, the Hubway rider, the runner, the MBTA user, the driver (Gravallese) and the walker.

Gravallese said his race, which took him from MassDOT’s headquarters at 10 Park Plaza to Redbones restaurant in Somerville’s Davis Square, was “interesting” and that it took him between 35 to 40 minutes to reach the finish line at Redbones.

This is the second year in a row that Gravallese has participated in the Rush Hour Challenge. He drove a car last year too.

Gravallese told Boston.com that the race revealed some important lessons for transportation officials about how different types of commuters navigate the city during the busiest times.

“The main takeaway is our city is growing, and fast, and is on the cutting edge of transportation design so we have to make sure we’re accommodating all modes of transportation,” he said.

Gravallese is a manager of public infrastructure at transportation engineering firm Howard Stein Hudson. He says he thinks Boston transportation and policy officials are making a lot of correct moves and praised Boston for committing to Vision Zero, a pledge to eliminate fatalities and serious injuries from traffic crashes by 2030.

“We have the right polices in place and the right tools at hand, now it’s about implementing and putting those tools into action,” he said.

Gravallese said he normally takes the commuter rail to work. The Rush Hour Challenge can teach users of different transportation modes to appreciate how other commuters get around the city.

“There’s no magic bullet for everyone,” he said. “An event like this brings everyone together to understand why certain people have their preferences for their mode and opens up their eyes to other modes and why they’re important.”

Meanwhile, a new report from the non-profit business group A Better City predicts Boston will see an increase of 80,000 cars, trucks and tractor trailers by 2030, and a nearly 5 percent increase in highway usage from 2010.

The report also indicates that traffic slows down significantly during the busiest travel times, between 7 and 9 a.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. During these times, the fastest drivers in the area average 23.1 miles per hour in the I-93 northbound lanes. The slowest average speed during these times is 10.3 mph on US-3 northbound.

[Metro Boston] Rush Hour Challenge proves the race is not always to the swift

Electric bike wins fourth annual ‘competition’ that promotes co-existence in transportation.

The following article was originally published by Spencer Buell in Metro Boston, on June 6th, 2016.

Gabriela Ziritt Hauser, who rode an electricity-assisted bicycle, was first to arrive in Somerville from Boston during this year’s Rush Hour Challenge. photo: Derek Kouyoumijan/Metro

In a battle pitting commuting option against commuting option, the electric bicycle has emerged victorious.

Seven commuters squared off after work Monday for the fourth installment of Boston’s Rush Hour Challenge (previously known as the Rush Hour Race), traveling from MassDOT headquarters in downtown Boston to Davis Square in Somerville.

Three rode bikes (the electric bike, a Hubway, and a good old-fashioned commuter bicycle), one took the train, one walked, one ran, and one got behind the wheel of a car.

But it was Gabriela Ziritt Hauser who got to the finish line first, completing the challenge in 28 minutes.

“The ride went pretty good I think,” said Hauser, who’s been riding a souped up cycle for three years on her commute to South Boston from Brighton.

It’s her preferred form of transportation, she said, because it’s much quicker than taking the T. And because she doesn’t have to pedal much, she doesn’t have to worry about showing up to the office covered with sweat.

But never mind who won, because that’s beside the point.

“We actually took the word ‘race’ out on purpose, because we want to highlight more the challenge of getting around the city,” said Stacy Thompson, deputy director of the LivableStreets Alliance, an organization that advocates for policies that favor bikers and pedestrians as well as cars.

That’s because no matter who got to the finish line at a Davis barbecue joint first, organizers hope that it’s Boston that can win in the long term.

Sure, it’s a competition, but it’s only tongue in cheek. There’s already enough animosity on the road to go around.

“The ultimate message is that it’s time for us to tear down the invisible barriers between modes in municipalities. Oftentimes there’s this really unhealthy conversation that bikes are against drivers, or pitting pedestrians against drivers,” Thompson said. “What we’re trying to say is everyone is just trying to get around, and if we prioritize people’s needs to move around Metro Boston, and we work to make our streets function better regardless of the modes people are using, we’re all going to be happier.”

In past races, cyclists won twice and a passenger on the MBTA won once.

A lot has changed since the first rush hour face-off in 2012, Thompson said. Alternatives to cars have gained in popularity, buzzwords like multi-modal transit and transit-oriented development have entered the public sphere. Planning efforts are underway, like Go Boston 2030, which focuses on the future of transportation in Boston, or Focus40, which focuses on drafting a capital plan for the MBTA.

“We are at, I think, an inflection point,” Thompson said. “So many groups are stepping back and saying, ‘What do we want our cities to be, and how are people going to get around five years from now, 10 years from now, 20 years from now. They’re realizing that, today, our streets kind of aren’t working for anyone.”

Seven commuters took part in the fourth installment of the Rush Hour Challenge on Monday. They rode bikes, ran, waled, drove and took the MBTA. photo: Derek Kouyoumijan/Metro

[Boston Patch] Rush Hour Challenge 2016: Driver Vs. Bikers Vs. MBTA

The following article was originally published by Alison Bauter in Boston Patch, on June 6th, 2016.

The challenge is on once again—a race from Downtown Boston to Somerville’s Davis Square meant to decide which mode of transit is truly fastest: a Hubway rider, a commuter on their own bike, an electric-assist bicyclist, a T rider, a runner, a walker and a driver.

For the fourth year running, contestants representing each form of travel will take off in the midst of rush hour traffic. The first to reach Davis Square will be declared this year’s winner.

In 2015, the biker won the Rush Hour Race, pedaling to victory on one of the city’s Hubway bike-shares.

Click here to meet this year’s contestants.

[Boston.com] The Boston-to-Somerville Rush Hour Challenge starts at 5 p.m. sharp

The following article was originally published by Sanjay Salomon on Boston.com, on June 6th, 2016.

Tonight, a group of commuters will race from downtown Boston to Somerville’s Davis Square using different modes of transportation.

The seven participants will travel by bike, car, running, walking, the MBTA, Hubway or an electric pedal assist bicycle for the fourth annual Rush Hour Challenge. Participants will leave from MassDOT’s Park Plaza offices and attempt to get to Redbones restaurant in Davis Square first.

Lauren LeClaire, communications coordinator for MassBike, the event organizer, said the purpose of the race is to highlight the challenges that all commuters must endure.

“The takeaway is no matter what mode of transit you’re using, whether you’re biking or driving, there are challenges and issues that all different types of modes face in this region,” said LeClaire in a phone interview. “Show a bit of empathy for your fellow commuter because it’s not easy for any of us to get around.”

Seven official participants have already been selected to race using a particular mode of transportation. But interested parties are welcome to “tag-along” with the official racers as they navigate Boston’s rush hour commute to Davis Square.

Spectators are invited to visit Redbones or get updates on how each participant is progressing via Twitte. Participants will have other people shadowing them on their commute who will provide updates via text message or Twitter to an announcer at the restaurant.

LeClaire said the participant who reaches Davis Square fist will receive a gift certificate to Redbones valued at $100, other small prizes and “a year of bragging rights.”

The race kicks off at 5 p.m. today from MassDOT headquarters at 10 Park Plaza.

[NewBostonPost] Boston board promotes bicycling as healthy mode of travel

The following article was originally published by Beth Treffeisen in New Boston Post, on June 2nd, 2016.

One of the posters being used to promote bicycling in Boston by the city’s health commission. (Image courtesy of the Boston Public Health Commission)

Seeking to encourage active living and safety for Hub residents, the Boston Public Health Commission launched the “I Bike” campaign on Wednesday.

Seven Bostonians are featured on campaign posters alongside their wheels as they share their reasons for biking. Plans call for the advertising blitz to run through the summer and will include promotions for the BostonBikes.org informational website and the expanded Hubway bike-sharing program in the city.

“For both youth and adults to gain the physical activity benefits from bicycling, it is critical to inform them about active living options in their communities, particularly those neighborhoods outside of downtown Boston,” Monica Valdes Lupi, the commission’s executive director, said in a statement released Thursday. She said the ad campaign will showcase people from diverse neighborhoods and why they ride.
“Their different reasons, from getting to work to spending time with their kids or discovering the city, help to promote biking not only as a means of transportation, but as a fun and healthy social activity,” Valdes Lupi said.

The campaign will include billboards, posters in bus shelters and on transit vehicles. All Boston residents can share their own reasons for biking in the city to promote the activity on social media by tagging @healthyboston and using the hashtag #IBikeBOS.

[Wicked Local Waltham] Waltham cyclists seek more bike lanes, increased education

The following article was originally published by Bill Whelan in Wicked Local, on June 2nd, 2016.

Every morning, Andrew MacBlane rides his bike 13 miles from his home on Prospect Hill in Waltham through Watertown, Newton, Brighton, Allston and Jamaica Plain before arriving at his job in Mattapan.

He said leaving Waltham in the morning and arriving in Waltham in the evening is always the worst, most difficult stretch.

According to MacBlane, the lack of bike lanes or “sharrow” shared-use lanes combined with the lack of driver awareness and education discourages more people from cycling in the city.

“People might be inclined to take more trips if there were better options,” he said.

MacBlane said in the four years he has lived in Waltham he has seen an increase in the number of young professionals in the city, who are generally more inclined to cycle and reduce the amount of cars on the city’s congested road.

Less obvious than the population and commercial growth in the city, city officials have made strides in the last year and a half to improve the state of biking in Waltham.

In the spring of 2014, when the Waltham Planning Department delivered its inaugural bicycle update, there were no bicycle lanes in the city and just over one mile of on-road sharrows and off road bicycling paths.

Since that time, the city has added a one-mile bicycle lane on Winter Street and has a total of 12.5 miles of on and off-road bicycling facilities, including about eight miles of sharrows.

When planning director Catherine Cagle gave the third annual bicycle update on May 18, she outlined an additional 6.2 miles of proposed additional bicycling facilities to be added in 2016.

The following day, on May 20, the Waltham Traffic Commission approved a part of the Transportation Master Plan that would add a bicycle lane in both directions on Lexington Street from Curve Street to Lake Street. That section would also change to one lane northbound and remain two lanes southbound. Lexington Street is on the city’s list to be repaved this year, which is the main opportunity to add cycling options to roads.

Additionally, city councilors recently passed a proposal to work with Watertown in trying to obtain a bike-sharing program in Waltham, similar to the Hubway program in Boston and its surrounding cities.

John Allen, a member of the city’s bike committee said there is a small, but active cycling community in Waltham. He said one of the major improvements the city could make to facilitate biking would be to convert the three miles of the Wayside Rail Trail that runs across Waltham into a usable path for biking and walking.

“It’s an important improvement that could be made in Waltham and it’s been a long time coming,” Allen said.

The project has moved in fits and starts for the past 20 years, but city councilors recently resurrected the project with the idea of partially or totally funding the project with Community Preservation Act funds.

The rail trail runs from the east end of Waltham 23 miles to Berlin and is part of the seven corridor, 788-mile network of on and off road bicycling paths that comprise the Bay State Greenway. Funding the design of the rail trail in Waltham is one of the planning department’s goals for 2016, according to Cagle’s presentation.

“It means you could go from the middle of Waltham to Bentley without having to go over the hill and on into Belmont,” Allen added.

Expanding the number of bicycle paths in the city, however, is only part of the equation to make Waltham more bicycle friendly.

Allen and MacBlane said both drivers and cyclists need to be more aware of the rules of the road and how to share the road. Allen said he periodically holds classes about urban cycling skills.

In addition to riding, the Watch City Bike Lab is a volunteer group that helps cyclists of all backgrounds and abilities learn how to repair and maintain their bikes. The lab is open every Sunday throughout the summer, except July 3, at the Charles River Museum of Industry & Innovation from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Allen and MacBlane also said there should be more signage around Waltham to help cyclists navigate the city.

“Better signage for people who are new to the city would be great to show where there are green spaces and bike paths.” MacBlane said. “Young families are moving in and these are the things they want. It’s like a treasure hunt trying to find these things.”

#WhereToRide with Hubway in June

We want you to have a fun time this month, and have a few suggestions of cool places to ride! All the events below are near a Hubway station or otherwise accessible/ride-able on Hubway.


FEATURED EVENT

Mon, 6/6, 5:15-9pm  Rush Hour Challenge

What’s the fastest way to get from downtown Boston to Davis Square in Somerville? Driver, T-rider, Hubway cyclist — who will be the first to arrive? Witness the start at 5:15pm from Park Plaza and come along for the ride, or watch from the finish line and join us at Redbones BBQ, 55 Chester St, Somerville. We’ll be celebrating our Hubway victory (of course) until 9pm with drinks, food, a raffle, and more fun. More details →


Wed, 6/1, 5:30-7:30pm  MassCommute Bicycle Challenge Bike Bash
National Bike Month’s Grand Finale. This year’s MCBC’s winners, raffles, and prizes from Hubway and many others. Flat Top Johnny’s, 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge.


Sat, 6/4, and Sun, 6/5, All Day  Common Boston Festival 2016
Your city unlocked! Access to dozens of architecturally and culturally significant spaces —  many not usually open to the public, and all for free.


Sat, 6/4, 11am-6pm  Cambridge Arts River Festival
Named one of the “top 15 art happenings in greater Boston,” the festival’s new location features six dynamic stages showcasing local music, theater & dance for audiences of all ages, plus the new Bicycle Bonanza with bike valet & tune-ups, Hubway, e-bike demo rides, trivia and helmet giveaways (while supplies last). Community tables, storytelling & poetry tents, roving performances, all kicking off with People’s Sculpture Racing.


Sat, 6/4, Noon-6pm  Brookline’s Inaugural Porchfest
Over 50 bands & musicians playing music on porches throughout Town. See & hear more with Hubway, your quickest way from one venue to another. It’s all free! Finish your tour at the 38th annual Coolidge Corner Arts Festival (see below).


Sat, 6/4, 10am-6pm  38th Annual Coolidge Corner Arts Festival
Over 75 artists, selections from the Boston Food Truck Alliance, wine & beer garden, DJ, and also live music!


Sun, 6/5  Bikes Not Bombs Bike-a-Thon
Join hundreds of cyclists for the Bikes Not Bombs Bike-a-Thon. Choose from 4 scenic routes through greater Boston (10, 30, 50, or 80 miles). Depart from Stony Brook Park in Jamaica Plain and return to a fun-filled after-party featuring free food, music, games & more! Registration is $30 for adults and includes T-shirt, breakfast & lunch. Each rider fundraises at least $150 ($75 for riders under 18) to support Bikes Not Bombs’ youth and international programs for social change.


Sun, 6/5, 2-6pm  SomerStreets Carnaval
The streets of East Somerville will be closed on Broadway from McGrath Highway to Pennsylvania Ave, and open to cycling, walking, dancing, running & play! Crafts, music, parkour, trapeze, and more!


Mon, 6/6, 7-9pm  Brookline Bicycle Advisory Committee Meeting
Brookline Town Hall, Room 408. Open to the public.


Sat, 6/11, 11am-3pm  Fresh Pond Day
Celebrating land, water & wildlife. Water Purification Facility, Fresh Pond Reservation, 250 Fresh Pond Parkway, Cambridge.


Sat, 6/11, 1pm  Boston Festival of Bands
Featuring the Metropolitan Wind Symphony. Faneuil Hall.


Sun, 6/12, Noon-4pm  The 2nd Annual Village Fair
Harvard Street will be closed to cars for music, games, food & entertainment in the heart of Brookline Village.


Sun, 6/12, Noon-6pm  The 5th Annual Squeezebox Slam 2016
A celebration of accordions, button boxes & other free reed instruments. There are no rules! This is accordion anarchy throughout the streets of Somerville.


Mon, 6/13, 7-9pm  Femmechanics Grrrease Time
A workshop & open shop time for femme/trans/women cyclists to learn more about bicycle mechanics. Bikes Not Bombs Bike Shop, 18 Bartlett Sq, Jamaica Plain.


Sat, 6/18, 9:15am  The Somerville Library Ride
Departing from the West Branch of the Somerville Library, 40 College Ave, near Davis Square. Join the Friends of the Somerville Public Library for refreshments, activities, and a 6-mile ride to celebrate and introduce residents to the three historic branch libraries and their programs & services. Suggested donation $10 for adults.


Tue, 6/21, 6:30-8:30pm  Somerville Bicycle Committee Meeting
Somerville City Hall, Basement Employee Lounge. Open to the public.


Are we missing an awesome free event, or are you organizing something coming up that we should be mentioning in our newsletter and on our site? Tweet it to us @Hubway with hashtag #WhereToRide.

Want a "Successful Docking" email verification?

When you return a Hubway bike, the dock will emit a beep and display a green light

to indicate a successful docking. But we’ve heard from a number of you that glare from the sun, street noise, and other factors make it difficult to see and hear those things in some situations.

WE’VE GOT GOOD NEWS! Now you can easily opt in to receive a simple email verification to put your worries to rest and confirm that the bike has been docked successfully. Here’s how:

        (1) Log in here.
        (2) Click the Manage Notifications option under the Membership Status section.
        (3) Check the box for “Yes, send me an email notification each time I return a bike.”
        You can also choose to receive an email each day a rental incurs a usage fee.
        (4) Click Change.

That’s it! You’re all set! Now go #TakeHubway today to test it out :)

We’re always looking for ways to make Hubway easier and more convenient like this (and our new Card-As-Key functionality). Have a suggestion for making Hubway even better? Tweet it to us @hubway and we’ll share it with the appropriate municipal & operations folks! Thanks!

Meet The Local Man Who’s Running Every Street In The ‘Ville

The following article was originally published by Emily Cassel in Scout Somerville, on May 31st, 2016.

A Somerville dad is pounding pavement—and learning about his city along the way.

David Lewis is a lot of things. He’s a dad, an experienced litigator and a Somerville resident of more than 20 years. But one thing he says he’s not is a serious runner. “I’m the proverbial dad with a little kid, who’s ten pounds overweight and trying to get that down so you don’t get the wagging finger from your doctor,” Lewis insists with a laugh.

So you might be surprised to learn that he has a somewhat “serious runner” goal: to run every single street in Somerville.

About a year ago, Lewis found himself feeling a little listless. Before the birth of his son, he used to run a lot. But between working and raising a family, he was lacing up his sneakers less and less frequently until he had almost stopped entirely. “I was like, ‘Okay, I have to change my motivation. My circumstances have changed,’” Lewis explains. He needed a reason to start hitting the streets again, but he also wanted a program that would work on his time and his terms—something flexible enough that he could set it aside on busy weeks and return to it when he had the time. Having lived in the city for close to two decades, he figured, why not run every road in town? So he printed out a map of Somerville and started with the streets closest to his house.

To accommodate his schedule, Lewis likes to run on weekend mornings. He’ll form a general idea of the streets he wants to hit, fire up a running app on his phone to track his progress and get to stepping. Once he’s finished, he fills in the day’s progress on that Somerville map, which he keeps on his fridge.

He’s also a firm believer in multi-modal transit; the red dots on the map are stations for the bike-sharing system Hubway. “I started doing this thing, and I’m in terrible shape,” Lewis jokes. He could run the streets near his house, but as he expanded into Central and East Somerville, he realized that he was spending a lot of time (and energy) just getting to and from those streets. The Hubway stops have been a crucial component of his strategy.

Lewis says he enjoys these workouts because they take him down streets there would otherwise be no reason to see. “If it’s not the fastest way and it’s not a shortcut, unless you were lost—or trying to do what I’m doing—you’d never see them,” he says. But on each weekend run, he learns something about the city that he didn’t know before. In fact, the reason for his runs has almost evolved over time. He used to return home, tired and sweaty, and let his wife, Christine, know if he had seen something cool. Now, he pounds the pavement purposefully, looking for unexpected landmarks throughout the city that he can share with Christine and their son. After one early April run, he sent a text with some of the things he noticed: “a couple of beautiful farmhouses on Adams, a bunch of sideways houses on Partridge that have been renovated differently and several houses here and there that still had their barn in the back.”

“You never know what you’ll find when you start going down roads you’ve never gone down before,” he says. “It’s a lot of fun, but you’ve also gotta pay attention.”

Overall, Lewis says Somerville is a great place to run. The density of housing means that it doesn’t get too windy in the winter. There’s the Community Path, which he—along with many of the area’s runners, cyclists and pedestrians—hopes will eventually get longer. Of course, there’s also the huge hill that runs right down the middle of the city. “Looking at the map, I’m like … definitely some of those sections I’ve gotta fill in I know are really hilly,” he says. But hills aside, he hopes to finish up later this spring or early summer. He’s planning for his very last run to wrap up at Assembly Row—and to celebrate the accomplishment with a little party in the beer garden at Slumbrew’s American Fresh Brewhouse.

And after that? Will he run every street in Cambridge? Or Medford? Boston?

“Actually, the other day when we were at a cocktail party … somebody was like, ‘Wow! Which city are you going to run next?’” Lewis laughs. “I was like, ‘Whoa. Stop.’ I’ve lived here, and this is where I’m going to run. I don’t really have plans to do another town.”

[WBUR] The City of Boston wants you to vote on future transportation projects

The following article was originally published by Zeninjor Enwemeka on WBUR, on May 25th, 2016.

Want to help shape Boston’s transportation future? You can now vote on the transportation projects you want the city to pursue.

The city of Boston has created a ballot with a list of transportation projects and policies it wants the public to weigh in on. The effort, announced Wednesday, is part of Go Boston 2030 — the city’s long-term planning initiative to improve transportation, which kicked off last year.

The ballot includes 48 projects and policies that were narrowed down from over 3,700 ideas the city collected online and through public meetings. Ballot responses will be incorporated into a transportation action plan set to be released this fall, according to the city.

“Those projects and policies will guide our thinking for the next 15 years [and] would also directly contribute to how we structure the capital plan, which will be where the money is coming from to build this,” said Vineet Gupta, the director of policy and planning for the Boston Transportation Department.

Residents can submit their ballot responses through June 17. Responses can be submitted online or by mail.

Here’s how the ballot works:

The 48 ideas have been organized into four categories. One category dubbed “Go Local” focuses on improving streets in neighborhoods. Another category called “Go Crosstown” focuses on ideas to connect residents to different job centers in the city, such as the Longwood Medical area or South Boston Seaport District. A category called “Go Tech” focuses on emerging technology, such as self-driving cars. And a category called “Go Regional” focuses on how Boston can better connect to surrounding areas.

First, you select one of four categories that you want to be the city’s primary focus. Then in that category, you can select three projects or policies.

Some projects include adding pedestrian and bike paths in different neighborhoods, creating new plazas or public spaces, or building streetcar service to connect underserved areas to job centers, such as a direct link from Mattapan to the Longwood Medical area. Policy ideas span from creating a strategy for autonomous vehicles to developing a plan to restructure bus routes through the city.

Many of the ideas will require coordination with the state, particularly the MBTA and MassDOT. Chris Osgood, Boston’s chief of streets, said the city has been working with those agencies on the Go Boston 2030 efforts.

“They’ve been great partners in this effort,” Osgood said. “We’re optimistic about the next 15 years.”

The city also outlined Wednesday some near term projects it is working on, including expanding Hubway into more neighborhoods, building more protected bike lanes and improving pedestrian safety through its Vision Zero initiative. The city is also looking into variable parking meter pricing and implementing smart traffic signals.

[Fox 25] Biking groups hope to make Roxbury, Mattapan & Dorchester healthier

The following article was originally published by Crystal Haynes on Fox 25, on May 20th, 2016.

Biking groups in Mattapan, Roxbury and Dorchester are working on creating biking communities in an effort to make their neighborhoods healthier.

Roxbury, Mattapan and Dorchester have the highest rates of obesity, the least access to fresh foods and vegetables, and the fewest options for exercise in the city, according to the Boston City Department of Health.

On average, 21 percent of Bostonians are considered obese, according to numbers compiled by Tufts University and Medical Center in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health.. The data also shows that communities of color are well above that average with 28 percent of adults in Dorchester 29 percent of adults in Roxbury considered obese. Mattapan has the highest rate of obesity at 37 percent.

“Doing something as easy or simple as biking will help reduce the obesity rate in our communities,” said Michelle Cook, founder of “Black Girls Who Bike.”

There are currently seven community biking groups that teach people how to bike and go on bike rides together.

“In Mattapan and Dorchester, it’s started to clean up the neighborhood because people are coming together and seeing there’s a group of cyclists; it’s not just people rising around. It’s people bonding together,” said Alex Gordon, from the “Mattapan on Wheels"group.

There is also an initiative encouraging the addition of bike lanes and Hubway stations to the area. The company behind Hubway hasn’t pledged to put stations in the heart of those neighborhoods yet.

[CBS Boston] Boston riders participate in National Bike To Work Day

The following article was originally published by Daniel Niles on CBS Boston, on May 19th, 2016.

BOSTON (CBS) – A large group of Boston-area residents used two wheels rather than four as they hit the road to close out the work week.

Friday marks National Bike To Work Day, and Boston held a festival to celebrate at City Hall.

During the festival, nearly 30 “bike-friendly” companies set up exhibit tents and offered a complimentary breakfast.

Twelve convoys of bicyclists descended on City Hall from starting points throughout the greater Boston area.

For Bike To Work Day, Boston residents are encouraged to take advantage of Hubway, ride their bicycles on the 6-mile Southwest Corridor Park in the Back Bay, and attend free Learn-to-Ride clinics.

“The City of Boston is pleased to be celebrating National Bike Month and Bay State Bike Week with the tens of thousands of people in the greater Boston area who bicycle as a mode of transportation, for exercise, or just for fun,” said Chris Osgood, City of Boston Chief of Streets.

“Boston offers miles of off-road bike paths and on-street bike lanes, over a hundred Hubway bikeshare stations, and other amenities to help people ride bikes to their destinations, near and far, safely and conveniently.”

Andy Levine from DuVine Cycling and Adventure Company joined WBZ-TV’s Danielle Niles to discuss the benefits of biking to work.

“Whether you’re commuting to work or you want to travel by bicycle, you shouldn’t be intimidated,” said Levine. “Cycling is for everyone. Kids do it. Older people do it. Everyone does it. Put away your car and get on a bike.”

Levine said safety is an important thing for riders to remember on Bike To Work Day, and every other day as well.

Specifically, Levine stressed that riders should wear helmets, respect the rules of the road, stop at lights, and monitor blind spots and car doors.

For more information on Bike To Work Day, visit BostonBikes.org.

[Boston.com] Why making some (or many) Boston streets car-free might not be so crazy

The following is an excerpt of an article originally published by Sanjay Salomon on Boston.com, on May 19th, 2016.

Some streets in Boston could become occasional car-free zones in the near future, according to a tweet sent from the City of Boston’s official handle. On Wednesday, during a live Twitter chat with Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, a question from @ConciergeBoston asked about the possibility of closing certain Boston streets during summer months.

Click here for the full article.

Card-As-Key launches today

We’re always looking for ways to make Hubway easier and more convenient. Thanks to a recent software upgrade, existing members are now covered if something should happen to your key fob, and new members can start riding immediately instead of waiting for a key in the mail.

With our new Card-as-Key functionality, you can use the credit or debit card associated with your membership to check out a bike at any station. Simply go to any Hubway kiosk and insert the credit card associated with your account to get a one-time-use ride code. (Don’t worry, you won’t be charged again.) Once you get your ride code, use it to unlock any available bike at the station. To ride again, insert the same credit card to get a new ride code.

New Hubway members will still have two options to get their member key: (1) You can wait to get your key in the mail, which usually takes about a week; OR (2) You can pick up your key at one of our new key dispensers, which can be found at select stations. To find a station with a key dispenser, go to the Station Map and look for the grey key icon.

Want more information on how the Card-as-Key feature works? Check out our updated FAQ page for all the details.

[Boston Metro] It's Bike to Work Day in Boston, so get on the road

The following article was originally published by Spencer Buell in Metro Boston, on May 19th, 2016.

Ditch the car, put that CharlieCard away and pump some air in your tires.

That’s because Friday, May 20 is Bike to Work Day.

It’s a celebration right in the middle of National Bike Month and Bay State Bike Week that calls on everyone who can to commute to work in the bike lane.

“We think it’s important to celebrate everyone who rides in Boston, and we want to make it easier for new riders to start commuting,” Boston Bikes, the city-sponsored cycling initiative, said in a statement.

The city planned to host a big early-morning get-together at City Hall Plaza from 7:00 a.m. to 9 a.m. with some music and a free breakfast.

The riders had been encouraged to join one of a dozen “convoys” from around Greater Boston, then converge at City Hall.

“The City of Boston is pleased to be celebrating National Bike Month and Bay State Bike Week with the tens of thousands of people in the greater Boston area who bicycle as a mode of transportation, for exercise, or just for fun,” said Chris Osgood, City of Boston Chief of Streets. “Boston offers miles of off-road bike paths and on-street bike lanes, over a hundred Hubway bikeshare stations, and other amenities to help people ride bikes to their destinations, near and far, safely and conveniently.”

There are lots of other bike-hyping events to attend throughout Bike Month. For example in Somerville, bikers on Sunday, May 22 plan to take a historic tour retracing the path Paul Revere trotted down on his horse that fateful night.

Still too nervous to ride a bike through the busy, tangled mess that is Boston’s roads?

The city offers an “Into to Street Riding Clinic” periodically through October. The next one is Saturday, June 4 at the Boston Water and Sewer Commission in Roxbury from 12 p.m. – 2 p.m.

[Boston.com] Your ultimate guide to graduation weekend in Boston

The following is an excerpt of an article that was originally published by Cassie Shortsleeve on Boston.com, on May 16th, 2016.

The best hotels, restaurants, and activities for tourists in town for commencement. Click here to view the entire guide.

Boston is called America’s College Town for a reason. The city is home to 35 colleges and universities, and there are more than 100 in the greater Boston area.

Massachusetts’s capital is also rich with history, a flourishing food scene, and hotels—from old sprawling waterfront properties to new, hip boutique inns—which makes it hard to decide how (and where) to spend your time.

If you’re one of the many entering either Boston or Cambridge this spring for commencement festivities, consider this your guide, courtesy of top travel experts.

What to do:

See the city on two wheels via Hubway
“Take advantage of Boston’s public Hubway bikes to see the city on wheels. Biking along the river is particularly lovely.” You can find station stops all over the city.

View the entire guide here.

Where do you want bikeshare in metro-Boston?

Suggest-a-location is back! With all four system municipalities (Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Somerville) planning or considering expansion in 2016, and other cities and towns looking to bring Hubway to their communities, now is the time to make your suggestions on Hubway’s Suggest a Location page. The new page enables you to suggest new locations and to leave comments and feedback about other locations that have already been suggested.

View the Suggest a Location page here, and add your feedback today!

[Waltham News Tribune] Waltham makes plea for Hubway bike sharing

The following article was originally published by Bill Whelan in the Waltham News Tribune, on May 10th, 2016.

The Hubway bicycles that cover city streets in Boston might be rolling into Waltham in the future if two city councilors have their way.

The city council accepted a resolution on Monday, May 9, to work with the Metropolitan Area Planning Council to bring a bike-sharing program to Waltham.

“This would be another step to making Waltham a bicycle-friendly city,” said city councilor Robert Logan, a co-sponsor of the resolution along with city councilor George Darcy.

Hubway is a bicycle-sharing service that launched in Boston in 2011 and Cambridge, Somerville and Brookline in 2012. In the first 10 months, Hubway users logged 500,000 rides. There are currently 107 Hubway bike rack rental stations in Boston, 38 in Cambridge, 12 in Somerville and four in Brookline, according to the MAPC.

Logan said the MAPC recently put out a request to receive information on bicycle sharing services and included a list of cities and towns that would be interested in obtaining a bicycle-sharing program. Waltham wasn’t included on that list.

“We don’t have [a bicycle-sharing program] in Waltham and in order for it to get here, an adjacent community would have to get it,” Logan said. “It builds out from the center core.”

Logan suggested the city work with the MAPC and officials from Watertown, an adjacent city that was on the list of interested municipalities, to get bicycle sharing in Waltham.

Darcy expressed his support for the idea at the meeting, adding that more bicycles could reduce the amount of cars on the road.

“It would be great to decrease the traffic. People know how difficult it is to cross the city of Waltham during rush hour,” he said.

The matter was referred to the economic and community development committee. Additionally, the city is holding its annual city bicycle update on Wednesday, May 18 at 6 p.m. in the Government Center auditorium.

[Scout Somerville] Somerville's cyclists are on a roll

The following article was originally published by Jm Lindsay in Scout Somerville, on May 9th, 2016.

Almost eight percent of Somerville’s commuters get to work on a bicycle—and while that percentage may seem small, it actually puts the city in fifth place nationally, according to a 2014 report by the League of American Bicyclists.

“It all stems from [the Curtatone] administration’s push,” says Ward 3 Alderman Bob McWatters, Chairman of the Somerville Traffic and Parking Committee. “They want to be a bikeable and walkable city.”

A lifelong Somerville resident, McWatters thinks small steps have had a big impact when it comes to making the city friendlier and safer for cyclists and pedestrians. “I grew up in the city and I never had a bike lane,” he says. (The city’s first bike lane, on Washington Street, was only built in 2003; its second was installed in 2008.) He lists the bike-sharing system Hubway—which is adding four new locations in Winter Hill and East Somerville in 2016—as an example of a positive change that’s making cycling more accessible. He also points to Neighborways—low-volume residential streets designed to improve pedestrian and cyclist safety—as a “great, effective, low-cost traffic-calming measure.”

Ken Carlson of the Somerville Bicycle Committee agrees that many of the small-scale improvements coming this year and next will go a long way to increase bike safety and overall ridership statistics. And there are big infrastructural changes on the way, too. Bike lanes are currently being added to Beacon Street, which sees up to 400 cyclists per hour during rush hour, making it one of the busiest biking corridors in Greater Boston. Within a year of adding protected bike lanes, Carlson expects that number to increase to 600 per hour.

bay state bike month“When you build safe bicycling infrastructure, you increase the people riding bikes in cities,” he explains. “When you put in protected bike lanes, you increase ridership.”

But not everyone is so enthusiastic about Somerville’s cycling culture. Sam Christy and Zach Hirschtritt, co-founders of the Somerville Bike Kitchen in Davis Square, find that there’s a frustrating disparity of resources between drivers and cyclists, as well as a culture clash between the two groups.

“No amount of paint you’re going to put on the road is going to change driver culture,” laments Hirschtritt in regard to initiatives like Neighborways. Christy adds that, in addition to building better infrastructure, the city could make cyclists and pedestrians feel safer and more welcome by holding motorists accountable for the financial strain they place on the city. “It’d be nice if cars had to fully pay what they actually cost the community,” he says, listing snow removal, parking issues and the physical space cars take up as resources that bikes and pedestrians don’t require.

Asked about Somerville’s consistently high ranking as one of the country’s most bikeable cities, Christy cautions against being too optimistic. “Even in the best situation, 99 percent of the road is [for drivers] and one percent is ours … There’s a real long way to go,” he explains. Adds Hirschtritt, “The streets are designed for cars, the lights are timed for cars. It’s all built around cars.”

Carlson and the Somerville Bicycle Committee understand these frustrations. With the support of the mayor, they want to increase the number of cycling commuters to fifteen percent. To do that, Carlson says that fostering any kind of “us-versus-them” narrative between bicyclists and motorists is counterproductive. “A bicycle is closer to a car than it is to a pedestrian when it comes to how it operates on the road and how it moves,” Carlson says. “If we as cyclists want to gain respect as vehicles on the road, and coexist with other vehicles … we have to give respect to get respect.”

Instead of fighting over which space belongs to whom, Carlson believes that the city should be implementing solutions that will make the roads safer and easier to navigate for everyone. One of the best ways to do that, he says, is by putting in constructed intersections—intersections designed with very clear visibility lines to minimize the chance of a “right hook” by constructing a physical barrier that extends into the intersection, staggering the stop line and giving cyclists a head start, thereby also protecting pedestrians.

To Carlson, nothing is more important than infrastructure. “In the last seven years,” he says, “we’ve added miles and miles of bike lanes, we’ve added safety boxes, we’ve had a change in culture.”

“You can see the change happening,” Carlson adds, “and it’s leading to a healthier environment.

Friday-Monday deployments: 3 more stations out & "live"

Since Friday afternoon, May 6th, three more stations have been redeployed for the 2016 riding season:

  • Newbury St / Hereford St, Back Bay
  • Kenmore Sq / Comm Ave
  • Boston Public Library, 700 Boylston Street, Copley Square
  • All three are open and fully operational. Make sure to use our station map or one of the free mobile smartphone apps to view real-time dock/bike availability when planning your trip.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    [Bangor Daily News] 3 ways for Bangor to consider growing public transit's reach, ridership

    The following article was originally published by Christopher Burns in the Bangor Daily News, on May 6th, 2016.

    Bangor likely won’t see longer bus hours or new routes for the Community Connector anytime soon. At the Bangor City Council’s budget workshop on April 27, city residents called on the councilors to extend bus service by at least two hours. While the councilors were in agreement that the bus service eventually should be extended, they concluded the price tag was too high.

    There are benefits to investing in public transportation, from reducing carbon emissions and traffic congestion to saving local residents money on transportation costs. But the upfront cost can be prohibitive. To extend bus service on existing routes within Bangor by two hours would cost the city about $250,000, according to the city’s proposed fiscal year 2017 budget.

    Ridership on the Bangor bus system has declined in recent years, from more than 1 million rides in fiscal year 2013 to 895,287 two years later.

    Extending service is one way to spur more residents and visitors to the Queen City to ride the bus. After Lewiston-Auburn added limited Saturday service and lengthed service hours in 2011, use of the bus rose 31 percent, from 285,209 rides in fiscal year 2011 to 414,574 in fiscal year 2015.

    As councilors weigh the bus service expansion, they indicated they might begin talks about a long-term plan for the bus system that could include longer hours. As this conversation goes forward, there are many options for improving public transportation beyond simply extending service hours. Many cities across the U.S. have taken creative approaches to make it easier for those without cars to get around and more convenient for those with cars to use alternative transportation.

    Here are three ways cities are supporting public transit and increasing transportation options.

    Bikes can go where buses can’t travel.

    Public transit can’t reach every street corner. But about 53 percent of all Americans live within at least 2 miles of a transit stop, a feasible distance to bike, according to a 2013 study in the Journal of Public Transportation. An easy way to increase public transit use, then, while improving public health is to incorporate bike sharing into a city’s public transportation infrastructure.

    Already, more than 50 cities across the U.S. have bike-sharing programs, including Boston, Minneapolis, New York and Seattle, to complement existing public transit infrastructure to bridge gaps between transit stops and passengers’ homes and destinations.

    In Maine, the town of Norway began a bike-sharing program in April 2015, and Portland received a federal grant in 2013 to begin planning a bike-sharing program that could roll out sometime later this year.

    Here’s how it works. With Boston’s Hubway bike-sharing program, which entered its sixth season of operation in March, users can sign up for an annual membership for $85 or get a one-time pass at any Hubway station for $6. They can use the bike to commute to work or run errands and, when they’re done, park the bike at any Hubway station in the city.

    In 2015, Hubway had 13,248 annual subscribers, compared with 3,203 in 2011, according to Hubway. One-time passes for 24 and 72 hours rose to 102,445 in 2015 from 30,655 in 2011.

    There’s some evidence that expanded bike sharing boosts use of public transit. One 2014 report, for example, found that a bike-sharing program in Washington, D.C., has increased ridership on public transit by 3 percent.

    One city has started a public-private partnership with Uber to help residents get where they need to go.

    In recent years, public transit agencies across the U.S. have partnered with the ridesharing service Uber to supplement public bus and rail options. MetroTransit in Minneapolis, for example, reimburses the cost of some Uber trips with its Guaranteed Ride Home if passengers need to travel outside rush hour for an emergency.

    But the city of Altamonte Springs, Florida, is the first city in the U.S. to subsidize trips with the ridesharing service as a way to ease traffic congestion and offer residents another way to get around the city.

    Under the agreement with Uber, the city pays 20 percent of any fare that begins or ends within city limits. And as a way to promote ridership on the SunRail, a central Florida commuter train, the city pays 25 percent of any Uber fare to and from the Altamonte Springs station.

    While Uber might make public transit a more convenient option, its benefits will likely accrue to the wealthiest passengers. The average household spends $8,500 per year on personal vehicles and takes about 2,000 trips per year, according to federal statistics. Uber fares average about $20 per trip, while American households spend an average of $4 to $5 per car trip.

    Because of the expense of Uber, people with incomes of less than $25,000 per year are three times less likely to use the ridesharing service than those who earn more than $50,000, according to an analysis by FiveThirtyEight.

    Even for wealthier passengers, completing 85 percent of trips on the bus and 15 percent with Uber just breaks even with the cost of owning a car, according to FiveThirtyEight. This makes it unlikely that Uber will replace public transit for now because it isn’t cost effective for low-income passengers, and it isn’t cost competitive for people who own cars.

    In Washington state, cities work with large employers to encourage workers to not drive to work.

    Instead of just trying to make public transit more convenient, Washington state has been trying to change drivers’ behavior by removing incentives to drive solo. Since 1991, the state has seen some positive changes with its Commute Trip Reduction program.

    Under state law, businesses that employ more than 100 workers must implement programs to incentivize their employees to walk, bike, carpool or take the bus to work instead of making solo commutes.

    Some businesses offer straightforward incentives, such as giving workers the option to telecommute, charging workers to park their cars at work and offering free transit passes. Other employers offer bolder incentives, including paying workers not to drive or giving mortgage discounts to workers who move closer to the office. Some even forgo building additional parking spaces.

    The state offers $2.7 million in tax credits to employers to partially reimburse the cost of these incentives. For each tax dollar spent on the Commute Trip Reduction program, employers spend $18, according to the Washington State Commute Trip Reduction Board’s 2013 report to the Legislature.

    It’s an investment that has shown some evidence of changing behavior. In 2014, 63 percent of workers at worksites affected by the program made solo commutes, compared with 71 percent in 1993, according to the board. Over that same 21-year period, the statewide rate of workers who commuted alone to work dipped only slightly, to 73 percent from 74 percent.

    The impact is even more measurable in certain cities. Only 26 percent of workers at Commute Trip Reduction worksites in Seattle, for example, drove alone to work, compared with the citywide average of 30 percent, according to a 2015 survey by Commute Seattle. Instead of driving, about 41 percent of workers at Commute Trip Reduction worksites used public buses to get to work, compared with the citywide average of 37 percent.

    Plenty of Reasons for Bay Staters to Pedal During National Bike Month

    The following article was originally published by Mike Clifford on the Public News Service Massachusetts website, on May 6th, 2016.

    LISTEN HERE!

    BOSTON - It’s National Bike Month, offering plenty of opportunities for folks in Massachusetts to press their feet to the pedals and get on the road.

    Stefanie Seskin, active transportation director for the Boston Transportation Department, runs the Boston Bikes Program.

    She says they are encouraging Bay Staters to consider biking this month for all sorts of trips, whether it is to the store, to get to work or just riding for pleasure.

    “Riding a bike is fun, and it’s a great way to get exercise as part of your daily life,” says Seskin. “It’s great for the community as a whole, when you think about public health and congestion, and air-quality concerns.”

    One of the biggest events statewide will be Boston’s National Bike to Work Day Festival that will take place May 20. A convoy will ride from Dorchester to downtown for free breakfast at City Hall Plaza.

    There is no community more into biking in the state than Somerville, according to Ken Carlson chair with the Somerville Bicycle Committee.

    “Somerville, for instance, is the third-highest bicycle mode share in the country,” says Carlson. “We have 8 percent of our city bikes regularly to work. We are trying to build that to 15 percent by 2020, and that would make us second in the nation.”

    He says there is plenty of outreach all over the state this month aimed at teaching bike safety and getting more folks to hit the road by bicycle.

    “We have bike commuting clinics, so I’m bringing in someone to my workplace who is basically going to be talking about basically how to bike to work safely, so a big part of this is education and encouragement,” he says.

    Toward the end of National Bike Month cyclists can retrace the route of Paul Revere’s famous ride from Somerville to Lexington on May 22 during Bay State Bike Week.

    [Dorchester Reporter] Hubway plans ten new stations in Dot, Roxbury

    The following article was originally published by Jennifer Smith in the Dorchester Reporter, on May 5th, 2016.

    Making use of the $525,000 bike-sharing grant awarded to Boston in April by the Barr Foundation, Hubway will install 10 new stations in Roxbury and Dorchester, Mayor Martin Walsh announced last week.

    The bike-sharing service will seek community input about the proposed locations, which will join the existing 155 stations holding 1,500 bikes in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville. Hubway recently marked its four-millionth trip since its Greater Boston launch in 2011.

    Advocates tout bike-sharing as an effective way to improve the health of communities and their residents. Over the past five years, Hubway users have logged more than six million miles, according to the service, burning an estimate 168 million calories and offsetting nearly 2,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

    Bike-share expansions happen incrementally, and are limited to a certain range from existing Hubway stands. Roxbury and the northern portion of Dorchester, which currently houses seven stations, are slotted to receive the newest batch of locations.

    “New Balance Hubway has demonstrated that Boston can lead, and that Bostonians will embrace new, innovative ways to close transportation gaps, and to enhance mobility for residents and visitors,” said Mary Skelton Roberts, senior program officer at the Barr Foundation, in a prepared statement. The latest expansion will “better connect more people to more places they want and need to go for work, school, and play throughout the region,” she said.

    Two workshops will be held this month (May 12, at 6:30 p.m. at the Roxbury YMCA, and May 14 at 10 a.m. at the Dudley Square Library), the city said in a press release, after which the community will be able to fill out surveys determining locations for the new stations. The final public planning stages will take place at open houses in Roxbury and Dorchester in mid-June.

    ICYMI: Detroit Bikes to make bikes for Hubway and other bikeshare systems operated by Motivate

    The following article was originally published on Pez Cycling News, on May 5th, 2016.

    Detroit Bikes, North America’s only large-scale bicycle manufacturer, and Motivate, the nation’s leading bike-share operator, announced that Motivate’s bikes will now be assembled in the United States.

    Detroit Bikes will assemble 3,000 Motivate bikes in its 50,000 square-foot factory in Detroit. The manufacturer will also build wheels and oversee local partners to paint frames and forks. As a result of the increased workload, Detroit Bikes has added ten workers and a built a new assembly line.

    “This contract makes a huge statement about what Detroit is capable of” said Zak Pashak, Founder and President of Detroit Bikes. “It is fitting that American bike-share bikes will be assembled here in America and we’re proud to work with Motivate to make it happen,” he said. “Detroit Bikes is looking forward to working with even more cities and systems as we hone our capabilities.”

    “It’s terrific that Motivate, a growing national business has selected a Detroit company for this manufacturing work,” said Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan, “It’s another good sign of the strength of Detroit business. This initiative will create jobs in a Detroit neighborhood and help power an innovative new form of transportation.”

    Motivate operates the largest bike share systems in the country and nearly 70% of the entire bike-share fleet in the U.S. Moving the assembly of its bikes to the U.S. allows Motivate to ensure quality control and fulfill orders for new bikes more quickly.

    “I can’t think of a better place to have our bike assembly operations than Detroit,” said Jay Walder, President & CEO of Motivate. “With Detroit Bikes’ help, Motivate will be able to meet the growing demand for bike-share operations in cities all across the country, getting more bikes to more people more quickly.”

    Carrying forward with this success in bike-share partnerships, Detroit Bikes is thrilled to announce a subsequent partnership with CycleHop, the nation’s fastest growing bike-share provider, to bid on the recently announced City of Detroit bike-share RFP, operated by the City of Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT) and the Downtown Detroit Partnership (DDP).

    “If we’re going to making thousands of bikes for some of the biggest bike share programs in the country, it only makes sense that the city of Detroit would also look to a local manufacturer when sourcing bikes for their new program” said Zak Pashak. “We would love to be able to contribute to the city’s program and have partnered with some of the most well respected names in bike-share to put together a rock solid proposal”.

    The City of Detroit bike-share RFP was announced in November of 2015.

    About Detroit Bikes:
    Founded in 2011, Detroit Bikes manufactures accessible, quality bicycles. Leveraging a rich tradition of skilled manufacturing and innovative design, the company operates a factory on Detroit’s west side with a capacity to produce more than 100 bicycles a day. Detroit Bikes’ signature production bikes include the A-Type city commuter and the B-Type step through and the new C-Type single speed. For more information visit: http://detroitbikes.com/

    About Motivate:
    Motivate is a global leader in bike share. A full-service bike share operator and technology innovator, Motivate works to re-envision how people experience and move around cities. Motivate currently manages all of the largest bike share systems in the United States and many of the largest systems in the world, including Bay Area Bike Share (California Bay Area), Citi Bike (New York and Jersey City), Divvy (Chicago), CoGo Bike Share (Columbus, Ohio), Capital Bike Share (Washington, D.C.; Arlington and Alexandria, Va.; and Montgomery County, Md.), Hubway (Boston, Somerville, Cambridge and Brookline, Mass.), Pronto (Seattle), Bike Chattanooga (Tenn.), Bike Share Toronto, and Melbourne Bike Share in Australia. Motivate will add thousands of bikes to its current systems and launch the new BIKETOWN bike share system in Portland, Oregon in July 2016.

    [Smart Cities] Em Boston, o mèdico prescreve bike sharing


    O seguinte artigo foi publicado originalmente em Smart Cities, em 03 de maio de 2016.

    Bike sharing quase gratuito já pode ser “clinicamente receitado” a uma parte dos cidadãos de Boston.

    Os médicos da cidade de Boston já podem prescrever bike sharing aos seus pacientes. A iniciativa, única no mundo, foi anunciada pelas autoridades municipais como uma parceria com o Centro Médico de Boston. O programa chama-se “Prescribe-a-Bike” e vai permitir que os profissionais médicos de Boston, beneficiando de subsídios concedidos pela cidade, possam receitar aos utentes com mais baixos rendimentos uma fidelização anual na Hubway, um programa de bike-share, por apenas 5 dólares.

    O número de vezes que podem utilizar as bicicletas será ilimitado, desde que as utilizem por, pelo menos, 30 minutos de cada vez. O programa prevê ainda a entrega gratuita de capacetes.

    Na origem desta medida, estão diversos problemas característicos de quem vive numa grande cidade. A obesidade é um deles já que “tem aumentado de forma significativa e preocupante, particularmente entre os habitantes de classes sociais mais desfavorecidas e famílias com menos rendimentos”, referiu a diretora do Centro Médico de Boston. “Exercício regular é a solução para combater esta tendência e Prescribe-a-Bike é uma forma interessante dos nossos profissionais proporcionarem aos nossos utentes formas acessíveis de conseguirem o exercício necessário para a sua saúde”, continuou.

    Cerca de 900 residentes de Boston já estão integrados no programa que se espera estender a mais mil cidadãos.
    Uma ferramenta para Inclusão Social

    É um dos maiores desafios que se coloca às cidades que integram medidas inovadoras, por exemplo, de mobilidade como é o caso dos programas públicos de public bike-share que enfrentam problemas de inclusão social. Para uma grande maioria, estes programas que estão a surgir por todas as cidades do mundo não estão a conseguir penetrar nas comunidades com menores rendimentos.

    Esta medida agressiva da cidade de Boston pretende minimizar estes dados, aproximando o programa de partilha de bicicletas, que normalmente custa 85 dólares anuais, a todos os cidadãos com mais baixos rendimentos, por 5 dólares anuais.

    “E o que descobrimos, é que todas estas pessoas pareciam interessadíssimas na oferta e isso foi um alívio”, refere Nicole Freedman, responsável da Boston Bikes.

    Ou seja, para além de proporcionarem uma oferta saudável a uma parte da sua população, a cidade também conseguiu comunicar com essa franja de cidadãos que dificilmente conseguiria obter informação pelos meios modernos como as redes sociais (Facebook e Twitter) e até os tradicionais como a comunicação social.

    “Sabemos que quando as cidades implementam programas de fidelização e partilha de bicicletas, as barreiras iniciais para as pessoas com menores rendimentos são [o facto de] não terem bicicletas nos locais onde vivem, não terem capacetes, etc., e Boston criou um modelo que resolve este tipo de situações”, explica Cassie Ryan, uma enfermeira e estudante de medicina registada no programa.

    Assim, Boston torna-se na primeira cidade a lançar um serviço que liga diretamente a medicina ao bike sharing público. O próximo passo será simplificar ainda mais o processo de prescrição para os profissionais de saúde.

    [Wicked Local] City of Boston relaunches Hubway bike-share system, announces expansion of service stations

    The following article was originally published by in Wicked Local West Roxbury, on May 2nd, 2016.

    ROSLINDALE

    The Boston Transportation Department/Boston Bikes recently officially relaunched the full New Balance Hubway bike-share system and announced plans for an expansion of Hubway service to reach the neighborhoods of Roxbury and North Dorchester. Stations all across Boston, along with Somerville and Brookline, are now open for the season.

    A celebration of the return of the Hubway bikes was held at the Hubway station in front of the New Balance Experience Store on Boylston where Commissioner Fiandaca of the Boston Transportation Department joined Matt LeBretton, New Balance vice president for public affairs. The popular bike-share system recently recorded the four millionth trip taken by Hubway users since the system’s launch in 2011.

    The Boston Transportation Department will hold community workshops to invite public input into the plans for the new stations. Following the workshops, crews from local youth-based organizations will conduct surveys of possible locations for new stations, with opportunities for residents to participate by text message, online and in-person. These participation options are being providing in an effort to engage as many people in the community as possible in the process. Public planning for the new stations will conclude with an open house on June 9 and 11.

    The workshops are scheduled from 6:30-8 p.m. May 12, Roxbury YMCA, 285 Martin Luther King Blvd., Roxbury; and 10-11:30 a.m., Dudley Square Library, 65 Warren St., Roxbury. The open houses are scheduled for 6:30-8:30 p.m. June 9, Roxbury YMCA, 285 Martin Luther King Blvd., Roxbury; and 10 a.m. to noon, Grove Hall Library, 41 Geneva Ave., Dorchester.

    For information: bostonbikes.org; thehubway.com; facebook.com/Hubway.

    Hubway operator, Motivate's bikes to be assembled in Detroit

    Motivate has begun assembling bike share bikes in Detroit, Motivate CEO Jay Walder and Detroit Bikes Founder Zak Pashak announced today. Motivate’s bikes will now be designed, engineered and assembled in the United States, allowing the company to respond to enormous demand for new and expanding bike share systems,  with quality, speed and reliability.

    Read more info in the full release here.

    [Fox News] 12 transportation businesses you can start now

    The following article was originally published on Fox News, on May 2nd, 2016.

    In Start Your Own Transportation Service, the Staff of Entrepreneur Media explains how you can launch a profitable transportation service, whether you want to start a long-haul operation or an in-town service. In this edited excerpt, the authors briefly discuss 12 ways you can get started in the transportation industry.

    The following represent many of the possible types of transportation businesses you could decide to start. It all depends on what your personal interest is and what skills you want to employ in your business.

    1. Taxi service
    Despite its initial controversy and claims of unfair competition, Uber has staked its claim across the world—in fact, in 400 cities and 65 countries. Uber’s attraction as a small-business opportunity is that you’re an independent contractor and on your own schedule. To sign up as a driver, start by going to Uber’s website, and click on the “Become a Driver” button. A short questionnaire initiates the process.

    As a driver, you use your own vehicle, so startup costs are relatively low. Uber handles all the financial aspects of the ride. Payment to the driver is on a weekly basis. As independent contractors, drivers take on overhead costs (gas, maintenance, insurance, etc.) themselves. Financial analytics website SherpaShare says Uber drivers everywhere (except New York City where rates are highest) make in the range of $8.80 to $11 per hour gross before Uber’s percentage is taken.

    2. Bicycle rental
    Renting bicycles is a thriving business in certain areas. The two key environments where renting bikes is a natural are in recreational tourism areas and cities. In tourism areas, you might look to set up near a large hotel or resort where extended vacations stays create ready customers. In this type of business, you’re going to need a storefront as well as a space to store all your rental bikes.

    Another possibility for bicycle rentals is a bicycle-sharing approach like Hubway in Boston. Bicycle stands around the city allow riders to rent a bicycle in one place, ride to their location, and drop the bicycle at a stand near their destination. Hubway offers annual or monthly membership or daily passes. Perhaps your town is ready for a mini version of this business.

    3. Limousine service
    You could provide limo service to celebrities or to regular people. We’ll focus here on the “regular people” limo service.

    Whenever anyone is entrusting you to drive them, a clean reputation is important. But in the case of the personal limo service, typically you’ll be driving a group of people who aren’t paying attention to where you’re going or how you’re driving but are enjoying the ride. The driver needs to be supremely trustworthy, and the vehicle needs to be safe and well -maintained.

    You can operate the limo yourself, and your fleet of one limousine will be relatively easy to maintain. You can provide all the service yourself, from scheduling to driving. If you want to expand, just add vehicles and drivers, and keep expanding your marketing to keep business flowing.

    4. Owner/Operator trucking
    Although international trucking, including to Canada and Mexico, is an enormous sector of the trucking industry, we’ll focus here on trucking within the United States. The basic format of the trucking business is to bid on and fulfill contracts. According to the SBA, there are two basic forms of operating, with the key difference being how you get drivers to fulfill those contracts (or accounts if you contract to do all of the trucking for a business):

    1. Subcontract drivers. Drivers, in this case, are independent contractors who likely own their own equipment. You’ll spend your time on two key coordination pieces—getting the contracts and accounts with the manufacturers who need goods transported and then finding drivers who can fulfill those contracts on schedule. The advantage is lower costs—independent contractors not only usually have their own vehicles that they maintain themselves but they insure them and themselves as well. Insurance is a huge cost factor in the transportation business, so clearly this is a savings. However, you’ll also be paying them a higher fee than if you were paying your own drivers, which cuts into profits. The real trade here might be in fewer headaches—as long as you feel confident of the drivers you hire.

    2. Privately “owned” drivers. In this scenario, you own the trucks and the drivers work for you. You have total control and retain all profit—and you pay all of the expenses of employees and equipment, which means higher startup as well as higher operating costs. While your drivers will be at your service for the accounts and contracts you retain, the pressure is on to have no down time because you’re paying for those drivers and those vehicles whether you’re using them or not.

    If coordinating and scheduling is more of your strong suit, you may find that setting up your business using contracted drivers is the best way to go. Or maybe a combination of both—a manageable number of drivers and size of your owned fleet with a stable of contract drivers to call on when you get more contracts than you can handle.

    5. Moving van business
    Starting a small moving business is relatively easy—which also means you need to keep in mind that you’ll likely be competing with college students who use a rented box truck. Your ace card will be that you’ll set up and conduct your business professionally, perhaps offering add-on services such as space for temporary, in-between moves storage.

    Startup costs include purchasing one or more trucks in a range of sizes that will accommodate the type of moving you plan to do. And, of course, you’ll need a place to park them.

    You’ll need at least one employee—you can’t lift that sofa alone! And you’ll need to train that employee for packing, moving procedures, customer interactions, how to behave appropriately in a client’s home, etc., so your professional reputation isn’t damaged.

    6. Specialty transportation
    Specializing in a specific kind of unusual transportation—extremely large items such as airplane parts, or modular houses, or refrigerated perishables, blood, or human organs—can provide a healthy income. You’ll likely have fewer clients but can charge higher fees for the expertise you have or gain from specializing. Depending on where you’re located (for example, a medical transport business in downtown Boston where there are numerous large medical facilities opposed to a small town in southern Indiana) will dictate whether you can do this business yourself or need employees.

    7. Livestock transportation
    Although you don’t need any specific licenses for transporting personal horses for customers unless you get into commercial-size vehicles that hold many animals, you will definitely need equine or bovine experience for potential clients to trust your ability to transport their animals, and you need to familiarize yourself with the livestock transport regulations for crossing state lines.

    Although the livestock owner will be responsible for having their animal ready for transport to its final destination, you’ll want to know the livestock regulations of any state you’ll be entering. Most states have at least minimum requirements of certain infectious tests (including a health exam) and/or vaccinations for entering their state.

    Don’t leave it up to horse or cattle owners to know these regulations; while they may be the one lining up and paying the veterinarian who’ll do these tests, you’ll want to be knowledgeable to advise them. It’s to your benefit to make sure they have the proper paperwork for you to show at the final destination or anywhere along the way that’s necessary.

    To make sure the trip goes smoothly for the animal, you need to be knowledgeable about livestock or hire someone to do the actual transport who’s knowledgeable. Keep in mind that if you’re transporting any distance and need to overnight, you’ll need to get the animal on and off the trailer several times. And not only do you need to know how to deal with things on the road—tricks to get the horse to drink while traveling and help avoid colic, how to treat or bandage a wound if necessary—you also need to know the basics behind driving carefully while towing a live animal. Getting a veterinary technician license or bringing a certified vet tech with you might be useful and give you an edge for getting customers and word-of-mouth praise.

    8. Boats
    Transporting boats is another specialty business that can be lucrative and interesting if you’re in a maritime area. Keep in mind that this will be a seasonal business—and extremely busy during the pre- and post-boating season since everyone will want their boat in the water or taken out of the water in the same general timeframe.

    You’ll need to decide what kind of boats you want to transport. A speedboat for the lake has a very different trailer requirement than a large sailboat with a mast and a keel. Although motorboat transport would likely be a higher-volume business, it’s also something many boat owners can do themselves. But if you keep your prices reasonable and become known for taking extra good care of the boats you transport, you may find people hiring you to take care of this for them anyway. Motorboat owners are likely to have room in their yard to store them, but if you can provide covered storage, you can have an added-value component to your business. You can also add the service of shrink-wrapping the boat before storage.

    The startup funding for boat transport is modest but perhaps surprisingly higher than you might think, especially given the cost of pickup trucks. You’ll need an appropriately sized truck and perhaps two or three different-sized trailers. Also important is liability insurance to cover the boats you transport and the possibilities of things that can happen when you haul things. That storage option is a good expansion aspect to the boat hauling business.

    9. Air transport
    Transport by air, whether plane or helicopter, involves significant startup costs for equipment, licensing (for yourself and/or employees), and insurance. Small plane transport can be of goods or people like hunters or skiers headed to remote territory, delivering goods or mail to islands, or even transporting freight internationally.

    You’d need to get your ducks in a row using a facility that has excellent cargo handling and inspection equipment (especially for agricultural products and other items highly regulated when they move around the country) and customs if you plan to do any international shipping since moving products by air is all about speed.

    10. Marine shipping
    Transport by boat is a huge business. It’s also a huge business to start. Marine shipping is often done by tankers stacked with containers that get lifted off the trailer of an 18-wheeler and stacked on the boat, typically entails international import/export business, and requires knowledge of customs regulations in general and for specific merchandise. If you’re an expert scheduler and coordinator, perhaps this is the business for you. But, like air transport, be prepared for a lot of research, planning, and need for significant startup resources.

    11. Medical transport
    Medical transport is an important business in the transportation arena. There are several ways to focus this business. Some require no more than a regular vehicle, driver’s license, and a solid driving record. You could focus on transporting seniors to medical appointments locally, or, if you live in an area that’s some distance from a city, you could focus on driving people long distances to specialist appointments at world-class hospitals.

    If you have an EMT license, other medical credentials, or are willing to get them, you could start a business that contracts with hospitals to drive admitted patients to other medical facilities for specialized treatment; this would also require some specialty equipment like oxygen delivery and perhaps a vehicle that can transport a patient in a wheelchair.

    12. Senior services
    America is aging at a fast pace. As older citizens relinquish their driver’s licenses, there’s opportunity for driving seniors to places they can no longer take themselves. Beyond medical appointments, you could drive seniors to the grocery store or to outings at the mall. If you’re in an area where seniors tend to be low-income, you could consider setting up as a nonprofit and getting grant support to help seniors in your region be more mobile. Grant funders, corporate sponsors, and the federal government are often looking to utilize their funds for human service programs coming to the aid of the most vulnerable citizens.

    [Boston Magazine] Hubway Relaunches, Announces Further Expansion to Roxbury and Dorchester

    The bike sharing network will open 10 new stations this year.

    The following article was originally published by Jamie Ducharme in Boston Magazine, on April 28th, 2016.


    Image: Kadam on Flickr/Creative Commons

    Hubway is back for 2016, and it’s bigger and better than ever. The bike sharing system today announced that all existing stations have relaunched for spring, and 10 new ones are on the way.

    The 10 new stations are planned for Roxbury and North Dorchester, expanding access to those neighborhoods. The network serves Boston, Allston, Brighton, Brookline, Cambridge, Somerville, Roxbury, and Dorchester.

    The Boston Transportation Department will hold a series of workshops and open houses to gather community input and keep residents in the loop about the upcoming stations. The schedule is as follows:

    • Community Workshop – May 12, 6:30 – 8:00 p.m., Roxbury YMCA
    • Community Workshop – May 14, 10:00 – 11:30 a.m., Dudley Sq. Library
    • Community Open House – June 9, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., Roxbury YMCA
    • Community Open House – June 11, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., Grove Hall Library
    • Why not celebrate Hubway’s full return by biking your commute tomorrow? You won’t even miss the T, we promise.

    Did you hear? Hubway is expanding in Roxbury and northern Dorchester!

    Originally posted at BostonBikes.org

    Today, Boston Bikes celebrated New Balance Hubway’s 2016 operating season with high-fives, ice cream, and the news of more Hubway stations coming to Boston!

    Yes, you heard that right. The Barr Foundation has provided a generous grant to the Boston Transportation Department for ten new stations in Roxbury and northern Dorchester this summer. The goal is to build a highly connected bikeshare network in these neighborhoods, so that all residents in those areas live within a 5- to 10-minute walk of Hubway.

    This will be the most significant expansion in one targeted part of the city since New Balance Hubway’s launch in 2011. While we know we have a long way to go to achieve the full potential of bikeshare in Boston, this expansion will help pave the way to future stations in other neighborhoods.

    Map of Expansion Area

    Where exactly will these stations go? Well, that’s where we need your help. The process of choosing a location for a station is anything but simple. We start by looking at all the locations that have been requested to date and consulting community organizations, businesses, and residents to get the super-local view of where stations are needed.

    Next month, we are holding two community workshops to talk about what makes a good location for a New Balance Hubway station. Attendees will work together to prioritize general locations for new stations. We’ll consider four key criteria:

    1) Proximity to existing network
    2) Future growth
    3) Known gaps and chronic outages
    4) Local travel patterns

    We will then take feedback from these workshops and develop several specific, viable site options for each general location. Considerations like permitting, solar exposure, utilities,  and other infrastructure on the streets and sidewalks constrain where a station can actually go. The stations take up at least 41 feet, and ensuring the safety of Hubway users, pedestrians, other cyclists and drivers is critical.

    Once we develop these options, we will hold two community open houses in early June to gather input on site alternatives. Dates and locations of the meetings are below. 

    Since we know not everyone can make it to community meetings, we’ll also deploy several street teams to gather input at community events and on busy street corners in Roxbury and Northern Dorchester. We’re honored to have the help of young people from the Yawkey Boys and Girls Club, Bikes Not Bombs, Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation, and the Mayor’s Youth Council who will take the lead in conducting these surveys.  At the same time, we will provide opportunities for input online or by text message. Stay tuned for more details!

    If you would like to receive updates about this expansion and other Hubway news, click here to sign up for the Hubway newsletter. 

    Mark your calendars:

    Part I: Community Workshops – work with other participants to prioritize general locations for Hubway stations

    • May 12, 6:30pm - 8:00pm Roxbury YMCA
    • May 14, 10:00am - 11:30am Dudley Square Library

    Part II: Community Open Houses – drop in to review specific site options for each general location

    • June 9, 6:30pm - 8:30 pm Roxbury YMCA
    • June 11, 10:00am - noon Grove Hall Library

    [Press Release] City of Boston Relaunches Hubway Bikeshare System, Announces Expansion of Service Stations

    Boston Announces Plans for New Bike Stations in Roxbury and North Dorchester

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to view City of Boston site release.
    April 28, 2016

    FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
    Mayor’s Press Office
    617.635.4461

    BOSTON - Thursday, April 28, 2016 - The Boston Transportation Department/Boston Bikes today officially re-launched the full New Balance Hubway bike-share system and announced plans for an expansion of Hubway service to reach the neighborhoods of Roxbury and North Dorchester. Stations all across Boston, along with Somerville, Brookline, and Brookline, are now open for the season.

    “The Hubway bike-share system offers residents and visitors a healthy, affordable way to travel throughout our city and I am excited that this year we are expanding the service to reach even more neighborhoods,” said Mayor Martin J. Walsh. “As demand continues to grow, I look forward to working with our partners to explore additional opportunities to provide this active transportation service to the people of Boston.” 

    A celebration of the return of the Hubway bikes was held today at the Hubway station in front of the New Balance Experience Store on Boylston where Commissioner Fiandaca of the Boston Transportation Department joined Matt LeBretton, New Balance Vice President for Public Affairs. The popular bike-share system recently recorded the four millionth trip taken by Hubway users since the system’s launch in 2011.

    “We look forward to New Balance Hubway’s strongest season ever, with 10 new stations planned for Roxbury and North Dorchester in 2016, a fifth birthday celebration this summer, and our 5 millionth trip anticipated for this Fall,” said Boston Transportation Commissioner Fiandaca. “With these new stations, Boston continues to be a national leader in its commitment to equity in bike-share. The City of Boston would like to thank the Barr Foundation for supporting the establishment of these new stations with a $525,000 grant, as well as for partnering with us to ensure that Boston is a sustainable and vibrant city for all residents and visitors.” 

    “From its first to its four millionth ride,” said Mary Skelton Roberts, Senior Program Officer at the Barr Foundation. “New Balance Hubway has demonstrated that Boston can lead, and that Bostonians will embrace new, innovative ways to close transportation gaps, and to enhance mobility for residents and visitors. It is our privilege to be able to support this latest expansion into Roxbury and North Dorchester, to better connect more people to more places they want and need to go for work, school, and play throughout the region.” 

    The Boston Transportation Department will hold community workshops to invite public input into the plans for the new stations. Following the workshops, crews from local youth-based organizations will conduct surveys of possible locations for new stations, with opportunities for residents to participate by text message, online and in-person. These participation options are being providing in an effort to engage as many people in the community as possible in the process.  Public planning for the new stations will conclude with an Open House on June 9 and 11. Below is more information about the workshops and open houses:

  • Community Workshop - May 12, 6:30 - 8:00 p.m., Roxbury YMCA
  • Community Workshop - May 14, 10:00 - 11:30 a.m., Dudley Sq. Library
  • Community Open House - June 9, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m., Roxbury YMCA
  • Community Open House - June 11, 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Grove Hall Library
  • The New Balance Hubway system is regional public transportation by bike, owned by the municipalities of Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville.  Since opening in 2011, Hubway users have logged over six million bicycle miles, burning 168 million calories and offsetting nearly 2,000 tons of CO2 emissions.  Hubway has nearly 13,000 annual members and last year sold more than 91,000 24-Hour subscriptions, 8,700 72-Hour subscriptions, and 3,400 monthly subscriptions. In 2015 alone, Hubway riders took 1,122,475 trips and pedaled approximately 2.1 million miles.

    About Hubway: New Balance Hubway is metro-Boston’s bike-sharing system with more than 1,600 bikes at 160 stations in Boston, Cambridge, Brookline and Somerville.  The City of Boston has the longest-running subsidized bike-share membership program in the country, offering Hubway memberships to low-income residents for just $5 per year.  For more information about subsidized memberships please visit http://www.bostonbikes.org/ or call #617-635-1470.  Find out more about the New Balance Hubway system, station expansions, deployments, and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter and on Facebook

    ###











    10 Things to do in Boston this weekend

    Do you ever find yourself wanting to jump on a bike but don’t have a really cool destination in mind? Enjoy the sunshine this weekend and #TakeHubway to explore some of Boston’s (and surrounding area’s) unearthed gems.

    Station Move Alert: Brookline Village station literally moves across the tracks

    Station Alert: Effective Thursday morning, April 28th, the Hubway station at Brookline Village in Brookline has been deployed in its new location on Station Street. This 15-dock station is adjacent to the T station just beyond the public bike corral.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Celebrate Hubway's 2016 Boston Launch Today!

    Join Boston Bikes at the New Balance Experience Store, 583 Boylston St, on Thursday, April 28th, from 2-3pm, as we celebrate this season’s launch of New Balance Hubway in metro-Boston. Every station in the system will be on the streets, including a few new ones—so hop on a bike and meet us there! Enjoy a snack and enter a raffle to win a New Balance gift certificate!

    Boston Transportation Commissioner Gina Fiandaca, New Balance’s VP of Public Affairs Matt LeBretton, and representatives from our partner municipalities will join us to mark the occasion. Commissioner Fiandaca will share some exciting plans for system expansion, made possible by the generous support of the Barr Foundation, and information on how you can help us identify new station locations.

    System Alert: Union Square - Somerville temporarily closed

    UPDATE -> 4/27, 4:30pm
    Eversource repair maintenance is expected to last until 7:30pm this evening. The Union Square - Somerville Hubway station is expected to be operational by 8pm. Further disruptions are not expected.


    Due to a gas leak in the area, the Hubway station located at Union Square - Somerville will be closed, effectively immediately, Wednesday, April 27th, 9:30am, to enable Eversource to access a gas line. The station will return following resolution of the issue, but there is currently no estimated timeline. Please check the Hubway websitefacebook, or twitter pages for updates.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Station Move Alert: New location for Teele Square station in Somerville

    Station Alert: Effective Thursday afternoon, April 28th, the Hubway station at Teele Square in Somerville will re-deploy to its new location around the corner on Newbury Street, across the street from its prior location and adjacent to the intersection with Holland Street & Broadway. This 15-dock station should be available for Thursday’s evening commute, but make sure to check the Hubway station map to confirm when making your travel plans.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: East Somerville's 1st Hubway station arrives at Broadway at Lombardi Way this Thursday

    Station Alert: Effective Thursday afternoon, April 28th, the newest Hubway station is scheduled to deploy at Broadway at Lombardi Way in Somerville. This 15-dock station is East Somerville’s first Hubway station, and will be located in a City lot on lower Broadway Street between Mt. Pleasant and Mt. Vernon Streets. The City plans to expand stations in East Somerville and Winter Hill over the next year.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Brookline stations to return this Thursday!

    Good news, Brookline! The Town’s 4 stations are scheduled for deployment this Thursday, April 28th! Now with over 150 stations available throughout the system, this is the best time ever to #TakeHubway in 2016! Get ready to ride!

    Please note: the deployment schedule is subject to change due to weather conditions. Make sure to view our station map or download a free app by searching “Hubway” on your smartphone (android link here) to confirm active stations along with bike/dock availability. Stations will be “live” as soon as they are deployed.

    Here are the stations planned for deployment this Thursday:

  • Brookline Village - Station Street @ MBTA
  • Coolidge Corner - Beacon St @ Centre St
  • JFK Crossing at Harvard St. / Thorndike St.
  • Washington Square at Washington St. / Beacon St.
  • Sign up to receive station deployment announcements—subscribe to the Hubway newsletter by clicking here.

    [Greenovate Boston] The Boston Yeti is Serious about Climate Preparedness #ClimateReadyYeti

    The following post by Jessica Feldish was originally published on the Greenovate Blog, on April 14th, 2016.

    The Boston Yeti stopped by Greenovate to talk climate resiliency - and to take Hubway’s Greenovate bike for a spin.

    No Bostonian will soon forget the winter of 2015. Relentless snowfall brought many aspects of daily life to a grinding halt and widespread cabin fever plagued the city. And lots of people probably did blame fever dreams when they spotted a large, white, furry figure traipsing through the city.

    The creature that would come to be known as The Boston Yeti first appeared last January, and as the madness of that winter went on, Yeti sightings ramped up as well. He was all over social media, and even developed his own Twitter following.

    Nearly a year after the he captivated the city, the Boston Yeti is back, and he has a message for Boston (as told through an interpreter): the effects of climate change are serious, and we need to be ready for a lot more than just extreme snowfall.

    Like many coastal cities, Boston is particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change, which include rising sea levels, more extreme weather events, and increased urban heat island effect. Those impacts translate into real threats to human health and damage to critical infrastructure.

    That’s why the City of Boston continues to prioritize its Climate Action Plan, which lays out strategies for the City to both reduce its contribution to climate change and adapt to its effects. The Boston Yeti is serious about Boston’s climate preparedness too, and he’s teamed up with Greenovate to engage all Bostonians in reducing emissions and preparing for the effects of climate change. And so it’s no surprise that he asked to take Hubway’s new Greenovate bike out for its first spin.

    Hubway, Boston’s bike share program, created this one-of-a-kind member of its fleet as a way to celebrate Greenovate’s commitment to sustainable urban living and climate readiness. The Boston Yeti also wants to remind people that you can make everyday choices, like riding a bicycle, taking the T, or walking, to help create a greener, healthier, and more prosperous Boston for everyone.

    So keep your eyes peeled, because now that the Greenovate bike is released into the wild, you can be entered to win prizes from Greenovate award-winning businesses for those of you who are lucky enough to spot it (find more details about how to win here).

    Photo credit: Erin Stevens

    10 more stations scheduled for deployment this week

    The stations listed below are scheduled to deploy during the week of April 25th - 29th. Please note: there are a number of factors that may contribute to deployment delay, so when planning your trips and commutes in these station areas, make sure to have alternate travel plans.

  • Boylston St / Berkeley St, Back Bay
  • Boylston at Fairfield, Back Bay
  • Broadway at Lombardi Way, Somerville - East Somerville’s 1st station!
  • Brookline Village - Station Street @ MBTA, Brookline
  • Coolidge Corner - Beacon St @ Centre St, Brookline
  • Heath St at S. Huntington, Jamaica Plain
  • JFK Crossing at Harvard St. / Thorndike St., Brookline
  • New Balance Store - Boylston at Dartmouth, Back Bay
  • Teele Square, Somerville - new location
  • Washington Square at Washington St. / Beacon St., Brookline
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    [UMass Boston News] Hubway back on campus at UMass Boston

    The following announcement was originally published on UMass Boston News, on April 21st, 2016.

    The popular Hubway bike station is back on campus and has a new location for the 2016 cycling season. The station, which can hold up to 18 bicycles, is now located near the rear entrance of the Integrated Sciences Complex under the catwalk. Dozens of additional stations are available throughout Boston and the surrounding areas, including at the JFK/UMass and Savin Hill stops of the MBTA.

    “We’re thrilled to have Hubway back on campus for the fourth straight year,” said Diane D’Arrigo, assistant vice chancellor for campus services. “This is another step in our efforts to create a welcoming, accessible, sustainable campus with a variety of transportation options.”

    Helmets can be purchased in the campus bookstore.

    Image credit: Zach Herman

    Take Hubway and explore Boston’s Gems: Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum's Third Thursdays

    You probably have been to the unconventional Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, but what about a jazz concert there? On the third Thursday of each month, there is a special night of artful activities, drinks, and music. “Fashion Forward” is this month’s theme: delve into a world of rich textiles and high fashion at the Museum, and take Hubway to show off your own unique style.

    Take Hubway and explore Boston’s Gems: L.A. Burdick

    The award-winning chocolatier, L.A. Burdick is chocolate heaven in Harvard Square (with an additional location in Boston’s Back Bay). While the hot milk chocolate is the best thing to fight the zero degree weather, why not a white chocolate in the springtime? If you cannot decide which one you want, you can always customize your hot chocolate by mixing up things from the menu.

    Take Hubway and explore Boston’s Gems: Google Secret Garden

    Shh! Don’t tell anyone. This above-the-parking-lot garden at 4 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, is definitely the hidden gem in Kendall Square. The roof garden offers a beautiful view with lots of greenery. This is a perfect spot for lunch, reading, and relaxation.

    Take Hubway and explore Boston’s Gems: Bodega

    Looking for a pair of sneakers? This hole-in-the-wall convenience store on Clearway Street in Boston, just off of Mass Ave, near Berklee College of Music, will definitely surprise you. After entering the door, hold your hesitation and look past the toilet paper. You will find that the Snapple machine that serves as the hidden door will eventually lead you to a room full of shoes, apparel, and swanky fun music!

    Take Hubway and explore Boston’s Gems: Alive & Kicking

    This tiny shop in Cambridge may be easy to miss while riding on your Hubway, but we recommend you find it. Sit outside with friends and enjoy the spring weather and the best lobster sandwich in town. The lobster portions are generous so come prepared with an empty stomach. We also recommend the clams, steamers, and bisque!

    Take Hubway and explore Boston’s Gems: Escape the Room

    Bring along a group of your friends to Escape the Room to solve puzzles and find clues to escape the room you are in (deep in the bowels of Downtown Crossing). We guarantee this will be a fun and memorable experience that you will remember for a lifetime!

    Take Hubway and explore Boston’s Gems: Punjabi Dhaba

    While this hole-in-the-wall spot in Inman Square, Cambridge, looks ordinary from the outside, the food is anything but that. This cozy restaurant offers you a variety of delectable Indian dishes at affordable prices. You can bike off the calories after while checking out the great stores nearby! Our Hubway stop is right across the street.

    Take Hubway and explore Boston’s Gems: Harvard Gardens

    If you have not yet tried the decadent red velvet pancakes at Harvard Gardens, we recommend that you do so. This quaint Beacon Hill spot has an extensive brunch menu that we guarantee will satisfy your sweet and salty cravings.

    Take Hubway and explore Boston’s Gems: Moakley Courthouse

    The John Joseph Moakley Courthouse is located on Fan Pier with a scenic bicycle route along Boston’s coast with amazing views, great restaurants, and stores around the area. Bring along your helmet and Hubway bike and take in the great sights that Boston has to offer!

    Take Hubway and explore Boston’s Gems: Mike's Pastry

    Mike’s Pastry, with locations in the North End and now Harvard Square, is known for the world’s greatest cannoli. This is a must-see spot where you will find a variety of delicious desserts and pastries. Our tip: Try the chocolate chip cannoli. You won’t be disappointed!

    Station Alert: UMass Boston Integrated Sciences Complex new station location

    Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, April 20th, the Hubway station located at UMass Boston Integrated Sciences Complex, has been deployed for the season in its new location. This 19-dock station is now located in the courtyard on the north side of the integrated sciences complex near the intersection of Quinn Road and University Drive West.

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    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    5 stations scheduled for return today

    The stations listed below are scheduled to deploy during the day today. Please note: there are a number of factors that may contribute to deployment delay, so when planning your afternoon trips and commutes in these station areas, make sure to have alternate travel plans. They may be available for use this afternoon, but we are expecting them to be fully operational for Thursday morning’s commute.

  • Allston Green District - Commonwealth Ave & Griggs St
  • Brigham Cir / Huntington Ave
  • Hyde Square at Barbara St, Jamaica Plain
  • UMASS Boston Integrated Sciences Complex
  • Washington St & Brock St, Brighton
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    3 stations opened today: 4/15/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Hayes Square, Charlestown
  • Purchase St and Pearl St - new station!
  • Andrew Station - Dorchester Ave at Humboldt Pl
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    New Station Alert: Purchase Street at Pearl Street, Boston

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 15th, the newest Hubway station has been deployed at Purchase St at Pearl St, and is open & operational in the Financial District of Boston. This 19-dock station is located on the sidewalk on the northeast corner of Purchase & Pearl Streets.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    5 stations opened today: 4/14/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • E. Cottage St at Columbia Rd
  • Upham’s Corner - Ramsey St at Dudley St
  • Mt Pleasant Ave / Dudley Town Common
  • Savin Hill MBTA
  • Dorchester Ave. at Harborview st
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    New Station Alert: Savin Hill MBTA, Dorchester

    Station Alert: Effective Thursday afternoon, April 14th, the newest Hubway station has been deployed at the Savin Hill MBTA, and is open & operational in Dorchester. This 15-dock station is located at the corner of South Sydney Street and Bay Street, on the southwest side of the T station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    5 stations opened today: 4/13/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Boylston / Mass Ave
  • BIDMC - Brookline at Burlington St
  • Washington St. at Waltham St.
  • Washington St. at Rutland St.
  • Boston Medical Center -  East Concord at Harrison Ave
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    [Improper Bostonian] Worth the Price

    The following post is an excerpt of an article by Scott Lauber that was originally published in the Improper Bostonian, on April 13th, 2016.

    Price says he has always enjoyed visiting Boston. He appreciates the fans’ passion, even relishes the give-and-take with many of them on Twitter. When he came to town with the Rays, he was known to rent a Hubway and pedal down Newbury Street. Price even has the good sense to go to Dunkin’.

    Click here to view the entire article.

    (Re)balancing Act

    We get it—it’s no fun, and often super-inconvenient, when you’re planning to #TakeHubway and there isn’t a bike available at your nearest station, or when you’re already on Hubway with no docks at your destination station. And with warmer weather upon us (hopefully) and an increase in riders needing to go where they need to go, our call center crew and the team here at Hubway HQ are receiving an uptick in questions about station and dock availability.

    We definitely don’t want you stuck without a bike or a dock, and we work hard to ensure that every rider can use the system when they want, but with a finite amount of bikes & docks along with service vehicles that have to move at the speed of traffic, the reality is sometimes there isn’t a bike or a dock awaiting you at a station. Whether you’ve experienced an “outage” or not, here are a few things to know about why this happens at stations, and what goes into anticipating outages and moving bikes around the Hubway system, and finally some tips to help you avoid or handle the situation if and when it does happen. This is…

    Hubway Rebalancing 101
  • Hubway’s field staff includes four rebalancing vans, each with space for approximately 25 bikes, in operation from 6am-10pm, 7 days a week.

  • During those same hours, Hubway’s Field Operations Managers are monitoring station balance from our main dispatch office, using real-time data and historical analysis to direct Rebalancers when and where to make their pick-ups & drop-offs.

  • The Rebalancers’ role is different from that of our Mechanics and Field Bike Technicians. Though they will snag bikes marked for repair to bring them back to our garage for servicing, Rebalancers won’t be able to fix bikes on the spot as they’ll be off to their next station to make sure there are bikes & docks available.

  • During rush hours, we’re in transit, too. At heavy commute times, especially at locations like North Station or Kendall Square, Hubway stations fill up and empty out much like roads, trains, and buses. And when our vans are needed most, they could be stuck at another station, or often in traffic, sometimes making it difficult to get to a station immediately.

  • The popularity of a station increases dramatically with its proximity to other stations. So while it isn’t always the case, stations at the outskirts of the current system could experience an outage because there simply aren’t as many nearby docks to which people can ride. A station surrounded by 5 other stations may experience more “natural” rebalancing than a station that’s only near 2 others, but as a result it may also be a busier station in general.

    Keep in mind that most daytime outages are resolved, either organically or by a rebalancer, within 15 minutes, so a little patience goes a long way. But we also recognize that it’s a tough gamble to wait around when there’s no guarantee. Unfortunately, a timely Tweet, while helpful for analysis & reporting (we are listening), may not solve the problem for you since our drivers may not be able to get there as soon as you’d like them to. It can be frustrating to encounter a full or empty station, so check out these tips for making your Hubway trips as stress-free as possible:

    1. Technology is your friend! There are many good, free mobile apps that will show you nearby stations and give you real-time dock & bike availability. Here are a few:

  • Spotcycle

  • Citymapper

  • Bikey

  • Boston Bikes

  • Biximo
    (Have any other favorites? Let us know, we’ll add them to the list!)
    Note: all these apps (or from your desktop computer try Hubway Tracker) are powered by our publicly available XML feed, so the one you should use is really just a matter of personal preference. Or hey, you could build your own! Hubway riders have created all kinds of tools to help us all better understand the system.

    2. Get 15 minutes free! If you arrive at your destination and there are no docks available, to avoid any usage fees for trips longer than 30 minutes, simply go to the kiosk at the full station and follow the prompts to get 15 extra minutes. That’s hopefully enough time to wait for an open dock or to ride to another nearby station if you don’t feel like waiting around.

    3. Multi-modal is the way to be! We hope Hubway works the way you want it to every time, but make sure you know of other transport/commute options (MBTA subway, bus, etc) so you don’t get stuck. And if possible, you may also consider adjusting your commute times, especially if you use Hubway to beat the rush hour.

    4. Let us know where you think new stations should go to help ease system congestion. Suggest a station here.

    Hubway is always looking to improve the system, and rider feedback has driven that process since day 1. Please continue to reach us on Twitter & Facebook with questions, ideas, concerns, and other feedback!

    And if you really want to help keep Hubway operating at its very best, we’re hiring! Click here to view Hubway’s job opportunities.

  • 5 stations opened today: 4/12/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Charles Circle - Charles St. at Cambridge St.
  • Charles St at Beacon St
  • Boylston St. at Arlington St.
  • Beacon St / Mass Ave
  • Yawkey Way at Boylston St.
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    6 stations opened today: 4/11/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Liberty Wharf - Brand New Station!
  • Fan Pier
  • Congress / Sleeper
  • Franklin St. / Arch St.
  • Post Office Square
  • Cambridge St. at Joy St.
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    New Station Alert: Congress St & Northern Ave in Boston Seaport

    Station Alert: Effective Monday afternoon, April 11th, the newest Hubway station has been deployed at Congress St & Northern Ave, and is open & operational in the Boston Seaport neighborhood. This 19-dock station is located on the southwest corner of the intersection of Northern Ave and Congress St., kitty corner from the Blue Hills Bank Pavilion.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Boston on-street Station Deployments April 11-15

    In previous seasons, we’ve waited until almost all the stations were out before turning on the system. This year we were able to enable each station as it was deployed, and that will continue this week as more than two dozen more Hubway stations, including a couple of completely new locations, are slated to return to Boston. This will bring the system back over 140 live stations, with even more to come the week after the Boston Marathon.

    PLEASE NOTE: this schedule is subject to change, so make sure to view our station map or download a free app by searching “Hubway” on your smartphone (android link here) to see active stations along with bike/dock availability. Stations will be “live” as soon as they are deployed.

    Here are the stations scheduled to deploy this week:

  • Allston Green District - Commonwealth Ave & Griggs St
  • Andrew Station - Dorchester Ave at Humboldt Pl
  • Beacon St / Mass Ave - deployed 4/12
  • BIDMC - Brookline at Burlington St
  • Boston Medical Center -  East Concord at Harrison Ave
  • Boylston / Mass Ave
  • Boylston St. at Arlington St. - deployed 4/12
  • Brigham Cir / Huntington Ave-sidewalk
  • Cambridge St. at Joy St. - deployed 4/11
  • Charles Circle - Charles St. at Cambridge St. - deployed 4/12
  • Charles St at Beacon St - deployed 4/12
  • Congress / Sleeper - deployed 4/11
  • Dorchester Ave. at Harborview st
  • E. Cottage St at Columbia Rd
  • Fan Pier - deployed 4/11
  • Franklin St. / Arch St. - deployed 4/11
  • Hayes Square-charlestown
  • Hyde Square at Barbara St-JP
  • Liberty Wharf - Brand New Station! - deployed 4/11
  • Mt Pleasant Ave / Dudley Town Common
  • Post Office Square - deployed 4/11
  • Purchase St and Pearl - Brand New Station!
  • Savin Hill MBTA - Brand New Station!
  • Upham’s Corner - Ramsey St at Dudley St
  • Washington St. at Rutland St.
  • Washington St. at Waltham St.
  • Yawkey Way at Boylston St. - deployed 4/12
  • Sign up to receive station deployment announcements—subscribe to the Hubway newsletter by clicking here. Please note: stations on or adjacent to the Boston Marathon route are scheduled to deploy the week after the race.

    Hubway's 4 millionth ride just happened!

    Today, Thursday, April 7th, at 10:33am, Chris Puzzo of Boston checked out a Hubway bike from the Roxbury Crossing Station. After a 3 minute, 51 second ride, Chris docked his bike at Hubway’s Ruggles Station at Columbus Ave near the border of Roxbury & Mission Hill. This was the 4,000,000th ride ever taken on Hubway!

    To commemorate and celebrate this milestone, our lucky rider # four million, Chris, will receive a $250 gift card from New Balance, who has been a generous supporter of Hubway since even before day 1!

    “I originally joined Hubway so that I had a way to commute to work in Cambridge other than relying on the MBTA buses,” writes Chris. “I still mostly use Hubway to get to and from work and school, but I also use the service as much as possible to travel to concerts, events, and restaurants, and to run errands. I really like how well spread out Hubway is through most of Boston & Cambridge, and I like that it allows me to travel independently of taxis or public transportation while getting a good workout.”

    Thank you to all our members and riders. You are what makes this bikeshare system thrive and grow, and we look forward to even more expansion and Hubway’s 5 millionth ride as we #TakeHubway later into the season!

    Will you be Hubway's 4 millionth rider? You could win a $250 New Balance Gift Card

    UPDATE! Thursday, April 7th, 9:45am: 100 rides to go! We’re at 3,999,900 lifetime Hubway trips!!

    Wednesday, April 6th, 4:20pm: 3,998,500 trips! Only 1,500 rides to go!
    Wednesday, April 6th, 10:15am: 3,998,000 trips! Only 2,000 rides to go!
    Monday, April 4th, 11am: 3,996,000 trips! Only 4,000 rides to go!
    Friday, April 1st, 11pm: This is no April Fools Joke! You’re at 3,994,000 trips! 6,000 rides to go!

    New Balance has been a supporter since day 1, and to make it even more fun to #TakeHubway this season, New Balance has generously provided us with a $250 gift card for the lucky Hubway member rider #4,000,000!

    But you can take luck (a little) out of the equation. With fewer than 50,000 trips to go and more stations being deployed every day, it’s almost definite the 4 millionth trip will happen sometime in early April (or possibly even March). So make your trips using Hubway—we’ll announce ride totals daily on facebook & twitter—and you might go down in Hubway history. And while you’re at it, maybe win some sweet New Balance gear!

    [SYSTEM ALERT] Software Upgrade, Possible Rider Impact late night on Monday, April 4th

    SYSTEM ALERT: Beginning Monday, April 4th, at approximately 11pm, Hubway will be conducting an upgrade to the operational software that powers the system.

    The upgrade will last approximately 90 minutes. During this time there should be little to no impact on key holding members (annual & monthly). Here are ways in which there might be an impact on some users of the system:

    • No card-payment “casual” rentals for 24-hour or 72-hour memberships will be available at Hubway stations. Casual riders with keys will be able to undock bikes using the key fob.
    • Members will not be able to log into their online account. Once the update is complete, you’ll be able to access all of your account history.
    • No new memberships, renewals, or gift certificates will be available for purchase on the Hubway website (www.thehubway.com).
    • Station and dock information may not be accurate on any website, map, or mobile app. Once the update is complete, the accurate info will return.
    • “Time credits” and other features may not be available at Hubway station kiosks.
    • Hubway’s customer support call center will be available but will be unable to look up user account information or research technical issues. Callers may be asked to call back at a later time. Once the update is complete, support representatives will be able to help further.

    While the majority of the changes will not be visible to Hubway users, the updates to the system software will provide improved administrative tools for Hubway operations and customer support representatives.

    Every effort will be made to minimize the disruption this may cause. We thank you in advance for your patience as we work to improve Hubway for all riders.


    If you have any questions, please reach Hubway customer service by calling 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929) or writing to customerservice@thehubway.com. Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    GAME ON! Hubway riders get 50% off WGBH's Boston Talks Happy Hour, April 13th


    Boston Talks Happy Hour: Game On

    Wednesday, April 13, 2016, 7-9pm
    WGBH Studios, One Guest Street, Brighton


    A Smarter Happy Hour
    Grab your friends and #TakeHubway for WGBH’s take on happy hour — inspiring conversation plus wine and local craft brews. Hear from and connect with local experts in a variety of fields while enjoying the great company of your neighbors from Boston and beyond.


    Hubway members click here to get your $5 tickets (regularly $10)!
    Hubway members get $5 tickets—USE PROMO CODE HUBWAY


    Boston Talks: Game On
    You know games can entertain, but did you know they also can motivate you, make you more social and creative, and even map your brain? Designer Amy Robinson discusses the Eyewire game she helped create that combines science, social good, and a good time. Video game music composer Jason Margaca shares how music enhances your in-game experience. And critic, writer, and geek culture expert Ethan Gilsdorf explains how the renaissance of board games, role-playing games, and reality games is a necessary antidote to digital culture. Join Amy, Jason, Ethan and others to talk games.
    Meet the Host
    Edgar runs WGBH’s Curiosity Desk, where he digs a little deeper into topics in the news, explores the off-beat, and searches for answers to questions posed by the world around us. His radio features can be heard on 89.7 WGBH’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and his television features can be seen on WGBH’s Greater Boston. Follow him on Twitter @ebherwick3.

    PLEASE NOTE: You must be 21+ to attend.


    [Boston Globe] Capital W Returns to Connect Women with VCs

    The following article by Janelle Nanos was originally published in the Boston Globe, on March 30th, 2016.

    Lately, Sheryl Marshall has been thinking a lot about the idea of “the last mile.” The concept is a familiar one to engineers working in transportation or telecommunications. It’s the notion that even when you build a massive network, you still have to find ways to get to the people at its outermost reaches.

    The Hubway is a perfect example of one kind of solution: Once you hop off the T, the bike-sharing system can get you closer to where you want to go.

    But Marshall isn’t an engineer; she’s an entrepreneur and investor. She’s also the founder of Capital W, the Boston Women’s Venture Summit. Launched last year, it will return May 6 with a daylong event at District Hall in the Seaport.

    The goal of the conference, she says, is solve the last-mile problem that female entrepreneurs often face.

    “You have many, many women’s groups helping women get their businesses off the ground,” Marshall said. “There are many angel groups that help with the first round [of financing] and offer training. But when the pedal hits the metal, and it comes time to get institutional financing, it’s almost impossible.”

    In 2014, the Diana Project at Babson College found that only 2.7 percent of companies that had received venture capital in the three years prior had a women in the role of chief executive. It also found that female-led companies that were funded also tended to be better established, demonstrating that venture firms were more likely to invest when the companies were more of a sure thing.

    That’s the problem that Marshall is hoping to solve with Capital W.

    The event brings together angel investors, partners from some of the city’s largest venture firms, and female entrepreneurs for panels, workshops, and a series of speed-pitching rounds. It’s a chance to build valuable networks, she said. Last year’s event drew entrepreneurs from New York and California, and Marshall is in talks to replicate the concept in other states.

    “You cannot be what you cannot see, you cannot invest in what you don’t know,” she said. “I want to put myself out of business. That’s my goal: To finish the last mile.”

    2 stations opened today in Cambridge: 3/18/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Kendall Square T Station - click for details.
  • Dana Park
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    New(ish) Station Alert: Kendall Square MBTA Station

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, March 18th, the newest Hubway station has been deployed at Kendall Square MBTA, and is open & operational in Cambridge near 265 Main Street adjacent to the Kendall Square outbound T exit. The station was installed with 18 docks, but will be expanded to a 23-dock station by the end of March. It is located in the spot of a previous station which, due to construction, was moved two blocks west and became the Ames St at Main St station. Both stations will remain in operation throughout the 2016 riding season.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Updated station deployments Mar 14-18

    PLEASE NOTE: this schedule is subject to change (and already has). Updates are posted below.

    Week #3 of Boston-based station off-street (sidewalk) location deployments. Over 50 stations have returned in the last two weeks (week 1 list | week 2 list), and more than a dozen scheduled this week. We’re awaiting word on the possibility of deployments in Somerville & Brookline, and we’ll post updates here when they’re available.

    Please note that the schedule is subject to change (and did in each of the last two weeks), so make sure to view our station map or download a free app by searching “Hubway” on your smartphone (android link here) to see active stations along with bike/dock availability. Stations will be “live” as soon as they are deployed.

    Here is this week’s deployment schedule:

    Monday, 3/14 (5 stations)

  • Day Boulevard - in its triumphant return!
  • Bunker Hill Community College
  • Seaport Square - Seaport Blvd. at Boston Wharf
  • Seaport Hotel
  • Lawn on D
  • Tuesday, 3/15 (5 stations)

  • Harvard University Transportation Services - 175 North Harvard St
  • Harvard University Housing - 111 Western Ave. at Soldiers Field Park
  • Colleges of the Fenway
  • Dudley Square at Warren St
  • Franklin Park - Seaver Street at Humbolt Ave
  • Wednesday, 3/16 (5 stations)

  • Northeastern U / North Parking Lot
  • Back bay / South End Station - in a new location
  • Franklin Park Zoo
  • JFK / UMASS at MBTA Station
  • Boston Convention & Exhibition Center
  • Thursday, 3/17

  • No deployments scheduled today
  • Friday, 3/18 (2 Cambridge stations)

  • Kendall Square T Station
  • Dana Park
  • Sign up to receive station deployment announcements—subscribe to the Hubway newsletter by clicking here. Please note: stations with on-street locations along the Boston Marathon route will not be deployed until after the race in April.

    Station Alert: Day Boulevard station (Castle Island) is Back!

    Station Alert: We are excited to announce that the Day Boulevard Hubway station in South Boston is back! This station was last in operation in 2014, but was removed for the winter season and was not redeployed in 2015 due to ongoing construction in the area. Effective Monday afternoon, March 14th, the 19-dock station has finally returned and is fully operational along William J Day Boulevard, in front of the Marine Park building just north of Broadway, adjacent to Pleasure Bay on the way to Castle Island Park.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Bunker Hill Community College deployed in original location

    Station Alert: Effective Monday afternoon, March 14th, the Hubway station located at Bunker Hill Community College, has been deployed, and is open & operational in Charlestown. This 19-dock station has returned to its original location on the sidewalk on the southern end of the College and T station, adjacent to Austin Street and the Gilmore Bridge.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    5 stations opened today: 3/16/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Northeastern U / North Parking Lot
  • Back bay / South End Station
  • Franklin Park Zoo
  • JFK / UMASS at MBTA Station
  • Boston Convention & Exhibition Center
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    5 stations opened today: 3/15/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Harvard University Transportation Services - 175 North Harvard St
  • Harvard University Housing - 111 Western Ave. at Soldiers Field Park
  • Colleges of the Fenway
  • Dudley Square at Warren St
  • Franklin Park - Seaver Street at Humbolt Ave
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    5 stations opened today: 3/14/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Day Boulevard
  • Bunker Hill Community College
  • Seaport Square - Seaport Blvd. at Boston Wharf
  • Seaport Hotel
  • Lawn on D
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    5 stations opened today: 3/11/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Charlestown - Main St @ Austin St
  • Cross St. at Hanover St
  • Lewis Wharf - Atlantic Ave
  • The Esplanade - Beacon St at Arlington St
  • Newmarket Square
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    Updated station deployments Mar 7-11

    SEE UPDATED BELOW! Please note: the schedule is subject to change.

    We’re entering our 2nd week of Boston station deployments. It’s all gone pretty smoothly so far, with more than 25 stations already set up and operational, and another 25+ on the deployment docket for this week. Following Boston deployments, our field staff will be working to enable stations in Somerville & Brookline. Please note that the schedule is subject to change (and did quite a bit last week), so make sure to view our station map or download a free app by searching “Hubway” on your smartphone (android link here) to see active stations along with bike/dock availability. Stations will be “live” as soon as they are deployed.

    Here is this week’s deployment schedule:

    Monday, 3/7 (4 stations)

  • Mayor Martin J. Walsh - 28 State Street
  • South Station - 700 Atlantic Ave
  • Chinatown Gate Plaza - Surface Rd at Beach St
  • Rowes Wharf - Atlantic Ave
  • Tuesday, 3/8 (5 stations)

  • Wentworth Institute of Technology
  • JP Monument - South St at Centre St, Curtis Hall, Jamaica Plain
  • Green Street T, Jamaica Plain
  • Jackson Square T @ Centre St, Jamaica Plain
  • Egleston Square at Columbus Ave, Jamaica Plain
  • Wednesday, 3/9 (5 stations)

  • Aquarium Station - 200 Atlantic Ave
  • Dorchester Ave at Gillette Park
  • West Broadway at D St
  • W Broadway at Dorchester St
  • South Boston Library - 646 East Broadway
  • Thursday, 3/10: (6 stations)

  • Tremont St / West St
  • Stuart St at Charles St
  • Boylston St / Washington St
  • Ink Block - Harrison Ave & Herald St
  • Tremont St at Berkeley St
  • Prudential Center / Belvidere St
  • Friday, 3/11: (5 stations)

  • Charlestown - Main St @ Austin St
  • Cross St. at Hanover St
  • Lewis Wharf - Atlantic Ave
  • The Esplanade - Beacon St at Arlington St
  • Newmarket Square
  • Sign up to receive station deployment announcements—subscribe to the Hubway newsletter by clicking here. Please note: stations with on-street locations along the Boston Marathon route will not be deployed until after the race in April.

    6 stations opened today: 3/10/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Tremont St / West St
  • Stuart St at Charles St
  • Boylston St / Washington St
  • Ink Block - Harrison Ave & Herald St
  • Tremont St at Berkeley St
  • Prudential Center / Belvidere St
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    [BostInno] It's Wicked Safe to Walk or Bike in Boston (Statistically)

    The following article by Alex Weaver was originally published in BostInno, on March 10th, 2016.

    Not only is Boston a top city for the amount of commuters who walk or bike to work, but it’s one of the safest, too.

    According to the 2016 Benchmark Report from the Alliance for Biking and Walking, Boston and Washington, D.C., have the most commuters who bike or walk to work among the 50 most populous cities in the U.S. – tied for the top spot, with 16.7 percent of all commuters opting for one of those modes of travel.

    What’s more, Boston is also tied with D.C. for cyclist and pedestrian safety, with 1.6 fatalities reported per 10,000 commuters.

    The Benchmark Project began in 2003, and the Alliance for Biking and Walking has been tracking data across the U.S. ever since. Every two years, the team releases a new report based on its most recent data.

    Boston’s rates have stayed steady since the 2014 report; D.C., on the other hand, has seen a 2 percent increase in the number of residents biking or walking to work. Boston ranks No. 1 for percentage of commuters who walk to work, and No. 11 for those who bike – combining the percentages who do one or the other puts them No. 1 in the country.

    From 2007 to 2013, according to the report, Boston has seen a 1.3 percent rise in percentage of commuters who walk – behind just Seattle terms of growth. During that same time, the percentage of commuters who bike to work has increased by .9 percent, behind D.C. (2.3 percent), Portland, OR (2.3 percent), San Francisco (1.5 percent), Seattle (1.4 percent) and Oakland (1.3 percent).

    The safety figures require a closer look.

  • The report indicates Boston saw 24 pedestrian fatalities from 2005 to 2007, 23 from 2008 to 2010, and 20 from 2011 to 2013, putting its average pedestrian fatality rate per 10,000 walking commuters at two during that span.
  • Conversely, there were three bicyclist fatalities from 2005 to 2007, three from 2008 to 2010, and seven from 2011 to 2013, putting the average bicyclist fatality rate per 10,000 biking commuters at three during that span.
  • It’s great seeing more and more people opting to walk or bike to and from work. And as more city streets add dedicated bike lanes, bike-share services like Hubway continue to proliferate and the driving population generally becomes more attuned to the reality of sharing the road (and vice versa, cyclists become more comfortable and confident riding in an urban environment), those numbers could stand to go up.

    It’s worth nothing, however, that Boston has seen a spate of bike fatalities in recent years. And accidents involving cyclists or walkers and motor vehicles is an entirely different statistic than those that result in deaths.

    In fact, I was hit by a car biking to work just last week. Anecdotally, the police officer who assisted me at the crash site said he sees this sort of thing all the time. The bike mechanic who assessed the damage said it was the fourth bike he’d seen mangled by a car in the previous week alone. And the orthopedic surgeon who informed me my right elbow had been fractured from the collision said he’s treated “thousands” of injuries from bike-on-car run-ins.

    It stands to reason that Boston still has a ways to go in terms of cyclist and pedestrian safety, but it’s great to see so many people feeling more and more comfortable opting for alternative modes of commuting.

    Hubway in the News! [Boston Globe] BRA outlines vision for Winthrop Square garage

    The following article by Tim Logan was originally published in The Boston Globe, on March 10th, 2016.

    After years of false starts, Boston officials said they will choose a developer to build a skyscraper on the site of a municipal garage in June, expecting it will be “one of the most notable structures” on the city skyline.

    The Boston Redevelopment Authority on Wednesday issued a formal request for proposals for the Winthrop Square Garage, giving developers six weeks to pitch an “iconic,” “innovative” tower in the Financial District. The agency hopes to have a permit issued for the project by the end of the year.

    The garage was first targeted for redevelopment a decade ago by then-mayor Thomas M. Menino, who called for a 1,000-foot tower on the site. Current guidelines would limit a tower to the 700-foot range.

    The 53-page document outlines the BRA’s priorities for the site, including a “substantial” contribution to the skyline, a “decidedly civic character” at the street level, observation deck, and even a Hubway station.

    “We’re looking for something that epitomizes the future of downtown Boston,” said Ed O’Donnell, BRA director of real estate.

    A year ago, the city received interest from eight major development firms. The BRA expects those firms — and potentially more — to submit formal proposals.

    Firms in the mix include Millennium Partners, developer of the nearby Millennium Tower condo project in Downtown Crossing, which pitched a 750-foot glass tower, and entrepreneur Steve Belkin, who owns the property adjacent to the garage on Federal Street, which he would combine into one larger building site.

    Former BRA director Tom O’Brien’s HYM Investment Group proposed a complicated package in which he would build a 780-foot tower across the street while turning the city site into a plaza and new school and St. Anthony Shrine church.

    5 stations opened today: 3/9/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Aquarium Station - 200 Atlantic Ave
  • Dorchester Ave at Gillette Park
  • West Broadway at D St
  • W Broadway at Dorchester St
  • South Boston Library - 646 East Broadway
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    5 stations opened today: 3/8/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Wentworth Institute of Technology
  • JP Monument - South St at Centre St, Curtis Hall, Jamaica Plain
  • Green Street T, Jamaica Plain
  • Jackson Square T @ Centre St, Jamaica Plain
  • Egleston Square at Columbus Ave, Jamaica Plain
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    Bikeshare in the News! [WTOP] Research emerges on bike-share safety across the U.S.

    The following article by Nick Iannelli was originally published on WTOP.com, on March 8th, 2016.

    WASHINGTON — Bike-share programs like D.C.’s Capital Bikeshare are becoming more popular around the country, and new research indicates the riders who use them are staying safer than regular bicyclists on the roads.

    “Overall the vehicle-involved collision rate is lower than what we have seen in rates of personal bicycling,” says Elliot Martin, a researcher with the Mineta Transportation Institute.

    Not only is the rate of injuries and vehicle-involved crashes lower, but there have been zero deadly crashes in the United States involving bike-share riders.

    One of the key reasons seems to be the design of bike-share bicycles. They are heavy and sturdy, which may slow down riders and make them less likely to engage in risky behavior.

    They are also painted with easy-to-see bright colors and they light up at night.

    “Those are some of the factors that would contribute to mitigating the risk for collision,” Martin says.

    The bike-share research focused on the metro areas around D.C., Minneapolis-St. Paul and San Francisco.

    4 stations opened today: 3/7/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Mayor Martin J. Walsh - 28 State Street
  • South Station - 700 Atlantic Ave
  • Chinatown Gate Plaza - Surface Rd at Beach St
  • Rowes Wharf - Atlantic Ave
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    [NewBostonPost] Boston ranks No.1 for commuting by foot, bike

    The following article by Kara Bettis was originally published on NewBostonPost, on March 7th, 2016.


    Bicycles await riders at a Hubway station. photo: Wikimedia.org

    BOSTON – A greater percentage of Bostonians walk to work than in any other major U.S. city, while the Hub is tied with Washington for No. 1 among those who either walk or bike to their jobs, according to the Alliance for Biking and Walking.

    The assessment marked the second time that Boston has ranked first in the nation among the 50 largest cities in terms of the percentage of commuters who come and go without using cars or public transportation. Yet many cyclists in the Hub still feel that the city has a long way to go to be considered bike-friendly, and by at least one measure, the statistics bear out that view.

    Boston’s bike fatality rate, at 3 per 10,000 bicycle commuters, put it behind 10 other cities, including Washington, at 1. Just 1.9 percent of Boston commuters bike to work, ranking the city 11th out of the top 50 by that measure, trailing Philadelphia (10th) and Denver (eighth), the only two in the top 10 where, like in Boston, winter weather often means snow-covered streets.

    The number of walking commuters in Boston rose 1.3 percentage points from 2007, according to the alliance, based in Washington. The Hub had the lowest rate of pedestrian fatalities per 10,000 walkers, at 2, the group said. Washington was tied with Minneapolis and Seattle at 3.

    Overall, the percentage of commuters who walk to work in the 50 largest cities ranked by population remained at about 5 percent compared with 2014, while commuters who cycled rose to 1.2 percent from 1 percent, the organization said. Boston’s biking commuter rate almost doubled, to 1.9 percent from 1 percent.

    In terms of demographics, fewer women bike to work compared with men, but there’s no such difference among walkers. Members of households with annual incomes of less than $20,000 are more likely to walk or bike where they need to go than those in higher-income households, according to the study.

    Until recently, Massachusetts was one of the worst states for bicyclists, according to the League of American Bicyclists – it ranked 19th among bicycle-friendly states in 2009. But its rank rose to fourth by 2015. The move up was largely due to a number of factors, including the Boston Bike Network Plan, which would add 120 miles of bicycle tracks.

    The city has extended a friendly hand to residents who prefer riding a bike over using public transportation, adding stations citywide for its Hubway bike-share program. The city is deploying bikes weekly, announcing March 5 that it had recently installed 25 bike stations across the city, with another 28 planned for this week across Jamaica Plain, the South End and Charlestown, among other districts.

    Boston began Hubway in 2011 with 60 stations and 600 bicycles. Now, it has 1,300 bikes at 140 stations, according to the Hubway website.

    POWER OF A STORY: Hubway riders get 50% OFF to WGBH's Boston Talks Happy Hour: The Book, March 16th


    Boston Talks Happy Hour: The Book

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 7-9pm
    WGBH Studios, One Guest Street, Brighton



    A Smarter Happy Hour
    Grab your friends and #TakeHubway for WGBH’s take on happy hour — inspiring conversation plus wine and local craft brews. Hear from and connect with local experts in a variety of fields while enjoying the great company of your neighbors from Boston and beyond.


    Hubway members click here to get your $5 tickets (regularly $10)!
    Hubway members get $5 tickets—USE PROMO CODE HUBWAY


    Boston Talks: The Book
    In this digital age, let’s celebrate the printed word and an increasingly rare commodity: books. Brookline teen librarian Robin Brenner talks about her work in the library and the power of a story in relation to graphic novels. And book conservator Todd Pattison highlights the history of bookbinding and how women changed the game.
    Meet the Host
    Edgar runs WGBH’s Curiosity Desk, where he digs a little deeper into topics in the news, explores the off-beat, and searches for answers to questions posed by the world around us. His radio features can be heard on 89.7 WGBH’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and his television features can be seen on WGBH’s Greater Boston. Follow him on Twitter @ebherwick3.

    PLEASE NOTE: You must be 21+ to attend.


    Downton Abbey loved its bikes, upstairs AND downstairs

    With last night’s series completion of Downton Abbey, we’re shedding an extra tear because we won’t get to see all the characters enjoying their early 20th century bicycles. See below for just a sampling of times they rode:

    And OK, this one isn’t from the show, but it is Lord Grantham himself, actor Hugh Bonneville, taking a pedal through the streets of London:

    Hubway Challenge Accepted: #TakeHubway, Get Burritos

    Last week, two riders/friends who were excited about the early-season station deployments tweeted out their Hubway ride statistics to do a little trash-talking.

    We tried to intervene…

    But they insisted…

    So we decided to issue them a challenge. We picked two active stations in Boston that were about as far away from each other as possible (given the current system), and…

    We weren’t sure if either Dan or Jonathan (or any other rider) would take us up on it, but a few minutes after 5pm…

    And then about half an hour later…

    Well, we here at Hubway aren’t one to break promises, so after confirming the trip, a $10 gift card to El Pelon was in the mail.

    And of course we encouraged Dan to bring Jonathan along for the grub…

    We didn’t even know there was a Taco Emoji!!!

    Want to stay informed about rider challenges and other spontaneous Hubway fun? Sign up here to receive our Fun Challenges emails!

    Exclusive Hubway Member Perk: save 25% on tickets for The Wizard of Oz

    We’re off to see…. the most magical adventure of them all. A new production of The Wizard of Oz is coming to the Citi Wang Theatre. Not only will you be able to #TakeHubway to the theatre (the station at Stuart St at Charles St is right around the corner), but as a Hubway rider, you save 25% on tickets for select performances.

    Developed from the ever popular MGM screenplay, this production contains the beloved songs from the Oscar-winning movie score, all the favorite characters and iconic moments, plus a few surprises along the way, including new songs by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber.

    Reserve your Hubway rider 25% off tickets today! Visit citicenter.org, and use code OZHUB for available tickets for these performances while supplies last:

    • Tuesday, 4/12, 7pm
    • Wednesday, 4/13, 7pm
    • Thursday, 4/14, 7pm
    • Friday, 4/15, 7pm
    • Sunday, 4/17, 6:30pm

    7 stations scheduled for deployment today: 3/4/16 deployments

    The stations listed below are scheduled for deployment in Boston today. Please note: the subject is subject to changes.

  • Charlestown - Main St @ Austin St
  • Charlestown - Warren St @ Chelsea St
  • Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital - Charlestown Navy Yard
  • TD Garden - Causeway at Portal Park #1 (North Station)
  • TD Garden - Causeway at Portal Park #2 (North Station)
  • Mayor Martin J. Walsh - 28 State Street
  • Tremont St at West St
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    Call for Submissions: 7th Annual Ciclismo Classico Bike Travel Film Festival

    All Hubway fans who love to explore and film (professional or amateur) are invited to submit entries for consideration for The 7th Annual Ciclismo Classico Bike Travel Film Festival on June 1st!

    Your film doesn’t have to involve an organized tour or international travel or anything you’d have to “quit-your-job” for (though it could)—your film can be informal and domestic, or even local! One of the festival’s best-received films in previous years involved an epic journey from Marblehead to Swampscott (a 10 mile ride) There’s even an award for the best film made by a Massachusetts resident!

    Films can range from 3 to 60 minutes, and must feature bicycle travel of some type. Oh, but entries must be submitted by the deadline on March 15th! Soon!

    Watch last year’s festival winners:
    Audience Prize: Megamoon
    Grand Jury Prize: A Nomad’s Life

    ABOUT
    This year’s Festival’s mission is to celebrate the first-ever National Bike Travel Weekend (June 3-5, 2016), and to inspire attendees to explore by bicycle. This is the ONLY film festival in the USA that focuses specifically on bicycle travel.

    Get applications, rules, regulations, and more details on the Festival site here!

    5 stations opened today for the season: 3/3/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • HMS / HSPH - Ave. Louis Pasteur at Longwood Ave.
  • Roxbury Crossing Station
  • Ruggles Station / Columbus Ave.
  • Washington St. at Lenox St.
  • Tremont St / W Newton St
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    [Next City] D.C., Boston tie for cycling, pedestrian commuting rates and safety

    The following article by Jen Kinney was originally published in Next City, on March 3rd, 2016.

    For the second time in a row, Boston and Washington D.C., have topped a biannual report for the share of commuters who bike or walk to work in the 50 most populous U.S. cities — but this year, D.C. has narrowed the gap between them to a dead tie.

    According to the Alliance for Biking and Walking’s 2016 Benchmarking Report — a breakdown of non-vehicular mode share in the U.S. released this week — 16.7 percent of both cities’ commuters bike or walk to work. That’s a 2 percent increase in D.C. since the 2014 report, with Boston’s rates unchanged in the same time period.

    The cities also tie for pedestrian and cyclist safety, at a rate of 1.6 fatalities per 10,000 commuters.

    San Francisco, Seattle and Portland round out the top five most populous cities with the highest cycling and biking rates, rankings unchanged since 2014, and each experienced modest gains. New York, Philadelphia, Minneapolis, Chicago and Baltimore follow in the top 10. Only Philadelphia does not also appear in the top 10 safest pedestrian/cycling cities, coming in at number 11.

    This year the report calculated cycling and walking rates in all 50 states and the 50 most populous cities, plus 19 additional cities of various sizes. Last year New Orleans and Honolulu made the top 10 mode share list in place of Chicago and Baltimore, but this year were shifted onto the smaller cities list.

    Overall, the percentage of commuters walking to work in the largest cities remained stable at 5 percent. Commuter cycling rates increased slightly from 1 percent in 2014 to 1.2 percent today.
    The report also highlights an increase in government support for bicycle- and pedestrian-oriented policy measures. Forty-one of the largest cities have a published goal to increase walking, up from 36 in 2014; forty-seven have a published goal to increase cycling. Twenty-eight cities have complete streets policies, compared to 23 in 2014. Forty-six have a bicycle and/or pedestrian master plan.

    More cities also have plans to fund these initiatives, but those with annual spending targets for cycling and bicycling are still in the minority: just 16, up from 10 in 2014.

    Unfortunately, cycling and walking gains didn’t seem to correspond with positive change in national health outcomes. The percentage of the U.S. population meeting physical activity recommendations is slightly down from 2014, while the percentage living with obesity, hypertension and diabetes is slightly up. Only the percentage of the population living with asthma decreased, by .1 percent.

    The report also notes demographic trends in just who, exactly, is biking and walking to work. In all of the cities studied, women walk equally but bike to work at far lower rates than men. They make up just 29 percent of bicycle commuters overall.

    The study dedicates a section to millennials, the group of Americans study after study has deemed least car-centric. The report cites a 2013 Urban Land Institute study that found that only 77 percent of millennials commute by car, compared to 90 percent of baby boomers and 92 percent of Generation X.

    Low-income households, defined as those with an annual income below $20,000, are also more likely to walk or use public transit than higher-income households, and more likely to walk or bike for transportation, as opposed to recreation, the report finds. Only 47 percent of biking trips made by low-income households were social or recreational, compared to 63 to 68 percent for higher-income households. As Next City contributor Rachel Dovey reported last fall, when it comes to critical investing in bike infrastructure, business-as-usual urban planning often fails low-income cyclists.

    The rest of the report’s many findings, including the complete mode share, fatality and infrastructure spending rankings of the 50 most populous cities, and a breakdown of cycling/walking rates for women, low-income residents and people of color can be downloaded here.

    6 stations opened today for the season: 3/2/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Faneuil Hall (Congress St along the backside of City Hall)
  • John F. Fitzgerald - Surface Rd at India St
  • ID Building East
  • ID Building West
  • State St at Channel Center
  • Nashua Street at Red Auerbach Way
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    [Time Money] Commuters in these cities bike and walk to work more than everyone else

    The following article by Alicia Adamczyk was originally published in Time, on March 2nd, 2016.

    A new report from the Alliance for Biking & Walking shows where car commuting is going out of style.

    A cyclist rents a bike from Hubway outside North Station, on May 17, 2013 in Boston, Massachusetts. Hubway is a bike-sharing system with more than 100 stations and 1000 bikes available in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville. Riders can buy annual, monthly, 3-day or 24 hour memberships. Members get a key to use three seasons of the year. photo: Melanie Stetson Freeman, Christian Science Monitor

    More commuters are walking and biking to work in America’s biggest cities.

    The Alliance for Biking & Walking’s 2016 benchmark report found that cities all over the country are adopting measures to make alternate modes of transportation more accessible and safe. The report looked at transportation trends in all 50 states and in the 50 most populous cities in the country, in addition to 18 cities that were previously studied by the Alliance.

    If a more active, less car-dependent commute is appealing to you, these are the cities you’ll want to check out:

    Percent of Commuters in Most Populous U.S. Cities Who Walk/Bike to Work

    CITY PERCENT OF COMMUTERS WHO WALK OR BIKE TO WORK
    Boston 16.7%
    Washington, D.C. 16.7%
    San Francisco 13.9%
    Seattle 12.9%
    Portland 12.1%
    New York 11.2%
    Philadelphia 10.6%
    Minneapolis 10.4%
    Chicago 8.1%
    Baltimore 7.7%

    Among other, less-populous cities, Burlington, Vermont, Davis, California, and Boulder, Colorado boast populations with over 20% of commuters walking or biking. Statewide, Alaska, New York, Vermont, Montana, Massachusetts, Hawaii, and Oregon see the largest percentage of residents (all over 5%) walking or biking to work.

    “Bicycle commuting has seen steady gains in the majority of large cities from 2007-2013,” the report reads.

    Interestingly, while women make up 46% of walking commuters, they make up just 27% of bikers (and 47% of commuters overall). Another divide is age: Just 77% of millennials commute by car, compared to 92% Generation X and 90% of Baby Boomers, according to a 2013 study by the Urban Land Institute. Lower income households are also more likely to walk to work than high income households.

    If a big city isn’t your scene, MONEY also analyzed the best small towns for walking and biking as part of our 2015 Best Places to Live list. You can check that out here.

    6 stations opened today for the season: 3/1/16 deployments

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Buswell St at Park Dr
  • Agganis Arena - 925 Comm Ave
  • Packard’s Corner - Commonwealth Ave at Brighton Ave
  • Landmark Centre - Brookline Ave at Boylston St
  • Longwood Ave at Binney St
  • Brighton Center - Cambridge St & Washington St
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    [Metro Boston] Boston's Hubway bikes emerge for the season

    The following is an excerpt of an article originally published in The Boston Metro, on March 1st, 2016.

    Bikes redeployed earlier than ever this year.

    Boston’s Hubway bikes are coming out of hibernation this week.

    Six stations for the city’s bike-sharing program were scheduled to come back online on the last day of February, the earliest in the season the bikes have ever been re-deployed, Hubway said on its website.

    Plans on the site include bringing 26 stations online by Friday.

    Boston, Somerville and Bookline bring their Hubway stations inside for the winter for repairs. Cambridge, meanwhile, offers bike-sharing year-round.

    As warmer months approach, Boston continues to eye expansions for the program, Stefanie Seskin, the city’s active transportation director, said in an interview.

    She said she hoped to add “a few stations this year.”

    One additional station is slated to pop up for the first time at the corner of Nashua Street and Martha Road near North Station.

    It “will be going out hopefully this week, assuming everything goes well,” Seskin said.

    Since its launch in 2011, 4 million trips have been logged on Hubway bikes, she said, adding she expects the system will surpass 5 million trips by the end of summer or early fall.

    “I think we have surpassed all the initial expectations for what bike-share in Boston could be and how well it would be used and received by both residents of the city and those who come to visit Boston,” she said. “Also, there is a lot of unmet demand for more bike-sharing in all of our neighborhoods.”

    The city announced the roll-out of 11 new docking stations in October.

    [Boston.com] Hubway's Boston-based stations are opening for spring

    The following is an excerpt of an article by Meagan McGinnes originally published on Boston.com, on February 29th, 2016.

    A Dorchester resident prepares to cross Boylston Street after renting a bike at the Hubway station in Boston’s Copley Square. photo: Wendy Maeda / The Boston Globe

    Hubway, the city’s bike-sharing system, is reopening all of its Boston stations, making this the earliest that Boston stations have ever deployed.

    Stations began reopening Monday and will gradually “go live” each day over the next few weeks, the company said in a statement. Stations with on-street locations along the Boston Marathon route will not be deployed until after the race on Patriots’ Day.

    Boston and Somerville stations closed at the end of December. Cambridge, the only city paying to keep Hubway stations open year round, kept 37 stations open this winter.

    Boston riders are approaching their four millionth ride since the bike-sharing system launched in 2011, according to the company.

    6 stations opened today for the season: 2/29/16 deployments

    BOSTON STATION DEPLOYMENT BEGINS FOR 2016 SEASON

    The following stations were deployed today, and are fully operational:

  • Innovation Lab - 125 Western Ave at Batten Way
  • B.U. Central - 725 Commonwealth Avenue
  • Harvard Real Estate - Brighton Mills - 370 Western Ave
  • New Balance - 20 Guest St
  • Union Square - Brighton Ave at Cambridge St
  • Christian Science Plaza
  • To view all active stations along with real-time bike/dock availability, visit our station map or use the mobile Spotcycle app.
    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    [Charles River TMA] Hubway is on its way back in Boston

    The following announcement was originally published on CharlesRiverTMA.org, on February 29th, 2016.

    Last year on the last day in February, Hubway was not on our minds [ed: the picture above was from 2/28/15]. 60º was a dream; we hadn’t seen 40 in a month and a half. 60” of snow was the monthly tally (well, actually, a bit more) and it would have taken days just to chip out the parking spaces for Hubway to return to the streets. The river was frozen solid (and wouldn’t melt for a month). Hubway and Cambridge worked diligently to keep the bikes free on out side of the river. With the snow melting slowly, Hubway would finally return to Boston in mid-April.

    But guess what? It didn’t snow 110” this winter! It wasn’t Minneapolis-cold in February; in fact, despite the coldest temperature in 59 years, February has clocked in above average, and more than 15º warmer than last. And as the saying goes, February showers bring March Hubway (wait, that is not a saying at all). But still, Hubway is coming back, and soon!

    The first stations are actually going in today, on the leap day. If you’re lucky and live in Allston, you may be able to Hubway home today (and you can do so one the best new bike facility in the country). For others, the racks will come a bit more slowly. Kendall commuters will be most interested about Yawkey (Tuesday) and North Station and South Station (Thursday). No word on the Back Bay area, which will probably be coming in the next week or so.

    The only downside is that for Kendall, it will mean that the racks will be getting full again, so check out the Spotcycle app to make sure there are bikes or spaces available.

    Oh, and if you’ve been off the Longfellow this winter, remember that the traffic pattern has changed, so follow signage, and read up on the new patterns here and check out a video here.

    Hubway returns to Boston! Station deployments Feb 29 - Mar 4

    Nevermind the groundhog! It’s a beautiful day for a ride. Today Hubway begins its return to a full multi-municipality system with the re-deployment of Boston-based locations, joining Cambridge stations (open year-round). This marks the earliest in the season that Boston stations have ever deployed, and there will be a few stations opening each day over the next few weeks.

    See below for this week’s station deployment schedule. PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to change for a variety of reasons, so make sure to check our station map or download a free app by searching “Hubway” on your smartphone (android link here) to see active stations along with bike/dock availability. Stations will be “live” as soon as they are deployed.

    Monday, 2/29 (6 stations)

  • Innovation Lab - 125 Western Ave at Batten Way
  • B.U. Central - 725 Commonwealth Avenue
  • Harvard Real Estate - Brighton Mills - 370 Western Ave
  • New Balance - 20 Guest St
  • Union Square - Brighton Ave at Cambridge St
  • Christian Science Plaza
  • Tuesday, 3/1 (6 stations)
    PLEASE NOTE CHANGES HAVE BEEN MADE

  • Buswell St at Park Dr
  • Agganis Arena - 925 Comm Ave
  • Packard’s Corner - Commonwealth Ave at Brighton Ave
  • Landmark Centre - Brookline Ave at Boylston St
  • Longwood Ave at Binney St
  • Brighton Center - Cambridge St & Washington St
  • Wednesday, 3/2 (6 stations)
    PLEASE NOTE CHANGES HAVE BEEN MADE

  • Faneuil Hall (Congress St along the backside of City Hall)
  • John F. Fitzgerald - Surface Rd at India St
  • ID Building East
  • ID Building West
  • State St at Channel Center
  • Nashua Street at Martha Road [NEW STATION - details here]
  • Thursday, 3/3 (5 stations)
    PLEASE NOTE CHANGES HAVE BEEN MADE

  • HMS / HSPH - Ave. Louis Pasteur at Longwood Ave.
  • Roxbury Crossing Station
  • Ruggles Station / Columbus Ave.
  • Washington St. at Lenox St.
  • Tremont St / W Newton St
  • Friday, 3/4 (5 stations)
    PLEASE NOTE CHANGES HAVE BEEN MADE

  • Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital - Charlestown Navy Yard
  • Charlestown - Warren St @ Chelsea St
  • TD Garden - Causeway at Portal Park #1 (North Station)
  • TD Garden - Causeway at Portal Park #2 (North Station)
  • Edwards Playground - Main Street & Eden Street
  • We plan to announce next week’s deployment schedule as soon as possible. To make sure you receive these announcements, sign up to receive the Hubway newsletter by clicking here. Please note: stations with on-street locations along the Boston Marathon route will not be deployed until after the race in April.

    Hubway Riders Setting Winter Records

    Riders have taken over 3,940,000 trips since Hubway’s launch in July of 2011. #CountdownTo5MillionRides

    Boston station 2016 deployment begins LeapDay!

    It’s true! 2016 deployment of Boston-based stations begins this coming Monday, LeapDay, February 29th. What a difference a day makes! This is the earliest (by over a month) that Boston stations have opened for the riding season. As riders approach their 4 millionth ride in the life of Hubway (and then the 5 millionth later this year), you’ll be able to #TakeHubway at more and more stations in the system.

    [It's Kristin] 10 Must-Do Activities in Boston, according to local bloggers

    The following is an excerpt of an article originally published on the blog, It’s Kristin, on February 22nd, 2016.Click here to read the full article.

    Whether your visiting Boston, new to the city or looking for something new to do, I’ve teamed up with a bunch of other fabulous local bloggers to share our favorite things to do around town. From museums to booze to parks, we’ve got you covered with these nine must-do activities.


    Bike Ride by the Charles River


    “While I don’t recommend doing this until the weather gets a bit warmer (damn you, Punxsutawney Phil!)… for an active way to show your friends our beautiful city of Boston, there’s no better way to do so than via bike. This past fall, I had family in town and knew I had to impress . We kept on passing the new Hubway Bikes and finally decided to hop on one for a cruise around the Charles River. Holy shiz. It might have been because of the amazing weather or because the Charles River Esplanade is just absolutely stunning…but either way, it made for the best afternoon riding along the river, taking in the view of the hundreds of sailboats (I’m not exaggerating), crossing the Harvard Bridge (where I was told the story about ‘smoot‘), and eventually finishing up in Charlestown’s Paul Revere Park. A suggestion to elevate the biking adventure? Pack a picnic and make a pit stop at the Charles River Dock.” – Robbin The New England Life

    System Alert: Hubway has reopened (all stations in Cambridge)

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Tuesday, morning. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather and ongoing station cleanup. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    [Philly.com] Indego has inroads yet to make

    The following is an article originally published by Jason Laughlin and Dylan Purcell on Philly.com on January 24th, 2016.

    It was after dark when Kieu Tran slid the bright blue bike into a bright blue dock in Point Breeze.

    Her commute was almost over. The docks, part of the city’s bike-share program, Indego, are a short walk from home, where her four children waited to eat dinner. Since Indego’s April debut, Tran, 45, has discovered that the 15-minute bicycle trip to her job at Peirce College’s admissions office in Center City takes half the time as riding the bus and is cheaper.

    “I’m going to try to go through the winter,” she said.

    The city would love more bike riders like Tran, who lives in a neighborhood with a median household income of about $30,000. Yet an analysis of rider data from April to September shows that Indego has struggled with one of its founding missions: to get riders from low-income areas up on two wheels.

    Bike share offers publicly owned cycles for rent at 73 stations in the city. The program has sold 8,300 memberships since April and reported 421,000 rides taken. Indego has become a reliable commuting option for thousands of Philadelphians.

    But The Inquirer’s analysis of April-to-September rider data shows that the five least-used bike-rental stations in the city were in neighborhoods with median household incomes below $25,000.

    The least-used rental station, at 11th and Poplar Streets, saw 71 bikes signed out in September. That’s about the same traffic that the kiosk in Rittenhouse Square, the city’s most popular, gets in 12 hours.

    A Philadelphia neighborhood with one of the lowest median household incomes, Mantua, has two Indego rental stations. Both are among the least used, the data show. One near 39th and Mount Vernon Streets reported 461 rentals in six months. The other, at 36th and Spring Garden Streets, at the fringe of Drexel University’s campus, reported 565 rentals.

    Promoting biking means changing people’s habit of using public transit or cars, said James Wright, a manager at the community-development organization People’s Emergency Center, based in Mantua.

    “Right now, it’s not really on their radar,” he said of bike shares. “I don’t really know if they paid attention to it, to be honest.”

    With membership at $15 a month for unlimited one-hour rides, Indego offers a cheaper, healthier way to commute than bus or subway. It also offers freedom, Wright said, from the set routes used by public transportation.

    Despite those benefits, Indego’s challenges reaching the city’s lower-income residents are neither surprising nor unique.

    An April 2015 study from the National Association of City Transportation Officials stated that “while bike share offers clear financial benefits, low- income people are not proportionally represented among U.S. bike share users.”

    Indego is entering its second phase this year, with 24 new stations planned, some likely to go to poorer neighborhoods. Philadelphia officials overseeing the program will spend the winter analyzing data and reaching out to riders, to determine how to sell bike share’s advantages to people feeling financial pressure.

    “Our goal is to learn from each station,” said Aaron Ritz, complete streets implementation manager in the city managing director’s office of transportation and infrastructure. “We’re using this ongoing learning process to drive the next round of station planning.”

    Indego’s outreach efforts have included organized rides, an ambassador program that used neighborhood activists to promote the benefits of biking, and outreach to such community leaders as Wright.

    The program’s fare structure is one of its most significant innovations. A monthly membership payment plan helps attract people put off by a pricey initial investment. It also allows people to pay with cash, an entry point for those without debit or credit cards.

    Of the program’s 8,300 members, the number paying with cash is in the double digits, city officials have said.

    Getting communities to buy in also has proved a challenge. In Point Breeze, two businesses, a 7-Eleven and a Family Dollar, are registered to process cash payments, according to Indego’s website (www.rideindego.com). But store clerks asked about Indego cash payments said the businesses did not process them.

    In an actual cash transaction for Indego, a clerk would simply need to scan a bar code that a rider receives online, Ritz said. Still, he said, having staff at the businesses who were so uninformed was a problem. “We’re looking to update the cash membership program,” he said.

    It’s too soon to draw conclusions from the data, said Ritz, but he noted that density and geography are two factors that might make bike-share stations in poorer neighborhoods less used.

    Stations in densely populated areas with diverse development tend to do better, he said. Poorer neighborhoods tend to have lower residential density.

    To give it the best chance of reaching a lot of people, Indego’s original stations were clustered in Center City and University City, where there are offices, cultural attractions, and lots of residents. A neighborhood like Point Breeze or Mantua is on the network’s outskirts, with fewer directions a cyclist can go to reach another station.

    Adding stations outside the city’s core will be in the mix during this year’s expansion, officials said.

    Boston’s bike share, Hubway, was founded five years ago and has had some success getting low-income residents biking.

    Hubway, which also serves neighboring Somerville, Brookline, and Cambridge, Mass., has more than 4,000 members in Boston, about 15 percent of them low-income residents. Its membership is $85 a year, but those whose income and family size meet the program’s measures of low income can get annual memberships for just $5.

    Indego will likely keep its $15 membership for most users, Ritz said, but it is considering creating a greater spectrum of prices.

    “We’re beginning the stages of piloting projects where we target groups with different offers and different prices to encourage ridership and to lower any financial barriers,” he said.

    Hubway staffers are regulars at community meetings and keep up a presence in Boston neighborhoods, but they say what helps most is word-of-mouth and visibility.

    “That’s part of the best marketing, having the bikes out there,” said Najah Shakir, program manager at Boston Bikes, which oversees Hubway for Boston.

    Wright, the Mantua community leader, said Indego’s staff could be even more visible in the neighborhood by attending meetings that draw crowds of residents invested in the community.

    “It just takes time and effort and massive outreach because you’re changing the culture,” he said. “People are used to SEPTA or driving” or taking cabs.

    This year, Indego will begin a major marketing push, officials said. It will seek customer feedback and conduct surveys.

    The system will work best if it responds to the needs of riders, Ritz said: “Part of that learning is making sure we’re aware of trips people need or want.”

    Even where ridership is low, there are signs that Indego is catching on. At the station at 39th and Mount Vernon Streets and the one in Point Breeze where Tran starts her commute, the data show rider use grew during peak summer.

    Tran is an Indego convert, she said, and surprised her friends by saying that, even on cold days, biking is better.

    “If I took the bus, I would have to stand and wait and then get on the second bus,” she said. “On this, I was always moving.”

    [Boston Globe] GE move puts Seaport gridlock back in spotlight

    The following is an article originally published by Nicole Dungca in the Boston Globe on January 23rd, 2016.

    With General Electric Co. likely to move to Boston’s booming Seaport District and a flood of new construction underway across the area, workers and businesses are hoping for quick improvements to routine gridlock and public transit woes.

    Already, morning commuters navigate through slow-moving traffic on Summer Street or crowd into a small waiting area at South Station to pack onto Silver Line buses to take them to work. Whereas the Seaport — also known as the South Boston Waterfront — seemed deserted and full of parking lots merely five years ago, it’s now teeming with new companies and thousands of workers.

    By 2035, when the district’s final 17 million square feet are developed, trips to and from the waterfront during peak hours are estimated to increase by 63 percent. But even now, growing pains are evident. One Silver Line route, which travels through South Station to the Seaport’s Design Center, operates at 123 percent of its maximum capacity during the morning commute, according to a 2015 report. And companies have commissioned more than two dozen private shuttles to help employees get around.

    “I think for the Seaport to be successful, public transit has to catch up with growth,” said Julie Wormser, executive director of the Boston Harbor Association. Wormser has purchased Razor scooters for her staff so they can sometimes avoid public transportation. “There’s no question.”

    Daniel McMahon of Jamaica Plain, who commutes to work at the Seaport via the Silver Line, is worried about the impact of more workers. “It barely has the capacity to run with the amount we have now,” McMahon said this week, waiting for the bus at South Station. “People are always standing 10 deep, just elbow to elbow, and you have to hope you don’t become late.”

    Liz White of West Newton said she’s used to the crowds by now, and that her co-workers constantly talk about the need for more express buses. “The MBTA does the best they can, but there’s just a big influx of people,” she said.

    Seaport congestion is already on the radar of state and city officials: In January last year, A Better City, a nonprofit backed by business and civic institutions, released a study with public agencies that outlined recommendations for improving transportation in the Seaport.

    The recommendations included consolidating the private shuttles that circle the neighborhood during rush hour, improving the traffic signals for the Silver Line at D Street, installing more Hubway bicycle stations, buying 60 new Silver Line buses, and re-opening or rebuilding the Northern Avenue Bridge.

    A year later, city and state officials have made some improvements: They installed new real-time information signs for Silver Line buses, and the traffic signals at D Street now prioritize buses. The city this week made clear it intends to rebuild the Northern Avenue Bridge, and the state is experimenting with HOV lanes and letting all cars onto the South Boston Bypass Road. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is also overhauling 32 Silver Line buses for $24.3 million.

    With help from the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority, some companies are close to signing onto consolidated routes for the private shuttles that were dispatched to help pick up the slack for the MBTA, providing connections from South Station and North Station.

    Still, some big changes remain up in the air: Though the MBTA has purchased some new buses that can serve the Silver Line’s above-ground stops, it does not yet have a plan to acquire the 60 new buses that A Better City recommended.

    Joe Pesaturo, an MBTA spokesman, said the transportation authority is well positioned to meet some future demand in the Seaport, such as outbound commutes for new residents in the area or trips outside of peak hours.

    “As far as new Silver Line vehicles [for South Boston tunnel routes] are concerned, the Authority will continue to explore new technologies, evaluate its options for the next fleet, and determine the best way to meet future demand,” he wrote in an e-mail.

    All of this debate comes as GE formally announced plans this month to relocate its headquarters — and about 800 employees — to the city, likely in the Seaport District. The neighborhood will ultimately also become home to hundreds of new apartments, stores, restaurants, and entertainment venues, particularly in the Seaport Square development.

    Rick Dimino, executive director of A Better City, said city and state officials have worked hard to focus on near-term changes so far, but he said they know more needs to be done. Though improving the traffic signals on D Street has improved the reliability of the Silver Line, Dimino said the MBTA must still expand its capacity.

    “We’re not there yet in terms of being able to meet that transit share,” he said.

    Officials are also considering building a tunnel to allow buses to go underground around D Street to improve speed and reliability.

    And many don’t believe the solutions fall squarely on the Silver Line: The Boston Harbor Association’s Wormser said officials should take more seriously proposals to increase ferry service traveling from North Station to the Seaport, which could relieve some traffic congestion.

    She said private shuttles or more Uber rides may not be the answer, since they aren’t accessible or affordable for everyone. Instead, she said, the government should be investing more in its transportation network.

    “Can we have dedicated bike lanes? Can we have dedicated bus lanes? Can we have ferries?” she said. “That’s going to better equalize the access to jobs.”

    The government has pledged some further improvements: With news of GE’s move to Boston, city and state officials said they wanted to continue with plans that could use up to $100 million to rebuild the closed Northern Avenue Bridge, and use $25 million in already-approved funds to fix sidewalks, intersections, and other transportation challenges in the district.

    General Electric’s move to Boston will be far from the biggest influx of workers to the Seaport. But Lauren Grymek, executive director of the Seaport Transportation Management Association, said the news has helped keep the spotlight on transportation issues there.

    “I think it was a good reminder that there’s still work to be done, but also signifying that there are solutions and people still want to be in this area,” she said.

    [Wicked Local] Boston College provides grants for Allston-Brighton enhancement projects

    The following is an article originally published in Wicked Local Allston on January 20th, 2016.

    Boston College and the city of Boston recently gave neighborhood grants totaling almost $450,000 to Allston-Brighton, providing funding for future enhancement projects including a Medal of Honor monument, bike share stations and improvements to parks.

    Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh recently joined William Leahy, Boston College president, at a ceremony on the University’s Chestnut Hill campus to award Neighborhood Improvement Fund Grant checks to six organizations. It’s part of the school’s support for physical improvements that are available to the residents of Allston-Brighton. The $2.5 million fund was established as part of the community benefits package under the University’s Institutional Master Plan. It targets projects where public sources of funding may be unavailable or inadequate.

    The Allston-Brighton Veterans received $90,000 to help fund a Medal of Honor monument for Pfc. Ernest W. Prussman, killed during World War II; Boston Police will use $40,000 to buy two speed alert display board units; two solar powered trash and recyclable compacting stations costing $25,000 are on their way to the Chestnut Hill Reservoir; and Brighton Main Streets will use $100,000 to install gateway signage along with an interactive wayfinding kiosk that will provide information about local businesses, access to public transit and a community calendar.

    Boston Bikes-Hubway and the city’s transportation department will use $95,600 for two bike share stations while $95,538 will fund improvements to McKinney Park including a new automated solar scoreboard, three concrete chess tables and transformation of the street hockey court so it can also be used for soccer and basketball.

    Created last year as part a package of public benefits related to its Institutional Master Plan, the University is providing financial assistance to public and private nonprofit entities in Allston-Brighton to help enhance public parks and open space, for neighborhood beautification, transportation and roadway improvements, public safety projects, public art, and other projects that achieve the objectives of the fund. Particular emphasis is paid to areas of Brighton closest to Boston College.

    [East Boston Times-Free Press] City Councilor Sal LaMattina is Sworn in to his Fifth Term

    The following is an article originally published by John Lynds in the East Boston Times-Free Press on January 7th, 2016.

    City Councilor Sal LaMattina was sworn in to his fifth term as District 1 City Councilor Monday at Faneuil Hall and said he looks forward to representing East Boston, Charlestown and the North End for another two years.

    “I am very excited to begin my 5th term on the Boston City Council,” said LaMattina. “With the changeover I have now become the dean of the City Council as the longest serving member. I am also excited about working with new Council President Michelle Wu and am proud of the new diversity of the Boston City Council. I strongly believe that this is a council that will work together with the Mayor to move Boston forward.”

    LaMattina said he will continue to be a hands on City Councilor and plans to work on quality of life issues that are important to our neighborhood.
    “For me it has always been about the nuts and bolts of working with basic city service departments,” said LaMattina. “I will also continue my work with District 7 Captain Kelley McCormick and Community Response Team. I plan to continue my discussions with the administration on a new senior center in East Boston.”

    With waterfront development finally happening in East Boston, LaMattina plans to focus his attention in Eastie on the current and future developments along the neighborhood’s water’s edge.

    “Waterfront development is something that I am very proud of because I have fought for decades for developers to build here,” he said. “I will be sure to work closely with developers about maintaining and allowing waterfront access for the public by focusing on one, unified harbor walk while continuing to fight for ferries.”

    LaMattina said he will also push for more workforce housing and a new public middle school.

    “I strongly believe that workforce housing is something that we need more of in the community,” said LaMattina. “Another top priority will be to work with the Walsh Administration to build another middle school in East Boston as well.”

    While committee assignments will be ironed out in the next few days, LaMattina hopes to chair the Parks and Transportation committee.

    “With more residents moving in I believe that it is vital to create more open space,” said LaMattina. “I also feel that East Boston would benefit greatly by adding alternative forms of transportation which is why I will work with the administration on bringing Hubway to East Boston.  I will continue to work with the neighborhood and Massport to address issues at Logan Airport as well.”

    #TakeHubway All Year Long

    For the third year in a row, all Cambridge-based stations except the Dana Park location are open year-round! That’s 37 stations you can find bikes all season long until the system-wide reopening this spring.

    Please reference the Hubway station map or the spotcycle app for up-to-the-minute station, dock, and bike availability. As usual, all closed stations are expected to reopen in spring.


    Here are the stations that will remain open for all of the winter season, pending weather conditions:

    • 359 Broadway - Broadway at Fayette Street
    • Alewife Station at Russell Field
    • Ames St at Main St
    • Biogen - Binney St / Sixth St
    • Biomed - Kendall Street
    • Cambridge Main Library at Broadway / Trowbridge St
    • Cambridge St - at Columbia St / Webster Ave
    • CambridgeSide Galleria - CambridgeSide PL at Land Blvd
    • Central Sq Post Office / Cambridge City Hall at Mass Ave / Pleasant St
    • Central Square at Mass Ave / Essex St
    • Danehy Park
    • EF - North Point Park
    • Harvard Kennedy School at Bennett St / Eliot St
    • Harvard Law School at Mass Ave / Jarvis St
    • Harvard Square at Brattle St / Eliot St
    • Harvard Square at Mass Ave/ Dunster
    • Harvard University / SEAS Cruft-Pierce Halls at 29 Oxford St
    • Harvard University Gund Hall at Quincy St / Kirkland St
    • Harvard University Housing - 115 Putnam Ave at Peabody Terrace
    • Harvard University Radcliffe Quadrangle at Shepard St / Garden St
    • *Harvard University River Houses at DeWolfe St / Cowperthwaite St
    • Inman Square at Vellucci Plaza / Hampshire St
    • **Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main St / Columbia St
    • Lechmere Station at Cambridge St / First St
    • Linear Park - Mass. Ave. at Cameron Ave
    • Lower Cambridgeport at Magazine St/Riverside Rd
    • Mass. Ave at Lesley University
    • MIT at Mass Ave / Amherst St
    • MIT Pacific St at Purrington St
    • MIT Stata Center at Vassar St / Main St
    • MIT Vassar St
    • Mt. Auburn
    • One Broadway / Kendall Sq at Main St / 3rd St
    • One Kendall Square at Hampshire St / Portland St
    • Porter Square Station
    • Rindge Avenue - O’Neill Library
    • Sidney Street at University Park

    *The Harvard River Houses station has returned to its permanent location at the intersection of DeWolfe Street, Cowperthwaite Street, and Memorial Drive.
    **The Lafayette Square station has moved to its seasonal location on the sidewalk in front of the Salvation Army at 402 Mass Ave.


    Visit thehubway.com/news for station move alerts and details.

    Please note: the Hubway system may temporarily shut down during periods of extreme or inclement weather. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Twitter and Facebook. Members and Hubway email newsletter recipients will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email. Click here to sign up for Hubway’s email list.

    [Boston.com] New bike laws may be coming to Massachusetts

    The following is an article originally published by Steve LeBlanc on Boston.com on January 2nd, 2016.

    Bicyclists can get little respect on the road — from drivers, pedestrians, even fellow cyclists.

    Sometimes the angry stares are deserved, but more often the friction stems from the fact that bicycles, cars, buses, trucks and pedestrians are scrabbling with each other for a narrow sliver of the same street.

    Bills aimed at helping protect bicyclists are a focus of the first public hearing of the year at the Massachusetts Statehouse on Wednesday before the Legislature’s Transportation Committee.

    Richard Fries, executive director of bicycling advocacy group MassBike, says the group is hoping to hear testimony from “the families and friends of victims whose lives and limbs may have been spared if these laws had been in place.”

    One of the bills MassBike is keeping a close eye on would require side guards on trucks and other large vehicles.

    Activists say more than half of bicyclists killed by trucks first hit the side of the truck and are then swept beneath. Side guards are intended to help block bicyclists from being pulled under a truck’s wheels.

    Boston passed an ordinance requiring side guards on trucks in 2014. Mayor Marty Walsh praised the move, calling the guards a low-cost feature that can save lives.

    “We’re seeing more Bostonians choosing bikes as their primary mode of transportation, but with this increase in use, we’ve also seen an increase in crashes between cyclists and vehicles,” Walsh said when the measure was adopted by the Boston City Council.

    Another bill would ban drivers from stopping or parking their cars on any lane officially designated for the use of bicycles. Violators would face a $100 fine.

    Many cities and towns have begun designating portions of roads as bicycle lanes, often by painting lanes on the street. Sometimes the lanes are blocked by double-parked cars or drivers who have pulled into the lane to stop — forcing cyclists to veer into traffic.

    Bicycle advocates are pushing for another bill set to come up at Wednesday’s hearing.

    The measure would require motorists to provide a minimum of 3 feet when passing a bicyclist or other “vulnerable user,” even if it requires them to cross the center line to do so. The bill would add cyclists to police, first responders, construction workers, pedestrians and others defined as vulnerable users.

    MassBike pointed to research it said shows that bicyclists being struck from behind account for 40 percent of fatalities.

    A fourth bill would require cars to yield for bicyclists and pedestrians who are using a crosswalk that is also part of a bicycle path. Currently bicyclists are technically supposed to walk through such intersections, something activists say is unrealistic.

    Massachusetts is seen as more welcoming to bicyclists, and has watched the popularity of Hubway, Boston’s bike-sharing system, grow. The League of American Bicyclists ranked the state fourth in its 2015 list of states most friendly to bicyclists, up from tenth in 2014.

    Despite those efforts, bicycling isn’t without risk.

    Several bicyclists have died on the road in the state in 2015, including Swiss surgeon and medical researcher Dr. Anita Kurmann, 38, who was struck by a flatbed tractor-trailer in Boston in August.

    Just this week, on Wednesday, another cyclist — a 54-year-old man from Shrewsbury — was struck while riding along Route 9 in Worcester.

    Give Yourself a Hubway Gift for the New Year


    There’s one person you forgot from your holiday list: YOU!
    Get your new year’s resolutions started
    by purchasing or renewing your Hubway membership today.



    Already a member? Why wait until your membership expires? Make your Hubway renewal a new year’s resolution by logging into your account and pre-purchasing your membership extension!

    New to Hubway? Awesome! Start here to register and order your key, or visit the Hubway online store to grab some 24-Hour or 72-Hour passes. Passes start at only $6.

    Of course you can always still grab passes as gifts for friends, too :).
    Visit the Hubway online store today!


    [Bikabout] 29 U.S. Bike Shares Open During Winter

    The following is an excerpt of an article originally published by Megan Ramey on Bikabout on December 23rd, 2015.

    BUNDLE UP AND RIDE YEAR ‘ROUND ON THESE BIKE SHARES

    Many cities who operate bike sharing programs pack up their kiosks for the winter months, rather than operate through potential snow and ice. Some cities, however, have decided to keep their bike share systems open and running during the winter months, which means that visitors coming in for the holidays have an easy option for getting around town.

    Click here for the full map and list of the U.S. systems that are open this winter.

    SYSTEM ALERT: December 31st is final day for Boston- & Somerville-based stations

    SYSTEM ALERT: The final day of 2015 winter operations for all Boston- & Somerville-based stations will be Thursday, December 31st! Though you may continue to see the Boston & Somerville stations during the first week of January, they will not be operational, and riders will not be able to rent bikes from these stations. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. All stations that have closed for the season are expected to relaunch again in spring 2016.

    Click here to register for email system alerts. If stations you typically use are within Boston or Somerville city limits, we recommend making alternative arrangements for your trips beginning on the 31st.

    Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for over 3.9 million rides… and counting!

    The Force is Strong with Hubway

    [Bicycling] We Dare You: Break the Rules

    The following is an article originally published by Nicole Blades in Bicycling on December 16th, 2015.

    Sometimes, rules are meant to be ignored—as in the case of Kittie Knox, a racial pioneer in the sport of cycling.

    Photograph courtesy of Smithsonian Library

    An open letter to the late Kittie Knox:

    There’s something about riding a bike—the freshness of the breeze against my skin, the undisturbed connection with the road—that feels so free and easy.

    It was never free and easy for you. But you did it anyway. And that’s why everyone should know your story: Born to a free Black father and white mother in Boston in 1874, when cycling was bursting out of its infancy, you fell in love with it. However, a woman—one of mixed race, no less—had no business on a bicycle. People wanted you to know your place, to focus on being a seamstress, but you refused to be limited. Rejecting women’s tricycles, you insisted on riding a man’s two-wheeled bike, and designed your own pantaloons for riding instead of the standard cumbersome skirts.

    In 1894, the year after you joined the League of American Wheelmen, the national organization voted to become whites-only (a stipulation that wasn’t officially reversed until 1999). In the face of segregation and discrimination, you persevered. When I learned that you regularly completed century rides and finished near the front of the pack at coed races, I practically pumped my fist in the air. You even showed up at the League’s big annual meeting in Asbury Park, New Jersey, in 1895, causing a scene as you showed off fancy bike turns outside the hotel and danced with a white man at the social. Despite the protests from delegates who fought to have you removed from the event, you would not stand down.

    When you died of kidney disease, at just 26 years old, the fight was long from won. Still, you had made your mark. You pieced together your own convention, pursuing joy despite the barriers. This is how a pioneer behaves: moving forward, regardless.

    And for all of it, I thank you. We—the outsiders, the marginalized, the dismissed—we thank you for riding against the color bar; for asserting your right to fun, community, and exhilaration; for broadening the boundaries, clearing a path for other women of color like me to chase our joy, pedaling on our own terms.

    Nicole Blades is a novelist and freelance journalist who writes about motherhood, identity, and culture. Her second novel, The Thunder Beneath Us (Kensington), will be published in November 2016.

    [Wicked Local Somerville] Somerville cyclists could get safety gear instead of tickets for riding without lights

    The following is an article originally published by Monica Jimenez in Wicked Local Somerville on December 16th, 2015.

    Somerville cyclists riding without helmets or lights may in the future receive the items they’re missing for free, and a friendly warning instead of a ticket.

    The Somerville Bike Committee has talked with the Somerville police about officers carrying bike helmets and lights that they can give to cyclists who are riding without them, and are considering partnering with local businesses to fund the program, according to members at the committee’s end-of-year meeting Dec. 15 in the basement lounge of City Hall.

    Providing these items for free would actually improve safety, Somerville Bike Committee member Ian Woloschin said during a rundown of the committee’s 2016 goals. On the other hand, a $25 ticket isn’t worth the time it takes the officer to issue it, Woloschin said.

    “Here’s a light, have a good night,” Woloschin said, in a demonstration of how such an encounter might go. “Don’t ride away before I see you turn it on.”

    Another goal for 2016 is working with police to improve the collection of bicycle crash data in the city. The standard accident report form is geared toward motor vehicles, asking questions such as whether the operator was wearing a seatbelt, Woloschin said. The city of Cambridge is now working with an expert at Harvard University to create a bike-specific form that Somerville might be able to share, he said.

    “SPD should do a better job getting people to trade info and also recommending that cyclists talk to us,” Woloschin added. “A lot of cyclists get in a crash and have no idea what to do. We can say, here’s a bike shop, here’s a lawyer to talk to.”

    The committee also wants to begin analysis of bike crash data to develop a map of accident hotspots in the city, Woloschin said, and to develop at least three projects to encourage current cyclists to ride and to engage with people who don’t ride bikes, according to committee member Alex Anderson.

    Ideas include expanding Hubway, organizing school bike rides for students, parents and teachers, bringing in an expert to talk to kids about bike maintenance after school, and working with Tufts on neighborhood engagement, Anderson said.

    Also on the committee’s to-do list: Coming up with cycle facility guidelines setting, for example, a standard width for a bike lane.

    “It’s actually kind of a mishmash,” member Brian Postlewaite said of current guidelines. “And we want to add to that mishmash.”

    Postlewaite also proposed continuing to push for more cycling infrastructure in the north-south direction, as opposed to east-west, and improving coordination with the city to keep abreast of all projects that might affect cycling infrastructure.

    “Historically we’ve received time to review them in order to make statements, nothing more,” Postlewaite said. “We want to be part of the process and in framework so we can work with the city.”

    Committee member Brandon Stafford wanted to investigate the idea of building a bridge over the Mystic River to connect with a little-used bike path on the other side.

    “It’s amazing, it’s like the community path but it’s nine miles long and no one’s on it,” Stafford said. “And it ends right across the river from Somerville. I think our role is to say, let’s build this bridge.”

    Finally, Woloschin said local cyclists should be encouraged to report instances of trucks or other vehicles blocking bike lines so the police will take notice and perhaps issue tickets.

    “You see all these cyclists riding by, not caring,” Stafford said. “If we can get 10 percent to care, the streets will be a lot safer.”

    [Fragrant Elephant] Hubway Bikes: for the Post-Theft Cyclist

    The following is an article originally published by Nicole Mitton in her Fragrant Elephant blog on December 15th, 2015.

    Back in 2011, Boston launched its bicycle sharing system, called Hubway. The bikes are locked in stations throughout the city. To use one, assuming you’re a member, you use your fob to unlock the bike of your choice (I always select one with the seat at the lowest setting), and off you go.

    I explain it to my mom thus: “It’s Zipcar but with bicycles.”

    Now, any form of transportation requires both infrastructure and human will. My dear city has bike lanes as well as, er, assertive cyclists (dudes who follow cars and yell at the drivers for infractions). Drivers these days are also nicer and more accepting of sharing the road with cyclists, as evidenced by the lady in the SUV who apologized for almost squishing me because she got distracted. So the Hubway system works quite well indeed.

    The bikes themselves are terrific. I was surprised at how light they were compared to my dear Trek2, which was an 8-speed hybrid. Hubway bikes only have three gears, and I sail along on my morning commute, just sail, I tell you. (Side note: internet research indicates that both my stolen Trek FX7200 and the Hubway bikes weigh around 30-40 lbs., so I must’ve had Trek2 on the wrong gear combination for my stubby legs.)

    The best part about using a Hubway bike is not having to maintain or upgrade it. Each bike comes built in with flashing lights, a front “basket,” and best of all, front and back fenders, so that I don’t get a trail of mud up my butt and back when I ride during wet conditions.

    Image Source: boston.com

    Most importantly, the fact that I don’t own them means they are also theft-proof! Hurray!!!

    I highly recommend using these bad boys. When they first came out and my eager eco-friendly engineer of a husband immediately signed up, I scoffed at him. You own a bike, I pointed out. Why rent as well?

    Now I shake my head at my younger, stupider self. Current me uses hubby’s Hubway membership, bwahahaaaaa!!! I WIN ANYWAY. I took this as an opportunity to explain a vital Tagalog word/concept to him: angkin, which is to take as your own something that belongs to someone else. So, in Taglish: “I made angkin his Hubway membership.”

    In conclusion: the image below provides an excellent summary of the Hubway experience:

    Image Source: BDC Wire

    Don’t listen to the haters, Hubway. You don’t have to be pretty, you have a great personality! Especially since both hubby and I get massive membership discounts through work.

    [The Daily Free Press] Summit explores way to improve urban mobility

    The following is an article originally published by Brianne Garrett in The Daily Free Press on December 8th, 2015.

    The Boston University Initiative on Cities hosted a summit Monday to address ways that various technologies, policies and low-cost design interventions could improve transportation in Boston.

    About 100 people attended the summit, “Transportation Nudges: Experiments in Improving Urban Mobility,” at BU’s Photonics Center. The main objective of the event was to “change the conversation around transportation,” said Katharine Lusk, executive director of the IOC.

    “We want to ask: what are the interventions that have been proven to work, and what are the things that cities still have at their disposal to mitigate congestion, to improve safety, to create greener environments,” she said.

    Although the conference mainly consisted of local city officials, Lusk said the topic of transportation in Boston is just as relevant to BU students.

    “We’re an urban university, and the reality is, if the room had been filled with students and I had asked the same question of ‘how did you get here today,’ it would be a very similar answer,” she said.

    Lusk said she believes the ideas expressed during the summit will bring positive changes to Boston’s transportation systems.

    “Our hope is that the cities and towns that are represented here actually find actionable insight of things they can do tomorrow, and new partners they can work with, and new interventions they can experiment with,” she said.

    In particular, Lusk said, she appreciated the presentation from one of the summit’s keynote speakers, Itai Vardi, as his words “shed light on the idea of being advocates and skeptics” when it comes to analyzing transportation methods.

    Vardi, a professor of sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences, said he believes there is a need to go beyond “technical and quantifiable metrics” when looking at traffic accidents and other transportation issues.

    “When statistics become a dominant lens by which you understand the problem, other conversations are marginalized,” Vardi said.

    Later in the event, a panel of various researchers and practitioners voiced strategies in how to develop urban mobility.

    Panelist Chris Osgood, the city’s chief of streets, emphasized the need to eliminate fatalities on the road through the initiative Go Boston 2030, a new policy to improve the future of transportation in the city.

    “A lot of the data that’s at the fingertip of cities are really poor administrative data,” Osgood said. “Go Boston 2030 understands what those things are what is most meaningful to our residents when it comes to transportation.”

    Several attendees said the summit was a chance to educate and open up the discussion of new modes of transportation in the BU community.

    Yasaman Khazaeni, a doctoral student at BU, said the conference was informative and that she believes there are various ways to eliminate vehicle congestion on roadways.

    “Assuming that a lot of things right now are being done by vehicles that could actually be done by drones, you can actually limit the number of vehicles being used in the streets,” she said.

    Sara Constantineau, human resources and administrative manager at Hubway bicycle share, commended the conference for merging different perspectives to the problem of transportation.

    “I think it’s a great opportunity for academia to merge with transportation and policy,” she said.

    Angela Johnson, program associate at Transportation for Massachusetts, said she was enlightened by panelist Azer Bestavros, a computer science professor at BU, who spoke about building projects that bring constituents and businesses together.

    “I like that he said that he thinks society is really the one to decide what are the laws and roles and rules are supposed to be.” she said. “There are limitations as to what technology can do for us.”

    Station Alert: Three stations scheduled for seasonal closure on Monday, December 7th

    STATION ALERT: Three Hubway stations listed below are scheduled for seasonal closure on Monday, December 7th. All other remaining Boston-based off-street stations and 2 stations in Somerville will remain open through December, and almost all Cambridge-based stations are open year-round. All closed stations are expected to relaunch in spring 2016. For a list of stations open during winter operations, click here.

    Register to receive system alerts on days when stations are removed by clicking here.

    Here are the scheduled station removals (subject to change) for Monday, December 7th*:

  • Colleges of the Fenway, Boston
  • The Esplanade - Beacon St. at Arlington St., Boston
  • Jackson Square T at Centre St., Boston
  • No further stations are scheduled for removal prior to the end of the 2015 calendar year.

    *Please note: This schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for almost 4 million rides… and counting!

    [SYSTEM ALERT] Software Upgrade, Possible Rider Impact late night on Monday, December 7th

    SYSTEM ALERT: Beginning Monday, December 7th, at approximately 11pm, Hubway will be conducting an upgrade to the operational software that powers the system.

    The upgrade will last approximately 2 hours. During this time there should be little to no impact on key holding members (annual & monthly). Here are ways in which there might be an impact on some users of the system:

    • No card-payment “casual” rentals for 24-hour or 72-hour memberships will be available at Hubway stations. Casual riders with keys will be able to undock bikes using the key fob.
    • Members will not be able to log into their online account. Once the update is complete, you’ll be able to access all of your account history.
    • No new memberships, renewals, or gift certificates will be available for purchase on the Hubway website (www.thehubway.com).
    • Station and dock information may not be accurate on any website, map, or mobile app. Once the update is complete, the accurate info will return.
    • “Time credits” and other features may not be available at Hubway station kiosks.
    • Hubway’s customer support call center will be available but will be unable to look up user account information or research technical issues. Callers may be asked to call back at a later time. Once the update is complete, support representatives will be able to help further.

    While the majority of the changes will not be visible to Hubway users, the updates to the system software will provide improved administrative tools for Hubway operations and customer support representatives.

    Every effort will be made to minimize the disruption this may cause. We thank you in advance for your patience as we work to improve Hubway for all riders.


    If you have any questions, please reach Hubway customer service by calling 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929) or writing to customerservice@thehubway.com. Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    [WBUR] Ready To Ride: Hubway Expands Winter Operations

    The following is an article originally published by Zeninjor Enwemeka on the WBUR.org on December 3rd, 2015.

    A Hubway station in East Cambridge. (John Phelan/Wikimedia Commons)

    Boston-area Hubway riders will have more riding options this winter, as the bike-share system plans to expand its operations.

    In total, about 110 Hubway stations will remain open through the end of the year. In Boston, more than 70 stations will stay open through Dec. 31. This is the second year the service has been extended in Boston. Last year, 57 stations were kept open through the end of the year.

    Over in Somerville, two Hubway stations (in Davis Square and Union Square) will remain open through the end of the year — the first time the city has operated any station past November.

    In Cambridge, all stations will remain open beyond Dec. 31 for the entire winter season, as they have the last two years.

    Here is a list of the stations that will be open this winter.

    All stations that are closed will reopen next spring.

    The Benefits of Bike-Share are Huge and Varied

    The following article by Melanie Curry was originally published on StreetsBlog California, on December 2nd, 2015.

    The city of Santa Monica opened their 500-bike Breeze bike-share last month. Photo: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.

    Bike-share is excellent in multiple ways. It eases traffic congestion in large, dense cities. It increases transit use in suburbs and smaller cities. And in all kinds of cities, it reduces auto use. It also has its drawbacks.

    These are the results found by researchers Susan Shaheen and Elliot Martin when they studied established bike-share programs in Montreal, Toronto, Washington D.C., and Minneapolis-Saint Paul to find out how bike-sharing programs influence the travel patterns of their users.

    The study found “both a modal shift toward bicycle use and a heightened public awareness of bikesharing as a practical transportation mode,” they write in the current issue of Access Magazine, published by the University of California.

    The authors found that when people had access to the one-way trips bike-share provided, they drove less. Other mode shifts seem to depend on which city they were in—and are likely a result of a combination of factors, including what kinds of transit is available to them and where the bike-share stations are located.

    For example, whether bike-share members walked more or less than they did before vs. after they joined seemed to depend on the city. In both D.C. and Minneapolis-Saint Paul, some walked more and some walked less than before, but the ratios were different. The authors conclude that:

    “Bikesharing often complements walking in certain cities but is likely to be situation-specific. Some members in the suburbs may bikeshare instead of walking to or from public transit. Downtown users may walk more to the actual bikesharing stations but then use public transit less.”

    They also saw shifts in the amount of rail transit used, which is dependent on the availability and extensiveness of rail available. In all four cities taken together, the authors found that a good chunk of bike share users took trains less often after they joined bike-share.

    “Reduced demand for rail transit among bikesharers, particularly in the city center, may benefit public transit operators during rush hours in large transit-intensive cities like Washington, D.C.,” write the authors.

    By adding transportation alternatives, bikesharing opens up additional capacity on congested bus and rail lines in the urban core. Indeed, one reason Capital Bikeshare was launched in Washington, D.C. was to relieve congestion on the subway system. Additionally, bikeshare systems in cities with developed rail systems can save people time by providing more direct routes between their destinations, as well as providing health benefits and cost savings.

    Another finding of their study, not well highlighted, is that bike-share systems (like other transportation infrastructure, including highways and rail) still do not provide equitable access to their benefits. “Within the four cities, bikeshare members were younger, disproportionately male, more likely to be non-Hispanic white, and significantly more educated than the general population,” they write.

    This may reflect the initial placement of bikesharing stations within downtown cores with high levels of white-collar employment. It may also reflect characteristics of early adopters, such as access to credit/debit cards, which are typically required for system use.”

    Bike-share is still a relatively new idea, and as it expands to new cities and within areas where it already exists, we are only beginning to understand the multiple ways it can benefit cities and the people in them.  More studies, please! Let’s quantify its health, safety, environmental, and other benefits, so that people will stop arguing about whether bike-share operation and expansion deserve public investment.

    Here are the stations that will be open this winter

    It’s a little later in the season than we usually announce, but Hubway’s winter operations are expanding again this season!

    As in the last two years, all Cambridge-based stations except the Dana Park location will be open throughout winter, and almost all Boston-based off-street stations will remain open through December, pending weather conditions. Plus, two Somerville stations will stay open through December, as well! That’s over 105 stations open through the end of the year, and 37 in Cambridge year-round!

    Please reference the Hubway station map or the spotcycle app for up-to-the-minute station, dock, and bike availability. As usual, all closed stations are expected to reopen in spring 2016.

    Click here to view the list of stations (subject to change) that will remain open for some or all of the winter season, pending weather conditions.

    Station Move Alert: Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main St / Columbia St, Cambridge

    Station Move Alert: Effective immediately, the Lafayette Square Hubway station has returned to its seasonal off-street location on the sidewalk in front of the Salvation Army at 402 Mass Ave, close to the intersection of Mass Ave, Main St, and Columbia St. This is a 15-dock on-street station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Seasonal Removal Alert: Dana Park, Cambridge

    Station Alert: Effective immediately, the Dana Park Hubway station in Cambridge has been removed. This is considered a seasonal change, and the station is expected to return for full-system operations in spring 2016. We apologize for any inconvenience this move may cause.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway.

    Station Move Alert: Harvard University River Houses at DeWolfe St / Cowperthwaite St, Cambridge

    Station Move Alert: Effective immediately, the Harvard University River Houses Hubway station has returned to its permanent (and original) location on DeWolfe Street at its intersection with Cowperthwaite Street & Memorial Drive in Cambridge. This is a 19-dock on-street station. The move is considered to be permanent.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Wicked Local Cambridge] Living and working green in Cambridge

    The following is an article originally published by Sarah Kennedy, the Director of Government Affairs at the Cambridge Center of Commerce, in the Wicked Local Cambridge on November 28th, 2015.

    The city of Cambridge is consistently named as a “Best Place to Live” because we’re one of the “Greenest” and “Most Walkable” cities in the country. A big part of what makes us green is the investment Cambridge businesses are making in energy efficiency.

    Cambridge residents are among the least car-dependent commuters in the country. In fact, 46 percent of people who work in Cambridge, also live in Cambridge, which is 50 percent greater than the state average. This is partly due to employers that support a variety of alternatives to commuting by car, whether it’s installing on-site bike racks, providing T passes to employees, or sponsoring new Hubway stations around the city. As a result, 52 percent of Cambridge workers are able to commute by bike, public transit or walking.

    Climate change is a global challenge that will significantly affect our community. Many of our businesses’ community engagement initiatives focus on enhancing the local environment and include activities around environmental education, water conservation, recycling and energy efficiency. Many Cambridge companies are also global leaders in sustainability.

    For example, Biogen has neutralized the carbon footprint of its worldwide businesses, making it our city’s first net-zero company. This milestone means the company will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by nearly one million tons every day worldwide.

    In its own goal to go carbon neutral, Microsoft established a self-imposed fee on carbon emissions in 2012. With the funds collected, the company has purchased more than 10 billion kilowatt-hours of green power and reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 7.5 million metric tons.

    Novartis cut greenhouse gas emissions by 15 percent between 2008 and 2015, despite increases in production levels. The company aims to reduce emissions by an additional 30 percent by 2020 and substantially reduce its water consumption and quantities of non-recyclable waste. The company is on track towards this goal with its new 181 Massachusetts Avenue expansion. LED lighting has been combined with daylight harvesting to create an 80-90 percent reduction in energy compared to traditional bulbs.

    Akamai Technologies’ has an ongoing commitment to reduce GHG emissions relative to its server operations and network traffic by 30 percent each year. Since January 2009, the company has reduced emissions by 91 percent. Over the past five years the company has surpassed its own goals, averaging a 33 percent per year reduction. In 2014, the company achieved a 40 percent reduction.

    Additionally, we are fortunate to have companies in our community that are already global leaders in building and operating some of the greenest companies in the world. Cambridge has 435 buildings and 15 million square feet of commercial space that are LEED or ENERGYSTAR certified and all new construction or major renovations must meet LEED standards. The advantages of green or sustainable buildings extend beyond environmental gains, with improved public health of Cambridge residents resulting from reduced air and noise pollution.

    Our world-renowned universities are not only leaders in academic excellence but also models in cutting-edge, science-based climate goals. Harvard University has reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 21 percent since 2008, which is the equivalent of removing 12,213 cars from the road. By the end of 2015, the “Efficiency Forward Program” at MIT will result in a savings of 55 million kilowatt hours of energy. That’s enough to power over 7,200 Massachusetts homes every year.

    Our businesses and universities build green, operate green and encourage employees to work and live green. They also understand that sustainability is not only about adopting eco-friendly business practices, but also about sustaining the communities in which they work and live.

    Hubway in Cambridge Will Continue Through Winter!

    The following announcement was originally published by the Cambridge Community Development Department on November 25th, 2015.

    For the third year, Hubway in Cambridge will remain in operation throughout the winter, to provide citizens with a sustainable public transportation choice year-round.

    The only changes to the system for the winter months will be moving Lafayette Square station to the sidewalk on the south side of Mass. Ave., and taking Dana Park off the street; these changes are in order to better accommodate snow clearance operations.

    Since opening in 2011, the Hubway system has logged over 5.1 million bicycle miles on more than 3.75 million trips, and Hubway riders have burned 228 million calories and offset 1200 tons of CO2 emissions. Hubway has over 13,000 annual subscribers and last year sold more than 78,000 24-Hour subscriptions, 10,000 72-Hour subscriptions, and 2,800 monthly subscriptions.

    Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments, and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    Station Alert: Station Removal Schedule for November 23-25, 2015

    STATION ALERT: Seasonal phased station closures continue this week with station removals in Somerville & Brookline. The final day of 2015 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 25th. All Boston-based off-street stations and 2 stations in Somerville will remain open through December, and almost all Cambridge-based stations are open year-round, and all closed stations are expected to relaunch in spring 2016. Click here to register for email system alerts on days when stations are removed.

    Here are the scheduled station removals (subject to change) for the week of November 23-25*:

    Monday, 11/23 (6 stations)

  • Somerville City Hall, Somerville

  • Somerville Hospital at Highland Ave / Crocker St, Somerville

  • Conway Park - Somerville Ave, Somerville

  • Wilson Square, Somerville

  • Powder House Circle - Nathan Tufts Park, Somerville

  • Packard Ave / Powder House Blvd, Somerville

  • Tuesday, 11/24 (8 stations)

  • Washington St / Beacon St, Somerville

  • Summer St at Cutter St, Somerville

  • Teele Square at 239 Holland St

  • Magoun Square at Trum Field

  • Washington Square at Washington St / Beacon St

  • Brookline Village - Station Street @ MBTA

  • JFK Crossing at Harvard St / Thorndike St

  • Coolidge Corner - Beacon St @ Centre St

  • No stations are scheduled for removal between Wednesday, November 25th, and Sunday, November 29th.

    *Please note: This schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for almost 4 million rides… and counting!

    Exclusive Hubway Member Perk: 30% off tickets to see "ONCE"

    Winner of eight 2012 Tony Awards including BEST MUSICAL, ONCE is a truly original Broadway experience. Featuring an impressive ensemble of actor/musicians who play their own instruments onstage, ONCE tells the enchanting tale of a Dublin street musician who’s about to give up on his dream when a beautiful young woman takes a sudden interest in his haunting love songs.

    Click here to listen to the original Broadway cast recording of Once’s “Falling Slowly.”

    “Once” is an unforgettable story about going for your dreams and the power of music to connect us all. Connect with “Once” with this special ticket offer for Hubway members only!

    Hubway members receive 30% off tickets to select performances.
    Visit http://www.citicenter.org/once for tickets, and use code DREAM for available tickets for these performances while supplies last:

    • Tuesday, 12/8, 7:30pm
    • Thursday, 12/9, 7pm
    • Thursday, 12/10, 7:30pm
    • Thursday, 12/11, 8pm
    • Thursday, 12/12, 2pm MATINEE
    • Thursday, 12/12, 8pm
    • Thursday, 12/13, 1pm MATINEE
    • Thursday, 12/13, 6:30pm
    • Thursday, 12/15, 7:30pm
    • Thursday, 12/16, 7:30pm
    • Thursday, 12/17, 7:30pm
    • Thursday, 12/21, 7:30pm
    • Thursday, 12/22, 7:30pm
    • Thursday, 12/23, 2pm MATINEE
    • Thursday, 12/23, 7:30pm
    • Happy Holidays!

    [Charlestown Patriot-Bridge] City Agrees to Move Charlestown Zip Car Spaces after Local Backlash

    The following is an article originally published by John Lynds in the Charlestown Patriot-Bridge on November 19th, 2015.

    The City of Boston couldn’t have picked a worse location in Charlestown to place Zip Car parking spaces.

    About three weeks ago, the City’s Transportation Department quitely installed two Zip Car parking spaces on Bunker Hill Street across from the Grasshopper Restaurant. The installation was met with immediate backlash from business owners and residents in the already congested section of Charlestown.

    While many residents welcome the world’s largest car sharing company’s arrival in the neighborhood, the location and lack of planning was the main issue among residents and business owners.

    Charlestown residents and State Rep. Dan Ryan said he was immediatly inundated with complaints. Business owners felt the spaces took away parking for patrons to places like the Grasshopper and residents felt taking away two on street parking spaces was detrimental the already tough parking situation in Charlestown.

    This week the city announced it would move the spaces after pressure from residents and elected officials.

    “I want to thank the Mayor’s office, BTD and Zip Car for responding to neighborhood concerns,” said Ryan.  “The way I see it, this was about more than two parking spots. There needs to be a more comprehensive approach to this New Urbanism. I applaud the City’s efforts over the years to bring in new ideas.  But, Boston is not Portland, Oregon or Europe. Our climate, geography and culture is far different than any place that I see these multi-model transportation studies coming from. For Zip-car, Hubway and other transportation ideas to be implemented efficiently we need to work with every type of traveler to come up with a plan that addresses our overcrowded streets but is culturally sensitive to Bostonians”.

    Tom McKay, Charlestown’s liaison from the Mayor’s Office of Neighborhood Services, said in a statement, “After reviewing the feedback received, the Transportation Department has determined that these spaces are to be moved to a new location. The location will be in Hayes Square at the corner of Vine Street and Tufts Street; the two spaces will be located in front of where the Hubway bike station is located.”

    McKay said this small area is currently unregulated parking, so no resident parking will be taken away to accommodate the spaces.

    “As of right now, Transportation is looking at Monday, November 23 for the relocation date, though this is subject to weather conditions,” he said.

    Charlestown City Councilor Sal LaMattina applauded the city’s decision to move the spaces.

    “We need to be more sensative in city government to the plight of residents in thickly settled neighborhoods like Chalrestown and plan better when it comes to placing programs like Zip Car and HubWay in our neighborhoods,” said LaMattina. “The city did a good job quickly responding to the issue and addressing the feedback from residents and business owners.”

    Station Alert: UPDATED Station Removal Schedule for November 16-20, 2015

    PLEASE NOTE: This announcement, originally published on November 15th, has been updated to reflect the latest station removal schedule. Please see below.

    STATION ALERT: Seasonal phased station closures will begin on Monday, November 16th. The final day of 2015 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 25th. Though some stations may remain in operation throughout some or all of the winter season, a specific station list has not yet been announced. Announcement of that list is expected soon. All closed stations are expected to relaunch in spring 2016. Click here to register for email system alerts on days when stations are removed.

    Here are the scheduled station removals (subject to change) for the week of November 16-20*:

    Monday, 11/16 (7 stations)

  • Andrew Station - Dorchester Ave at Humboldt Pl
  • Dorchester Ave. at Harborview
  • E. Cottage St. at Columbia Rd.
  • Upham’s Corner - Ramsey St. at Dudley St.
  • Mt. Pleasant Ave. / Dudley Town Common
  • Brigham Circle / Huntington Ave.
  • Heath St. and S. Huntington
  • Tuesday, 11/17 (6 stations)

  • Hyde Square at Barbara St.
  • JP Center - Centre St. at Myrtle St.
  • Hayes Square at Vine St.
  • Boston Medical Center - East Concord at Harrison Ave.
  • Washington St. at Rutland St.
  • Washington St. at Waltham St.
  • Wednesday, 11/18 (7 stations)

  • Charles Circle - Charles St. at Cambridge St.
  • Charles St. at Beacon St.
  • Boylston / Mass Ave.
  • Boylston at Fairfield
  • New Balance Experience Store - Boylston at Dartmouth
  • Boylston St / Berkeley St.
  • Newbury St. / Hereford St.
  • Thursday, 11/19 (5 stations)

  • Franklin St. / Arch St.
  • Post Office Square
  • Congress / Sleeper
  • Boylston St. at Arlington St.
  • Beacon St. / Mass Ave.
  • PLEASE NOTE: This day there is also one station move scheduled, with the Cambridge St. at Joy St. station moving to the median of Cambridge Street.

    Friday, 11/20 (4 stations)

  • Yawkey Way
  • BIDMC - Brookline at Burlington St.
  • Allston Green District - Commonwealth Ave. & Griggs St.
  • Washington St. and Brock St.

  • No stations are scheduled for removal on Saturday, November 21st, and Sunday, November 22nd.

    *Please note: This schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for almost 4 million rides… and counting!

    Take Hubway, Give Thanks, Get Pie!

    And do good while you’re at it, too!

    As winter nears, and some stations are removed from the streets into hibernation for the season, you can help corral the bicycles for their check-ups and annual tunes. If you #TakeHubway next week, you could receive one of 100 pies from our awesome friends at Petsi Pies & Flour Bakery!

    Here’s how:

    (1) Be one of the first 25 to RSVP for any of the four locations and times listed below. Please RSVP for only one location.
    (2) Ride a Hubway bike —any Hubway bike from any other station— to the location at the time you picked, and turn it in along with at least one non-perishable canned good to the Hubway rep waiting for you.
    (3) Receive a gift certificate from either Petsi Pies or Flour Bakery, redeemable for one free pie! Limit one pie/certificate per person.
    (4) That’s it! There is no step 4!

    Hubway reps will be on hand to dock your bike and get it to our mechanics for a tune-up, and your canned goods will be donated to the organizations listed below.

    HURRY & RSVP NOW!

    Remember, we’ll have coffee and other goodies for everyone who comes by, but only the first 100 (25 for each location) will get pie (limit 1 per person)! Click the links below for each city/town to RSVP.


    RSVP for BROOKLINE
    Monday, November 16, 8-9:30am
    Location: Coolidge Corner, on the Beacon Street MBTA median between Centre Street & Winchester Street.

    RSVP for CAMBRIDGE
    Tuesday, November 17, 8-9:30am
    Location: 359 Broadway - Broadway at Fayette Street.

    RSVP for BOSTON
    Wednesday, November 18, 4:30-6pm
    Location: Boston Public Library, 700 Boylston Street.

    RSVP for SOMERVILLE
    Thursday, November 19, 8-9:30am
    Location: Davis Square, by the Holland Street T entrance.

    Don’t worry about forgetting!
    We’ll email you to remind you the day before!

    Pies & goodies generously provided by:

    Please note: Gift certificate redemption, pie pre-orders, and pickup dates subject to bakery directions & availability. In order to receive pies in time for Thanksgiving, pre-orders must be made by Friday, November 20th. But certificates will be valid through December, and we’ll review the specifics with certificate recipients.

    Additional goodies unstintingly provided by:







    Non-perishable canned food item donations will benefit the following organizations:

    Add a descriptionAdd a descriptionAdd a description










    Want to share Hubway for the Holidays? Gift yourself or a friend a year of Hubway membership by clicking here!

    Exclusive Hubway Member Perk: 20% off tickets to see Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical!

    The original television classic comes to life! First airing in 1964, RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER has become a beloved Christmas classic - capturing the hearts and wonder of generations of fans. Something magical is happening as the beloved classic soars off the screen and onto the Shubert Theatre stage this holiday season. Fly along with this special ticket offer for Hubway members only!

    Hubway members receive 20% off tickets to select performances.
    Visit citicenter.org/rudolph2015 for tickets, and use code RUHUB for available tickets for these performances while supplies last:

    • Tuesday, 12/1, 7pm
    • Thursday, 12/3, 7:30pm
    • Friday, 12/4, 7pm
    • Happy Holidays!

    Exclusive Hubway Member Perk: 30% off tickets to see Elf the Musical!

    ELF The Broadway Musical is the hilarious tale of Buddy, a young orphan child who mistakenly crawls into Santa’s bag of gifts and is transported back to the North Pole. Go along for a ride with this special ticket offer for Hubway members only!

    Hubway members receive 30% off tickets to select performances.
    Visit citicenter.org/elf2015 for tickets, and use code ELFHUB for available tickets for these performances while supplies last:

    • Tuesday, 11/17, 7pm
    • Wednesday, 11/18, 7pm
    • Thursday, 11/19, 7pm
    • Friday, 11/20, 7pm
    • Sunday, 11/22, 6pm
    • Tuesday, 11/24, 7pm
    • Wednesday, 11/25, 7pm
    • Sunday, 11/29, 6pm
    • Tuesday, 12/1, 7pm
    • Wednesday, 12/2, 7pm
    • Thursday, 12/3, 7pm
    • Sunday, 12/6, 6pm
    • Happy Holidays!

    Will my station close for the winter? And if so, when?

    Hubway will begin its regular season-end station closures on Monday, November 16th, with “full-system” operations concluding on Wednesday, November 25th, prior to Thanksgiving. Though some stations may remain in operation throughout some or all of the winter season, a specific station list has not yet been announced. We are expecting to announce that list soon, and here is the best way you can make sure to receive the info as soon as it’s available:

    Will my station close for the winter? And if so, when?


    To keep you up-to-date on the latest news & seasonal station closures, you can sign up to receive email system alerts on or prior to the days that stations are removed. That way you can easily get the latest info and develop a contingency plan for routes that involve your favorite stations. And as usual, we’ll publish specific station closure and system alerts on the Hubway website, as well as Hubway’s facebook and twitter.

    Click here to sign up for station closure alerts!


    [WBUR] Survey: Boston Millennials Say MBTA Is ‘Very Important’ Factor In Where They Live And Work

    The following is an article originally published by Zeninjor Enwemeka on WBUR.org on November 9th, 2015.

    Millennials in Greater Boston say access to public transit is the most important factor in where they choose to live and work.

    In a new survey from The Urban Land Institute Boston/New England and The MassINC Polling Group, 80 percent of young professionals ranked access to public transit as “very important” when choosing a place to live. More respondents said public transit was “very important” than things such as nightlife, shopping, crime/safety and being able to walk to amenities. Additionally, 81 percent of respondents said having an easy commute to work or school was “very important.”

    The survey also found that 78 percent of young professionals said a workplace located near public transit was “very important,” which far outranked office amenities such as a gym or cafeteria as well as proximity to restaurants and nightlife.

    The results are based on a survey of 660 college-educated residents in the Boston area between the ages of 20 and 37. The survey was conducted from Oct. 7 to 27.

    “Understanding the preferences this group of professionals has on transportation, lifestyle, housing, and employment can assist city planners, developers and employers shape our city landscape,” Taylor Shepard, the co-chair of ULI Boston’s Young Leaders Group, said in a statement accompanying the poll results.

    According to the survey, Boston area millennials tend to rely on public transportation to get to school or work. When asked how they normally get around, 49 percent of respondents said they use the subway or Green Line, 24 percent use an MBTA bus or Silver Line and 13 percent use the commuter rail. Survey respondents could choose all options that apply. Thirty-nine percent said they walk, 26 percent said they drive alone (versus 6 percent who drive with others), and 22 percent said they bike.

    When deciding how to commute to work or school, 73 percent said proximity to public transportation was “very important,” followed by reliability of buses or trains (68 percent) and travel time (65 percent).

    And while public transportation was very important in choosing a community or neighborhood to live in, local millennials are still concerned with costs. When it comes to choosing a home or apartment, 88 percent said price was a “very important” feature for them to consider. The next-closest important factor was layout, which half said was “very important.”

    Here are some other interesting findings from the survey:

    • On average, young professionals spend 28 percent of their income on rent or a mortgage payment.
    • 66 percent rent their current residence, while 32 percent own.
    • 46 percent feel they are better off financially than their parents, while 27 percent feel they are worse off. Twenty-three percent feel they are about the same.
    • 73 percent ranked paid family leave as the most important benefit their workplace could offer, followed by having a flexible work schedule (68 percent).
    • 58 percent live with a partner or significant other while 25 percent live with roommates and only 14 percent live alone. Three percent live with their parents or their partner’s parents — 100 percent said it was for financial reasons.
    • 45 percent plan on buying a home in the next five years. Thirty percent of those plan to buy a single family home.
    • Young professionals also use other transportation options — 84 percent use Uber, 39 percent use Hubway, 27 percent use Lyft. And 89 percent said they use taxis. (Survey respondents could choose all options that apply.)
    • 49 percent of young professionals see themselves still living in the Boston area in 10 years.

    Hubway expands in Cambridge

    The following announcement was originally published by the Cambridge Community Development Department on Wednesday, November 4th, 2015.

    CAMBRIDGE HUBWAY NEWS
    November 4, 2015

    Hubway, metro-Boston’s public bike share system, is continuing to expand, with five new stations added to Cambridge this week.

    Two new stations are being donated by MIT; one on Vassar Street West, and another on Pacific Street. Lesley University will have one in Porter Square, and additional stations will be installed at University Park and in front of Mt. Auburn Hospital. The new stations connect seamlessly with the rest of the system.


    Lesley University

  • Mass. Ave. at Roseland St.

  • 15-dock station on Mass. Ave. in front of the new Lesley University College of Art and Design, Lunder Arts Center, 1801 Massachusetts Avenue

  • MIT Vassar St. West

  • Vassar Street at Audrey Street

  • 25-dock back-to-back station, in front of the MIT Westgate Low-Rise Graduate Residences

  • MIT Pacific Street

  • Pacific Street at Purrington Street

  • 19-dock station by the MIT SIDNEY-PACIFIC housing

  • University Park

  • Sidney Street

  • 19-dock station near Green Street

  • Mt. Auburn Hospital

  • Mt. Auburn at Lowell Street

  • 19-dock station on the south side of Mt. Auburn Street convenient to the hospital.

  • Since opening in 2011, the Hubway system has logged over 5.1 million bicycle miles on more than 3.75 million trips, and Hubway riders have burned 228 million calories and offset 1,200 tons of CO2 emissions. Hubway has over 13,000 annual subscribers and last year sold more than 78,000 24-Hour subscriptions, 10,000 72-Hour subscriptions, and 2,800 monthly subscriptions.

    New Station Alert: MIT Pacific Street at Purrington Street, Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, November 4th, the new Hubway station, MIT Pacific Street, is open & operational at Pacific and Purrington Streets in Cambridge. This station is a 19-dock station by the MIT Sidney-Pacific housing. This is Hubway’s 155th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: MIT Vassar St. West, Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, November 4th, the new Hubway station, MIT Vassar St. West, is open & operational at Vassar and Audrey Streets in Cambridge. This station is a 25-dock back-to-back station, in front of the MIT Westgate Low-Rise Graduate Residences. This is Hubway’s 154th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Mt. Auburn Hospital at Lowell Street, Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, November 4th, the new Hubway station, Mt. Auburn Hospital, is open & operational at Mt. Auburn & Lowell Streets in Cambridge. This station is a 19-dock station on the south side of Mt. Auburn Street, convenient to the hospital. This is Hubway’s 153rd station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Lesley University at Mass Ave & Roseland St, Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, November 4th, the new Hubway station, Lesley University @ Massachusetts Avenue & Roseland Street is open & operational in Cambridge. This station is a 15-dock station on the north side of Mass. Ave. in front of the new Lesley University College of Art and Design, Lunder Arts Center, 1801 Massachusetts Avenue. This is Hubway’s 152nd station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Hubway Halloween 2015

    Halloween may be scary for some, but Hubway riders opted overwhelmingly for the fun, goofy side of the holiday! We’re excited to present some of our favorite rider-submitted pics from this past weekend. Participants who sent us photos in costume on a Hubway won prizes from our partners at New Balance and Ben & Jerry’s!

    Susanne Hay as Winnie the Pooh

    Rebecca Hung as one of Hubway’s Minions

    Jon Hay as Tigger

    Ryan Christman as the Cat in the Hat

    #TakeHubway on Halloween

    #TakeHubway on Halloween! It’s a really spokey time to ride ;)

    [Boston University News Service] Central Square Offers a Range of Transportation Options

    The following is an article originally published by Rachel Kashdan on the Boston University News Service on October 28th, 2015.

    Transportation options in the Central and Inman Square area are as diverse as the neighborhood itself.

    Central Square MBTA Red Line station lies right in the center of Central Square, and five bus lines pass through the area as well. In Inman Square, three MBTA bus lines make stops. Central Square also has a 280 space municipal garage and both squares offer metered parking.

    In recent years, the city of Cambridge has ramped up efforts to encourage biking as a mode of transportation. There are four Hubway bicycle stations in the Central and Inman area, and bike racks dot the area as well.

    A resident parking permit costs $25 and parking spaces on residential streets are chock-a-block full most of the time.

    Alternatives to the traveling by car have steadily become more popular in the area.

    In Cambridge 3,200 more people walk, bike, carpool, or use public transit than in 2000, according to a post on the City of Cambridge Twitter page.

    Alfonso Lopez, a Central Square resident who works at Santander Bank in Dorchester, takes the Red Line to work each day.

    “Just Red Line, straight until JFK UMass,” he said.

    Lopez also said his daily commute takes no more than 20 minutes each way, and because he uses the monthly LinkPass he spends $75 per month on his commute.

    [Boston University News Service] New Hubway Station to Open in Mission Hill

    The following is an article originally published by Samantha Peters on the Boston University News Service on October 27th, 2015.

    More bikes than ever will be circulating Mission Hill. The city of Boston plans to install a new Hubway station at the Heath and South Huntington Avenue stops. Biking is a popular option in Mission Hill as a way to avoid traffic and MBTA delays. The Green Line is also a common way people get to work, especially among medical staff whose commute expenditures are partially covered by the hospitals they work for. Some people in the neighborhood say their commutes take longer than the average of 19.1 minutes (according to City-Data.com), but most people who work in the area are satisfied with their commuting time.

    [Slice of MIT] A Vehicle for the Future

    The following is an article originally published by Julie Barr on Slice of MIT on October 26th, 2015.

    Michael Lin with a quarter-scale model of the PEV. Image: Politico Magazine.

    What do you get when you take three wheels, an electric motor, and autonomous capability? An entirely new vehicle that could revolutionize the way we live—at least that’s the vision of research scientist Kent Larson and Michael Lin SM ’07, SM ’10 and the Changing Places group in MIT’s Media Lab. The group created the Persuasive Electric Vehicle (PEV) as part of a strategy aimed at reimagining how we’ll live in denser cities of the future. The PEV includes shared properties similar to Hubway and the ride service capabilities of Uber, but the vehicle’s autonomous capability sets it apart. “We’ve come to realize that the ideal mobility in the city combines three features,” says Larson. “Shared use, electric drive, and thirdly you add autonomy.”

    The vehicle is designed to autonomously travel to a given pickup point where the passenger is located, traveling within bicycle lanes. When the PEV reaches the passenger, they have the ability to operate the vehicle with the electric motor or pedal to their destination. The vehicle is also designed for package delivery, with a roof that secures around the vehicle. “For systems like Hubway, nearly 50 percent of the operation cost is distribution, moving the bikes based on demand,” says Lin. “Since the PEV can move autonomously, it can travel to the customer. And the package delivery aspect of the system offsets the demand influx as packages can be delivered in off-peak travel hours.”

    The PEV has been in the works for several years, developed as a collaboration between the Media Lab, AeroAstro, and Megacity Logistics Lab (Center for Logistics). “It was 2006 when we first talked about shifting automobiles from product to service and people thought we were crazy,” says Lin, who has been working in the Media Lab off and on since 2005 while he was earning his master’s at MIT. Today, the PEV chassis and autonomous modules are fully designed and a prototype was built for the Media Lab’s members’ week (October 26-30) and 30th anniversary (October 30).

    With a complete prototype, roll-out could be just months away. The PEV has many sponsors eager to test the new technology, including an air force base in Taipei, Taiwan. “The enclosed area is perfect for testing the PEV,” says Lin. “It will be allowed to move within a set area, learning the bike lanes and the surroundings, allowing it to pick up data so it can learn to move on its own.” Other potential tests site includes Andorra and HafenCity in Hamburg, Germany.

    [Irish Times] Weekend in... Boston

    This little big town has emerged from its introverted shell to offer a livelier mix of cultural offerings, plus an exploding food scene.

    The following is an article originally published by Ethan Gilsdorf in the Irish Times on October 24th, 2015.

    Thanks to the area’s 50-plus colleges, Boston has a reputation for hitting the books first, goofing off second. To be sure, venerable institutions such as Symphony Hall, the Museum of Fine Arts and Faneuil Hall still anchor the city’s hold on music, art and history. But in recent years, this little big town has emerged from its introverted shell to offer a livelier mix of cultural offerings, plus an exploding food scene. The Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway parkland extends from the North End to Chinatown, connecting a new frontier of glass and steel construction, known as the Seaport District, to downtown. This is also a city obsessed with sports and craft beer, meaning you’re never far from a Celtics, Bruins, Patriots or Red Sox fan hoisting a pint for the home team in one of the Hub’s zillion pubs. Go Boston.

    Friday
    2pm
    1.
    Uncommonly local The classic tour begins at the 50-acre Boston Common, the nation’s oldest public park and endpoint of Frederick Law Olmsted’s green-space network, known as the Emerald Necklace. From here, if history’s your thing, walk the 4km Freedom Trail, which wends its way through 16 Revolutionary-era sites, from the Boston Massacre site in front of the Old State House to the Paul Revere House in the traditionally Italian-American enclave of the North End to the Bunker Hill Monument in Charlestown.
    Just follow the red-brick (or painted) trail as far as your legs can take you, perhaps as far as the ancient Warren Tavern, where George Washington and Paul Revere once tossed back a pint. The adjacent Public Garden is also worth a tour, with its Make Way for Ducklings sculpture (a tribute to Robert McCloskey’s picture book) and the bench featured in the film Good Will Hunting (now an unofficial memorial to the late Robin Williams). In warmer months, glide in one of the garden’s 19th-century swan boats; in winter, go ice-skating on the Common’s Frog Pond.

    4.30pm
    2.
    Back Bay watch From the Public Garden, stroll down Newbury Street into the heart of Back Bay. This neighbourhood was once as wet as Boston Harbour before being backfilled and built up with elegant 19th-century brownstones. Today, you’ll find the haughtier designer shops closest to the Public Garden, but increasingly funkier boutiques as you walk west towards Massachusetts Avenue.

    Homegrown Newbury Comics is a mecca to music and pop culture. Drop into Rick Walker’s for leather jackets, cowboy hats and vintage boots. The whimsical Fairy Shop has knickknacks devoted to unicorns, Alice in Wonderland and Tim Burton. Heading back east via Boylston Street, stop by Copley Square and pop in at the Boston Public Library’s 1895 wing, the McKim Building, to gaze at its sumptuous Edwin Austin Abbey floor-to-ceiling painting series The Quest of the Holy Grail and John Singer Sargent’s spectacular ceiling mural cycle Triumph of Religion. Outside the library, on Boylston between Exeter and Dartmouth streets, pause at the Boston Marathon finish line, site of the deadly 2013 bombings.

    7.30 pm
    3.
    Southern comfort Home to the nation’s largest Victorian brick rowhouse district, the South End is also the place for bold dining spots. One such down-home place full of artisanal spirit is the Gallows. Try one of their “boards”, little bites arranged on a wooden slab, such as the longshoreman ($18), beet-cured salmon with pickled oysters, lemon-crème fraîche and pickles. Poutine ($14 to $18) is another favourite – crispy fries, cheese curd and gravy combo made three ways – or mains like steak frites with summer succotash ($24). Wash it down with a local brew like Jack’s Abby Sunny Ridge or Pretty Things Baby Tree. For a blowout meal, try Back Bay’s Clio, at the Eliot Hotel, whose offerings include five-course ($79) and nine-course ($124) tasting menus with dished like cassolette of lobster and sea urchin, or foie gras laquee with molasses candy and bee pollen.

    10pm
    4.
    Night out At the Paradise Rock Club, next to Boston University on Commonwealth Avenue, you’ll find performances by alternative and indie bands such as OK Go, Of Montreal and Paul Weller. If you’re in a mellower mood, check out Wally’s Cafe Jazz Club. Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker and Art Blakey once played here; these days, it’s mostly students of Berklee College of Music and local jazz masters on stage, but it still swings.

    Saturday
    10am
    5.
    Beacon Hill is famous for its brick and stone Federal, Greek Revival and Gothic buildings, and its myriad shops and cafes lining Charles Street. Begin your day at the Paramount, with a beloved breakfast menu that includes a malted Belgian waffle ($7), Texas-style French toast ($7) and a blue cheese, bacon and spinach omelette ($10).

    Noon
    6.
    Here are three unconventional ways to get the lay of the land, and the sea. Head to Long Wharf and jump a ferry to the Boston Harbour Islands, a park encompassing 34 islands and peninsulas; one highlight is Georges Island, a 45-minute boat ride away ($17, children $10; ferries run until October 12th this year), site of the Civil War-era Fort Warren, where you can take in a vintage baseball game or concert and beer festival, and grab some refreshments at the snack bar. Boston Duck Tours ply the city (and the Charles River) in second World War-style amphibious landing vehicles and goofy costumed characters narrate your ride, which zigzags from the Museum of Science to the Prudential Center and the New England Aquarium ($35.99, children $24.99; Duck Tours run until November 29th). If a boat tour isn’t your idea of a tea party, you can rent from the Hubway bike sharing system; 24-hour ($6) and 72-hour ($12) passes are payable with a credit card at stations throughout the city.

    4pm
    7. Seaport and swing sets

    The rapid development of Fort Point and the Seaport District means fewer artists living in its lofts but more to see and do. As you wander the Boston Harbour Walk along Fort Point Channel, and by the former brick warehouses along Congress Street, make a late afternoon refuelling stop at the Flour Bakery, or buy high-end provisions at the market/deli/cafe Bee’s Knees Supply Company. Behind the hulking Boston Convention Center, the city is reinventing its outdoor spaces at Lawn on D, an innovative park with swing sets for adults, public wifi, a beer tent, food trucks, free games like bocce and corn hole, and live performances, such as fire-art and an ice maze.

    7.30pm
    8. Seafood by the Sea

    Pendant lights and fresh tiles accent the cavernous brick-and-rafter space of Row 34’s converted warehouse. Here, at one of the city’s best raw bars, begin with local oysters such as Moon Shoal ($3 each) from Barnstable, or Island Creek ($2.50 each) from Duxbury, and choose from two dozen beers on tap, such as Idle Hands’s Snake Eyes Farmhouse IPA, or Confluence, a dry hopped golden ale by Allagash. Main dishes include crispy oysters ($14 and $28), Ethel’s creamy lobster roll ($24) or pan-roasted bluefish with cherry tomatoes, zephyr squash and charred eggplant ($27).

    11pm
    9. Down cellar

    Two basement hangouts show the range of bar life along the waterfront. The quasi-French Bastille Kitchen’s underground Chalet, with its low seating, candles, a fireplace and a deer-antler chandelier, attracts a trendier crowd. Here, you can tuck into a late-night snack like brandade beignets ($15) and a glass of wine or a cocktail.
    Decorated with photos of the Rat Pack set, Lucky’s Lounge creates a popular and laid-back hideaway, part dive-bar, part throwback to a 1970s-style wood-panelled rec room. The Sinatra Saturday Night (and Sinatra Brunch on Saturday and Sunday) features a live jazz band covering the best of Old Blue Eyes. Sunday

    11am
    10. Books and brunch

    For eclectic reads and eats, stop by Back Bay’s multilevel Trident Booksellers and Cafe, with diner-style seating and an upstairs bar. Best-loved brunch favourites include lemon ricotta French toast ($11.95), buffalo Brussels sprouts ($8), and the Chamato, a BLT with Cheddar and fried chicken on rosemary focaccia ($12.95). To drink, try the Mood Enhancer’s blend of beet, spinach, carrot and apple ($4.95); they also serve beer, wine and mimosas. Afterwards, browse the bookshop stacks, including one of the best magazine racks in town.

    1pm
    11. Baseball and Botticelli

    Two of Boston’s most beloved shrines are accessible by the quirky Green Line MBTA trolley. The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (admission $15) was built as a folly to house Gardner’s eccentric art collection, which ranges from ancient statuary to 19th-century masters, to the faux Venetian palace’s dreamy landscaped courtyard. The glassy addition, designed by Renzo Piano, has more space for temporary exhibitions and visitor events.

    More than just Red Sox fans will appreciate Fenway Park’s behind-the-scenes guided tour ($18, children $12), which takes visitors backstage at Major League Baseball’s oldest theatre. Sit atop the famous Green Monster, then see the inside of the press box and the visiting team’s clubhouse (not as luxurious as you’d think). © The New York Times

    Station Move Alert: Heath St at S. Huntington, Jamaica Plain

    Station Move Alert: Effective immediately, the recently deployed Hubway station, Heath Street at South Huntington, has been moved to its new location in front of 135 South Huntington Ave, south of the intersection with Heath St, and across from the MBTA Green Line E-train turnaround. This is a 15-dock on-street station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Charlestown Patch] Boston Adds 15 New Hubway Stations

    With the expansion, the total number of stations across the City of Boston will be 106 with approximately 1100 bicycles.

    The following is an article originally published by Frank O’Laughlin in the Charlestown Patch on October 23rd, 2015.

    The Boston Transportation Department/Boston Bikes today formally opened its new expansion stations in the New Balance Hubway bike share system. A total of 15 new stations are being installed in Boston, including the first Hubway locations in Brighton and an expansion into new parts of Dorchester, Roxbury and Charlestown.

    “Hubway is a healthy, affordable option for Boston residents to get to school or work, and I am thrilled that we are able to expand it to even more neighborhoods,” said Mayor Walsh. “We will continue to work with our community partners so that all of our residents have access to a diverse range of transportation options.”

    “We are grateful to the many partners who have made Hubway such a success,” said Boston Chief of Streets Chris Osgood.

    At the newly-opened Brighton Center Station, the City of Boston joined partners, including President and CEO of New Balance Rob DeMartini, Motivate VP for Operators John Reynolds, Boston College VP for Governmental & Community Affairs Thomas Keady, and Zoning Chair of the Brighton Allston Improvement Association Anabela Gomes, to officially undock the first bike from the new Hubway station. “As our community grows, it’s so important to have alternative means of transportation for our residents and visitors,” said Gomes. “Hubway is providing that kind of flexible alternative.”

    “We are thrilled to expand Hubway to new parts of the City, helping bridge otherwise disconnected neighborhoods, and providing even more residents and visitors with access to active transportation,” said Boston Transportation Commissioner Gina Fiandaca.

    After the undocking, a convoy of Hubway users rode to Franklin Park, where they were welcomed by partners, including Zoo New England CEO John Linehan and Franklin Park Coalition Executive Director Anita Morson-Matra, for the first official docking at the new station. “The Franklin Park Coalition is extremely excited about the opportunities for both improving access to bike share and for increasing utilization of green spaces in Roxbury,” said Morson-Matra.

    In just four years, Hubway has become an integral part of the transportation system in Boston, redefining how people travel, get to work, exercise, and connect with each other. It is estimated that the half hour bike ride from Brighton to Franklin Park would have taken longer by any other mode of transportation.

    The New Balance Hubway Bike share System launched in Boston in 2011 with 60 stations and 600 bicycles. With this expansion, the total number of stations in Boston will be 106 with approximately 1100 bicycles. During the inaugural season, a total of 142,300 trips were recorded. Since that time, the program has expanded to include the neighboring municipalities of Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville, and the number of trips taken to date is approaching 4 million.

    New Balance President and CEO Rob DeMartini said, “At New Balance we are committed to supporting healthy lifestyles for everyone and we are proud to show our continued support of New Balance Hubway as the system expands to reach riders in neighborhoods throughout the city. Our roots are here in Boston, and we value Hubway as a partner in upholding the values of New Balance and this great city.”

    The City of Boston has the longest-running subsidized bike share membership program in the country offering Hubway memberships to low-income residents for just $5 per year. For more information about subsidized memberships please visit www.bostonbikes.org or call 617-635-4756. More information about the New Balance Hubway system may be found at www.thehubway.com.

    [Boston News Group] Boston Announces Successful Expansion of Hubway Bike Share System

    Official first bike undocked at Brighton Center and Re-docked at Franklin Park

    The following is an article originally published on BostonNewsGroup.com on October 23rd, 2015.

    The Boston Transportation Department/Boston Bikes today formally opened its new expansion stations in the New Balance Hubway bike share system. A total of 15 new stations are being installed in Boston, including the first Hubway locations in Brighton and an expansion into new parts of Dorchester, Roxbury and Charlestown.
    “Hubway is a healthy, affordable option for Boston residents to get to school or work, and I am thrilled that we are able to expand it to even more neighborhoods,” said Mayor Walsh. “We will continue to work with our community partners so that all of our residents have access to a diverse range of transportation options.”
    “We are grateful to the many partners who have made Hubway such a success,” said Boston Chief of Streets Chris Osgood. “From our title sponsor New Balance that has supported Hubway since its launch, to the hundreds of local groups that encourage residents to try bike share, to institutions like Boston College and the Franklin Park Zoo that support new stations, to Motivate, the company that operates the system – so many partners have come together to help bike share in Boston exceed expectations.”
    At the newly-opened Brighton Center Station, the City of Boston joined partners, including President and CEO of New Balance Rob DeMartini, Motivate VP for Operators John Reynolds, Boston College VP for Governmental & Community Affairs Thomas Keady, and Zoning Chair of the Brighton Allston Improvement Association Anabela Gomes, to officially undock the first bike from the new Hubway station. “As our community grows, it’s so important to have alternative means of transportation for our residents and visitors,” said Gomes. “Hubway is providing that kind of flexible alternative.”
    “We are thrilled to expand Hubway to new parts of the City, helping bridge otherwise disconnected neighborhoods, and providing even more residents and visitors with access to active transportation,” said Boston Transportation Commissioner Gina Fiandaca.
    After the undocking, a convoy of Hubway users rode to Franklin Park, where they were welcomed by partners, including Zoo New England CEO John Linehan and Franklin Park Coalition Executive Director Anita Morson-Matra, for the first official docking at the new station. “The Franklin Park Coalition is extremely excited about the opportunities for both improving access to bike share and for increasing utilization of green spaces in Roxbury,” said Morson-Matra.
    In just four years, Hubway has become an integral part of the transportation system in Boston, redefining how people travel, get to work, exercise, and connect with each other. It is estimated that the half hour bike ride from Brighton to Franklin Park would have taken longer by any other mode of transportation.
    The New Balance Hubway Bike share System launched in Boston in 2011 with 60 stations and 600 bicycles. With this expansion, the total number of stations in Boston will be 106 with approximately 1100 bicycles. During the inaugural season, a total of 142,300 trips were recorded. Since that time, the program has expanded to include the neighboring municipalities of Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville, and the number of trips taken to date is approaching 4 million.
    New Balance President and CEO Rob DeMartini said, “At New Balance we are committed to supporting healthy lifestyles for everyone and we are proud to show our continued support of New Balance Hubway as the system expands to reach riders in neighborhoods throughout the city. Our roots are here in Boston, and we value Hubway as a partner in upholding the values of New Balance and this great city.”
    The City of Boston has the longest-running subsidized bike share membership program in the country offering Hubway memberships to low-income residents for just $5 per year. For more information about subsidized memberships please visit http://www.bostonbikes.org or call 617-635-4756. More information about the New Balance Hubway system may be found at http://www.thehubway.com.

    [New Boston Post] Hubway bike share program expands, adding Brighton

    The following is an article originally published by Beth Treffeisen in the New Boston Post on October 22nd, 2015.

    BOSTON – The popular Hubway bike-share program grew again Thursday, adding 15 stations in Boston neighborhoods to make it easier to take a ride without owning a bike.

    The Boston Transportation Department said the new stations are in Brighton, the first for the New Balance-sponsored system, as well as Dorchester, Roxbury and Charlestown.

    “Hubway is a healthy, affordable option for Boston residents to get to school or work, and I am thrilled that we are able to expand it to even more neighborhoods,” Mayor Marty Walsh said Thursday in a statement about the additions. “We will continue to work with our community partners so that all of our residents have access to a diverse range of transportation options.”

    Boston began the bike-share system in 2011 with 60 stations and 600 bicycles. Including the expansion just announced, it has 106 stations and about 1,100 bikes. In its first year, riders took 142,3000 trips. As it has expanded into Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville, the number of rides taken has grown to almost 4 million to date, according to the Boston Transportation Department.

    The bikes are essential in Brighton as the community continues to grow, said Anabela Gones, the zoning chair of the Brighton Allston Improvement Association. “It’s so important to have alternative means of transportation for our residents and visitors,” Gones said in the city statement. “Hubway is providing that kind of flexible alternative.”

    As part of the program, Boston offers a subsidized membership for low-income residents which costs just $5 a year.

    After riding from Brighton to Franklin Park, which the city estimated was the quickest way to get to the park from Brighton, Franklin Park Coalition Executive Director Anita Morson-Matra said her organization “is extremely excited about the opportunities for both improving access to bike share and for increasing utilization of green spaces in Roxbury.”

    Join us for a Hubway Boston expansion celebration, Thursday, October 22

    #TakeHubway to the celebration!

    We'll jump on the Back to the Future meme, but we recommend a bike in lieu of a Delorean

    #BackToTheFutureDay #BTTF #BTTFDay #BikeToTheFuture

    [Christian Science Monitor] With memories of 'snowpocalypse,' Boston readies for winter

    Boston officials are ramping up the city’s emergency weather preparedness and tackling pre-existing problems with public transit, as cities across the country grapple with how to handle more extreme weather in the face of climate change.

    The following is an article originally published by Corey Fedde in the Christian Science Monitor on October 16th, 2015.

    During the record-breaking 2015 winter in New England – affectionately known as “Snowpocalypse” – a series of severe blizzards dumped more than 100 inches of snow on Boston. Retail stores were shut down, residents were asked to stay at home, and driving in the city was banned for a few stretches. Gov. Charlie Baker was forced to call a state of emergency as snowfall topped more than eight feet.

    The city’s rapid transit service (the T), which an estimated 1 million people in the city depend on for their daily commutes, was largely dysfunctional. Operated by the Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA), T service ground to a complete halt during certain periods. Even when it was running, minutes-long ride times stretched into hours; commuters had to be evacuated from one train that got stuck in the heavy snow. Things worsened to the point that the MBTA offered commuters a day of free rides in April to apologize.

    As the 2016 winter approaches, memories of 2015 loom large. However, some believe the city’s hiccups during that time have helped make Boston better prepared for future extreme weather events by forcing officials to reckon with long-neglected infrastructure problems.

    “This last winter has been a blessing in disguise as it illuminated how much we’d neglected the MBTA and how much needs to be done,” says Jose Gomez-Ibanez, a professor of urban planning and public policy at Harvard University.

    Boston is not the only major city brought to a standstill by remarkable weather in recent years. In January 2014, Atlanta virtually shut down after a rare few inches of snowfall, resulting in kids sleeping at school and commuters abandoning cars to seek refuge in local stores. California is struggling through a severe drought that has lasted more than four years. And those rare occurrences are only going to become more routine as a result of climate change, experts say.

    “Extreme weather events are a natural phenomena, but … as temperatures rise we will expect to see more heavy precipitation events and extreme heat events over much of the country,” says Virginia Burkett, chief scientist for climate and land use change at the US Geological Survey.

    That leaves it to local and state governments to shore up their preparation efforts. Last week in Boston, Mayor Marty Walsh unveiled a draft of Go Boston 2030, an initiative meant to engage the public in the process of improving the city’s public transit and set targets for the city to meet within 5, 10, and 15 years.

    The draft includes lofty transportation goals, such as, “every Boston household will be within a 10 minute walk of a rail station or key bus route, Hubway station, and car-share.” For reliability, the plan aims to ensure that “MBTA customers will experience waits and travel times that are longer than what is scheduled only 10% of the time,” by 2030.

    The high goals and community participation (over 6,000 Bostonians gave feedback for the initial draft) mark an attempt to create a comprehensive plan for the future of the city’s public transit and reaffirm public trust in the current MBTA system.

    “We learned last winter that in addition to structural reforms, the MBTA needs meaningful improvements to its snow resiliency efforts, including upgrades to infrastructure, operations, and equipment,” Interim MBTA General Manager Frank DePaola said in a written statement.

    In June, Mr. DePaola accompanied Gov. Baker and Secretary of Transportation Stephanie Pollack in announcing another initiative prompted by the 2015 winter, an $83.7 million MBTA Winter Resiliency Plan that aims to ramp up snow equipment, implement infrastructure improvements, and increase reliability over the next five years. The plan also calls for Massachusetts state legislators to expand its financial support for the MBTA.

    Portions of that plan are already underway. MBTA spokesman Jason Johnson told the Christian Science Monitor via e-mail that the T’s Red Line has had “36,929 linear feet, or 51 percent, of [exposed] third rail replaced.”  The Orange Line has had over 5,000 feet of snow fencing installed. Snow fencing on the Red Line has a completion date set for Dec. 15.

    Boston’s approach to preparing vital public infrastructure for extreme weather events, involving the public and balancing immediate and long-term investments, might be a good blueprint for other cities to follow.

    “If we do it right, the investments we make for climate change can also be investments today to make cities better places to live… Boston has been really good at finding those,” says Elisabeth Hamin, a professor of regional planning at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst.

    [The Daily Free Press] Transportation Project Continues with Community Outreach

    The following is an article originally published by Nicole Mis in the Daily Free Press on October 16th, 2015.

    The city of Boston released a draft of the community-developed transportation plan, created by the Boston Transportation Department and Go Boston 2030, on Oct. 9. PHOTO: Jacqui Busick / Daily Free Press Staff

    The city project Go Boston 2030 is gathering feedback from residents about issues and concerns with the transportation system with the goal of developing an action plan by the spring of 2016.

    Through community outreach, the city will continue to collect suggestions with a pop-up called “Ideas on the Street” that is currently touring more than 30 locations in Boston, according to an Oct. 9 release. There will also be “Idea Roundtables” held in November, the release stated.

    “Our transportation Action Plan will lay out an ambitious roadmap to address inequities in underserved neighborhoods, connect our workforce to job opportunities, and prepare our systems for climate change,” Boston Mayor Martin Walsh said in a release.

    Projects will focus on safety, reliability and access, the release stated. The plan will be completed by the summer of 2016.

    Vineet Gupta, director of planning at the Boston Transportation Department, said he is hopeful that the plan would make jobs more accessible to residents.

    “For example, not all jobs are in downtown Boston. There are jobs out in the South Boston area. There are jobs in the Longwood medical area. These are not well connected today. So we are hoping to make better connections for our neighborhood residents to get to those jobs in addition to jobs in the downtown area.”

    The plan also aims to reduce collisions with the help of the Boston Police Department and emergency medical services and decrease wait and travel times by partnering with the transportation app Waze.

    To connect with the residents of Boston, a question truck was dispatched during January and February that stopped at 15 neighborhoods in the city, The Daily Free Press reported on Feb. 2, 2015. Go Boston 2030 also hosted a “Visioning Lab” on May 8 and 9 to develop ideas for the future, according to their website.

    Of the more than 6,000 Boston residents who contributed feedback through the Go Boston Advisory Committee, 19 objectives were identified and included in the action plan that represents the concerns of the majority of citizens, Gupta said. Main goals of this project are connecting various neighborhoods through equitable transportation throughout the city as well as updating the transportation system to prepare for climate change, he said.

    Gupta also said there are parts of the city that are not well served by car shares, such as Zipcar, or the Hubway bike system. To accommodating these areas, the city will implement projects that recommend how to expand those networks, he said.

    Climate change is another issue that the transportation system faces and that this project seeks to address.

    “Similarly, we are looking for our action plan to address issues that have to do with climate change and so we are working with the [Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority] to see what the impact of sea level rise will be on all the stations that are hosting the subway system,” Gupta said.

    Citizens can submit concerns and questions about the transportation system by simply tweeting with #goboston2030 or visiting the website goboston2030.org.

    Several residents said they have had varying experiences with the transportation system, citing ways it could be improved.

    Mike Lamb, 23, of South Boston, said Boston is in need of revitalizing public transportation.

    “It’s the oldest system in the country, and it still runs like that. I know people who go to New York don’t have to deal with half the problems here,” he said. “Somehow when a big snow fall happens here they have to shut down the whole city for two days because no one can get in or out.”

    Tyesha Brown, 26, from Dorchester said, the system could be improved by adding more buses to cut down on waits and make it more reliable.

    “It could be better but at the same time it’s going to mess up somewhere else,” she said. “They are doing the best that they can.”

    New Station Alert: Heath St & S. Huntington, Jamaica Plain

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday afternoon, October 15th, the new Hubway station, Heath Street & South Huntington, is open & operational in Jamaica Plain. This station is a 15-dock on-street station at the intersection kitty corner from the North American Indian Center of Boston. This is Hubway’s 151st station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Bunker Hill Community College, Charlestown

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday morning, October 16th, the new Hubway station, Bunker Hill Community College, is open & operational in Charlestown. This station is a 19-dock off-street station near Austin Street. This is Hubway’s 150th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: Harvard Square's Gund Hall station returns to original location

    Station Move Alert: Effective Thursday morning, October 16th, the Harvard Square - Gund Hall Hubway station has returned to its original location at Quincy Street & Kirkland Street. The station had been moved in April to accommodate for ongoing construction. The new location for this 15-dock station is considered permanent, and it is visible from the former location across Cambridge Street.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [The Huntington News] Hubway Opens Huntington Station

    The following is an article originally published by Sam Haas in the Huntington News on October 15th, 2015.

    Photo: Scotty Schenck / The Huntington News

    Boston bike-share program Hubway’s recent expansion brings a new docking station to Huntington Avenue, potentially increasing access to the program for Northeastern University (NU) and Wentworth Institute of Technology (WIT) students.

    The expansion – Hubway’s first major growth in Boston since 2013 – was scheduled to add 11 new stations across the city by Oct. 9, although Hubway’s online map only displayed 10 of the 11 at press time. The Huntington Avenue docks opened on Oct. 2, and two other locations were unveiled the same day.

    The new bike docks benefit people seeking quick routes to specific places, according to Max Johnson, 32, of Boston. On Sunday, Johnson rode a bike from State Street to the WIT location to visit the Museum of Fine Arts.

    “Before, I would have gone further away [to stations near] Brigham Circle or the Fens,” Johnson said. “It could be a hassle.”

    In addition to the bike docks on Huntington Avenue, NU students have quick access to ones previously installed outside Ruggles Station and near the campus’s North Lot.

    The other new locations are spread across Brighton, Dorchester, Roxbury, Fenway, Charlestown and South Boston, in an attempt to broaden and strengthen Hubway’s base in the city.

    “We are thrilled to be able to expand Hubway to provide even more residents, commuters and visitors with the opportunity to take advantage of bike share,” Boston Transportation Department Commissioner Gina Fiandaca said in a press release on Oct. 6.

    Hubway launched in 2011 with 60 stations and 600 bikes. After the expansions are completed, Hubway will have 108 stations and nearly 1,100 bikes in Boston. The bike-share program offers users several usage options: annual memberships, monthly passes, and 72- or 24-hour access.

    Riders can rent and return bikes at any station, which means Hubway’s usefulness is dependent on stations with open spaces near a rider’s destination, Maria Davis, 25, of Boston, said.

    “I like the new station because it’s right by my apartment,” Davis said. “But it can fill up at night.”

    Davis found the Wentworth docks already full of bikes on Wednesday evening, forcing her to search for an open spot at a nearby station in the Fens.

    Balancing growth in new areas with availability in existing ones is a key concern for bike-sharing programs everywhere, according to Peter Furth, a Northeastern University professor of civil and environmental engineering who is part of an advisory group for Bike Boston.

    “There are two main issues, and there’s tension between them,” Furth said. “One is providing the needed density… When you try to return your bike and the station’s full, you don’t want to next one to be too far away. On the other hand, you want to expand. Neighborhoods in the city are saying, ‘Hey, we want Hubway to come to us.’”

    Hubway and Bike Boston officials hope their new stations will mark progress toward both goals, according to Benjy Kantor, a marketing manager with Motivate, the company that operates Hubway.

    “The idea is to grow a little bit organically, deliberately and, hopefully, sustainability,” Kantor said.

    While expanded bike share is a step in the right direction for Boston, the city has a ways to go to become truly good for cyclists, according to Furth.

    “One of the things that frustrates me is our city government wants to have an image of being bike-friendly,” Furth said. “That’s what they use Hubway for – and that’s a good thing that they’re doing it – but they’re really failing on the bike network.”

    According to Davis, however, Hubway is a safe way to navigate the city.
    “During the day, it’s perfectly safe,” Davis said. “At night I don’t like it as much, but you get used to it. You just have to be aware and know what you’re doing.”

    Ultimately, Hubway is largely a separate question from bike safety, Furth said. While Hubway’s expansion is a good thing for Bostonians, safety problems need to be addressed, too.

    “It will need a fundamentally different commitment from the city,” Furth said. “There has to be a priority to creating and completing a bicycling network.”

    2015 Boston Bike Counts

    The following announcement was posted on the Boston Bikes blog on Oct 14, 2015. Click for larger view.

    Each year, Boston Bikes estimates the growth of bicycling in Boston by counting the number of people on bikes at key locations. Last month, volunteers stood at 13 locations during the commuting hours of 7-9am and 4-6pm.

    We measured a 104% increase in cycling since 2007. Additionally, recently-released US Census Bureau data estimates that 2.4% of Bostonians rode bikes to work in 2014.

    We owe tremendous thanks to the volunteers who helped us complete the bike counts this year and in years past. While this information doesn’t fully show travel patterns or capture all people who ride bikes, it does show that more and more people are choosing to bike in Boston.

    [Bay State Banner] City Seeking Transportation Solutions

    The following is an article originally published by Sandra Larson in the Bay State Banner on October 14th, 2015.

    How will Bostonians get to work and move around the city in the future? Looking ahead to 2030, how might transportation improvements address challenges already evident today — a growing, diversifying and aging city population, increasing income inequality, congested streets and an overburdened public transit system?

    The City of Boston has been pondering these questions, with the help of an advisory group and public input from thousands of Hub residents and workers, for much of 2015. Last week, its “Go Boston 2030” initiative reached an interim milestone as Mayor Martin Walsh and the Boston Transportation Department released a report outlining a vision and goals.

    The “Go Boston 2030 Vision Framework” report sketches out the state of jobs, income and commuting in Boston and lays out goals under several themes, including access, affordability, safety and reliability.

    For access, the larger vision includes a “seamless, convenient, and easy to navigate” system in which “quality jobs, educational opportunities, healthy food, and cultural facilities will be accessible from every community.” An “aspirational target” is that by 2030, every Boston home will be within a 10-minute walk of a rail or key bus route, Hubway station and car-share. Today, that combination of amenities exists for less than half of the city’s households.

    Early action projects include new connections between the city’s green spaces, traffic calming measures to improve pedestrian and bicycle safety and “intelligent” parking meters that accept multiple forms of payment and collect data to inform parking policies.

    A call to be visionary

    The Go Boston 2030 initiative’s Mayoral Advisory Committee was co-chaired by state Rep. Russell Holmes, whose district includes parts of Dorchester, Hyde Park, Jamaica Plain, Mattapan and Roslindale, and Rick Dimino, president and CEO of A Better City, a Greater Boston independent business and institutional membership organization focused on transportation, land development and environmental policies.

    “We had a long discussion, thinking about what’s practical versus setting the stage to be aspirational,” said Dimino, who formerly served as Boston’s transportation commissioner and is on the Metropolitan Area Planning Council’s executive committee. “We knew that, in being aspirational, we might raise some eyebrows. But I’d rather think big and long, and the mayor thought that was important, too. Near-term actions should be in the context of a larger idea.”

    Holmes said the committee’s work involved addressing the needs of every stakeholder, from commuters to walkers, bikers and people with disabilities.

    “The walkers would point out that walking is free, but then the disabled folks would say, ‘but that’s not so easy for us,’” he said.

    But the biggest challenge, Holmes noted, is that the city of Boston does not have control over every piece of the transportation puzzle.

    “The city does not manage the T or the commuter rail,” he said. “So when we create a report that involves state and federal agencies, how do we as a city force that to happen? This is a vision we have for the city, and we need all these players to be involved.”

    Neighborhood participation

    The visioning process started in January. Through a Question Truck, social media outreach and an interactive website, the city collected some 5,000 questions from workers and residents. The questions were sorted and organized into major themes and priorities. In April, residents, community stakeholders and passersby provided feedback in a two-day “visioning lab” at the China Trade Building.

    The Vision Framework report caps Go Boston 2030’s first phase; the next phase will be formulating an action plan.

    Public dialogue sessions for phase two include this fall’s “Ideas on the Street” program, in which the Boston Transportation Department stations a bicycle-drawn cart at neighborhood sites. Passersby are encouraged to respond to the prompt, “My transportation project or policy idea is…”

    Outside Codman Square Branch Library on Oct. 7, hexagonal sheets of colored paper held suggestions and questions handwritten in several languages by adults, teens and a few grade school children who stopped by on their way into the library with their teacher.

    “Give announcements in Spanish.”

    “Trolley too crowded — Make trolleys larger to lessen crowds.”

    “Fairmount Commuter Rail should run more often.”

    “Make buses come more often! So if I miss one bus, I won’t automatically be late for work.”

    Victor Rodriguez, 71, chair of the Friends of Codman Square Library group and a board member of the Codman Square Neighborhood Council, lingered for a good while as area residents stopped by the cart, staffed by consultants working with the city on the vision initiative.

    “We have serious issues with transportation, especially in wintertime,” Rodriguez told the Banner. “Transportation for seniors — it’s a disaster.”

    The main issue in improving things, Rodriguez said, is communication. For elders in his community, he said, transit-related information should be communicated by radio, newspaper and flyers in multiple languages, as well as by e-mail or websites.

    The Ideas on the Street pop-up sessions will continue (weather permitting) through Oct. 17, with the cart appearing Oct. 14 at Roxbury Crossing T Station; Oct. 15 in Mission Hill and Jamaica Plain; Oct. 16 in Dorchester and Roxbury; and Oct. 17 in Hyde Park. For details, see http://goboston2030.org/ideas-on-the-street-schedule. Additional public engagement through the fall and winter is expected to culminate in a consolidated Vision Framework and Action Plan in Spring 2016.

    On the Web

    [WIT News] Hubway bike station arrives at 525 Huntington

    The following is an article originally published on WIT.edu/News on October 14th, 2015.

    On Friday, October 2 bike-sharing system Hubway expanded its operation to the corner of Vancouver Street and Huntington Avenue, adding a new transportation option for members of the Wentworth community.

    Hubway has more than 140 stations and 1,300 bicycles throughout Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville. Kevin Smith, Wentworth’s clerk of the works, is excited about the new station.

    “Having a station located at Wentworth allows our students to pick up a bike and ride to any of the Boston area locations,” said Smith. “It also makes Wentworth a destination to drop bikes off.”

    Students are also eager to use the new station.

    “I ride my own bike, but it’s a nice option to have if I don’t feel comfortable locking it up somewhere,” said Jack Reilly, Computer Engineering Technology ’17. “It’s also going to be nice for students to use when they want to get groceries.”

    Frank Spathanas, Computer Engineering Technology ’17, works for a catering company out of Rockland. Requiring him to travel to different locations for work. Spathanas expressed the convenience of having a bike on campus.

    “I’m definitely going to use it to go to work now that it’s so close,” said Spatahnas.

    Connor Poris, Electrical Mechanical Engineering ’17, added,  “It definitely makes sense having them located on school campuses.”
    Launched in 2011, Hubway is operated by Motivate, which runs bicycle-sharing systems in 11 locations around the world including Washington, D.C., San Francisco, Chicago, Toronto, and Melbourne.

    [Wicked Local Roslindale] City releases draft of the community-developed Boston 2030 and seeks public input

    The following is an article originally published in Wicked Local Roslindale on October 11th, 2015.

    Mayor Martin J. Walsh recently announced that Go Boston 2030, the city’s transportation planning initiative, reached a milestone, as the project moves from setting a vision for the city to identifying specific actions.

    As part of this announcement, the city released a draft transportation vision for the city, developed by the Go Boston Advisory Committee through conversations with over 6,000 Bostonians. That vision will be the foundation for engaging residents on what transportation projects they most want to see pursued in Boston.

    To build the action plan, the city is launching a series of community outreach efforts. Suggestions can be submitted by visiting the “Ideas on the Street” pop-up which is currently touring over 30 locations citywide and by attending “Idea Roundtables” in November. The collected project and policy suggestions will inform the priorities and implementation strategies to be included in the Action Plan. The plan will be completed by summer 2016.

    As part of the Go Boston 2030 initiative, the city is already taking steps to improve transportation.

    The Vision that will inform the action is a result of extensive public participation. Based on over 5,000 questions from the public about getting around Boston in the future and comments from the 600 people who participated in the Visioning Lab, goals and aspiration targets have been identified around nine themes.

    The following themes with their associated goals and targets rose to the top:

    Access:

    The goal is to make Boston’s neighborhoods interconnected for all modes of travel, and connect low-income communities to job-rich districts. Every home in Boston will be within a 10-minute walk of a rail station or key bus route, Hubway station and car-share. Early action includes a commitment to sign a Mayoral executive order making Complete Streets the city’s design policy to balance public space among transit, cars, walkers and bicyclists. DriveBoston, an expansion of car-share in the neighborhoods with 80 new spaces to be located on city streets and in municipal lots to add to those in off-street garages. Green Links, a plan that will connect residents in every neighborhood to Boston’s greenway network and park system.

    Safety:

    The goal is to collaborate on design and education to substantially reduce collisions on every street and eliminate traffic fatalities in Boston. Early action includes Vision Zero Boston, a joint effort by BTD, the Boston Police Department and EMS to eliminate traffic fatalities and dramatically reduce collisions involving motor vehicles.

    Reliability:

    The goal is to prioritize making travel predictable on Boston’s transit and roadway networks. MBTA customers will experience waits and travel times that are longer than what is scheduled only 10 percent of the time. Early action to help reach this goal includes a data sharing partnership with Waze, a smartphone app, to facilitate signal timing adjustments and enforcement of double-parking to improve commute times.

    For information, schedules and to submit ideas: goboston2030.org.

    New Station Alert: Brock Street and Washington Street, Brighton

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, October 9th, the new Hubway station, Brock Street and Washington Street, is open & operational in Brighton. This station is a 19-dock on-street station on Brock Street next to Armstrong Ambulance. This is Hubway’s 149th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Brighton Center

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, October 9th, the new Hubway station, Brighton Center, is open & operational. This station is a 15-dock off-street station at Cambridge Street and Washington Street, in front of St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center in Brighton. This is Hubway’s 148th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Boston Globe] What's the best app for navigating Boston?

    The following is an article originally published by Michael Andor Brodeur in the Boston Globe on October 9th, 2015.

    Finding one’s way in Boston can be tricky for even the most hardened veterans of local transit — our tangle of cow paths above ground and squealing catacombs below offer no shortage of… surprises. And there’s also no shortage of navigation apps available to help you along (the MBTA has a page listing dozens of system-synched options). But if you thought picking the right route to Union Square was confusing, try picking the right transit app. Or don’t. Just get Citymapper.

    PROS: Clean and easy to use, Citymapper tracks subways, buses, and trains using real-time data to propose multiple route options and estimated travel times. But it also drags in fare estimates from taxis and Ubers, as well as bike counts from nearby Hubway kiosks. (And if you opt to bike or hoof it, Citymapper will even tell you how many calories you stand to burn.) It’s also the best option (easily toggled) for getting around NYC, if that’s something you care to do.

    CONS: Citymapper can make you feel in control of your transit situation, but remember it’s only a semblance of control. For those who are still capable of feeling anything after years of riding the T, that may be enough.

    [Charlestown Patch] What should Boston's transportation future be?

    The following is an article originally published by Frank O’Laughlin in the Charlestown Patch on October 9th, 2015.

    Boston has released a draft of the community-developed transportation vision. Mayor Walsh is seeking public input on the specific actions.

    Mayor Marty Walsh today Friday that Go Boston 2030, the City’s Transportation Planning Initiative, reached a major milestone. The project has moved from setting a vision for the City to identifying specific actions.

    As part of this announcement, the City released a draft transportation vision, developed by the Go Boston Advisory Committee through conversations with over 6,000 Bostonians. That vision will be the foundation for engaging residents on what transportation projects they most want to see pursued in Boston.

    ”The City of Boston launched Go Boston 2030 to better understand the public’s aspirations for transportation throughout the city and to build a bold, innovative transportation future based on an unprecedented level of public engagement,” said Mayor Walsh. “Our transportation Action Plan will lay out an ambitious roadmap to address inequities in underserved neighborhoods, connect our workforce to job opportunities, and prepare our systems for climate change.”

    To build the Action Plan, the City is launching a series of community outreach efforts. Suggestions can be submitted by visiting the ”Ideas on the Street” pop-up which is currently touring over 30 locations citywide and by attending ”Idea Roundtables” in November.

    The collected project and policy suggestions will inform the priorities and implementation strategies to be included in the Action Plan. The plan will be completed by Summer 2016. Schedules are available at http://goboston2030.org/participate/. Ideas can also be submitted online at http://goboston2030.org/submit-ideas/.

    As part of the Go Boston 2030 initiative, the City is already taking steps to improve transportation.

    “We have identified early action projects to improve safety on our streets, fight congestion, and improve access for pedestrians and bicyclists,” said Boston Transportation Commissioner, Gina Fiandaca.

    The Vision that will inform the action is a result of extensive public participation. Based on over 5,000 questions from the public about getting around Boston in the future and comments from the 600 people who participated in the Visioning Lab, ambitious goals and aspiration targets have been identified around nine themes.

    The following themes with their associated goals and targets rose to the top:

    Access

    • Goal - Make Boston’s neighborhoods interconnected for all modes of travel, and connect low-income communities to job-rich districts.
    • Target - Every home in Boston will be within a 10 minute walk of a rail station or key bus route, Hubway station, and car-share. Early Action - A commitment to sign a Mayoral executive order making Complete Streets the city’s design policy to balance public space among transit, cars, walkers and bicyclists. DriveBoston, an expansion of car-share in the neighborhoods with 80 new spaces to be located on city streets and in municipal lots to add to those in off-street garages. Green Links, a plan that will connect residents in every neighborhood to Boston’s greenway network and park system.

    Safety

    • Goal - Collaborate on design and education to substantially reduce collisions on every street.
    • Target - Eliminate traffic fatalities in Boston.
    • Early Action - Vision Zero Boston, a joint effort by BTD, the Boston Police Department and EMS to eliminate traffic fatalities and dramatically reduce collisions involving motor vehicles.

    Reliability

    • Goal- Prioritize making travel predictable on Boston’s transit and roadway networks.
    • Target - MBTA customers will experience waits and travel times that are longer than what is scheduled only 10 percent of the time. Early Action - A data sharing partnership with Waze, a smartphone app, to facilitate signal timing adjustments and enforcement of double-parking and “Don’t Block the Box” to improve commute times.

    The complete draft Vision Framework report can be viewed and commented on at http://goboston2030.org/vision-framework.

    [Boston Globe] Report lays out Boston's transit wish list

    The following article was originally published by Nicole Dungca in the Boston Globe on October 9th, 2015.

    Boston residents want the city to eliminate fatal traffic crashes, make sure every household is within a 10-minute walk of public transportation, and ensure that MBTA trains and buses arrive on time at least 90 percent of the time, according to a new report released on Friday.

    The city says the report lays out the transportation goals of thousands of Bostonians, and represents the next stage of City Hall’s planning initiative called “Go Boston 2030.” The initiative aims to use feedback from the broadest group of Bostonians possible to develop long-term transportation plans.

    An “unprecedented” number of responses is allowing officials to hear what residents want the city to do before projects are planned, said Gina Fiandaca, the city’s transportation commissioner.

    “Generally, we have a preconceived plan and some options and we hold meetings, and we’ll talk about them, and at the end of the day, we’ll say, ‘Choose A, B, or C,’ ” she said. “And that’s not the case here.”

    As part of the Go Boston 2030 process, the city dispatched a van to different areas of the city and held several events to gather feedback on transportation; more than 6,000 residents responded. Officials then boiled down the comments to formulate respondents’ most important transportation goals.

    “What we really wanted to do is open the process to people we might not have had a chance to encounter,” said Vineet Gupta, the director of planning at the city’s transportation department. “In many cases, we found out, they hadn’t been engaged in any city process. For them, it was a real eye-opener.”

    Based on data collected over the last year, residents hope that the city will:

  • Lower the default speed limit from 30 miles per hour to 25 miles per hour.
  • Increase the number of train stations that have bus service, shuttle service, and access to car-share or bike-share stations.
  • Reduce the percentage of income that poorer households spend on transportation.
  • After officials gather more feedback on the report, they will release a final action plan in the spring of 2016.

    Friday’s report mentioned some general transportation goals for the city. For example, residents want to improve transit options so that residents from outlying neighborhoods can more easily get around town, without having to use central transit hubs such as Park Street and Downtown Crossing.

    But the report also suggested specific, numeric goals, such as decreasing the average commute time by 10 percent for all Bostonians. That would drop the current average from 28.8 minutes to 25.9 minutes.

    Achieving the goals detailed in the report will require substantial support from state agencies, as well as city offices. The city wants to ensure that MBTA customers will experience late trains or buses only 10 percent of the time, which will require buy-in and help from the T.

    The report also publicizes some projects that are already underway, such as Vision Zero, a nationwide initiative to eliminate all fatal traffic crashes.

    The plan also suggests relatively inexpensive improvements, such as repainting streets and placing planters to mark bike lanes on the street. Doing so can help slow drivers in corridors and intersections known for traffic accidents.

    Chris Osgood, the recently appointed Chief of Streets, say such projects have been emerging from continual conversations with residents, and show that the city wants to move as quickly as possible to keep up the momentum for change.

    “We don’t need to wait until the spring of 2016 for things we want to do right now,” he said.

    [Business Insider] Move over, millenials - here's where the young consumers of Generation Z are spending their money

    The following is an excerpt of an article originally published by Mallory Schlossberg in Business Insider on October 8th, 2015.

    Meet Generation Z.

    They’re younger and cooler than you. They also use Snapchat better than you. The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business called this generation “millennials on steroids.”

    Generation Z consists of those born between 1996 and 2010.

    Here’s where they’re shopping.

    “Stuff, not experiences”

    Something that set millennials apart is that they prefer to spend money on experiences rather than on stuff. An EventBrite study detailed that that’s what they want more than anything.

    “Similarly, that generation cares more about access to products and services rather than ownership of them. Note the popularity of Airbnb, the lodging company, Zipcar, the car-sharing company, and Bixi and Hubway, the public-bike-sharing systems in Montreal and Boston respectively, among this generation,” according to a UPenn Wharton blog post.

    Generation Z cares about owning. “This generation is in to stuff,” Keith Niedermeier, director of Wharton’s undergraduate marketing program, said.


    Click here to view the full Business Insider article.

    [Momentum Mag] The Numbers Are In: The U.S. is Biking All Over the Place

    The following is an article originally published by Geffen Semach in the Momentum Mag on October 8th, 2015.

    The League of American Bicyclists releases new analysis on the amount of bicyclists per state in the U.S.

    Every year the U.S. Census Bureau studies the commuting habits of Americans. While bicycle commuting is not the main focus of the census, The League of American Bicyclists makes use of the data to assess the numbers of bicycle commuters in cities across the country. Their latest analysis has certainly provided valuable insight into how different communities are stacking up in their transportation choices and, moreover, which cities in the U.S. are the most bicycle commuter friendly.

    As a nation, the U.S. saw growth of 67% in bicycle commuters in 2014. That said, there are a few things to remember when looking at the numbers. Nationally since 2005, states have seen an average of 46% increase in the share of people biking to work.

    However, an average is just that. Talking numbers, the places with the largest amount of bicyclists reflect the population – so cities like New York and Los Angeles have the most bike riders in the U.S. As well, there are smaller cities like Portland, Seattle, and Minneapolis that have seen enormous growth in bike commuting due to years of dedicated investment in cycling infrastructure and culture. But many other states have seen tremendous increases in bicycle commuters in the past few years. Many of them are states you wouldn’t expect, such as Rhode Island, Massachusetts, or Kentucky, all of which have seen a growth of over 100% since 2005 in the amount of bicyclists.

    As can be expected, some of the most bike riding friendly cities in America are college towns like Berkeley, Palo Alto, and Cambridge. This is perhaps due to the fact that these cities built extensive biking infrastructure early on with student population in mind. Still, those bike lanes are now critically relied upon by locals of all professions. Davis, CA, home to the University of California, has long been on the top of the list for cities with the highest share of bicyclists boasting bike lanes on 95% of its major streets.

    A noteworthy collection of data on the analysis is the fifty large cities where bike commuting is growing the fastest. At the top of the list are Detroit, Pittsburgh, and Portland – all of which scored over 300% in growth from 2000-2014. Moreover, and importantly, all have begun investing in cycling infrastructure steadily in the last few years and have plans to continue expanding.

    In terms of a regional race, the average mode share for each region depicts clearly that The West is definitely coming in 1st with 6.3%, and the East in last place with only 2.3%.

    While the percentage of bicyclists is less than 1% of commuters overall, the current direction is clear: commuting by bike is on the rise. Its modal share has grown by 67% since 2000, and while fast growth is obvious when starting from a small sum, it’s still an extremely positive beginning of a bike-friendly future for the United States, and not just in New York City or Berkeley, but everywhere.

    [Harvard Crimson] Green Transportation Event Showcases Sustainability Efforts

    The following is an article originally published by Marella A. Gayla in the Harvard Crimson on October 8th, 2015.

    On Thursday afternoon, transportation companies and Harvard organizations gathered in the Science Center Plaza to showcase options for sustainable travel in Cambridge. The event was organized by CommuterChoice, a Harvard program that provides information for Harvard affiliates about commuting options and planning.

    Among the wide variety of booths featuring sustainable transportation groups were some well-known names such as Hubway and Zipcar, as well as other lesser-known programs and businesses.

    Ben A. Hammer, an administrator of the CommuterChoice program, said that the annual event aims to “let [the University community] know [about] all the stakeholders that are promoting sustainable transportation across campus.”

    Kurt A. Belhumeur of Bern Unlimited, a business that sells bike and multi-sport helmets, manned a table advertising its products. He said the business encourages people to bike more and to bike safely.

    “We’re a local company … trying to promote a healthy and active paradigm shift in lifestyle, and trying to do it in a fashionable and safe manner,” Belhumeur said.

    At another table, a representative of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation encouraged attendees to sign up for a program that rewards commuters who use public transportation or walk. A representative of Park and Pedal provided information about its network of parking lots on the outskirts of Boston, which allow employees to park their cars for free and bike for the remainder of their commutes.

    The Harvard Office for Sustainability and Harvard Transportation and Parking was present at the event as well. They explained the University’s efforts to improve sustainability, such as the more environmentally-friendly fuel the shuttles use and the University’s five-year sustainability plan.

    Jennifer L. Lawrence, a sustainability planner for the city of Cambridge, said the city as a whole is striving to become more environmentally efficient. She explained that Cambridge is one of 50 communities across the nation competing for the Georgetown University Energy Prize, which will award $5 million to the city with the greatest reduction in energy use in the next two years.

    The city also aims to have a net zero carbon footprint by 2070.

    “The technology isn’t there yet, but we’re hoping to work with Harvard, MIT, and other of the other universities across greater Boston to get us there,” Lawrence said.

    [Dorchester Reporter] New Hubway station on Dot Ave.; more to come

    The following article was originally published by Jennifer Smith in the Dorchester Reporter on October 8th, 2015.

    Dorchester now has its first Hubway station, a 15-bike facility next to Robert E. Ryan Playground off Dorchester Avenue in Savin Hill. The new station is one of 15 that either have been or are scheduled to be installed as part of the city’s latest expansion of the popular bike sharing program.

    It is the 145th Hubway depository in Greater Boston, including those in Brookline, Somerville, and Cambridge, according to Hubway. Once all currently planned stations are installed, the city of Boston will be host to 108 stations holding 1,100 bikes, according to the mayor’s office.

    “Whether your mission is to visit family or local businesses, get to work, or just enjoy a ride, Hubway is a convenient and economical option for traveling around the city,” said Boston Transportation Commissioner Gina Fiandaca. “I encourage anyone who isn’t already using the service to give it a try.”

    David Cotter, Dorchester liaison for the Mayor’s Office of Neighborhood Services, updated Columbia-Savin Hill Civic Association members Monday about the new Ryan Playground station. Another location at the Savin Hill MBTA station is on hold pending approval, and “unfortunately, it’s probably not going to happen this year,” Cotter said.

    A potential location on Sydney Street across from the Savin Bar and Kitchen has not been confirmed; public comment on the location is open until next Monday, Cotter said.

    The expansion will include the first Hubway locations in Brighton, with more to come in Dorchester, Roxbury and Charlestown. The system is reliant upon a reasonable distance between hubs, so new stations will be rolled out incrementally.

    “Hubway is a healthy, affordable option for Boston residents to get to school or work, and I am thrilled we are able to expand it to even more neighborhoods,” said Mayor Martin Walsh. “We will continue to work with our community partners so that all of our residents have access to a diverse range of transportation options.”

    [Charlestown Patriot-Bridge] Hubway Bike to Expand to More Locations

    The following article was originally published in the Charlestown Patriot-Bridge on October 8th, 2015.

    Mayor Martin J. Walsh along with the Boston Transportation Department/Boston Bikes ann-ounced this week that work is underway to expand the Hubway Bike Share System to 15 additional station locations throughout the City, including two locations in Charlestown.

    “Hubway is a healthy, affordable option for Boston residents to get to school or work, and I am thrilled we are able to expand it to even more neighborhoods,” said Mayor Walsh. “We will continue to work with our community partners so that all of our residents have access to a diverse range of transportation options.”

    The New Balance Hubway Bikeshare System launched in Boston in 2011 with 60 stations and 600 bicycles. With this expansion, the total number of stations in Boston will be 108 with approximately 1,100 bicycles. During the inaugural season, a total of 142,300 trips were recorded.  Since that time, the program has expanded to include the neighboring municipalities of Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville, and the number of trips taken to date is approaching four million.

    New station installations are beginning this week at the following locations:

    • Main Street at Eden Street, Charlestown
    • Bunker Hill Community College, Charlestown

    The City of Boston partnered with MassDOT, the MBTA, MassPort, Bunker Hill Community College, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital and Zoo New England to offer these convenient station locations with direct access to public transportation, parks and bike routes. This year’s expansion was funded in part by generous sponsorships from Gerding Edlen, Skanska and the Wentworth Institute of Technology.

    Revenues from memberships and advertising fund the system’s operation. The City of Boston has the longest-running subsidized bike-share membership program in the country offering Hubway memberships to low-income residents for just $5 per year.

    [Boston Globe] Hubway service proving popular with Boston's landlords

    The following article was originally published by Tim Logan in the Boston Globe on October 8th, 2015.

    A growing numbers of real estate operators are sponsoring Hubway stations, including at Post Office Square and Fan Pier in the Seaport district (above). The stations provide a dose of sustainable-economy cachet, as well as convenience. (image: Jonathan Wiggs / Globe Staff)

    When it comes to new buildings these days, game rooms are a given, and pools almost passe.

    But a Hubway bike station outside the front door? That’s a way to stand out from the crowd.

    Boston’s popular bike service is the latest must-have cool amenity in the arms race among Boston developers to woo well-off young urbanites to their residences and cool tech companies to their office towers. Growing numbers of real estate operators are sponsoring Hubway stations, paying $50,000 in Boston, or $94,000 in Cambridge, to have their logos on a kiosk and 10 bicycles, along with a say in where a station is located — often right outside their front doors.

    For Hubway and the cities that run it, the sponsorships help expand the service to more locations. For the developers, a Hubway station provides a dose of sustainable-economy cachet and adds to the list of amenities they can offer young renters and workers who would just as soon not bother with a car.

    Hubway has used sponsorships since its launch in 2011. New Balance helps fund the entire system, and a number of universities sponsor stations. The major real estate concerns that have rolled into the business include two of the region’s most prominent landlords, Equity Office Properties Trust and Biomed Realty, and the trendy new Ink Block complex in the South End. This month, Hubway announced that construction giant Skanksa and apartment builder Gerding Edlen were sponsoring new stations in Boston.

    Hubway sponsorships help expand the service to more locations. (image: Jonathan Wiggs / Globe Staff)

    For Gerding Edlen, Hubway is a natural extension of the urbane lifestyle the company is marketing at Troy Boston, said partner Kelly Saito. It makes sense to have a station there.

    “It just reinforces our brand, the aspect of our brand that supports building better neighborhoods and communities and promoting sustainable lifestyles,” he said. “And it just provides our residents a lot of convenience. It’s right there.”

    While the system is operated by a private company called Motivate, its budget is overseen by Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline. They negotiate sponsorships and plan where stations go. Of the 147 stations, 40 were funded by “champions,” as Hubway calls its sponsors, and bear a company, university, or hospital logo — and in some cases advertising. Those funds have helped expand the system — which otherwise relies on grants and operating proceeds — much faster than it could have otherwise, said Cara Seiderman, transportation program manager for Cambridge.

    (Patrick Garvin / Globe Staff)

    In exchange for their cash, sponsors get a say in where Hubway stations are located. They can’t dictate, said Vineet Gupta, director of planning at the Boston Transportation Department; the location has to make sense for the broader network. But sponsors certainly get to influence where the stations go.

    “On one hand, the developer would like to see the station right next to their building. On the other hand, they’d like to see it well used,” Gupta said. “We try to work out something that works for everybody.”

    One of the first developers to jump in was Joseph Fallon, whose Fallon Co. sponsored a station at its Fan Pier development in the Seaport District. It came in handy when the startup program MassChallenge moved in for a few years, bringing an influx of young tech workers who would come and go all day and didn’t want the hassle of a car.

    “We paid $50,000,” Fallon said. “It was a really smart investment.”

    And the cachet of Hubway, coupled with the flexibility it offers to riders, means those stations are likely to keep sprouting up outside new buildings all over town. Boston and Cambridge officials said they are talking with more developers that want one of their own.

    Of the 147 Hubway stations, 40 were funded by “champions,” as the company calls its sponsors, and bear a company, university, or hospital logo. (image: Jonathan Wiggs / Globe Staff)

    Pro Tips for the New Hubway Bikes

    The new bikes are HERE! With the deployment of new stations over the past week, you might have noticed a few bikes that look, well, a little bit different. Over 100 of the new bikes, featuring redesigned, higher-quality parts designed to improve overall durability and ease of repair, have begun to roll out into the Hubway fleet.

    We’re extremely proud to deploy these new and improved bikes as they’re the first new models developed by Hubway’s operating company, Motivate, in partnership with world-class bike designer Ben Serotta, and they offer a series of new features and comforts. If you haven’t had a chance to test out one of these beauties yet, here’s what you should look for to track one down, along with some Pro Tips for making the most of your ride:

  • Seamless integration: First and foremost, no worries! The new bikes don’t require any special docking or undocking tricks. Check ‘em out, ride ‘em, and return ‘em as you always have.
  • Kickstands: The new kickstands are based on a European model that provides more stability, but please note they may take a minute to get used to. As you kick them down, allow the two sides to separate into two legs. Kick them back up and they’ll spring back together again automatically.
  • Seats: These go to 11. Great for taller people and Spinal Tap fans. They also have a cut-out for comfort that allows water to drain and not pool (to help prevent cracking).
  • Lights: Both the front and rear lights are larger! Plus, like on the older bikes, they’re pedal-powered, but the new ones also keep the charge so your the lights stay on longer after you stop pedaling, which keeps you safer when you’re stopped at traffic lights, stop signs, or simply pulled over.
  • Fenders: The fenders now provide wider coverage to avoid those skunk-stripes of mud and water that may have previously adorned your shirt, jacket, or bag.
  • Gears: The new gears shift in the opposite direction as the old ones, twist away from you for a higher gear (for flat streets), twist towards you for a lower gear (for chugging up any of the bridges).
  • BONUS TIP: Save the shifters! Our mechanics offer up one more pro-tip.

    You’ll need to pause your pedal in order to shift, just for a second while you’re turning the shifter.

    You’ll shift more smoothly and you’ll also help extend the life expectancy of the parts on the bike, ensuring that Hubway bikes spend more time on the street and less time in the repair shop, improving the experience for every Hubway rider.

    Let us know what you think of the new rides. Post your Hubway pics on Twitter @Hubway.

    New Station Alert: Main Street at Eden Street, Charlestown

    New Station Alert: Effective Tuesday afternoon, October 6th, the new Hubway station, Main Street at Eden Street, is open & operational in Charlestown. This station is a 15-dock off-street station in front of Edwards Playground. This is Hubway’s 147th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Charlestown Patch] Boston adds additional Hubway stations throughout city

    The following article was originally published by Frank O’Laughlin in the Charlestown Patch on October 6th, 2015.

    11 new Hubway Bike Share systems will be installed across the City of Boston this week.

    Mayor Marty Walsh along with the Boston Transportation Department/Boston Bikes announced Tuesday that work is underway to expand the Hubway Bike Share System to 15 additional station locations throughout the city. The expansion will include the first Hubway locations in Brighton, and significant expansion into new parts of Dorchester, Roxbury and Charlestown.

    “Hubway is a healthy, affordable option for Boston residents to get to school or work, and I am thrilled we are able to expand it to even more neighborhoods,” said Mayor Walsh. “We will continue to work with our community partners so that all of our residents have access to a diverse range of transportation options.”

    “We are thrilled to be able to expand Hubway to provide even more residents, commuters and visitors with the opportunity to take advantage of bikeshare,” said Boston Transportation Commissioner Gina Fiandaca.

    The New Balance Hubway Bikeshare System launched in Boston in 2011 with 60 stations and 600 bicycles. With this expansion, the total number of stations in Boston will be 108 with approximately 1,100 bicycles. During the inaugural season, a total of 142,300 trips were recorded. Since that time, the program has expanded to include the neighboring municipalities of Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville, and the number of trips taken to date is approaching four million.

    New station installations are beginning this week at the following locations:

  • Brighton Center

  • Brock Street and Washington Street, Brighton

  • Main Street at Eden Street, Charlestown

  • Bunker Hill Community College, Charlestown

  • Dorchester Avenue and Harbor View Street, Dorchester

  • Wentworth Institute of Technology, Fenway

  • Nashua Street at Martha Road, North Station

  • Franklin Park at Seaver Street, Roxbury

  • Franklin Park Zoo Roxbury

  • The Lawn on D, South Boston Waterfront

  • West Broadway at D Street, South Boston
  • The following station locations are pending final permitting approvals:

  • Savin Hill, Dorchester

  • Heath Street and South Huntington Avenue, Jamaica Plain

  • Congress Street and Northern Avenue, South Boston Waterfront

  • Troy Boston, South End
  • The City of Boston partnered with MassDOT, the MBTA, MassPort, Bunker Hill Community College, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital and Zoo New England to offer these convenient station locations with direct access to public transportation, parks and bike routes.

    [Press Release] Mayor Walsh Announces Expansion of Hubway Bike Share Program











    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to view City of Boston site release.
    October 6, 2015

    FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
    Mayor’s Press Office
    617.635.4461

    Mayor Walsh Announces Expansion of Hubway Bike Share Program

    Mayor Martin J. Walsh along with the Boston Transportation Department/Boston Bikes today announced that work is underway to expand the Hubway Bike Share System to 15 additional station locations throughout the City.  The expansion will include the first Hubway locations in Brighton, and significant expansion into new parts of Dorchester, Roxbury and Charlestown.

    “Hubway is a healthy, affordable option for Boston residents to get to school or work, and I am thrilled we are able to expand it to even more neighborhoods,” said Mayor Walsh. “We will continue to work with our community partners so that all of our residents have access to a diverse range of transportation options.”

    “We are thrilled to be able to expand Hubway to provide even more residents, commuters and visitors with the opportunity to take advantage of bikeshare,” said Boston Transportation Commissioner Gina Fiandaca.  “Whether your mission is to visit family or local businesses, get to work, or just enjoy a ride, Hubway is a convenient and economical option for traveling around the City.  I encourage anyone who isn’t already using the service to give it a try.”

    The New Balance Hubway Bikeshare System launched in Boston in 2011 with 60 stations and 600 bicycles. With this expansion, the total number of stations in Boston will be 108 with approximately 1,100 bicycles. During the inaugural season, a total of 142,300 trips were recorded.  Since that time, the program has expanded to include the neighboring municipalities of Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville, and the number of trips taken to date is approaching four million.

    New station installations are beginning this week at the following locations:

  • Brighton Center

  • Brock Street and Washington Street, Brighton

  • Main Street at Eden Street, Charlestown

  • Bunker Hill Community College, Charlestown

  • Dorchester Avenue and Harbor View Street, Dorchester

  • Wentworth Institute of Technology, Fenway

  • Nashua Street at Martha Road, North Station

  • Franklin Park at Seaver Street, Roxbury

  • Franklin Park Zoo Roxbury

  • The Lawn on D, South Boston Waterfront

  • West Broadway at D Street, South Boston
  • The following station locations are pending final permitting approvals:

  • Savin Hill, Dorchester

  • Heath Street and South Huntington Avenue, Jamaica Plain

  • Congress Street and Northern Avenue, South Boston Waterfront

  • Troy Boston, South End
  • The City of Boston partnered with MassDOT, the MBTA, MassPort, Bunker Hill Community College, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital and Zoo New England to offer these convenient station locations with direct access to public transportation, parks and bike routes. This year’s expansion was funded in part by generous sponsorships from Gerding Edlen, Skanska and the Wentworth Institute of Technology.  Revenues from memberships and advertising fund the system’s operation.

    The City of Boston has the longest-running subsidized bike-share membership program in the country offering Hubway memberships to low-income residents for just $5 per year. For more information about subsidized memberships please visit www.bostonbikes.org or call 617-635-4756.  More information about the New Balance Hubway system may be found at www.thehubway.com.

    ###

    New Station Alert: The Lawn on D, Seaport District

    New Station Alert: Effective Monday afternoon, October 5th, the new Hubway station, The Lawn on D, is open & operational in the Seaport District. This station is a 19-dock off-street station on D Street by the Westin Hotel. This is Hubway’s 146th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Dorchester Ave and Harbor View St, Dorchester

    New Station Alert: Effective Monday afternoon, October 5th, the new Hubway station, Dorchester Avenue & Harbor View Street, is open & operational in Dorchester. This station is a 15-dock on-street station in front of Ryan Playground. This is Hubway’s 145th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Franklin Park Zoo

    New Station Alert: Effective Monday afternoon, October 5th, the new Hubway station, Franklin Park Zoo, is open & operational. This station is a 15-dock off-street station on Franklin Park Road at Blue Hill Avenue, near the Zebra entrance to the zoo. This is Hubway’s 144th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Boston Magazine] The Hubway is adding 11 new locations this week

    The following article was originally published by Jamie Ducharme in Boston Magazine on October 5th, 2015.

    There will be new stations in Boston, Brighton, Charlestown, Dorchester, and Roxbury. (image: Meredith Foley)

    By the end of this week, Boston will be home to 11 new Hubway locations.

    According to an announcement from Boston Bikes, this is the Hubway’s first expansion since 2013. Since then, the company has analyzed location suggestions from riders, conversations with community organizers and residents, and the layout and limitations of the current network to determine neighborhoods that would be a good fit. The new stations will bring the grand total up to more than 150 sites spread across Boston, Cambridge, Brookline, Somerville, Roxbury, Brighton, and Charlestown.

    This week’s new locations include:

  • Franklin Park Zoo, at Franklin Park Road and Blue Hill Avenue, Boston

  • North Station, at Nashua Street and Martha Road, Boston

  • Wentworth Institute of Technology, at Huntington Avenue between Ruggles and Vancouver Streets, Boston (open now)

  • Brighton Center, at Cambridge Street and Washington Street, Brighton

  • Brock Street and Washington Street, Brighton

  • Main Street at Eden Street, Charlestown

  • Bunker Hill Community College, near Austin Street, Charlestown

  • Dorchester Avenue and Harbor View Street, Dorchester

  • Franklin Park at Seaver Street, Roxbury (open now)

  • West Broadway at D Street, South Boston (open now)

  • The Lawn on D, at D street by the Westin Hotel, South Boston
  • Four more locations—one each in the South End, Seaport District, Dorchester, and Jamaica Plain—are currently pending.

    [Boston.com] Hubway Launching New Boston Stations This Week

    The following article was originally published by Adam Vaccaro on Boston.com on October 5th, 2015.

    Boston is adding 15 new Hubway stations. (image: The Boston Globe)

    Boston’s public cycling system is getting a little more robust this week, with the city adding 11 new Hubway stations inside city limits.

    The new stations began rolling out late last week, and so far three are up and running. Their locations:

  • At West Broadway and D Street in Southie;

  • At Seaver Street and Humboldt Avenue, at Franklin Park in Roxbury;

  • On Huntington Avenue, between Ruggles and Vancouver Streets, near Wentworth Institute of Technology.

    Eight more are coming by the end of this week, according to the website of the city’s cycling program, Boston Bikes. They are spread across the city, with locations at:

    • Blue Hill Avenue and Franklin Park Road, at the Franklin Park Zoo;
    • Dorchester Avenue and Harbor View Street in Dorchester;
    • Main Street and Eden Street in Charlestown;
    • Bunker Hill Community College in Charlestown, near Austin Street;
    • Nashua Street and Martha Road, near North Station;
    • Cambridge and Washington streets, near Brighton Center;
    • Brock and Washington streets in Brighton;
    • The Lawn on D in the Seaport District.

    The city is also planning on four more stations, but those stations are waiting on permitting or construction issues to be resolved. When they’re ready, they will be located at:

    • The Troy Boston development in the South End;
    • Liberty Wharf in the Seaport;
    • Savin Hill in Dorchester;
    • Heath Street and South Huntington Avenue in Jamaica Plain.

    Once all 15 new stations are installed, the city will have 106 in its boundaries, and there will be 155 system-wide (Hubway is also in Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline). Hubway spokesman Benjy Kantor said Cambridge is also planning to add new stations, but there is not a definite timeline for that yet.

    Through August of this year, Hubway riders across the region had taken 720,000 trips, Kantor said. In 2014, for the full calendar year, riders took nearly 1.2 million trips.

  • New Station Alert: Wentworth Institute of Technology, Fenway

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday evening, October 2nd, the new Hubway station, Wentworth Institute of Technology, is open & operational in the Fenway. This station is a 15-dock off-street station on Huntington Avenue between Ruggles and Vancouver Streets. This is Hubway’s 143rd station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Franklin Park at Seaver St, Roxbury

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, October 2nd, the new Hubway station, Franklin Park at Seaver Street, is open & operational in Roxbury. This station is a 15-dock off-street station on Seaver Street on the north side of Franklin Park by the parking lot at Humboldt Avenue. This is Hubway’s 142nd station.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: West Broadway, South Boston

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday morning, October 2nd, the new Hubway station, West Broadway at D Street, is open & operational in South Boston. This station is a 19-dock off-street station in front of Catholic Charities at 275 West Broadway. This is Hubway’s 141st station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Introducing Boston’s Newest Hubway Locations

    The following announcement was posted on the Boston Bikes blog on Oct 2nd, 2015.

    It’s been a very busy summer and fall planning and siting Boston’s first Hubway expansion since 2013. We’re pleased to announce the first of our new stations are going in today!

    View interactive map.

    Scheduled Installations Oct 2-9

    • West Broadway at D Street, South Boston: 19-dock off-street station in front of Catholic Charities
    • Franklin Park at Seaver St, Roxbury: 15-dock off-street station on Seaver Street by the parking lot at Humboldt Ave in Roxbury
    • Franklin Park Zoo: 15-dock off-street station on Franklin Park Road at Blue Hill Ave, near the Zebra Entrance to the Zoo
    • Wentworth Institute of Technology, Fenway: 15-dock off-street station on Huntington Avenue between Ruggles and Vancouver Streets
    • Main Street at Eden Street, Charlestown: 15-dock off-street station in front of Edwards Playground
    • Bunker Hill Community College, Charlestown: 19-dock off-street station near Austin Street
    • Nashua Street at Martha Road, North Station: 19-dock off-street station on the back side of North Station
    • Brighton Center: 15-dock off-street station at Cambridge Street and Washington Street, in front of St. Elizabeth’s
    • Brock Street and Washington Street, Brighton: 19-dock on-street station on Brock Street next to Armstrong Ambulance
    • Dorchester Avenue and Harbor View Street, Dorchester: 15-dock on-street station in front of Ryan Playground
    • The Lawn on D, Seaport District: 19-dock off-street station on D street by the Westin Hotel

    Pending Locations:

    • Troy Boston, South End: 15-dock station at 275 Albany Street. Some lingering construction issues on site might postpone this installation until spring.
    • Congress Street and Northern Ave, Seaport District: Permit pending
    • Savin Hill, Dorchester: Permit pending
    • Heath Street and S. Huntington, Jamaica Plain: Permit pending

    Our Process

    The process of expanding Hubway is anything but simple. First we analyzed demand by mapping the more than 30,000 suggestions for station locations submitted since our last expansion in 2013. We also consulted with community organizations and residents in many different neighborhoods to get their take on station locations. Based on these two sources of data, we conducted six neighborhood-specific surveys to help us better understand community priorities.

    In addition to new station demand, we considered other key criteria including:

    1. Proximity to existing network. We aim to keep stations a maximum of ½-mile apart so the system will function well.
    2. Future growth. We consider how this year’s expansion can set the stage for future growth.
    3. Known gaps and chronic outages. We also add new stations where they can help relieve pressure on existing stations, reducing the frequency of coming across a station that has either no room for you to dock or has no bikes for you to use.

    Heatmap of station requests in N. Dorchester

    Once we honed in on general station locations, we had to identify the specific sites and obtain the necessary permits . Many factors influence whether a site is suitable for a station, including: solar exposure, accessibility, utility conflicts, street/sidewalk conditions, and abutter concerns. We took care in minimizing impacts to parking and the pedestrian environment.

    In the coming days, Hubway will be sharing updates on Twitter, Facebook, and this website on the progress of station installations, so stay tuned.

    We are grateful for all the ideas and feedback we have received in this process to date. We will keep working to expand the Hubway system until it reaches every neighborhood. We’ve heard very clearly your requests for stations in Field’s Corner, Codman Square, Ashmont, Grove Hall, Four Corners, Forest Hills, Roslindale, East Boston, Sullivan Square, Pleasure Bay, and many more locations. This year’s expansion gets us closer to reaching those destinations, and we look forward to working with many community groups and partners to get there.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Beacon St / Mass Ave station reinstalled

    Station Alert: Effective Wednesday afternoon, September 23rd, the Beacon st / Mass Ave station has been redeployed following construction in the area, and is fully operational. This station is a 19-dock station located on Beacon Street on the northwest corner of the intersection.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thank you for your patience during the temporary removal of the station, and thank you for using Hubway.

    MEMBER PERK: $5 tix for WGBH Boston Talks Happy Hour: Reimagining the Wheel, September 24th


    Boston Talks: Reimagining the Wheel

    September 24, 2015, 7-9pm
    WGBH Studios, One Guest Street, Brighton



    A Smarter Happy Hour
    Grab your friends and join us for WGBH’s take on happy hour — inspiring conversation plus wine and local craft brews for $5 a glass. Hear from and connect with local experts in a variety of fields while enjoying the great company of your neighbors from Boston and beyond.


    Hubway members click here to get your $5 tickets (regularly $10)!
    Hubway members get $5 tickets—make sure to use promo code HUBWAY


    BostonTalks: Reimagining the Wheel
    Local innovators will discuss how they’ve discovered new ways of doing everyday things. Superpedestrian’s Andrew Schmidt will highlight how The Copenhagen Wheel is revolutionizing bike riding; Groupmuse’s Sam Bodkin will talk about making classical music “cool” again; and Mei Mei co-owners Margaret Li and Irene Li will serve up insights about food industry innovations. Connect with Andrew, Sam, Margaret and Irene at WGBH’s take on happy hour.
    Meet the Host
    Edgar Herwick is the guy behind WGBH’s Curiosity Desk, where the quest is to dig a little deeper into (and sometimes look a little askew at) topics in the news, and search for answers to questions posed by the world around us. His features can be seen on WGBH’s Greater Boston and heard on 89.7 WGBH’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered. He also appears regularly with Jim Braude and Margery Eagan on Boston Public Radio. Follow him on Twitter @ebherwick3.

    PLEASE NOTE: You must be 21+ to attend.


    Exclusive for Hubway Members: $5 Discount for 11th Annual Hub On Wheels, Sunday, September 20th

    Join us for the 11th Annual Hub On Wheels citywide bike ride on Sunday, September 20th.

    Use discount code “5_Hubway” at BostonCyclingCelebration.com by Friday, September 18th, to receive $5 off the registration fee!

    Enjoy a pedaling experience along a car-free Storrow Drive, explore hidden pathways and historic neighborhoods, and take in views of the Boston Harbor that you’ve never seen before.

    The ride starts and finishes on City Hall Plaza in downtown Boston, with three different routes to choose from: 10, 30 and 50 miles.

    Sign up online using discount code 5_Hubway by Friday, September 18th, to receive $5 off the registration fee!

    [Streetsblog USA] What cities are learning about making bike-share more equitable

    The following article was originally published by Angie Schmitt in Streetsblog USA on September 16th, 2015.

    Cities are gaining more insight into how bike-share can be more useful and accessible to low-income people. (image: NACTO)

    So far, the customer base of American bike-share systems has skewed toward affluent white men. But cities have been working to make the systems more useful and accessible to a broader spectrum of people, and in a new report, the National Association of City Transportation Officials has compiled some of the lessons learned.

    Here are a few key takeaways:

    The appeal of monthly membership plans

    (image: NACTO)

    The price of a full 12-month membership can be a barrier for some people. Providing the option of monthly passes or installment plans encourages people across all income levels to try bike-share, NACTO reports.

    People who have less predictable personal finances and income benefit from the flexibility of shorter-term memberships, NACTO says. Low-income people are more likely to purchase short-term transit passes, and the same reasoning applies to bike-share.

    Although monthly payments can create some uncertainty for bike-share operators, that can be managed with options like auto-renewing monthly passes, NACTO reports. Monthly payments can also serve as a reminder to use the system and boost ridership.

    Clearly communicating costs is incredibly important

    “Absolute cost is rarely highlighted as a major barrier” in focus groups or anecdotal accounts from bike-share officials, NACTO says. What appears to play a bigger role is uncertainty over what the bike-share service will cost.

    A 2012 focus group of Emerson University students found that “the cost of Hubway is not the factor that limits students from using the service, but rather the confusion and inefficient method of making the payments.”

    Make payment convenient

    One factor that’s often flagged about bike-share systems is making them accessible to the “unbanked” — people without credit or debit cards. About 8 percent of Americans are unbanked, though there is a great deal of variation from city to city and neighborhood to neighborhood.

    To tackle this problem, Philadelphia offers cash memberships to low-income people. Interestingly, the city found that about a third of people buying cash memberships renewed with credit cards, presumably because it was easier. Still, having the option to make the initial purchase with cash is one less barrier to entry.

    Advertise discount membership options on kiosks

    (image: NACTO)

    Low-income people get most of their information about bike-share directly from the bike-share kiosks, a Philadelphia study found. So if the kiosks only offer informations about daily rates or regular annual rates — and not special discounts for qualifying groups — many people will never know those options are available.

    In New York City, anecdotal accounts revealed that many low-income people thought the $9.95 daily rate was the only option and weren’t aware of the reduced price $60 annual membership.

    “Improving the information presented on the kiosk — both content and graphic layout — is an important and low-cost way to increase ridership,” NACTO reports.

    Provide a physical key

    Providing members with a key — the way they do in Philadelphia and Austin — can serve “as a physical reminder that bike-share is available and shortens time spent getting a bike,” NACTO reports.

    But if people have to wait too long to receive a key in the mail, that can be a barrier as well. Pronto Bike Share in Seattle can dispense keys for short-term use right from the kiosks.

    Make it easy to qualify for membership discounts

    Boston is the big national success story on bike-share equity. About 18 percent of its members are low-income, the result, NACTO says, of extensive outreach.

    But Boston also makes getting a membership cheap and easy for low-income people. The reduced annual rate is just $5 and Boston does not require those members to prove they qualify for assistance. The program works on the honor system.

    Even so, locals don’t think the program is being abused. A review of the program found 64 percent of people paying the discount rate are also “on public assistance,” NACTO reports.

    There must be enough stations in low-income neighborhoods to make it worthwhile

    If there are just a few scattered stations in low-income neighborhoods, the system won’t provide enough value to low-income people to justify the cost.

    Low-income people who do have memberships may use bike-share more than other members

    Once low-income people sign up for bike-share, evidence suggests they use it more than affluent subscribers. In Boston last year, low-income men with discounted memberships on average took 18 more trips than men who paid the full cost. And in Philadelphia, cash memberships represent 1 percent of total memberships but 4 percent of trips.

    [WBUR] Cyclists Call For Greater Barriers on Boston Streets

    The following piece was originally published by Simón Rios on WBUR 90.9 FM on September 15th, 2015.

    Anita Kurmann’s ghost bike is fastened to a street sign at the Back Bay intersection where she died. (image: Hadley Green / WBUR)

    When cyclist Anita Kurmann was killed this summer at the intersection of Beacon Street and Massachusetts Avenue, she was reportedly inside a painted bike lane. When Boston University student Christopher Weigl was killed three years ago on Commonwealth Avenue, he also was reported to be inside a painted bike lane.

    For Dr. Anne Lusk of Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the solution to danger faced by cyclists is not painted bike lanes.

    “Bike lanes are safer for the pedestrians, bike lanes are safer for the car drivers — bike lanes are less safe for the bicyclists,” Lusk said. “And Boston will proudly talk about the miles and miles and miles of bike lanes that are going to be put in. You’re putting in bicycle facilities that are less safe for the bicyclists.”

    Lusk spoke before a packed city council chamber at City Hall Monday night, with dozens of cycling advocates making the case for new resources to beef up bike infrastructure.

    Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley called the hearing before the Committee on City, Neighborhood Services and Veterans Affairs.

    “We’ve got to find a way to coexist and share our roadways,” Pressley said, “ensuring the safety of all, pedestrians, motor vehicle drivers and cyclists. It’s simply a matter of life and death.”

    City officials detailed at Monday’s meeting plans including a new form for police to report cycling accidents, enhanced methods for collecting data on crashes, and seven miles of new bike lanes. There are more Hubway bike-sharing stations coming for Boston’s neighborhoods, and the city has signed on to Vision Zero, a five-city project that aims to do away with traffic deaths.

    But advocates say the city is only going after the low-hanging fruit.

    “If we really want to make efforts to make it safer for walking and biking, we’re going to have to start investing a lot more money,” said Doug Johnson of the Boston Cyclists Union. “The city of Boston is dedicated to Vision Zero right now, but the funding isn’t really there, so I think you as a City Council, the No. 1 thing you can do to really make our streets safer, traffic-wise, is invest more.”

    Cyclists ride down Commonwealth Avenue. Under a city plan, this section of the busy road would have protected bike lanes. (image: Robin Lubbock / WBUR)

    Many advocates call for investment in cycle tracks, physical barriers separating cars and bikes, including Dr. Lusk. Lusk says funding for the tracks should come primarily from government, but can be supplemented by raising parking permit fees and imposing new fees on developments.

    “What do we do with Mass Ave. and all the other roads in Boston?” Lusk said. “I would still suggest that the one answer is the cycle track, the barrier-protected, bicycle-exclusive track beside sidewalks.”

    In 2010, former Boston Mayor Thomas Menino said, “The car is no longer king in Boston.” Three years later, Menino outlined a plan to install 20 miles of cycle tracks on city streets over the next five years.

    But just a handful of cycle track projects are in the works. Two miles of cycle track are being built downtown, in the so-called Connect Historic Boston trail, while the city plans less than a mile on a busy stretch of Commonwealth Avenue at Boston University.

    With about a dozen bicyclists killed in Boston in the last five years, cyclists are saying more needs to be done.

    [The Memo Blog] Bicycle Rack Recovered from WTC on Exhibit at 9/11 Memorial Museum

    The following is an excerpt from The Memo Blog, a news, discussion, and information blog about the National September 11 Memorial & Museum.

    Bicycle rack located on Vesey Street at the northern edge of the World Trade Center complex during the attacks. (Photo by Jin Lee, The Memo Blog)

    Bicycle racks were available as amenities for riders, including business tenants in the towers. By 2001, their primary users were messengers with documents and workers delivery orders from nearby delis and restaurants. At 8:46 a.m., when Flight 11 hit the North Tower, bicycle delivery traffic would have been active into the World Trade Center.

    This rack and the bicycles locked to it were shielded from the impact of cascading debris of the Twin Towers by 5 World Trade Center, keeping it mostly undamaged. In the aftermath of 9/11, only one owner stepped forward to claim his bicycle, still locked to the rack after he spray painted to word “save” in front of it. The status of the other owners and riders is unknown.

    [Boston Globe] Thinking outside the bike lane

    The following article was originally published by Jennifer Fenn Lefferts in the Boston Globe on September 6th, 2015.

    A “bike box” was recently painted at the intersection of Beacon, Webster and Centre Streets in Brookline, giving cyclists a head start at the traffic lights. (image: Dina Rudick / Globe Staff)

    As more residents in Boston’s western suburbs ditch their cars for bicycles, state and local officials are thinking beyond just painted bike lanes as they strive to make roadways safer.

    Brookline recently put in a “bike box’’ at one of its major intersections to give cyclists a head start at traffic lights. Newton has installed a bicycle signal to direct riders across the street. And Arlington is in the midst of two major roadway projects that call for new bike lanes on Massachusetts Avenue and revamping the intersection at Arlington Center.

    Some communities, including Watertown, are looking to add the Hubway bike sharing program. Others are considering separated bike lanes called cycle tracks, which advocates say is the future of urban cycling, while some communities, such as Framingham, are just starting to look at ways to increase the use of bikes in town.

    “The west is doing phenomenal things,’’ said Richard Fries, executive director of the Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition.

    Fries said accommodations for cyclists are gaining momentum because consumers are demanding it. He said the success of the 11-mile Minuteman Bikeway, a path that runs through Bedford, Lexington, Arlington, and Cambridge, for example, has been profound.

    “That bike path has become the main street of Arlington, Lexington and Bedford,’’ he said. “All of a sudden hordes of people are saying it was so easy to get from Cambridge to Bedford and I want to keep going. We’re seeing amazingly cool things as a result of this demand.’’

    One example is the Arlington Center Safe Travel Project on Massachusetts Avenue and Route 60, which will create a safe and visible connection that fills a gap in the bikeway, said Laura Wiener, the town’s assistant director of planning. The gap currently forces cyclists onto Route 60 and onto Mass. Ave. in order to reach the other leg of the path.

    The project calls for an extension of the bikeway through Uncle Sam Park, adjacent to the sidewalk; on-street bike lanes on both sides of Mass. Ave. between Swan Place and Route 60; and a bike signal and accessible ramps at Swan Place and Mass. Ave. to encourage westbound cyclists to cross Mass. Ave. and ride in the westbound bike lane.

    “What happens now is if you’re going toward Lexington, you come out to Swan Place and the bike lane ends,’’ Wiener said. “People tend to stay there and ride against traffic or walk on the sidewalk with bikes. The signal will make it easier to cross the street and get into the westbound bike lane.’’

    Also in Arlington, new bike lanes are going in on a heavily-traveled 1-mile stretch of Mass. Ave. between the Cambridge city line to Pond Lane as part of a major roadway and streetscape improvement project. Wiener said Mass. Ave. currently accommodates about 100 bicycles during the morning peak hour.

    Fries said changes are also taking place in several communities because state and regional transportation agencies are pushing for it. The state Department of Transportation implemented a new policy several years ago that requires communities to put in bike accommodations when possible for all MassDOT-funded projects.

    But advocates and planners say while many projects are moving forward, they often take years to complete and are not always embraced by the entire community. In order to accommodate bike lanes, parking or roadway space must often be reduced. And cost is always a factor, officials said.

    “We’ve tried to work with some of them but there is still a perception that they can’t fit bike lanes in because of parking,’’ said Eric Bourassa, director of the transportation division at the Metropolitan Area Planning Council. “When it comes down to making the decision to make a road smaller or get rid of parking, it’s still a challenge in the suburban towns to make those trade-offs.’’

    John Pelletier, chairman of Newton’s Bicycle Advisory Committee, said there are discussions about extending lanes on Centre Street and also on Beacon Street west of Newton Centre. But he acknowledged that it’s a challenge because it would take away on-street parking, which is the only option for many residents.

    He said the city is also looking at adding bike boxes at several intersections and is interested in having Hubway bike rental stations in the city. Bourassa said Watertown is also looking to add Hubway stations.

    “It’s not an easy discussion but it’s important to a lot of folks,’’ Pelletier said. “There are a lot of folks out there cycling and I see people using our road networks every day. It’s how do we meet that demand with all the other demands?’’

    Brookline is one community that has put together a long-term plan for bikes that is updated each year, said Cynthia Snow, chairwoman of the Brookline Bicycle Advisory Committee. She said money has been allocated each year through the town’s capital improvement budget for bicycle infrastructure work.

    Snow said the side streets in Brookline are fairly easy to navigate but it’s difficult to get anywhere without going on one of the major congested roads like Beacon or Harvard street.

    “We’ve been reasonably successful getting shared-lane markings and bike lanes but it’s still far from safe and friendly for people who aren’t willing to take some risk in traffic,’’ she said.

    The safest solution, she said, is a cycle track. She said the town’s first one will be going in on Route 9 from Brookline Village to the Boston city line as part of the Gateway East project. Cycle tracks are becoming increasingly popular in Boston and Cambridge.

    In Cambridge, for example, a cycle track was installed on Concord Avenue from Alewife Brook Parkway to Blanchard Road, but ends before the Belmont town line, where it becomes a more traditional bike lane.

    “You really need to separate cars and bikes and that seems to be the direction the forward-looking towns nationally are going,’’ Snow said.

    And there are even communities that still have little or no bike accommodations at all. Fries said Framingham has very little but town officials are looking to come up with a long-range plan.

    Fries said Waltham is one community that has been slow to make changes but city officials said several new bike lanes and sharrows (a shared lane marking) are in the works.

    New lanes will be going in on a portion of Lincoln Street, and also High Street, said Michael Garvin, the city’s traffic engineer. Sharrows are slated for South and Prospect streets.

    Garvin said only a few roads are done at a time because new markings are done in conjunction with construction projects.

    “It’s slow because the best time to do it is when you’re repaving a street,’’ he said. “That’s when we take a good close look at it.’’

    In Cambridge, a cycle track was installed on Concord Avenue from Alewife Brook Parkway to Blanchard Road, but becomes a more traditional bike lane before the Belmont Town Line. (image: Craig F. Walker / Globe Staff)

    A cyclist rides from the cycle track into the painted lane on Concord Avenue. (image: Craig F. Walker / Globe Staff)

    A driver crosses the bike lane on Concord Avenue to make a right turn. (image: Craig F. Walker / Globe Staff)

    [Boston Globe] Crashes are too frequent, but the solution is not to ban bikes

    The following letter by City Councilor Craig A. Kelley was originally published in the Boston Globe on September 6th, 2015.

    Jeff Jacoby’s Sept. 2 column “Busy streets are no place for bikes’ was very frustrating for me and many others to read. As a Cambridge city councilor, I am well aware of how dangerous and, too frequently, deadly our streets can be for cyclists. As a father, husband, and cyclist whose wife and children have all been hit by errant motorists, I know how important it is that Boston area roads be constructed for common uses that do not sacrifice safety for convenience.

    In some ways, Jacoby is right. Collisions between bicyclists and drivers frequently occur at busy intersections. But the answer is not to ban bikes from urban areas. The answer is to plan for, and build, safer bike infrastructure using real data. The answer is to more aggressively train divers and cyclists to coexist. The answer is to adequately enforce, and perhaps even change, relevant traffic laws.

    There are many ways to plan for Greater Boston’s future transportation needs, but banning bikes from busy streets cannot be one of them. The solution is to make these busy streets safer for all of us who use them.

    As a city councilor of 10 years, I have seen the influence of ideas such as those expressed in Jacoby’s column diminish in how we imagine the cities of the future. Cyclists, pedestrians, cars, and trucks are all going to be part of the urban transportation fabric. We cannot throw cyclists under the bus, literally or figuratively.

    Craig A. Kelley
    Cambridge

    [Dorchester Reporter] Dorchester bicyclists seek expanded and safer routes

    The following article was originally published by Jennifer Smith in the Dorchester Reporter on September 3rd, 2015.

    Bicyclists in much of Dorchester are out of luck if they want to go for a convenient bike ride around their neighborhoods but don’t own their own bikes. However, a new Active Transportation Director and more Hubway stations may indicate there’s a shift coming in the priority given to cyclists on Dorchester streets.

    The number of Bostonians who use bikes to commute to and from work rose from 1.3 percent to 1.7 percent from 2009 to 2012, as compared to the national average of 0.6 percent, according to the US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. More people are biking, it reports, especially in the Northeast.

    “We all have that story of the first ride. … That ‘aha’ moment that turned us onto cycling and all its possibilities,” said Noah Hicks, founder of the Bowdoin Bike School and bike shop, which hosts a series of weekly rides through partnerships.

    Stefanie Seksin is the city’s first Active Transportation Director. Her duties – which began just two weeks ago – encompass “implementing new initiatives to create people-friendly designs and programs that encourage and sustain active transportation options and lifestyles,” Mayor Martin Walsh said in a statement when Seskin was appointed.

    Her appointment and her work with the city’s Boston Bikes program coincide with a proposed Hubway expansion. The green and silver bike ports scattered across the city touch only the edge of Dorchester, a neighborhood with an active biking community but relatively few internal options for casual and safe biking, residents said.

    Hubway expansions are “an important first step,” Hicks said, but the end goal should be to increase bicycle ownership and teach people how to reliably care for their bikes. He added that he hopes they can ride in the city without the stigma that shared roads aren’t meant for the physically vulnerable bikers.

    It’s a stigma borne out in death and injury counts, as it turns out. Anita Kurrman, a 38-year-old medical researcher, was the latest of at least 13 bicyclist deaths in Boston in the last five years after some 520 crashes involving bikes annually, according to the Boston Globe’s archives.

    Watching ghost bikes pop up on street corners, Dorchester bike enthusiasts have expressed consternation over what they see as an improvement schedule that is lax at best and insulting at worst.
    “We’re basically getting zero new infrastructure,” said Philip Lindsay, a Dorchester resident of three decades and an avid biker. He and others pointed out inconsistencies in bike lanes along Massachusetts and Dorchester avenues as they move into Dorchester.
    They said the lack of dedicated space leads to confusion over whether bikers are expected to act like cars or pedestrians.

    “I feel like we’re getting left behind,” Hicks said. “All of Dorchester’s major roadways need to be looked at.”

    The Hubway expansion may be a good start, but it has been a long time coming, cyclists say. Since 60 Hubways docks were introduced into Boston in 2011, 30 more have been placed within the city, according to Hubway and Boston Bike’s websites. Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline also joined in on the project, bringing the total of Hubway stations to 140.

    In Boston, the vast majority have been in the northern portions of the city, such as the financial district, Back Bay, and Fenway/Kenmore, with Dorchester playing host to four stations: Uphams Corner, E. Cottage Street at Columbia Road, JFK/UMass station, and the UMass Boston Integrated Sciences Complex. There are currently no Hubway stations south of Uphams Corner.

    But that may change with the newest Hubway expansion. In a survey distributed online that just closed, Boston Bikes has asked for public input for 10 new docking stations. Five other bike locations will determined by sponsors, according to the Boston Bikes’ post.

    Since the last expansion, in 2014, which added 10 stations on both sides of the Charles, Boston Bikes has received more than 33,000 suggestions for Hubway docks, they said. The proposed stations for this round “have focused on options that are close enough to the existing network to ensure the stations will be successful.”

    In Dorchester, four potential stations are up for consideration: Uphams Corner Health Center, Dorchester Avenue at Savin Hill, Savin Hill T Station, and Four Corners.

    The cost of a yearly Hubway membership is $85, but a subsidized membership costs $5, according to Boston Bikes, which counts 800 subsidized members. Those who have started out with a Hubway subsidized membership often enjoy the experience of biking enough that “they went out and bought a bike,” Hicks said. The expansion “plays a role in expanding biking infrastructure,” but not nearly quickly enough.

    Boston Bikes declined a request to interview Seskin, citing the timing of her new position, and a Hubway spokesperson was unavailable to comment.

    In a greeting through Boston Bikes’s newsletter, Seskin said she was familiar with the “epidemic of pedestrian deaths,” which is chronicled in a report, “Dangerous By Design.” As Boston has become a regular witness to bicycle fatalities and accidents, “safety and access are key to transportation, but we also need to think about impacts on public health, equity, and social resilience,” she said in the message.

    Vineet Gupta, director of planning for the Boston Transportation Department, told the Reporter: “Dorchester as much as any other neighborhood is a priority when it comes to bike safety.”

    He cited bike lanes on “long and big streets” such as Blue Hill Avenue, Freeport Street, and Talbot Avenue as part of the ongoing improvements.

    City Hall is listening, he said, and residents are encouraged to reach out.

    Station Move Alert: BioMed Kendall Street, Cambridge

    Station Move Alert: Due to pending construction in the area, as of Tuesday, September 1st, the BioMed Kendall Street Hubway station has been moved to the public access walk way between 250 Kendall St and 350 Kendall St, directly across the street from its prior location. We do not expect this move to affect service in the area.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Better Bike Share] Prescription for Equity: Boston's Subsidized Memberships Lead the Way for Inclusive Bike Share

    The following article was originally published by Cameron Whitten in the Better Bike Share Partnership blogon August 27th, 2015.

    Boston’s bike-sharing equity program just might be the most successful in United States.

    Like all U.S. bike sharing systems, Hubway Bike Share has a long way to go before its members look like the city it serves. Boston’s population is 53.9 percent white, with a per capita city income of $33,964. Hubway’s annual members are wealthier and less diverse 87 percent white, with 80 percent earning more than $50,000 a year.

    But Boston’s efforts to shift these numbers are showing success so much, that it should demand the attention of other systems and cities.

    Here’s step 1: make bike sharing memberships cheap. Really cheap.

    In 2011, Boston Bikes, the city agency that owns and oversees Hubway, began offering $5 subsidized Hubway memberships in hopes of making bike share an affordable transportation option for all Bostonians.


    “We set it at $5 to make sure people had to commit something and take it seriously. But it’s low enough that everyone is virtually able to join if they want to,” says Kim Foltz, Programs Manager for Boston Bikes. “It’s been phenomenally successful.”

    Subsidized membership reduces the financial barriers so that more low income residents can become a Hubway member, but Boston Bikes also plays a crucial role by educating residents and directly signing them up for the program. With a database of more than 250 organizations, the agency is determined to reach out to as many potential subsidized members as possible. They send out flyers and newsletters, and speak with almost every group or class that invites them.

    In a fall 2014 presentation about their equity program, former Boston Bikes manager Nicole Freedman put it this way: “I hear from some cities, ‘Yeah, we’re going to partner with our public housing.’ And we say, ‘That is great! You’ll get 10 members out of it…’ It’s all about quantity, not quality, that we have found to be successful.”

    In 2014, Boston Bikes sold 778 subsidized memberships, which accounted for 18 percent of all Hubway memberships. Of those subsidized memberships, 53 percent went to people of color. And an impressive number of subsidized members are coming back for more: 49 percent of subsidized members renewed their subscription last year, compared to 57 percent for all annual members.


    An example of community partnership in action is Boston Medical Center, located in Boston’s South End. Each year, the hospital serves hundreds of thousands of low-income adults and children from nearby neighborhoods, such as Roxbury and Dorchester. Last Spring, Boston Bikes partnered with Boston Medical to launch an equity initiative called ‘Prescribe a Bike’, which promotes preventative health by offering subsidized, $5 annual Hubway vouchers to patients who live on public assistance or make less than four times the federal poverty level. Patients can go to the window at the transportation office in the hospital, and the clerk will purchase the prescription. A free helmet and key fob is sent to their registered address.

    This year, Boston Medical is increasing their efforts to make sure that every person who walks through their doors knows about Prescribe a Bike. Patients can expect to see posters displayed in waiting areas, on hospital computers, and hear from nurses and medical assistants encouraging everyone to sign up.

    Building these crucial relationships appears to be the most successful strategy for drumming up new subsidized Hubway members. In a survey of about 600 subsidized members, 51 percent said they heard about the $5 program from word of mouth, Prescribe a Bike, or some other partner organization.

    MORE WORK TO BE DONE

    However, many of these subsidized members still lack access in a way that would make Hubway truly equitable.

    “There is a clear, distinct thing where Hubway stations are in higher income neighborhoods. Subsidized members do not have stations in their neighborhoods,” says Barbara Jacobson, Programs Director for Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition.


    Hubway currently has 140 docking stations. Subsidized members typically live in neighborhoods at the edge of the network, meaning they have to travel longer distances to get from station to station, putting them at risk of going over the 30 minute grace period and racking up overage fees. For each ride, Boston Bikes provides subsidized members an extra 30 minutes in order to avoid inequitable overage fees.

    As Hubway expands, Boston Bikes aspires to place 25 percent of new stations in low-income communities. This year, 13 to 15 new stations are proposed and about four of those stations will be designated to serve low-income communities. For one, Hubway is partnering with the Franklin Park Coalition on a station that will serve racially diverse communities and provide bike share access to the Franklin Park Zoo and the largest green space in Boston.

    Building intentional community relationships helps to make bike share a valuable resource for more people. Boston has demonstrated that you can set achievable equity goals, and even within four years, see promising results.

    But the work has only just begun.

    Station Alert: Temporary removal of Beacon St / Mass Ave station

    Station Alert: Due to construction in the area, the Beacon St / Mass Ave Hubway station in Boston has been temporarily removed beginning Thursday morning, August 27th. Plans are to redeploy the station in the same location after construction has been completed. Until that time, the station will not be available for renting or docking bikes. If you are planning to use Hubway in the area during this period, please make arrangements to use alternate stations. The closest stations are:

    • Boylston / Mass Ave, Boston
    • Newbury St / Hereford St, Boston
    • MIT at Mass Ave / Amherst St, Cambridge
    • Kenmore Square / Commonwealth Ave, Boston

    Updates will be posted when available on Hubway’s Twitter & Facebook pages. For station map and up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this outage, and thank you for using Hubway.

    Origin -> Destination Map for all Hubway trips April-June 2015

    More than 364,000 trips were taken by Hubway between April 1st and June 30th this year (2015-Q2). The origin-destination map below gives a sense of where folks are riding to & from within the system.

    PLEASE NOTE: Hubway bikes are not equipped with GPS and as such the actual routes are not tracked. The map below simply shows lines between rental station and docking station.

    Click the map for a larger-size image.


    [Fortune] Take my bike, please: Cycle-sharing companies reshape U.S. cities

    The following article was originally published by David Z. Morris in Fortune on August 11th, 2015.

    Bike sharing services are popping up across America—including in some very unlikely places. But are they making any money?

    Tim Ericson was studying in Paris in July of 2007 when the Vélib’ public bike-sharing system was unveiled. Vélib’ lets citizens and tourists check out bikes from electronic docking stations and cruise around the City of Light.

    “I don’t own a car, I still don’t own a car,” says Ericson. “So I was fascinated by this concept.”

    Ericson would go on to launch CityRyde (now Zagster), one of the first U.S.-based bike share companies, even as others in the U.S. were having similarly eye-opening experiences. Chicago Mayor Richard Daley also hopped on a Vélib’, and thousands of riders enjoyed pop-up bike shares at the Democratic and Republican National Conventions in 2008, in Denver and Minneapolis respectively.

    Those two cities became the first to deploy large-scale permanent systems. Now, the floodgates are open—dozens of U.S. bike sharing systems have launched in the past three years.

    “It’s hard to keep up, there are so many new systems being developed,” says Time Blumenthal, president of the advocacy group People for Bikes. “And a lot of them are in unlikely places.”

    Unlikely places like sweltering McAllen, Texas; Tampa, one of the most dangerous places to cycle in America; and, maybe most remarkable of all, a General Motors office park in Warren, Mich.

    The systems—even Tampa’s—are proving hugely popular, adding riders, bikes and stations.

    Companies installing and servicing those systems include Ericson’s Zagster; B-Cycle, which runs 32 systems in the U.S. and South America; and Motivate, which runs systems in Chattanooga, Tenn., Chicago, and New York, among others.

    Groups like People for Bikes have been advocating for more cycle-friendly cities for decades, but pushback from drivers has been so intense it’s been characterized as the “Bike Wars.” The surge in bike sharing, despite that tension, is a response to undeniable trends.

    Motivate’s Dani Simons says New York hopes CitiBike will help its transportation infrastructure deal with the million new inhabitants it expects by 2030, and other booming urban centers face similar pressures. Bike sharing is also a way for cities to cater to young, educated workers, who are less interested in car ownership than accessibility and quality of life. The systems may also lower healthcare costs by giving citizens more exercise—B-Cycle was co-founded by the insurer Humana HUM 1.52% .

    Bikes can also increase efficiency for private companies—Ericson says the system Zagster installed for GM in Warren saves employees up to 30 minutes a day travelling between far-flung buildings.

    Those ancillary benefits are important, because, as Ericson bluntly points out, “There’s no bikeshare in the world that’s profitable on rider revenue.” Cities and companies are experimenting with funding models that include sponsorships, grants, and local government funding. New York’s CitiBike, which relies on no public funds, is expected by most to be the exception going forward.

    “I wouldn’t go so far as to say it’s a stunning business, with huge net profit upside for the private sector,” says Blumenthal.

    Bicycle manufacturers may be the big winners. They’ll supply hardware for the expanding systems, but more importantly, sharing is re-introducing biking to adults who may decide they want their own rides. The manufacturer Trek has taken over full ownership of B-Cycle, and shared bikes in some locations bear its branding.

    Another benefit may also constitute a risk. Researchers at McGill University found, in a study of Montreal after the founding of a bike-sharing system there in 2009, that property values near stations increased by an average of 2.7% over five years. Major investors in Motivate include real estate developers with large holdings in New York, according to Simons, which could create conflicts of interest.

    Bike sharing does face challenges. The bankruptcy of the Public Bike System Co. last year left systems like Boston’s scrambling for new suppliers, and New York’s CitiBike rollout was notoriously glitch-plagued.

    Most systems require payment by credit card, which may limit usage by the low-income people most in need of mobility. Philadelphia’s Indego, operated by Bicycle Transit Systems, is experimenting with allowing cash payments through the service PayNearMe.

    Finally, Blumenthal points out that providing bikes isn’t enough. He says protected bike lanes, which fully separate riders from car traffic, are crucial to making new riders feel safe.

    Theft, however, has turned out to be a surprisingly minor problem. In addition to credit-card requirements, safeguards include GPS tracking, custom construction, and robust station locks. Brian Conger, director of operations for B-Cycle, says no B-Cycle bike has ever been stolen from a docking station.

    Simons, who has spent more than a decade working in cycling advocacy, is thrilled by what she sees as a ride that’s barely begun.

    “This company started . . . five years ago,” she says of Motivate. “That’s nothing.”

    [Boston Globe] Get Ready to Bike to Work

    The following article was originally published by Jaclyn Reiss in the Boston Globe on August 7th, 2015.

    The number of bicycle commuters is mushrooming. And summer is a great time for a test run. There’s many benefits to biking to work: It’s green, saves money on transportation, and ensures that you’‘ll get some aerobic exercise every day. It’s also getting easier and safer as Boston, Cambridge, and other towns and cities in the state continue to expand bike lanes and green-light improvements to cycling infrastructure. Besides all the financial and health benefits, “it’s relaxing and therapeutic,” says Pete Stidman, executive director of the Boston Cyclists Union. Here are some tips for those just starting up.

    LOCK IT UP

    If you’ll be parking your bike outside, one of the first things to invest in is a sturdy lock. There are a variety of good (and bad) options, so Stidman recommends newbies keep it simple and look for a durable U-shaped one: “You want the smallest one that works for you, and protects your wheel and frame.” Stidman recommends the Kryptonite brand — “an old standard.” Check out the Kryptolok Series 2 Standard Bicycle U-Lock ($42, amazon.com and local shops).

    DITCH THE BAG

    Instead of carrying a messenger bag or backpack on your bike, which can slide around and set you off balance or cause your back to ache, Stidman suggests a mountable bike rack and bag. Stidman says he has had good luck with Ortlieb saddle bags ($35-$45, www.ortlieb
    usa.com and local shops), which are strapped under the seat, and come in three sizes — the smallest measuring 49 cubic inches, the largest comparable to a backpack — and several different colors. For those looking for panniers, which hang to the side of the bike off a rack, consider an option like the Green Guru Dutchy Recycled Banner Single Pannier ($69.95, rei.com and in stores), which holds up to 1,352 cubic inches and, as the name implies, is made from recycled billboards and banners. To make sure your panniers stay in place, invest in a durable rear rack, such as the Topeak Explorer Bike Rack ($39.95, amazon.com and in stores), which can hold up to 55 pounds and fits all bike frames.

    PROTECT YOUR HEAD

    When it comes to keeping your noggin safe, the city’s Boston Bikes program offers affordable helmet options: Just pop on over to one of many locations throughout Boston and Cambridge listed on its website to pick up a helmet for about $10, or you can order one online for $24.99. For a map of locations or to order, visit www.bostonbikes.org. Those who qualify for subsidized Hubway memberships may also qualify for a free helmet, according to the organization. Stidman says the Boston Cyclists Union also sells helmets for $5 at their offices at 375 Dudley St. in Roxbury.

    REFLECT YOURSELF

    Stidman also recommends bike lights and reflective tape to accent your bike and/or clothes and accessories so you can be seen on those dark early mornings or evenings. Consider an option like Nathan Reflective Tape in lime green ($10, rei.com and local shops), which reviewers say sticks satisfactorily to both fabrics and bikes. For a durable bike light, try the water-resistant Cygolite Metro 400 Hot Shot USB Combo Light ($71.42, amazon.com and local shops), which features both a front and tail light, features six different modes (one steady and five flashing), and recharges via USB.

    DRINK ON THE GO

    For the commuter who can’t bear the thought of a morning without stopping to pick up a cup of joe, Stidman also recommends a mountable cup holder: “It might sound silly, but if I’m going to work, I want to get a coffee,” he said. Try something like the Ibera Bike Handlebar CupClamp ($9.49, amazon.com), which features an angled rim to fit various cup sizes.

    OFFICE-FRIENDLY OUTFITS

    When it comes to clothes, Stidman recommends commuters simply don their office attire and just take it slow. “I ride a bike with a suit all the time,” he said. “Take it easy, find a safe route, and ride just as you would walk.” For those who want to ride harder, Stidman recommends moisture-wicking work attire from retailers like menswear company Ministry of Supply, which has both a website and a Boston location. The Newbury Street branch features breathable collared shirts ($108) and chino-style pants ($118) for men in several neutral, office-approved colors. For women, try work bottoms with an elegant silhouette like the women’s daily riding pant from clothier Outlier ($198, shop.outlier.cc). Stidman says cycling in high heels is fine — “as long as it’s a tough shoe.”

    [Press Release] City of Boston Celebrates Annual Bike Friendly Business Awards











    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to view City of Boston site release.
    August 3, 2015

    CONTACT:
    Tracey Ganiatsos
    BTD@cityofboston.gov

    City of Boston Celebrates Annual Bike Friendly Business Awards
    56 local businesses recognized for encouraging bike friendly practices



    The City of Boston celebrated the annual Boston Bike Friendly Business Awards with a ceremony on Monday, August 3.  The awards applaud the role of Boston based businesses in supporting and advancing the growth of biking in Boston.  They also recognize Boston businesses that have pledged to make the city better for cyclists by providing facilities, services and benefits to employees and customers who bike.  Over 150 businesses, ranging from small two-employee firms to large corporations consisting of tens of thousands of employees, have participated in the program since the awards were first initiated in 2008.

    “The City of Boston is committed to making sure our streets are safe and friendly for bicyclists,” said Mayor Martin J. Walsh. “I want to congratulate this year’s winners and thank them for their efforts to promote healthy, sustainable and efficient transportation options.”

    “I’d like to congratulate all of our Bike Friendly Business Award winners and thank them for their contribution to the city and the environment,” added Boston Transportation Commissioner Gina Fiandaca. “No matter their size, every organization can help Boston to achieve its bike friendly goals.”

    This year saw the introduction of more demanding qualifications to compete for the award. Businesses were rewarded for their creation of initiatives that benefit the public and points were added for the establishment of on-site bike repair stations and for providing discounts to customers who bike.

    A “Chocolate Award,” named to acknowledge the belief that nothing is better than chocolate, was introduced this year to honor the first-place winner. Harvard University and the Harvard Longwood Campus took home the 2015 Chocolate Award as the Most Bike Friendly Business in Boston. Harvard was credited for the following.

    • Providing discount Hubway memberships to their employees and sponsoring Hubway stations.
    • Offering guaranteed rides home to employees who bike in the event of an unexpected personal emergency.
    • Participating in the MassCommute Challenge and Boston’s annual bike events, along with sponsoring their own bike event each year.
    • Providing tax-free reimbursements of up to $20 a month for expenses related to bike purchases, improvements, and repairs
    • Making bike cages available for Harvard affiliates.
    • Installing multiple fix-it stations in locations that are accessible to the public.

    Harvard was joined by 54 other local companies that were honored with gold, silver and bronze awards.

    Award winners represent a diverse group of businesses who together have helped to pave the way for Boston’s tremendous growth in biking.  Award winners have designed many of Boston’s bike lanes, provided critical funding for the Hubway bike share system, developed creative incentives to encourage employees to bike to work, implemented innovative safety campaigns, and more.

    The following organizations were named as 2015 Boston Bike Friendly Businesses:

    CHOCOLATE - Most Bike Friendly Business
    Harvard Longwood Campus

    Harvard University


    GOLD

    Beacon Architectural Associates

    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

    Boston Children’s Hospital

    Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

    Digital Lumens

    Landry’s Bicycles

    Perkins+Will

    Sandulli Grace, PC

    Toole Design Group, LLC

    Urban AdvenTours

    SILVER

    A Better City

    Appalachian Mountain Club

    Boston Organics

    El Pelon Taqueria

    Emmanuel College

    Fenway Health

    Foley Hoag LLP

    MASCO

    McMahon Associates

    Motivate

    NaviNet, Inc.

    Next Phase Studios

    Stantec, Inc.

    Storiant

    The Gillette Company

    Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc.

    WGBH

    BRONZE

    Adi’s Bike World

    Back Bay Bicycles

    Bikes Not Bombs

    Boston Global Investors

    Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program

    Brigham and Women’s Hospital

    Carbonite, Inc.

    Community Boating, Inc.

    Cornerstone Research

    DiMella Shaffer

    ERG - Boston

    HNTB Corporation

    Howard Stein Hudson

    Hyatt Regency Boston

    Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti

    Jacobs Engineering Group

    John Hancock Financial Services

    JWA-Architects, Inc.

    Linea 5, inc. Architects

    Nelson\Nygaard

    Nutter McClennen & Fish

    Public Consulting Group

    Simmons College

    Treeturn, inc.

    United Way of Massachusetts Bay

    Wediko Children’s Services

    Wellframe


    For additional information on Boston Bikes and how to become more bike friendly, visit www.cityofboston.gov/bikes.

    ###

    [Boston Herald] Walsh taps new transportation director

    The following article was originally published by Matt Ingersoll in the Boston Herald on July 31st, 2015.

    Mayor Marty Walsh announced today the appointment of Stefanie Seskin as the city’s first active Transportation Director, a role effective Aug. 17.

    Currently serving as the Deputy Director of the National Complete Streets Coalition in Washington, D.C., Seskin will be responsible for proposing new projects and coordinating the review of existing projects that enhance pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure in her new role.

    “Boston is an active city and we are continuing to invest in our pedestrian and bike infrastructure, encouraging residents to think creatively about how they get from point A to point B,” Walsh said in a statement. “Stefanie brings leadership and talent to this new position, and I thank her for her willingness to serve.”

    Seskin will also oversee the Boston Bikes and Neighborhood Slow Streets programs. Her work will complement Go Boston 2030, the ongoing citywide mobility plan, as well as Vision Zero and Green Links.

    A graduate of Vassar College and the University of Chicago, Seskin was honored as the Young Professional of the Year by the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals in 2012.

    “I am excited to take on this new position,” she said in a statement. “I love seeing so many people who already walk and bike around the city, and I look forward to working with residents to make Boston even more walk- and bike-friendly.”

    [Boston Globe] Program encourages commuters to drive, then bike, to work

    The following article was originally published by Steve Annear in the Boston Herald on July 30th, 2015.

    Tired of sitting in downtown Boston’s taxing bumper-to-bumper traffic? A new program rolling out this week is encouraging commuters to ditch their cars on the way to work, then bike the rest of the way.

    On Friday, the Department of Conservation and Recreation and Montague Bikes, of Cambridge, will launch the Park & Pedal initiative. The program, which officials believe is the first of its kind in the country, will open “hubs” at existing state-owned free parking lots.

    Park & Pedal aims to ease traffic congestion into the city each morning as commuters clamber to make it to their jobs on time.

    It’s also meant to inspire more people to get out and exercise.

    “Those contributing to, and sitting in, traffic, it will get them to get out of the car and onto their bikes for the last few miles,” said Park & Pedal spokesman Ryan Walas. “If we can siphon some of those cars off the road ... they are going to avoid those most trafficked areas.”

    Park & Pedal signs will be installed at the lots and designate spaces specifically for those using the free program. Participants must bring their own bikes.

    The hubs are located in Watertown, Medford, Newton, Revere, and Boston. Additional hubs will open as the program expands. Organizers chose the lots based on their proximity to safe biking routes.

    Walas said Park & Pedal, inspired by the president of Montague Bikes, mostly targets people who live in the suburbs and feel they have to drive all the way to work.

    “Most people are either not willing to bike the whole distance, or are just not able to,” he said. “This is about just building awareness, and letting people know you can actually do this. It gives people the idea.”

    The program launches Friday with a ceremony in the program’s flagship lot at Christian Herter Park, on Soldiers Field Road in Brighton. Participants can get free bike tune-ups there, and take part in group rides into the city.

    Pete Stidman, executive director of the Boston Cyclists Union, said Park & Pedal is a great way to spread awareness about the areas growing bike network.

    “As we continue to improve bike infrastructure, this will make it a lot more pleasant to bike through the city instead of drive through the city,” he said.

    New Key Design!

    For our 4th birthday, we got new keys! The newer key is a bit sleeker, lighter, easier to get onto your keychain, and is designed to hold up longer. Check the picture out below.

    PLEASE NOTE: These new keys will be distributed to new members. Your existing key (a sense of pride, right?) will continue to work as they always have.


    [CircleID] Independent Show 2015: Out-of-the-Box Lessons in the Digital Age

    The following is an excerpt of an article that was originally published by Ladi Astrab in CircleID on July 28th, 2015.

    This year’s Independent Show summer conference was held in Boston, a place where the accents are strong and you hear great quotes like:

    “Hey Norm, how is the world treating you?”

    “Like a baby treats a diaper. Now start pouring.”

    Boston is one of my favorite cities on the East Coast. Intercity transport is made easy by having both a subway and a Hubway, and of course cabbies are everywhere and are always strong on conversation.

    If I had to sum up this year’s conference with one phrase, it would have to be: out-of-the-box thinking.

    Click here to read the full article.

    [Metro Boston] Hubway celebrates fourth anniversary, plans extentions

    The following article was originally published by Kayla Sweeney in Metro Boston on July 28th, 2015.

    Today marks four years since Hubway launched in Boston, and the bike sharing system is celebrating with a massive expansion.

    Hubway has more than 139 stations, but the officials said they plan to add 20 more throughout Boston and Cambridge during the next half of the 2015 season. 

    Hubway Spokesman Benjy Kantor told Metro that while the locations of the new stations have not been determined yet, “there will be hub-bub surrounding the extension later in the season,” so bikers should stay tuned.

    Kantor told Metro that they weren’t hosting a big celebration for their anniversary because of the extension plans and the buzz that will surround that later this year. However, Hubway officials will plan a collaborative special or celebration within the cities that Hubway resides, he said.

    Cyclists may also be looking at new lighter, sleeker bikes, but Kantor said the cities have yet to confirm the upgrade.

    Since 2011, Hubway users have offset more than 3 million tons of carbon, the system reported. Bikers can also be collaboratively proud of themselves for burning almost 200 million calories in the past four years.

    The website offers an ongoing statistics list on their website along with ways bikers can track their own usage. To join the movement or for more information visit http://www.thehubway.com/home

    Hubway Turns Four!

    Hubway launched on July 28th, 2011, with 60 stations and 600 bikes. Four trips around the sun* later, and the system is made up of 139 stations (140 really, but one has not been deployed this year due to construction) and 1300 bicycles, with further expansion expected later this year along with Hubway’s 4 millionth trip! If you take that trip, you could win a $250 gift card to New Balance!


    *4.6M miles is approximately 1/20th of the way to the sun, though we’d recommend turning back before it gets too hot. We’d still take Boston winters over global warming, which coincidentally Hubway riders are doing their part to fight by offsetting all that carbon.

    Today is Ernest Hemingway's birthday. He rode bikes.


    [CityLab] Where and why walking or biking to work makes a difference

    The following article was originally published by Steve Annear in the Boston Herald on July 30th, 2015.

    An active commute matters, wherever you live.

    It’s been more than seven years since Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett put his entire city on a diet and invested in wider sidewalks, better bike routes, and a larger park to encourage fitness. For politicians and urbanists alike, the connection between the shape of our cities and the shape of our bodies is clear. Those of us who live in sprawling suburbs and commute to work by car are less likely to be healthy, while those of us who live in dense urban neighborhoods end up healthier because we’re more likely to bike or walk to work.

    Unless, that is, people in compact urban areas don’t actually walk or bike to work a great deal more, even though it’s a readily available option.

    A new study by Timothy Wojan and Karen Hamrick from the U.S. Department of Agriculture takes a close look at the connections between urban form—especially compact cities and metros—and the level at which people walk or bike to their jobs. To get at this, the researchers use detailed data from the American Time Use Survey that collects information on how Americans spend their time, including the kinds of activities in which people engage and what they eat.

    The active commute

    Wojan and Hamrick identified active commuters—i.e. those who reported walking or biking to work—in compact versus more sprawling areas, and matched this to their reported Body Mass Index or BMI, a commonly-used standard of obesity and fitness. They then ran a regression analysis of the connection between active commuting and fitness in these two types of places, controlling for individual characteristics like age, gender, race and ethnicity, education, whether or not there were children in the household, as well as the physical activity level of their primary occupation and adverse weather conditions. They also controlled for community characteristics such as the presence of violent crime and whether the area had a bicycle-friendly community certification.

    Their findings shed important new light on the connections between urban form, walking and biking, and health. Contrary to evidence from previous studies, Wojan and Hamrick found that residents of compact cities did not necessarily demonstrate higher activity levels than those in more suburban-style settings. The reason? Only a small share of people in both kinds of places walk or bike to work. In fact, they found that there is no significant difference in levels of physical activity in compact versus sprawling places.

    “Urban density is not a silver bullet for fighting the obesity epidemic,” the authors write, “because compact settlements of themselves do not compel greater physical activity. Rather, compact development may facilitate less automobile use and more physical activity for a select group who chose to do so.”

    Walking, biking, and BMI

    That said, the researchers did find a strong correlation between walking and biking and a decreased BMI, or Body Mass Index. This means that although relatively few residents of compact cities elect to walk or bike to work, those who do have significantly lower BMIs, and presumably better physical health. These findings are consistent with those of other scientific studies, which suggest that long car commutes have deleterious consequences for our health and well-being. Research reported in The American Journal of Preventive Medicine, for example, found that people who commute 10 miles or more back and forth to work each day are at a higher risk of depression, anxiety, and social isolation. In contrast, walking just 20 minutes a day has significantly positive effects on health—and could even prevent premature death. Other studies rank long car commutes as one of the most miserable of all human activities.

    Still, while physical activity surely matters to health, this study found little evidence that widespread health is prompted by the kinds of places in which we live. As the authors write:

    “Despite evidence that more compact settlement patterns enable active commuting, only a small share of workers in these areas choose to walk or bike to work. In general, the activity level of residents in more compact cities and residents in more sprawling areas is very similar. But, [sic] there is a robust association between active commuting and lower body mass index that is not explained by unobserved attributes or preferences suggests that policies to promote active commuting may be effective. In particular, active commuting has a greater effect on BMI. Consequently, compact settlement appears to be an effective infrastructure for promoting more active lifestyles. The policy challenge is finding ways to ensure that this infrastructure is more widely utilized.”

    The bottom line: Far too few people are walking or biking to work, even in compact areas. Regardless, this is no reason to ignore the real health benefits that can be gained from an active commute. If we want to realize these benefits, we’re going to have to do more than persuade people to move from sprawling suburbs to compact urban places. We’re going to have to encourage them to get up, get active, and swap out those car keys for a bike ride or walk.

    Hip Hip...

    HOORAY!


    [Earth Day Network] What's Holding Back Bike-Share?

    The following article was originally published on the Earth Day Network blog on July 14th, 2015.

    Bike-sharing programs have been touted internationally as a way to ease the problems urban areas are experiencing. Advocates have claimed that these programs decrease traffic congestion and CO2 emissions while increasing riders health and their connection to the city. However, an article published last month by Miriam Ricci in Research in Transportation Business and Management. Ricci saw a lack of data to back up some of the suspected benefits of bike-share programs.

    There is a lack of data on all fronts, which is holding back improvements to bike-share systems. Little data on CO2 emissions prevented by bike-sharing exists, and as Ricci points out, the rebalancing schemes the many programs have made them carbon neutral or even put them in the red. Without better data on where these systems are failing, and what the real benefits are.

    People are beginning to notice this lack of data and are taking it into their own hands. Companies such as Ford Motor Company are starting programs to see how bicycles interact in cities by placing small trackers on bike frames. Likewise, the strengths of bike-share programs need to be emphasized instead of using claims that may not be true. Ricci found that many claims bike-share advocates have made were, in fact, true. Programs increase economic development near bike-share locations, as was the case in Washington DC. To take bike-sharing into its next steps, we need to gather more data, use it correctly and substantiate our claims to redefine urban transportation. We are off to a good start, but we need to keep the momentum rolling.

    [Next City] Have you heard about that awesome new bike-share diet?

    The following article was originally published by Josh Cohen in Next City on July 13th, 2015.

    In a survey of 3,100 Capital Bikeshare users in Washington, D.C., 30 percent of riders indicated they lost weight thanks to the program. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)


    For the last several years, bike-share has been the darling of U.S. bike advocates and city officials. It has been promoted as a boon to urban transportation that will help reduce congestion, normalize public perceptions of bicycling, improve health, bolster economies, reduce CO2 emissions, improve safety and more.

    Though there is likely some truth in those claims, they are often backed up by anecdotal evidence rather than hard data. It’s a problem that has the potential to undermine bike-share’s explosive expansion if the purported benefits turn out to be less than promised.

    “Bike-share attracts money … and it’s very popular so every city wants to have one to be cool,” says Miriam Ricci, a researcher at the University of the West of England’s Centre for Transport and Society. “I started to read lots of articles, academic papers and blogs about bike-sharing … and I was perplexed that there was a lot of hype and enthusiasm and lots of claims about CO2 savings and so on but very little or robust evidence to back it up.”

    Ricci delved deeper into bike-share claims and evidence in the June issue of Research in Transportation Business and Management. For “Bike sharing: A review of evidence on impacts and processes of implementation and operation,” Ricci analyzed existing studies and surveys for evidence that supported claims that bike-share shifts people’s mode-share choices, creates new cyclists and diversifies cycling, has economic and health impacts, reduces congestion and single-occupancy vehicle use, and reduces carbon emissions. She also looked at the processes by which cities set up and operate bike-share systems.

    It turns out that bike-share supporters aren’t grounded in hyperbole. Ricci found evidence that supported many of the claimed benefits including economic and health impact, new cyclist creation, and more. But there’s also a serious lack of proof that bike-sharing programs reduce congestion (in some cases, they may even increase congestion), get people out of their cars or help the environment.

    One of the most common reasons cited for launching bike-share is to increase the number of bicyclists in a city. According to Ricci’s paper, a recent survey of London bike-share’s active users found that 78 percent started to ride or ride more as a result of the system. Similarly, 68.4 percent of sampled bike-share users in Dublin claimed, “not to have cycled for their current trip prior to the launch of Dublinbikes” and 63.4 say they purchased a private bicycle after using bike-share.

    Ricci also found encouraging evidence that shows bike-share is good for user health, unsurprisingly. A study of Valencia University students commuting with the Valenbisi system found that they got half their recommended weekly exercise on the bikes and saw a small reduction of body mass index. In a survey of 3,100 Capital Bikeshare users in Washington, D.C., 31.5 percent reported stress reduction and about 30 percent indicated they lost weight as a result of bike-share.

    Though evidence is limited, there are two studies showing that bike-share can benefit local economies to some extent. Academic research on Capital Bikeshare’s potential economic benefits found 23 percent of surveyed users spent more money because they used CaBi. Another study of Nice Ride Minnesota found that bike-share stations generated “an average of $1.29 per week, which would equate to U.S. $29,000 over the season April to November” for nearby businesses.

    Part of the claim that bike-share will increase the number of cyclists is that it will help diversify ridership beyond the white, middle- to upper-class men who often dominate cycling’s demographics. Ricci did not find much supporting evidence. She writes that bike-share systems, “seem to attract a particular profile of user: male, white, employed and … younger, more affluent, more educated and more likely to be already engaged in cycling independently of bike-sharing.”

    Congestion reduction is perhaps bike-share’s biggest selling point. If bike-share increases the number of cyclists and frequency with which they ride, it makes sense that it would reduce traffic congestion. But, Ricci found that bike-share users don’t bike instead of driving so much as they bike instead of taking transit or walking. She writes that, “although Dublinbikes users reported considerable behavioral change, the prevailing trend showed a large modal shift (80.2 percent) from sustainable modes of travel to the bicycle, particularly from walking (45.6 percent) and including transfer from bus (25.8 percent) and rail (8.8 percent).” Still, nearly 20 percent of Dublinbikes users say they now drive less. Other European and American cities saw far lower rates of mode shift. In London only 2 percent of users shifted away from cars. In Lyon, France, and Washington, D.C., it’s 7 percent.

    Perhaps most surprising, Ricci says bike-share can actually contribute to congestion with the vans and trucks they use to redistribute bikes in the system. Those motorized fleets also harm bike-share’s environmental benefit. Ricci found zero evidence that bike-share leads to any significant reduction of carbon emissions.

    Ricci says, “If you put bike-sharing together with policies that strongly discourage car ownership and promote active travel and quality transit then it can be part of that picture and can contribute to the solution. [But] in isolation it won’t solve the pressing problems of air pollution, congestion, climate change … .”

    Despite some of the questionable claims, Ricci says, “Bike-sharing can indeed be a good thing for those who use it.”

    But, she thinks her study is proof that bike-share is due for more robust research that will provide good data for bike-share supporters to use. It is perhaps unsurprising, given that a lack of good data on ridership and demographics is a problem that continues to plague bike advocacy in general.

    Ricci writes, “A commitment to better, consistent and transparent monitoring and evaluation is necessary if bike-sharing is to be considered an effective element of sustainable urban mobility strategies.”

    Until then, she thinks that bike-share supporters would be better off sticking to claims for which they have real evidence.

    “Bike-sharing can be really good for some aspects, like improved accessibility, better journey experience, faster and cheaper travel. These should be the claims that promoters should focus on.”

    [Sampan] Boston Public Market Announces Food Rescue and Composting Programs

    The following announcement was originally published in Sampan, a bilingual Chinese-English newspaper, on July 9th, 2015.

    Upcoming Local Food Market Will Donate Leftover Food to Community Partners, Compost Food Scraps

    BOSTON — The Boston Public Market today announced a set of partnerships with local food rescue organizations, community partners, and a composting company that will allow the upcoming local food market to combat hunger in Boston, ensure convenience for the Market’s farmers and food producers, and reduce food waste.

    The Boston Public Market will house over 35 farmers, fishermen, and food producers from Massachusetts and throughout New England, selling items such as farm fresh produce; meat and poultry; eggs; milk and cheese; fish and shellfish; bread and baked goods; flowers; and an assortment of specialty and prepared foods. The Boston Public Market, located at 100 Hanover Street above the Haymarket MBTA station, will be open Wednesday — Sunday, 8 a.m. — 8 p.m, beginning on July 30.

    FOOD RESCUE:

    Under the newly-announced food rescue program at the Market, vendors can contribute leftover and underutilized food that would otherwise be discarded to the market’s non-profit food rescue partners: The Greater Boston Food Bank and Lovin’ Spoonfuls. The food will then be distributed to places like The Daily Table in Dorchester, Haley House Bakery Café’s weekly “Community Tables” dinner, the New England Center for Homeless Veterans, Boston Rescue Mission, Rosie’s Place, and the Pine Street Inn, which are all GBFB member agencies and receive the majority of their food from them. The food can then be prepared and served to those in need.

    “It’s incredibly important to us at the Boston Public Market that everyone in our community has access to healthy, local food,” said Boston Public Market CEO Liz Morningstar. “Through these partnerships, we can make sure that every bit of food in the Market is used by someone who needs it, rather than simply being thrown away.”

    The Boston Public Market already enjoys strong, multi-year relationships with several local food rescue organizations, and the Market’s two seasonal outdoor farmers markets currently donate surplus food. The Market plans to continue these existing relationships while adding new ones, rotating the community organizations that receive donations on a monthly basis.

    “The Greater Boston Food Bank is pleased to be able to connect several of our local member agencies, including the New England Center for Homeless Veterans, Rosie’s Place and the Pine Street Inn, with the new Boston Public Market,” said Catherine D’Amato, President and CEO of The Greater Boston Food Bank. “Working with like-minded organizations to reduce waste is in keeping with our mission to end hunger here in eastern Massachusetts. Partnerships like this reflect The Greater Boston Food Bank’s longstanding commitment to provide healthy food to those in need while promoting healthy communities.”

    “Lovin’ Spoonfuls is thrilled to extend our powerful partnership with The Boston Public Market,” said Ashley Stanley, Founder/Executive Director of Lovin’ Spoonfuls. “Lovin’ Spoonfuls had been rescuing incredible local product from the Dewey Square Farmers Market for many years, keeping it out of landfills and distributing it to those in need. With the exciting addition of the Boston Public Market, we are proud to connect the bounty of fresh, healthy and local fare to underserved communities.”

    COMPOSTING:

    Food scraps and other organic material from Market vendors that cannot be donated will be composted through a partnership with CERO, a Boston worker-owned cooperative company that offers waste reduction services. CERO delivers organic waste to composting facilities, where it is turned into rich soil for growing tomorrow’s food.

    “CERO Cooperative takes pride in our role as environmental stewards creating good jobs supporting green businesses,” said Lor Holmes, a CERO worker-owner. “We appreciate our partnerships with the Boston Public Market, grocers, restaurants, growers and gleaners as we all join together to build prosperous sustainable communities.”

    The Boston Public Market is a 28,000 square foot permanent, year-round, self-sustaining market that provides fresh local food to consumers from all income levels and nourishes our community.

    The Market is located in downtown Boston’s emerging Market District, next to the Haymarket pushcart vendors and the historic Blackstone Block, and it sits on the Rose Kennedy Greenway and the Freedom Trail. 100 Hanover Street also contains the Boston RMV branch, entrances to the Haymarket MBTA station, and a parking garage. Two Hubway stations are located nearby.

    The Boston Public Market is the only locally-sourced market of its kind in the United States. Everything sold at the Market is produced or originates in New England. Boston Public Market vendors are proud to accept SNAP/EBT for all eligible market products.

    The Market is a civic resource, educating the public about food sources, nutrition, and preparation. In addition to more than 35 vendor stalls, the Boston Public Market includes a 3,200 square foot demonstration kitchen, programmed by The Trustees of Reservations, the Market’s lead programming partner, with opportunities such as hands-on cooking demos, lectures, family activities, exercise classes, training and community events.

    [Boston Globe] Hubway asks naked bike riders to ‘please wear clothes'

    The following article was originally published by Steve Annear in the Boston Globe on July 9th, 2015.

    photo credit: Dina Rudick / Globe Staff


    Hubway has no affiliation with World Naked Bike Ride Boston, but the company is cautiously aware that some participants could use its bikes.

    If you’re riding your own bike at this weekend’s sixth-annual naked ride through Boston, feel free to go au naturel. But if you’re taking a Hubway bike, give the next rider a break, the company pleaded Wednesday.

    “For the love of all that is decent, please consider the other riders,” a spokesman for the bike-share company harrumphed in a light-hearted statement.

    “While there isn’t anything in the Hubway user agreement that explicitly prohibits riding naked, for safety and sanitary reasons we strongly encourage the wearing of clothing while riding,” said spokesman Benjy Kantor.

    Hubway has no affiliation with World Naked Bike Ride Boston, but the company is aware that some participants could use its bikes. It happened in 2013.

    The ride, hosted by local advocates, is held in 70 cities each year. Attendees ride naked — or mostly so — to “expose the unique dangers” cyclists face during their daily commutes and to protest people’s dependence on cars and oil, according to the event’s website.

    Boston’s ride begins Saturday in Cambridge, where participants undress before setting off on the adventure, and winds through Somerville and Boston. The ride’s Facebook event page has garnered more than 500 likes. Last year, 300 people joined the bare-naked brigade.

    Noting that nudity is not required, ride organizers underscored Hubway’s plea.

    “Wear underwear, they are public bikes, after all,” organizers said in a statement.

    #TakeHubway To The Fireworks


    #TakeHubway To The Esplanade


    #TakeHubway To The Pops


    [SYSTEM ALERT] Tonight's (6/30) software update, partial system outage 11pm-1am

    SYSTEM ALERT: Beginning Tuesday, June 30th, at approximately 11:00pm, and continuing through Wednesday, July 1st, at 1am, Hubway will be conducting an update to the operational software that powers the system. While key-holding members (annual & monthly) will be able to rent bikes during this 2-hour span, here are how the system will be affected at that time:

    • No card-payment rentals (24-hour & 72-hour memberships) will be available at Hubway stations.
    • Members will not be able to log into their online account. Once the update is complete, you’ll be able to access all of your account history again.
    • Station and dock information may not be accurate on any website, map, or mobile app. Once the update is complete, the accurate info will return.
    • “Time credits” and other features will not be available at Hubway station kiosks.

    Every effort will be made to minimize the disruption this may cause, and we do not anticipate this affecting a large volume of riders. We thank you in advance for your patience as we work to improve Hubway.


    If you have any questions, please reach Hubway customer service by calling 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929) or writing to customerservice@thehubway.com. Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    [Boston Globe] Public bike counter tracks cyclists cruising through Cambridge

    The following article was originally published by Nicole Dungca in the Boston Globe on June 27th, 2015.

    photo credit: Matthew J. Lee / Globe Staff


    Cambridge has one of the highest percentages of bike commuters in Greater Boston — and now, the city has a way to show it off.

    If you find yourself biking down Broadway Street in Kendall Square, you can now check out how many cyclists came before you that day. The city recently installed a bike counter that started on Tuesday displaying the number of cyclists who passed through the area, according to city spokeswoman Cara Seiderman.

    The new contraption, which displays in big green numerals the daily count of cyclists who have passed the spot, will supplement the city’s bike census, taken every two years. During those counts, employees spread out over 17 locations for four hours and record the cyclists they see. The city then extrapolates that data to come up with the number who pedal through the area.

    Seiderman said they won’t be doing away with the manual count, but officials hope the new bike counter will be more accurate and easier.

    “We know that a lot of people are traveling by bicycle in Cambridge and that the numbers have been increasing for more than a decade,” City Manager Richard C. Rossi said in a statement.

    Officials think the counter is a way to show how many people are out biking, and making sure people know “bicyclists count.” But Seiderman said they are also excited about the valuable pieces of data they’ll be able to collect.

    “If you can get 24/7 data, you have a much better picture of what the patterns are,” she said. “We can see if they’re biking year-round or biking through the rain.”

    Officials believe the counter is the first of its kind in the state. With it, Cambridge joins the ranks of such bike-friendly cities as Portland, Ore., and Montreal. The counter from the Montreal-based Eco-Counter company was funded by a $25,000 grant from the Helen and William Mazer Foundation.

    In three days, the counter had already ticked off about 6,000 bikes, according to Seiderman. Don’t expect to see that big green number skyrocket into the hundreds of thousands: The machine resets at midnight, ensuring a fresh daily count. A less prominent estimate of the annual bike tally will also be displayed.

    MEMBER PERK: $5 off Rock & Blues Concert Cruise tickets!


    The best way to see a band on the water in Boston just got even better for Hubway members!

    Join us on either (or both!) of the final two Rock and Blues Concert Cruises. If you’ve never been on one of the cruises, now’s your chance to see some of Boston’s best music while enjoying a beautiful day out on Boston Harbor aboard the Provincetown II.

    Get your tickets in advance—Hubway members get $5 off by using promo code HUBWAY at checkout!

    There are only two cruises remaining this season!


    Kingsley Flood and Parsonsfield
    Sunday, July 12th
    Boarding begins at 2pm, cruise departs at 3pm
    from the World Trade Center Pier, Seaport Blvd, Boston
    Hubway stations conveniently nearby!

    With “signature high energy” (Rolling Stone) and a live show that “could thrill Folsom Prison in ‘58 or CBGB in ‘76” (Boston Herald), Boston and Washington D.C.-based Kingsley Flood began 2015 with lofty goals: release two EPs and a full-length. The ambitious volume of output recognizes that the music business has changed and moved on from the era of the traditional album cycle. It also represents a shift in leader Naseem Khuri’s songwriting, channeling his personal journey as a Palestinian-American trying hard to do good and repeatedly coming up short. Parsonsfield is a five-piece Americana band from Connecticut that infuses a rowdy, rock-’n’-roll spirit into its bluegrass and folk influences, blowing away any preconception of what

    Purchase tickets here.


    Power of Love w/special guests New York’s Finest
    Sunday, July 26th
    Boarding begins at 12pm-Noon, cruise departs at 1pm
    from the World Trade Center Pier, Seaport Blvd, Boston
    Hubway stations conveniently nearby!

    Power of Love formed in 2012 with one simple goal: to be the best Huey Lewis & The News cover band you … or anyone else … has ever heard. Featuring a five-piece line-up and a full horn section, The Power of Love boasts an impressive collection of Boston indie rock and punk rock stalwarts (including members and former members of Big D and the Kid’s Table, The Fatal Flaw, This Blue Heaven, Razors in the Night, Mount Peru Lannen and more). PoL’s live show is no ironic, tongue-in-cheek takedown of Huey Lewis, nor is it a slavish tribute act. The band has the pure musicianship to honor the original songs and their arrangements, while still attacking the material with a raw rock and roll ferocity. Police tribute “New York’s Finest” opens.

    Purchase tickets here.

    Remember to use promo code HUBWAY to receive $5 discount on each ticket.

    [Jamaica Plain Gazette] Bikes and Wi-Fi among youth budget priorities

    The following article was originally published in the Jamaica Plain Gazette on June 19th, 2015.

    More Hubway bikes and free Wi-Fi. A renovated school gym. And more water-bottle refilling stations in parks like the one pioneered at Jamaica Pond.

    Those are the City budget priorities chosen by a vote of more than 2,500 Boston youths in Mayor Martin Walsh’s annual Youth Participatory Budgeting Vote, according to a City press release.

    Debuting last year with Walsh’s new Youth Lead the Change initiative, the process allows Boston youths ages 12 to 25 to vote on how to allocate $1 million on various budget proposals from a list also developed by youths. Organized in partnership with the New York-based nonprofit the Participatory Budgeting Project, the process allowed for voting at such locations as schools and T stations.

    Expansion of the popular Hubway bike-rental system to more neighborhoods is budgeted at $101,600. Expanding the City’s “Wicked Free Wi-Fi” program is budgeted at $119,000.

    Renovating the gym at Roxbury’s Boston Latin Academy is another youth priority, budgeted at $475,000.

    The youths also like the idea of the water stations in parks. Local City Councilor Matt O’Malley got a combo water fountain and refill station installed by a private corporation at Jamaica Pond Park in 2013. Young voters pegged $260,000 to install more stations on Boston Common and in parks in Roslindale, South Boston and West Roxbury.

    [The National] Emirati cyclists hope to inspire women to work out during Ramadan

    The following artcile was originally published by Ramola Talwar Badam in The National on June 13th, 2015.

    DUBAI // A group of female Emirati cyclists will be on their bikes during Ramadan hoping to motivate others to exercise after breaking their fast.

    While many view the holy month as a time to slow their daily routine and even stop working out, bank manager Masooma Ali is turning it up a gear in preparation for a 70-kilometre road race on July 3.

    “This is my goal, to get more girls into cycling. I’m trying to promote this sport for girls,” said Ms Ali, who is riding 50km a day as she trains for the Nad Al Sheba cycling championship, a race that takes place in the evening.

    “Cycling is not very common in our culture, and girls normally go to the gym or train indoors. So you really have to convince others to take up cycling.”

    She advised women not to overeat at iftar and work out to improve fitness and nutrition levels. “Last year, I raced for fun but this year I’m taking it seriously. You become conscious about what you’re eating because it affects training, so I make sure to have salad and proteins. In the UAE we tend to eat fried foods for iftar. I feel we stuff ourselves and this is the wrong way. During Ramadan we need exercise even if it’s a one-hour walk to feel fresh.”

    Ms Ali recently attended a nutrition workshop organised by Liv Cycling, a store dedicated to female cyclists. The participants heard valuable tips about eating small meals, the need for hydration, exercising two hours after a meal and adding rice, chicken, fish, whole grains and vegetables to their diet.

    More workshops are planned this summer with the next focusing on hydration and electrolyte management, said Emma Woodcock, who represents the store. She cautioned those who do not train regularly not to overdo it.

    “This is not a time to be pushing yourself hard. You can do strength training indoors like putting your bike on an indoor trainer for short workouts.”

    Asma Al Janahi, an Emirati computer engineering student, hopes women will be encouraged to cycle when they see her group out in Al Barsha park, Jumeirah and around town.

    “We are planning to do late evening rides during Ramadan,” said Ms Al Janahi, co-founder of UAE Cycling Girls, which has more than a dozen riders, mostly Emiratis.

    “We want to tell other girls there is no reason to stop training during Ramadan if you exercise the rest of the year.

    “Some people may be surprised to see us exercise during Ramadan. Some think being a girl you should not exercise or because it’s Ramadan you should not do anything. This is the general culture and we’re doing our best to change this idea. Girls need to eat healthy, stay hydrated and understand the power of cycling.”

    Dietician Salma Ganchi said eating small portions at iftar was equally important and cycling outdoors during fasting hours was not recommended.

    “Headaches are quite common during Ramadan and if you have a headache don’t go cycling,” she said.

    “Tingling, the shivers are other warning signs of dehydration. Feeling dizzy on a bike is dangerous. The key in Ramadan is maintaining fitness, it’s not a time to increase fitness or become stronger.”

    #TakeHubwayToPride


    Boston’s 45th annual Pride Parade on Saturday, June 13th, begins at noon at Copley Square (Boylston & Clarendon Streets), and heads through the historic South End, north on Berkeley Street into the Back Bay, turning east onto Boylston Street and passing by the Public Garden. It then turns left onto Charles Street, heading north alongside the Boston Common, before turning east on Beacon Street and passing before the Massachusetts State House, then winding around Tremont Street and Cambridge Street to end at Boston City Hall. There are many Hubway stations nearby and adjacent to the parade route. Please allow for extra time to rent or dock bikes, as large crowds are expected.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: MIT Stata Center at Vassar / Main (Cambridge) expands to 35 docks

    Station Alert: In response to increased usage, particularly during rush hours, the MIT Stata Center at Vassar Street / Main Street Hubway station in Cambridge has been expanded from 23 docks to 35 docks. The expansion was installed on Wednesday, June 10th, and the station is expected to remain at this size for the remainder of the season.



    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance] Putting Legacy First: Planning for the Boston 2024 Olympics

    The following report was originally published by the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance in June 2015.

    Boston’s Olympic bid – like many powerful ideas – carries the prospect of great reward and the risk of great failure. The Metropolitan Area Planning Council, the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance, and Transportation for Massachusetts released a joint report that proposes a framework for protecting the public interest during and after the bid. We believe that our proposal represents a major step toward creating a more transparent and coordinated process that will benefit the region and the state.

    One of the key recommendations is for Massachusetts to establish an Olympics Planning Commission to oversee and coordinate the public planning process. Additionally, we propose a series of specific actions to ensure that the Games-whether or not Boston actually hosts them-will have a positive legacy on the region’s housing, transportation, and environment. The unifying message is that all parties must put legacy first.

    Click here to read the full report.

    [RealEstateRama] Mayor Walsh announces winning projects of youth-participatory budget vote

    The following letter was originally published in RealEstateRama on June 10th, 2015.

    Mayor Martin J. Walsh on Tuesday announced the winning projects of the Youth Participatory Budgeting Vote. This year’s vote, in which young Bostonians ages 12-25 decided how to allocate $1 million of the City of Boston Capital Budget, is the second time the City has engaged young residents in the budgetary process, and is the first initiative of its kind in the nation.

    “We’re involving our youngest and brightest residents in local government, and empowering them to make positive changes in their neighborhoods,” said Mayor Walsh. “I am proud we were able to continue the process, building on last year’s achievements and enable young people to critically think about how to spend taxpayer dollars in a way that better serves the people. This fosters a sense of responsibility and accountability. They walk away knowing their voices matter.”

    Voters were able to select up to four projects on the ballot. Projects were divided into the following categories:

    • Public Safety
    • Parks
    • Health and Wellness
    • Community
    • Culture
    • Education
    • Technology

    The projected selected for funding were: expanding the Hubway bicycle system; expanding the City’s Wicked Free Wi-Fi system; installing water bottle refill systems at City parks; and renovations to Boston Latin Academy’s gymnasium.

    Young people from across the City were instructed by the Mayor’s Youth Council and other supportive partners on how to create guidelines from the voting process and develop a ballot, which included 10 projects.

    “This is a process designed by and for young people,” said Shari Davis, Director of the City’s Department of Youth Engagement and Employment. “One big piece of Youth Lead the Change’s success is creating real opportunities for youth participation. We were able to do that by meeting young people where they are, building relationships, and allowing them to be the experts that we know they are in spaces where they are safe and comfortable.”

    Voting polls were stationed at local train stations, youth centers and school buildings slated for the city-wide vote. Over 2,500 eligible votes came in from Boston’s youngest populations.

    Last year, young people voted to fund seven winning projects that enhanced community parks, installed security cameras, granted Boston Public Schools Chromebooks and funded a skateboard feasibility study.

    “I’ve learned a lot! I used to take some of these amenities for granted – like WiFi at school, or different features at parks – but now I know how much thought and work goes into making these things happen,” said Adonis Pitts, a member of the Mayor’s Youth Council. “Spending a million dollars is a lot of fun, but it’s a lot of work, too.”

    Youth Lead the Change (YLC) is carried out by the Department of Youth Engagement and Employment, in close collaboration with a steering committee comprised of 26 community and youth serving organizations. The Participatory Budgeting Project facilitates the implementation of participatory budgeting nationwide, and works closely with Youth Lead the Change.

    “Youth Lead the Change is the nation’s best example of true collaboration between young people and city administration,” said Pam Jennings of the Participatory Budgeting Project, a nonprofit leading the development of Participatory Budgeting in North America. “Participatory Budgeting empowers our young leaders to understand how government works while giving them the tools to make informed decisions. We are excited to spread the innovations introduced by Youth Lead the Change, to make democracy better for communities around the world.”

    “Our mission is to scale up collaboration and decision-making. We envision an era in which large communities can deliberate and brainstorm with one another on important issues with the aid of intelligently designed algorithms and digital communication platforms,” said Ashish Goel, Professor at Stanford University, who leads theStanford Crowdsourced Democracy Team, which developed the digital voting tool used for voting. “We are fortunate to partner with the Boston School District. The forward thinking, the willingness to innovate, and the commitment to inclusive democracy that we see from the city and the district has been a great motivator for our team.”


    The winning projects are as follows:

    Hubway Extensions
    Cost Estimation: $101,600

    Hubway, a bicycle sharing transportation system in Boston, helps to provide additional commuting options to local residents. The additional funding will:

    Expand the Hubway system into more neighborhoods;
    Increase access to this unique transportation system to thousands of residents who are currently underserved by other means of public transportation; and
    Provide alternative transit options to those who do not have a driver’s license and/or access to a personal vehicle.


    Wicked Free Wifi 2.0
    Cost Estimation: $119,000

    Mayor Walsh and the City of Boston’s Department of Innovation Technology (DoIT) launched the City’s free Public Wi-Fi in April of 2014. Wicked Free Wi-Fi is available at more than 170 access points within the public wireless network, and this investment aims to increase the number of users across Boston’s neighborhoods. This project will:

    Provide young people internet in areas that do not have inexpensive or free Wi-Fi options; and
    Increase internet access in target locations, such as at schools and community centers.


    Water Bottle Refill Stations at Parks
    Cost Estimation: $260,000

    Designated refill stations will help encourage the use of reusable water bottles and reduce negative environmental impacts on Boston’s parks system. This project will:

    Install water stations in Joe Moakley Park in South Boston, Hynes Field in West Roxbury, Healey Playground in Roslindale, Robert E. Ryan Playground in Dorchester and on the Boston Common
    Serve those who need to stay hydrated while enjoying Boston parks and partaking in sporting activities
    Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by eliminating fuel needed to package and transport bottled water


    Boston Latin Academy Gym Renovations
    Cost Estimation: $475,000

    The Boston Latin Academy (BLA) gymnasium is intended to serve thousands of BLA students and members of the local community. The gym serves as a safe space for students, and promotes a healthy and active lifestyle within the community. This funding will:

    Support cosmetic and safety improvements within the gym, such as painting, addressing flooring issues and bleacher repair.


    Youth Lead the Change will launch its third year in September with a call for steering committee members. To learn more about Youth Lead the Change, visit www.bostonyouthzone.com or contact the Department of Youth Engagement and Employment at 617-635-4202. To see a full listing of all the proposed projects, visit youthleadboston.org.

    Mayor’s Press Office
    617.635.4461

    [Boston Globe] Report calls for overseeing Olympics agency

    The following article was originally published by Mark Arsenault in The Boston Globe on June 9th, 2015.

    State lawmakers should establish and fund a new public commission with the power to impose binding conditions on Boston’s Olympic bid, and the responsibility of overseeing a vast planning effort to guide the long-term legacy of the Games, according to a new report by the Metropolitan Area Planning Council and two other planning organizations.

    “It is especially important that a single entity take responsibility for convening . . . interested parties, keeping everyone engaged, raising and addressing key questions, and making sure that the legacy impacts of the Games remain front and center,” according to a copy of the report shared with the Globe. “To date, no one has filled that role.”

    The three-month study, scheduled to be released Tuesday, acknowledges potential benefits and possible harms of hosting the Games, but does not directly take a side in the noisy public debate over whether the city should get behind a proposal to bring the 2024 Summer Games to Boston and other venues in Massachusetts.

    “The Olympic bid — like many powerful ideas — carries with it the prospect of great reward, and the risk of great failure,” states the report, which was prepared by the Planning Council, Transportation for Massachusetts, and the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance.

    The report, which suggests that intensive planning would give the region the best chance of developing a successful legacy from a bid, offers dozens of recommendations for public officials and Olympic planners in the areas of transportation, housing, and the environment. It also makes specific proposals regarding three key venue sites: Widett Circle, Columbia Point, and the Beacon Yards area.

    “The first step is to ask the right questions, and the most important question is this: How can we leverage the planning and investment for the Olympic Games to make Greater Boston a more connected, livable, and prosperous region — regardless of whether our bid is chosen, and even after the Games are over?” the report reads.

    Marc Draisen, director of the Planning Council, said a new Olympic Planning Commission would not replace or duplicate the role of Boston 2024, a private nonprofit that would remain in charge of finalizing the bid and trying to win the Games. A new public commission, he said, would be better positioned to coordinate permitting for venues, and involve municipal governments in the planning for the Games.

    “There is a need for coordination across city lines,” he said in an interview.

    In their 50-page report, the planning organizations offered support for public infrastructure spending related to the Games that “would be worthwhile investments even if Boston were not to be awarded the Olympics,” taking a position similar to those of Mayor Martin J. Walsh and Governor Charlie Baker.

    The report also calls for Boston 2024 to apply some of its private funding to public infrastructure, such as pedestrian and biking improvements at JFK/UMass Station and nearby Kosciuszko Circle, near the proposed site of an athlete’s village on land owned by the University of Massachusetts Boston.

    “The public has a legitimate role to play in repairing, modernizing, and expanding infrastructure that will last beyond the Games, just as the private sector has a role to play in supporting improvements that will advance the Olympic bid and make the Games more successful,” the report states.

    The report endorses the use of what it calls “value capture” public financing to pay for infrastructure, which can use future increases in tax revenue created by infrastructure improvements to help pay for those improvements.

    “It is the way public infrastructure is financed all around the US and all over the world,” Draisen said.

    Boston 2024’s original venue plan proposed this type of financing arrangement to pay for infrastructure in Widett Circle, where the committee wants to build a temporary Olympic stadium. The committee redacted the financing proposal from bid documents released to the public in January, and was heavily criticized for editing the information after the original documents came to light in May through public records requests.

    Boston 2024 has pledged to release a new venue plan this month that will provide more detailed revenue and cost estimates for the Games, and explain how the committee intends to finance the two most challenging Olympic facilities: the stadium and the athletes’ village. The bid committee has long said a Boston Olympics would be compact and walkable, though the first venue announced under the new plan moved Olympic sailing from Boston Harbor to Buzzards Bay off New Bedford. The majority of the venues are expected to stay in and around Boston under the new plan.

    The report recommended that Boston 2024 do more to encourage bike travel, such as contributing planning expertise and money to “a connected network of high-quality protected bike lanes for spectators to travel between venues and other destinations.” Also, Olympic venues should have ample bike parking and Hubway bike share stations, the report states. The report also suggests Boston 2024 explore a new ferry service to connect Olympic venues along the Charles River — a venture that could live on after the Games as a commuter ferry or water taxi service.

    On housing, the report warns that some prior Olympics have resulted in the displacement of residents. To prevent this, the report says, state and city governments should adopt tenant protections, among other recommendations.

    “This package should prohibit the following: no-fault evictions during the year preceding the Games, summer surcharges or other temporary rent increases, and/or ‘short-leases’ designed to end before the Games begin,” the report states.

    [Worcester Business Journal Online] Planning group lays out Olympics bid recommendations

    The following article was originally published in Worcester Business Journal Online on June 9th, 2015.

    Seeing great opportunity in the area’s US Olympics bid, a Metro Boston planning group said private dollars should fund a substantial amount of infrastructure upgrades, and the state should protect tenants and the homeless from displacement.

    The recommendations from the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), expected Tuesday, arrive just after the nonprofit Olympic backer Boston 2024 claimed $14 million in cash and in-kind contributions is “one of the strongest fundraising starts ever for a bid city.”

    Boston 2024, the group driving Boston’s bid to host the Summer Games in nine years, said in January the price tag for the games would be $4.7 billion. No Boston Olympics, which organized to oppose the bid, pegged the cost at $14.3 billion, which includes $5.2 billion in infrastructure improvements.

    The MAPC report recommended public dollars be used to fund projects that will have a lasting benefit, while recommending private money chip in for a range of infrastructure expenses. The group also recommended the state establish an Olympic Planning Commission that would coordinate permitting and public input, but would “not supersede” local control.

    “A single entity should coordinate the planning and application process for this bewildering set of approvals ̶ and ensure that any proposal submitted to one entity does not contradict proposals submitted to others,” said the report written for MAPC by Jessica Robertson and Tim Reardon.

    The group recommended establishing a Social Impact Advisory Committee, and said that when Atlanta hosted the games in 1996 there were reports of “price-gouging” by landlords, evictions, and in the lead-up more than 9,000 arrest citations were issued to homeless people, who were also offered free one-way bus tickets out of the county.

    “Whether displacement is caused by direct or indirect means, it is an unacceptable outcome, and planning for the Games and associated public policy must be focused on preventing it,” the MAPC report said, while also noting the construction of an Olympic village and other aspects of the games could increase the amount of affordable housing available in Boston.

    Controls on the size of monthly and annual rent increases may be necessary along with a ban on seasonal surcharges and a prohibition on no-fault evictions a year before the games, the report said. MAPC noted temporary deed restrictions intended to make housing units affordable are set to expire in the coming years.

    Boston 2024 CEO Rich Davey has said the only transportation upgrade necessary for hosting the games is the purchase of Red and Orange line cars, which is already funded and in the works.

    MAPC identified a number of other projects that it said Boston 2024 should help finance, saying that where projects would “principally” benefit the hosting of the games, the group should pay the “lion’s share.”

    “We haven’t quantified exactly what the number is,” said MAPC Executive Director Marc Draisen, when asked whether Boston 2024 would be able to afford helping to finance the array of projects promoted in the report. Draisen also said the fundraising report from Boston 2024 - which on Friday reported $2.9 million in fundraising and another nearly $1 million in “in kind” contributions in the first quarter of 2015 ̶ “doesn’t have much to say about funds that may be available over the course of the next decade.”

    MAPC floated the idea of a ferry service on the Charles River and recommended increased access to Widett Circle, the proposed site of the Olympic Stadium. Bounded by highway and rails, the site is currently occupied by train yards and businesses, and while Boston 2024 sees it as the beginning of a boulevard toward South Station, MAPC said additional connections should be made to the nearby neighborhoods of South Boston, the South End and Roxbury.

    The planning group also said 2024 should fund bikeways, the purchase of rentable Hubway bike stations and seize the opportunity of hosting the Paralympics to upgrade accessibility of the MBTA.

    “Hosting the Paralympics should bring added focus on the moral and legal responsibility to ensure that our public infrastructure serves all members of society,” said the report, which said making the T fully accessible would cost $2 billion. Also, the report recommends factoring in climate change when developing the three major portions of Boston 2024’s initial bid, which lie on Boston Harbor, near the Fort Point Channel and by the Charles River.

    Draisen noted that the properties acquired for the Olympics would be revenue-generating after the games end, and recommended new financing schemes for transportation projects that leverage the increased value of property with improved transportation. That type of financing was used to help fund the first new MBTA subway station in 27 years at Somerville’s Assembly Square, and the governor’s task force on ways to improve the MBTA recommended greater use of such “value-capture” financing for transit.

    MAPC would also like the planned Olympic lanes to be converted into a bus-rapid transit system post-games, which he said would go beyond the Silver Line buses that have some dedicated lanes.

    The group said planners “should resist the temptation to scatter venues around the state, which would inevitably defeat the walkable character of the Games,” include bike lanes in their plans and fund pedestrian connections between venue sites.

    MAPC is governed by a large board of mostly municipal government representatives, and the report is being issued in conjunction with Transportation for Massachusetts and the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance.

    Station Alert: University of Massachusetts Boston scheduled for redeployment this week

    Station Alert: The University of Massachusetts Boston Hubway station is scheduled for redeployment on Wednesday, June 10th. This is a 19-dock station that will be located at a new site on University Drive West, adjacent to the newly built Integrated Sciences Complex.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Two stations redeploying this week in Somerville - Beacon @ Washington/Kirkland, and Summer @ Cutter

    Station Alert: The following two Somerville-based Hubway stations are scheduled for redeployment on Wednesday, June 10th:

  • Beacon Street at Washington/Kirkland. This will be a 15-dock station located in front of 402 Washington (Kappa Dental Group), about a quarter-block east of the Beacon/Washington/Kirkland intersection.

  • Summer Street at Cutter Street. This will be a 15-dock station located in front of 366 Summer Street (the old Dole Publishing building), across from the VFW near the intersection with Cutter & Russell.

  • Both stations should be operational as soon as they are fully reinstalled.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Pro-Tip: Use Hand Signals To Indicate Your Intentions, and To Stay Safe In Traffic

    Every Hubway bike is equipped with wheel & sidewall reflectors along with pedal-powered front & rear flashing LED lights and other safety features, but one thing they don’t have is turn signals. That’s up to you as the rider to safely indicate your intentions to traffic around you. The good news is there are only three simple signals you need to know:

    LEFT TURN
    Simply extend your left arm straight out in the direction of the turn.

    RIGHT TURN
    Extend your left arm out but bend it at the elbow with your forearm and hand held up vertically at a 90° angle. As an alternative, it’s also generally accepted to simply extend your right arm straight out in the direction of the turn. Either way is fine, just so long as you deliberately exhibit your intention to turn.

    Fun fact: the left-arm / right-turn is a holdover from before all cars had turn signals and the driver had to use arm signals out of the driver’s side window.

    STOPPING, OR SLOWING DOWN
    Extend your left arm out to the left but bend your elbow so your forearm and hand are pointing vertically downward.

    That’s it! There are also occasional variations for other countries, so if you’re planning on cycling during any international travel, consult this wiki page to check if there are any differences.

    OTHER CYCLING COURTESIES
    It’s common courtesy when passing another rider to let them know on which side you’re passing by loudly but politely announcing “on your right!” or “on your left!” And of course keep your eyes up at any pathway intersections for other cyclists or pedestrians, and give a friendly ding of your bell (all Hubway bikes have them) if you see anyone or if you are going around a corner.


    Check out more about Hubway’s safety features and recommendations on Hubway’s safety page,
    and see what your safety score is by reviewing Hubway’s Perfect 5 safety tips.

    [PeopleForBikes] 6 Bike Share Cities You Should Watch (Because We Just Gave Them Grant Money To Focus On Equity)

    The following article was originally published by April Corbin, equity writer for in PeopleForBikes on June 1st, 2015.

    Equity in bike share isn’t going to happen on its own.

    Innovators will have to experiment with strategies and efforts in order to find best practices. Luckily, there are at least half a dozen cities in the United States ready to do this.

    We would know. The Better Bike Share Partnership announced today that it has awarded nearly $375,000 in grants to bike share operators and community organizations that are working to make bike share programs more equitable. The Partnership has also funded an academic research team that will look at data and equity outcomes in Philadelphia, which launched their bike share system Indego in late April.

    This first round of grant money is part of $900,000 that The JPB Foundation-funded Better Bike Share Partnership will award over the course of three years.

    We will be reporting more about these projects on this blog in the future,so stay tuned,but for now here are the details:

    Austin Bike Share Equity Project: $50,000
    Austin, TX
    Austin B-cycle will use this grant award to address barriers of cost, safety, comfort with bicycling, and language through a bilingual outreach and education campaign along with subsidized membership and cash payment options. A report with best practices on implementing a fully bilingual bike share system is one key deliverable of this project.

    Boston Bikes Hubway Equity Project: $51,760
    Boston, MA
    Boston Bikes will build on their successful membership subsidy program and Prescribe-a-Bike collaboration with the Boston Medical Center to reach more diverse city residents with the help of this grant funding. Expansion of these two programs will join with plans to understand, reinforce and replicate the system’s best referral sources, align with other Boston Bikes programs, and develop more effective peer marketing tools through storytelling.

    Building Up Bike Share in Bedford Stuyvesant: $75,000
    Brooklyn, NY
    The Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation (Restoration) will capitalize on Citi Bike’s addition of 26 stations to their neighborhood with several targeted interventions to increase use. Restoration will focus their grant funding on tailored community outreach, education about riding bicycles and using bike share, membership promotion campaigns, and integration with other community services to introduce more Bedford-Stuyvesant residents to bike share.

    Capital Bikeshare Outreach Resources for Community Organizations: $25,000
    Washington, DC
    The District of Columbia’s Department of Transportation (DOT) will strengthen and expand its network of local community service organizations as ambassadors for Capital Bikeshare with this grant award. In addition to initiating partnerships and developing best practices based on previous community partner experiences, the DOT will also create resources including a training curriculum and manual, multi-lingual demonstration video on how to use bike share, new member kits, and an ambassador network that links and supports community partners.

    Charlotte B-cycle Free Wheelin’ Fridays: $20,000
    Charlotte, NC
    Charlotte B-cycle is working with an extensive roster of community partners to help people from neighborhoods across the city try using bike share for their Friday morning commutes. This targeted program will use experienced riders, incentives, and origination points in communities with less bike share use to boost ridership.

    Divvy for Everyone: $75,000
    Chicago, IL
    The Chicago Department of Transportation (DOT) is using their award and match funding from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois to implement a citywide program of subsidized memberships and facilitated enrollment through the Local Initiatives Support Coalition (LISC) - Centers for Working Families. Chicago DOT will also partner with Slow Roll Chicago on targeted outreach, education and engagement in the Southside neighborhood of Bronzeville along with general outreach and engagement citywide.

    Equity Outcomes and Potential for Better Bike Share: $74,986
    Portland, OR
    Researchers at Portland State University will collect and examine data such as perceptions of bike share, barriers to use, success of specific interventions to increase use, and the impact of station siting decisions in Philadelphia’s Indego Bike Share System. The key deliverable is a report that will help new and existing bike share systems identify and implement interventions that will help them reach and engage more riders.

    [Boston Globe] Op-Ed: Cambridge tries to provide transportation options

    The following letter was originally published as an Op-Ed in The Boston Globe on May 24th, 2015.

    Robert Weisman raises many critical issues about transportation in Kendall Square, particularly the need to prevent congestion from damaging this area’s role in driving innovation and economic growth (“As tech hub grows, so do the traffic jams,” A1, May 19). The City of Cambridge has been working diligently over the past two decades to implement policies and programs that enable this growth, while managing impacts and recognizing that we cannot build our way out of congestion.

    Working with public and private partners, we have invested in bicycle facilities like Hubway, supported transit improvements like the EZRide bus, and advocated for regional investments in sustainable transportation. Eric Moskowitz’s July 2012 article detailed how successful promotion of sustainable transportation through the Parking and Transportation Demand Management Ordinance and other tools has led to a commuting modal share of 53% for walking, cycling, and transit.

    We have modified zoning to encourage development of a true mixed-use neighborhood and made strategic infrastructure investments to enhance mobility. While construction on the Longfellow Bridge and Main Street have short-term impacts, they are critical to this area’s future. As with all of Cambridge, Kendall Square is a work in progress, and we remain committed to working collaboratively to enable the continued success of this global center for innovation.

    Joseph E. Barr
    Director of Traffic, Parking and Transportation
    Cambridge

    [The Washington Post] Boston was just named the top city in the country for saving energy. Here’s why

    The following is an excerpt from an article originally published by Chelsea Harvey in The Washington Post on May 20th, 2015.

    It’s report card season — and not just for grade-school students. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) published the 2015 edition of its biennial City Energy Efficiency Scorecard today, ranking U.S. cities based on their local energy policies and initiatives. And for the second time in a row, Boston is top of the class.

    It was a close competition, with each of the top five cities scoring within a 10-point range. Boston took first place with a total of 82 and was the only city to get more than 80 percent of the possible points. How did the city manage to do so well?

    The scorecard’s authors attribute Boston’s success to a number of strong city-wide energy policies and local initiatives, which helped it score well broadly across the board. But the city really took the cake as a top scorer in the buildings policies category and the energy and water utility policies category, which assesses energy efficiency targets, spending on electric and natural gas efficiency and water efficiency efforts.

    Boston’s Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance requires large and medium-sized buildings to report their energy and water use, as well as complete an energy assessment every five years. And, the report states, buildings are required to improve their efficiency if they’re not ENERGY STAR certified or showing improvements. And the city’s Renew Boston initiative earned it points in the utility policies category. Introduced in 2009, the program aims to reduce electricity demand by 200 megawatts by 2017. Efforts to meet this goal included the launch of Renew Boston Solar, a program that encourages the widespread adoption of solar technology throughout the city. And Renew Boston also targets homeowners and small business owners by offering free energy assessments and providing incentives to adopt efficiency improvements, such as insulation.

    Boston also has a climate action plan, which aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Part of this plan involves reducing vehicles miles traveled (VMT) by 7.5 percent by 2020. Hubway, the city’s bike-sharing system, is one way the city government is tackling that goal, helping the city earn a relatively high score for transportation policy.

    And Boston was also among the top scorers in the community initiatives category, thanks to its Greenovate Boston campaign. This program aims to help the city meet its emissions reduction goals by engaging citizens in the city’s climate and sustainability initiatives. Engagement opportunities include community summits, personal carbon challenges, bike weeks and guidelines to help citizens improve energy efficiency in their own homes. “Community outreach is really the key element,” said Austin Blackmon, Boston’s chief of environment, energy and open space, during the Wednesday press conference. “One thing that we’re really focusing on is making sure that when we are communicating with our residents and businesses, we’re making sure we’re reaching out to those people who haven’t heard the message already.”

    Thanks to these broad-scale initiatives, Boston was able to lead the pack with 82 points. But the other cities in the top five weren’t too far behind. Click here for a quick look at how they stacked up.

    [SYSTEM ALERT] Software upgrade complete, thanks for your patience

    You may not have even noticed. It was only for a few hours, and most riders were able to continue using Hubway as usual, but the big news is we upgraded Hubway’s back-end software today!

    While the majority of changes will not be visible to Hubway riders, the updates to the system software will provide members with additional trip history details and an easier-to-read account redesign, and will provide automated tools for communicating mechanical issues with Hubway technicians (for example, when a rider marks a bike for repair)! The updates will also greatly improve the tools used by the company that operates the system, Motivate International Inc, and will allow for testing new equipment for Hubway expansion.

    This was a major system upgrade for Hubway. While every effort was made to minimize the disruption it may have caused, we do apologize to any riders who were inconvenienced. We thank you for your patience as this work to improve Hubway for all riders was going on.


    If you have any questions, please reach Hubway customer service by calling 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929) or writing to customerservice@thehubway.com. Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    Station Move Alert: Harvard University River Houses / Plympton St at Memorial Drive, Cambridge

    Station Move Alert: On Friday, May 22nd, the Harvard University River Houses / Plympton Street Hubway station will be moved approximately 1-2 blocks northeast from its current location along Memorial Drive in Cambridge to its new seasonal location on Grant Street, between DeWolfe & Banks Streets. This will be an on-street (not sidewalk) location.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: Kendall T at Main St, Cambridge

    Station Move Alert: On Friday, May 22nd, the Kendall T at Main Street Hubway station, located in Kendall Square, Cambridge, will be relocated to the Ames Street sidewalk at the southwest corner of Ames & Main Street. This station is scheduled to remain in the new location throughout the spring & summer.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: North Station Hubway

    Station Move Alert: Due to planned sidewalk construction, this evening, Tuesday, May 19th, at 6pm, the North Station Hubway station will be relocated to a temporary location to the left of Portal Park, against the wall that abuts the Route 93 underpass, as pictured in the image below.

    Because there are two station terminals at North Station, the relocation will be made without a break in service. There will be a Hubway representative to help you with docking during the move, but please allow for a little extra time.

    PLEASE NOTE: this is a temporary move expected to last a few days, and plans are for the station to return to its permanent location on Causeway Street after construction is completed.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [SYSTEM ALERT] Software Upgrade, Partial System Outage, Improvements on May 19-20

    SYSTEM ALERT: Beginning Tuesday, May 19th, at approximately 7:00pm, Hubway will be conducting a significant upgrade to the operational software that powers the system.

    While the majority of the changes will not be visible to Hubway users, the updates to the system software will provide members with additional trip history details and an easier-to-read account redesign, and will provide automated tools for communicating mechanical issues with Hubway technicians. The updates will also greatly improve the tools used by the company that operates the system, Motivate International Inc, and will allow for testing new equipment for Hubway expansion.

    The upgrade will last approximately 16 hours during which there will be an impact on users of the system. During the upgrade: 

    • Key holding members (annual & monthly) will be able to rent bikes from one station and dock them at the same or another station. However, you will not be able to rent bikes from the same station twice while the upgrade is underway.
    • Members will not be able to log into their online account. Once the update is complete, you’ll be able to access all of your account history.
    • No new memberships, renewals, or gift certificates will be available for purchase on the Hubway website (www.thehubway.com).
    • Station and dock information will not be accurate on any website, map, or mobile app. Once the update is complete, the accurate info will return.
    • “Time credits” and other features will not be available at Hubway station kiosks.
    • No card-payment rentals (24-hour & 72-hour memberships) will be available at Hubway stations.

    While this is a major system upgrade for the Hubway system, every effort will be made to minimize the disruption this may cause. We thank you in advance for your patience as we work to improve Hubway for all riders.


    If you have any questions, please reach Hubway customer service by calling 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929) or writing to customerservice@thehubway.com. Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    [Mentor Blogs - Colin Walls] Go Bike!

    The following article was originally published by Colin Walls in Mentor Blogs on May 14th, 2015.

    There is an old cliché, which says that the point of traveling is not to reach a destination, but to experience the journey. And I think there may be a lot of truth in that. This is the reason why driving a car is my least favorite way of getting around. When driving, almost all one’s attention is needed to control the car, so there is little opportunity to look around. Public transportation [bus, train, airplane or even taxi] is better because someone else is doing the driving. The best way to fully appreciate an environment is to walk – and I do a lot of that. However, there are limits to the distance one can cover in a limited time. So, the ideal compromise, IMHO, is a bicycle …

    I have a bike at home, but I rarely use it. My usual excuses are that the roads around here are not very bicycle friendly [traffic and hills] and my bike is a bit old and clunky – only some of the gears work. For some time, I have been promising myself that I’ll get an new bike, which will motivate me to get out on it.

    When we are on vacation, renting bicycles is something we have done in a number of places. I believe the first time was in San Francisco. I have walked over the Golden Gate Bridge lots of times – but cycling was a great new experience. On another occasion we were on Formentera [a small island off of Ibiza] and the rep told us that a bike was a great way to go anywhere on the island, except “up there” – she pointed towards La Mola, the one hill at the end of the island. I took this as a challenge, instead of a warning, and decided to give it a go. My wife was very supportive and took the bus to meet me at the top. I made it. Halfway up I thought that I was going to die, but, after a rest, I was fine. The highlight was coming down again, when I met a group of much younger cyclists pushing their bikes up the hill.

    Another vacation was a cycling tour of Syria – sadly not an option any more. That country made sense for bikes, as there were not too many hills. Touring in cities, like Berlin, is also great if they have cycle lanes etc. and are reasonably flat. Last week we were in Boston [which is quite level]. I was there for work, but I had some free time. My wife looked at bike availability and suitability and made a great discovery …

    It seems that, some years ago, Boston was cited as the least bike-friendly city in North America [or something along those lines]. The mayor decided to fix that. Lots of cycle lanes and routes were set up and an automated, short-term bicycle renting system installed, called Hubway. [Many other cities have similar systems, with varying success.]

    The system is based around a great number of bike parking stations, each of which accommodates around 10-20 bikes. Although they are not immediately noticeable, wherever you are in Boston, it appears, you are not far from a Hubway station. The easiest way to work with the system is to get the free smartphone app. This shows a map, indicating your location as a blue blob in the center of the screen.


    Nearby Hubway stations are shown by little markers. Initially, the nearest one is colored orange. At the bottom of the screen it shows how far away this station is and in what direction. It also indicates how many bikes are parked there and how many empty slots are available. Touching one of the other [green] stations makes it turn orange and its information is displayed.


    An alternative display gives you a simple pointer to guide you to the nearest station. This would work well if you could clip the phone to the handlebars and follow its guidance. [It would be rather handy if the bikes had a little dynamo with a USB power outlet …]

    To rent a bike, you just need to go to a station and buy a pass for, say, 24 hours. This costs $6 – longer durations are cheaper pro rata. You do not actually get a pass – the system simply uses the credit card as ID thereafter. Incidentally, it requests a phone number and ZIP code, which we did not have; I found that any numbers entered would keep it happy. When you are ready to take a bike, you swipe the card and receive a 5-digit code. You select a bike, enter the code and the bike is released. Just adjust the saddle height and you are off.

    The loan period is up to 30 minutes, which is fine for hopping from one station to another, even at quite long distances across the city. If you exceed the time, an extra $2 is charged, but this is not very likely to occur. When you arrive at the station, returning the bike is just a question of pushing it firmly into the stand. You can take and return bikes as many times as you like over the term of your pass.

    We really enjoyed using this facility and would recommend it, if you are visiting Boston at an appropriate time of year. Although people said that the traffic was unfriendly, I had no problems at all. We were staying in the center of the city, which is a $12 cab ride from the Convention Center, where I was working. One morning, I realized that I still had some time on my bike pass, so I cycled there [only 2.5 miles] – there is a station right outside the entrance. I hope that my employers appreciate my money saving activity!

    BTW, I just checked the app on my phone from the comfort of my desk. It tells me that the nearest Hubway station is 3200 miles West.

    updated MEMBER PERK: FREE tix for WGBH BostonTalks: The Bicycle Revolution, Thursday, May 14th


    BostonTalks: The Bicycle Revolution

    May 14, 2015, 7-9pm
    WGBH Studios



    A Smarter Happy Hour
    Grab your friends and join us for WGBH’s take on happy hour — inspiring conversation plus wine and local craft brews for $5 a glass. Hear from and connect with local experts in a variety of fields while enjoying the great company of your neighbors from Boston and beyond.


    Click here to get your FREE tickets!
    Hubway members get FREE tickets—make sure to use promo code HAPPYHOUR


    BostonTalks: The Bicycle Revolution
    Now bigger than ever in Boston — where the “Car is no longer the king” — bicycling is a hot topic in and outside the city. Cambridge Hubway and Transportation Program Manager Cara Seiderman will discuss the popularity of cycling and bike sharing — the new way to get around. Co-Founder and CEO, Slava Menn, tells the story of how Fortified Bicycle got their start. And the founder of the bike tourism company Bikabout, Megan Ramey, will share why she believes biking is the best way to see a city and help its economy. Join Cara, Slava and Megan for an in-depth look at the bicycle revolution.
    Meet the Host
    Edgar Herwick is the guy behind WGBH’s Curiosity Desk, where the quest is to dig a little deeper into (and sometimes look a little askew at) topics in the news, and search for answers to questions posed by the world around us. His features can be seen on WGBH’s Greater Boston and heard on 89.7 WGBH’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered. He also appears regularly with Jim Braude and Margery Eagan on Boston Public Radio. Follow him on Twitter @ebherwick3.
    More About the Series
    BostonTalks is throwing the formal panel discussion out the window. Each event combines short speaking programs, drinks, and a chance for you to join the conversation. Think happy hour, but smarter.

    [Boston Globe Magazine] A Bike Ride a Day Keeps the Doctor Away

    The following is an excerpt from an article that was originally published by in the Boston Globe Magazine on May 8th, 2015.

    Cutting-edge medical procedures and novel prescriptions for health

    New drugs and cancer treatments aren’t the only medical breakthroughs. Surgeons are using 3-D printers, dentists are using lasers, and Boston Medical Center is prescribing bikes.

    A BIKE RIDE A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY

    At Boston Medical Center, doctors write prescriptions for medications, groceries, and, now, bicycles. The hospital and the City of Boston launched a “Prescribe a Bike” program last spring, offering low-income patients a $5 a year pass to access the Hubway bike-sharing system. BMC says doctors can prescribe inexpensive exercise to patients with diabetes, high cholesterol, heart disease, and other chronic conditions. Patients are allowed an unlimited number of rides of up to 60 minutes.

    “This is a very innovative and cost-effective way to help our patients get exercise,” says BMC’s Dr. Alan Meyers, who spearheaded the program.

    BMC has pioneered the idea of unorthodox prescriptions. Similarly, doctors also give prescriptions for fruits, vegetables, and other healthy foods that patients pick up at a food pantry twice a month.

    [Scout Somerville] Rush Hour Race Will Answer The Question: Whose Commute Is Quickest?

    The following article was originally published by Emily Cassel in Scout Somerville Beat on May 7th, 2015.


    Driving, biking, the MBTA—there are plenty of ways for Boston’s commuters to get to and from the office, but which is the fastest? The 2015 Rush Hour Race, which returns to Boston for the third time this year, will attempt to determine just that, by pitting a cyclist and a Hubway rider against a T rider and a driver to see who can make the shortest trip from downtown Boston to Union Square in Somerville.

    The race kicks off at the Howard Stein Hudson building on the corner of Beacon and Tremont Street, where participants will sit at desks until 6 p.m. as if this was an average workday. When the clock strikes six, they’ll slip downstairs, find their mode of transportation and race one another to Union Square Plaza.

    “The idea really is to promote alternative transportation and try to get people thinking about different ways of traveling in Boston,” says Somerville Bicycle Committee secretary Ken Carlson, who brought the Rush Hour Race to the city in 2012. “I think people who bike and people who already take alternative modes know that driving is the most frustrating way to get around Boston. It’s a much smaller city on a bicycle.”

    According to Carlson, the race is an attempt to encourage people who aren’t yet bike commuters to embrace their bicycles by showing them examples of ordinary people who get around the city on two wheels. In fact, this year’s cycling representative is a woman who’s relatively new to bike commuting. “We’re not looking to have Lycra-clad young men zipping through the streets,” he says with a laugh. “She’s a great example of … a person who just took up bike commuting and really loves this.”

    Unofficial riders are welcome to race alongside the participating riders, and you don’t have to race to join in on the fun—stop by Union Square Plaza from 5:30 until 9 p.m. to enjoy Pretty Things beer and food from local vendors. The 6 p.m. start of the 2015 Rush Hour Race sets it apart from the first two competitions, which began at Redbones Barbecue and tackled the morning commute. Wrapping up the race in the evening in the evening gives commuters and community members a chance to talk transportation modes over brews and food. Carlson explains that this is a great opportunity for those who don’t yet travel by bicycle to talk to members of the cycling community. “You start realizing, ‘Wow, there are other people doing this,’” he says. “And then you start talking about, ‘Oh, what do you wear when it rains? You biked all winter, how do you do that? You bike at night? What kind of lights do you have?’ That makes it all much more manageable and makes it much more accessible.”

    Carlson isn’t making any predictions about who will win—history has shown that the race will be tight—though he admits that between traffic and having to find a parking space, the driver’s chances are slightly worse. The cyclist won the first Rush Hour Race, and the MBTA rider took home bragging rights in the second one (but only because the MBTA rider “walked right out and, boom, caught a T,” says Carlson). The driver has always finished dead last, though Carlson is quick to point out that the race isn’t an attempt to shame motorists. Encouraging people to use other modes of transportation benefits drivers too—the more people who opt to take the T or ride their bike, the less congested the roadways will be.

    Ultimately, the goal is to dispel the idea that cyclists in the city are “college kids who have a death wish,” says Carlson, who adds that he knows people from retirees to young parents and their children who cycle through the city.

    “You don’t have to have specialized muscles or a death wish to be a bike commuter,” he says.

    The 2015 Rush Hour Race departs from 1 Beacon St. Plaza at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, May 12 and wraps up at Union Square Plaza in Somerville. Find more information on the race here, and check out bios of this year’s participants below.

    Kristjan Varnick, Hubway rider: Any day I get to ride, is a good day. Cycling has been part of my commute for over 8 years. I currently ride from Somerville to downtown Boston. Everything thing in the area is only a few miles apart, and cycling is the best way to get around. Watching the number of riders, bike lanes and events in the area take off, has been unbelievable. Living near Hubway is a huge plus.  I’ve taken over 300 rides with Hubway. In the wintertime, I take Hubway to the Red Line from Inman Square.  In the summertime, Hubway is my favorite way to zip around Boston. There is tons of great cycling in the Boston area. Do Hub on Wheels. Try Hubway. Go. Ride. More.

    Jeremy Mendelson, transit rider: Jeremy is a transit service planner and co-founder of Transit Matters, an organization dedicated to improving public transportation system by making the MBTA more effective, convenient and affordable. He has designed bus and rail networks for transit agencies, toured dozens of cities and towns to study their transportation networks, and written extensively about transit planning, street design, bicycle and pedestrian safety, and social and environmental justice.

    When not waiting for a bus at Dudley Square, you can find Jeremy transporting things by bike, exploring new neighborhoods or scheming to make bus travel fast and easy. Follow him on Twitter @CriticalTransit.

    Mark Gravallese, motorist: Mark has over 14 years of experience in managing the development and sequencing of roadway, tunnel, facility and bridge projects. As the former MassDOT District 6 Projects Engineer, Mark’s expertise lays in the review, examination, and approval/ disapproval of complex and diversified engineering data, such as design plans, specifications, contracts, and bids. During his tenure at MassDOT, he routinely demonstrated his ability to work collaboratively with all engineering disciplines within the Highway Districts, MassDOT headquarters, MBTA, municipalities, contractors, design consultants, and other Federal and State agencies and authorities.

    As HSH’s Manager of Public Infrastructure, Mark provides guidance to communities relating to MassDOT policies, engineering standards, planning, and funding to design cost-effective and context-sensitive projects. He specializes in managing complex urban infrastructure projects focusing on progressive designs that fit today’s transportation landscape and are sustainable for the future.

    Ariel Horowitz, cyclist: Ariel Horowitz is a relatively new bike commuter riding a really old bike. Ariel just finished her doctorate in chemical engineering at Tufts. Her normal cycling turf is in Greater Camberville. She restarted cycling as an adult after being charmed by the Google bikes during a visit to the Googleplex in Mountain View, CA, and has been delightedly tooling around ever since. Ariel lives in Somerville with her fiance and two cats.

    Come Join Your Community: Bike In Cambridge spring 2015 station posters

    If you #TakeHubway in Cambridge, you’ll be seeing these posters on the opposite sides of the map frames at each of the Hubway stations. Learn more about riding in Cambridge at cambridgema.gov/bike. Scroll below for larger versions!

    [Somerville Beat] Cycling in the City: Somerville Shops & Resources

    The following article was originally published by Elyse Andrews in Somerville Beat on April 29th, 2015.

    It took me a while to get really comfortable riding a bike in the city after I moved to Somerville. I had little (OK, no) city biking experience and was really intimidated by the other cyclists, pedestrians and cars. After lots of local rides, I got confident enough to venture farther and farther from home. That was until I got in a bike/pedestrian accident nearly two years ago.

    With my confidence shaken, I sort of gave up biking for a while. But I last summer I got back on the wagon bike and I’m so glad I did! Being a cyclist in the city can be scary at times, but it’s also really liberating (you can always find a parking spot), it’s good exercise, it’s environmentally friendly and it’s fun. So if you’re looking to start biking or get back on your bike after a hiatus, here are some resources in Somerville to get you started.

    Bike Shops
    Ace Wheelworks (145 Elm St.): With two locations in the area (the other is in Belmont), Wheelworks has lots of bikes, gear, a repair shop and friendly service to get you going. This is a great place to get started if you’re new to biking or get your bike tuned up if it’s been stashed for a while.

    Bicycle Belle (368 Beacon St.): Opened in 2013, Bicycle Belle sells bikes specifically for use in the city with accessories like kickstands and racks for carrying cargo. And the shop has a big focus on biking with kids.

    Bike Boom (389 Highland Ave.): Located in Davis Square, Bike Boom specializes in restoring used, high-quality commuter and recreational bikes. The shop also offers repairs and tune-ups.

    Paramount Bicycle (104 Bristol Road): Blink and you’ll miss this small shop in Ball Square, but make sure you don’t because owner Tyler has lots of great biking knowledge to share. He helped my husband build some custom wheels a few years ago and provided some helpful advice to go along with them.

    Somervelo (361 Somerville Ave.): The new kid on the block in the Somerville cycling scene, this Union Square shop does repairs and tune-ups, builds wheels and sells bikes. And you can book your next appointment online.

    Resources
    Artisan’s Asylum Bicycle Building and Maintenance Classes: Somerville’s makerspace Artisan’s Asylum (10 Tyler St.) offers a plethora of classes in a variety of subjects including bike building and maintenance. Learn the basics of taking good care of your bike, build your own wheel, get a handle on winter biking and more.

    Hubway: With the introduction of the Hubway bike-sharing system in Boston it’s easy to get around on two wheels even if you don’t actually own a bike. Hubway has pick-up and drop-off locations all over the city and a variety of membership options, which makes getting around by bike extra easy.

    Minuteman Bikeway: This 10-mile long path starts at the Alewife MBTA Station in Cambridge and winds through Arlington and Lexington before ending in Bedford. Somerville residents can pick up the path in Davis behind the College Avenue MBTA stop. The paved, gently rolling bikeway makes a great place to ride with plenty of places to stop along the way for a picnic or break.

    Somerville Bicycle Committee: This group works to improve biking conditions in Somerville, help implement policy and programs and promote cycling as a means of transportation in the city, among other things. The Somerville Bicycle Committee puts on all kinds of events, like group rides that happen several times a year, and has meetings on the third Tuesday of the month from 7 p.m.-9 p.m. in the basement conference room at City Hall (93 Highland Ave.) that are free and open to the public.

    Pedal Power: Why Biking Is A Public Health Winner

    The folks at Online Masters in Public Health have recently produced an infographic, Pedal Power, included below, that we thought you might find interesting. Click here to see the original article and learn more about Online Masters in Public Health.


    Courtesy of Online Masters in Public Health.

    Station Alert: Newbury / Hereford station is open in Back Bay

    Station Alert: Effective Tuesday afternoon, April 28th, the Newbury St / Hereford St Hubway station is open and operational. This is a 19-dock station located on the northeast corner of the intersection of Newbury & Hereford, across the street from the Boston Architectural College.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Boylston / Berkeley station is open in Back Bay

    Station Alert: Effective Tuesday afternoon, April 28th, the Boylston St / Berkeley St Hubway station is open and operational. This is a 15-dock station located on the south side of Boylston, just west of Berkeley Street.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Mobilizing the Region] Can Philadelphia's Bike Share Be an Example for Citi Bike's New Leadership?

    The following article was originally published by Matthew Norris in the Mobilizing the Region on April 28th, 2015.

    Philadelphia’s Indego bike share network was officially launched last week with over 600 bicycles connecting various corners of the city. Mayor Michael Nutter and hundreds of bicycle enthusiasts came out to celebrate the opening of the system with a ceremonial ride from the Philadelphia Museum of Art to many of the 60 docking stations scattered across various neighborhoods.

    Indego is unique in that it is the first system in the United States that was launched from the start to allow riders to utilize the system without needing to have a credit card (Boston’s Hubway and Washington D.C.’s Capital Bikeshare now offer limited cash payment options, but there are geographic and income-level restrictions for this privilege). Over a third of Indego’s docking stations are located in low-income neighborhoods, and those without credit cards can sign up for a $15 30-day membership, which allows for unlimited one-hour rides. Cash users receive a key fob in the mail that grants access to bike share stations, and payments can be made at any local 7-Eleven or Family Dollar store.

    Philadelphia already has by far the highest bicycle commuting rate of the ten largest US cities—2.3 times higher per capita than New York City’s bike commute rate. With a planned threefold expansion of Indego’s network in the next three years, along with the continuing growth of area bike lanes and the Circuit regional trail network, many pieces are coming into place to make Philadelphia a world class bicycling city. If Indego is successful, the program may offer a number of lessons for cities across the country in how to implement a truly equitable bike share system. Especially New York City.

    Since its launch, New York City’s Citi Bike program has suffered its fair share of criticism for failing to to make itself more accessible to low income residents of the five boroughs, who often have the longest commutes and fewest transit options. And while it is in the process of doubling the size of its network and expanding beyond lower Manhattan and brownstone Brooklyn over the next two years, unlike Indego, Citi Bike program receives no public subsidies—a sore spot for many, as it has resulted in greater reliance on corporate sponsorship and membership cost increases and has been an impediment to the program’s expansion. Citi Bike currently offers a $60 discounted membership for qualifying users, as long as they have a credit card. And those who don’t want to pay the annual membership rate must still use a credit card to pay for hourly or daily passes and have a $101 security deposit placed on the card until the bike is returned.

    The good news is that Citi Bike’s new leadership is prioritizing a system overhaul and technology and design upgrades, in addition to focusing on private local sponsorship opportunities and corporate collaborations to promote the brand and bring in more revenue. While these changes will increase confidence in Citi Bike and encourage more widespread use, the next focus should be on how to match Philly’s efforts to make bike share an affordable option in low-income neighborhoods.

    Station Alert: Washington Square station returns to Brookline

    Station Alert: Effective Tuesday morning, April 28th, the Washington Square Hubway station is open and operational. This is a 15-dock station located on the median on Beacon Street at Washington. Please note: the docks are facing the opposite direction from previous years.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: Harvard Square's Gund Hall station crosses the plaza

    Station Move Alert: Effective Tuesday morning, April 28th, the Harvard Square - Gund Hall Hubway station has moved to the Cambridge Street side of the plaza at Quincy St & Kirkland St. The new location for this 15-dock station is visible from the former location.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Red Sox to Offer Free Bike Valet Service, Presented by New Balance, for Every Home Game Starting May 19

    The following press release was originally published on RedSox.com on April 27th, 2015.

    BOSTON, MA - Beginning Tuesday, May 19, the Red Sox will offer bike valet service for ticket holders who ride their two-wheelers to Fenway Park for games.

    “Fenway Park Bike Valet,” presented by New Balance, was successfully piloted at weekend home games in July, August, and September of 2014. The service has now been expanded to include all home games this season.

    Those who wish to bike to the ballpark can drop off their bikes with a valet attendant outside Gate D on the corner of Yawkey Way and Van Ness Street. Bike Valet is available 1 ½ hours before the game and closes a half hour after the game. The service is free for all ticketed fans.

    The Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition (MassBike) will oversee the operation, providing a safe, fenced-off area for bikes to be stored. Fans will be given a claim check for easy retrieval. 

    May 19 begins a six-game homestand against the Texas Rangers and the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

    The Red Sox are one of five Major League Baseball teams providing bike valet service. Other clubs include the San Francisco Giants, Miami Marlins, Washington Nationals, and the Chicago Cubs.

    Station Alert: Three stations return to the Back Bay

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 24th, the following three stations in Boston’s Back Bay are now open and fully operational:

  • Boylston at Fairfield: This is a 15-dock station near the Apple Store on Boylston.


  • New Balance Store: This is a 15-dock station between Dartmouth & Clarendon, across Boylston from Copley Square, and directly in front of New Balance store at 583 Boylston Street.


  • Boston Public Library: This is a 25-dock station directly in front of the Boston Public Library across Dartmouth from Copley Square.


  • Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Kenmore Square station is back

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 24th, the Kenmore Square Hubway station is open and operational. This is a 19-dock station located on the eastbound side of Commonwealth Avenue, near its intersection with Brookline Avenue and Beacon Street.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Go the Safe Way on Hubway: tips for safe cycling

    #TakeHubway for a safe ride! Some reminders, as sent via mail to all new Hubway members:

    Click here to read about safety features on a Hubway bike and more safety tips! Thanks for using Hubway safely!

    [San Jose Mercury News] Travel Top 10: Bike-share Cities

    The following list was originally published in the San Jose Mercury News on April 22nd, 2015.

    Bike hikes

    Sometimes the best way to see a city is on foot—and sometimes, with feet planted happily atop bicycle pedals. More than 50 U.S. cities offer bicycle-sharing programs these days, and these 10 make it particularly easy for travelers to borrow a bike and hit the road, according to USA Today:

    1. New York City’s Citi Bike
    2. Washington, D.C.‘s Capital Bikeshare
    3. Chicago’s Divvy
    4. Texas’ Austin B-cycle
    5. Minneapolis-St. Paul’s Nice Ride Minnesota
    6. Boston’s Hubway
    7. San Francisco and the South Bay’s Bay Area Bike Share
    8. Denver B-cycle
    9. North Carolina’s Charlotte B-cycle
    10. Tennessee’s Bike Chattanooga

    Station Alert: Dudley Square station returns to Roxbury

    Station Alert: Effective Tuesday afternoon, April 21st, the Dudley Square Hubway station in Roxbury, is open and operational. This is a 15-dock station.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Franklin St / Arch St station returns today

    Station Alert: Effective Tuesday morning, April 21st, the Franklin St / Arch St Hubway station in Boston, is open and operational. This is a 23-dock station, located downtown.


    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Boston Globe] Hubway bike-share program returns amid growing popularity

    The following article was originally published by Catherine Cloutier in The Boston Globe on April 17th, 2015.

    Boston’s Hubway bike-sharing program began its fifth season of full operation Friday, offering residents and visitors an active alternative for public transportation.

    The program never really shut down for the winter, though. It kept its 32 stations in Cambridge open, along with some in Boston, citing high demand.

    Since its creation in July 2011, the bike-sharing program has grown steadily in its annual number of members, trips, and miles traveled.

    Originally just in Boston, the program expanded as far as Somerville and Brookline, and more than doubled the number of its stations and bicycles. By the end of its third season, the system covered about 20 square miles, according to Hubway.

    Users can sign up for a membership online or purchase a day pass at a station’s machine. From there, they can take the bike to commute or run errands, and when they are finished, return it to any station.

    In 2014, the system had 12,673 members, up from 7,042 two years prior, according to Hubway.

    The growth in Boston is part of a larger trend: more US cities and residents are using bike-sharing programs.

    In 2010, there were five bike-sharing programs in the United States, according to data from the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center. By this year, 47 cities and regions had bike sharing.

    Many bike-sharing operators have programs in multiple cities. Hubway’s operator Motivate, for example, also oversees bike-sharing programs in the nine other cities, including New York, Washington, and Chicago.

    The type of program, which has been around in other countries since the middle of the 20th century, saw particular growth in the United States in 2012 and 2013, according to a study on bike sharing by the Mineta Transportation Institute.

    In all, public bike-sharing programs exist on five continents and 712 cities.

    In the United States and elsewhere, universities and colleges also operate bike-sharing programs. Three institutions in Massachusetts — Hampshire College, University of Massachusetts Lowell, and Wellesley College — have a combined 50 bicycles for student use.

    The Metropolitan Area Planning Council, which coordinates the Hubway system, said a large proportion of Hubway trips are taken in conjunction with public transit.

    For cities, bike-sharing programs can reduce traffic, use of fossil fuels, and pressure on the parking supply, a report by the Federal Highway Administration found. On top of that, the report found, the implementation and operational costs of these programs are fairly low.

    In the United States, most of the bike-sharing programs are operated in larger cities or tourist destinations. For most of them, there are 3½ to five bike-sharing stations per square mile of the service area, according to the Federal Highway Administration report.

    The number of bicycles per 100,000 residents is higher in most touristy areas, like Aspen, Colo., and Long Beach, N.Y., whereas the country’s largest cities, like New York and Chicago, offer the greatest numbers of bicycles and stations.

    The cost and cost structures of these program vary, but most offer both an annual membership and a day pass.

    Hubway is continuing to expand in the area. Boston and Cambridge have plans for new stations later this season, the system reported.

    In a statement last week, Mayor Martin J. Walsh called the program’s growth “a testament to its importance in moving people around the area.”

    “The return of the bikes has become a real sign of spring for the region,” Walsh added.


    Three Cambridge Station Alerts: Dana Park, Lafayette Square, Kennedy School

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 17th, the Hubway station at Dana Park in the Cambridgeport region of Cambridge, which had been removed for the winter season, has been redeployed and is open & operational. The Dana Park Hubway station is a 19-dock station, located on Lawrence Street between Pearl and Magazine, adjacent to Dana Park.


    Station Move Alert: Beginning Friday, April 17th, the Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main St / Columbia St Hubway station in Cambridge will move across the street, returning to its seasonal on-street location. Please note: This station has also expanded from 15 to 19 docks.



    Station Move Alert: On Friday, April 17th, the Harvard Kennedy School Hubway station was relocated to JFK Street, behind the MBTA bus shelter, against the building.



    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: Faneuil Hall [Boston]

    Station Move Alert: Beginning Friday, April 17th, the Faneuil Hall Hubway station in Boston, previously located at the intersection of Union and North Streets, will be placed in its new location on the backside of Government Center on Congress Street. The station will also be expanded the following week to its original 19 docks.

    During the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.


    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    Hubway reopens system-wide today!


    #TakeHubway system-wide, as of Friday, April 17th!

    Click here to view the station map of all available stations, docks, and bikes, or use the Spotcycle app from your tablet or phone.

    It’s a little wet out there—ride safely!

    Sign up to get an alert the moment the full-system reopens!

    Hubway is about to formally reopen full-system operations for its 5th season, as Boston-, Brookline-, and Somerville-based stations rejoin Cambridge on Friday, April 17th!

    Want to be the first to know when you can #TakeHubway system-wide? Click here to sign up to receive an email system alert the moment stations open.

    As usual, we’ll also publish specific station and system alerts here on the Hubway website, as well as Hubway’s facebook page and twitter profile. And you can always visit our Station Map or use Spotcycle to see which stations are currently open and have dock/bike availability.

    [Boston Business Journal] 5 Things You Need To Know Today (the bikes are back)

    The following excerpt is from an article originally published by Doug Banks in Boston Business Journal on April 15th, 2015.

    Good morning, Boston! Here are the five most important things you need to know to help start your busy business day:
    The bikes are back: Hubway start date is this week
    One more sign spring may actually be here: The appearance of Hubway bike docks in Boston. The bike-sharing system is set to start up again on Friday in the city. The Boston stations had been closed since Dec. 31, 2014. The Cambridge portion of the Hubway system — 32 stations in total — was open year-round for the second year in a row.

    [Boston Business Journal] Hubway prepares for April 17 start date

    The following was originally published by W. Marc Bernsau as a slideshow in Boston Business Journal on April 15th, 2015.



    One more sign spring may actually be here is the appearance of Hubway bike docks around the area. Station technicians Lindsey Daman and Tom Langelier set up a station on Pearl Street in Post Office Square. Now that spring is here, Hubway bike stations are starting to appear around the area. The Cambridge part of the Hubway system — which includes 32 stations — was open year-round for the second year in a row. The Boston-based stations have been closed since Dec. 31, 2014. Some facts: > In the summer of 2012, the system expanded to the Cities of Cambridge and Somerville, and to the Town of Brookline. > By the end of 2013, the system footprint covered approximately 20 square miles. > Hubway is owned by the governments of the Cities of Boston, Cambridge, and Somerville, and by the Town of Brookline. The Metropolitan Area Planning Council oversees the interaction and use between municipalities. > Hubway is operated by Motivate, which operates bikeshare systems around the world, including Capital Bikeshare in the D.C.-metro area, San Francisco’s Bay Area Bike Share, and Chicago’s Divvy Bikes. Each system has a different operating profile based on the scale.



    Hubway station technician Tom Langelier makes an adjustment to one of the bike docks at the station being set up on Pearl Street in Post Office Square.



    Hubway station technicians Tom Langelier and Lindsey Daman check the pay center at the station they set up on Pearl Street in Post Office Square.



    Each Hubway bike dock has to be calibrated -as Lindsey Daman places a bike in the dock Tom Langelier checks the pay center at the station set up on Pearl Street in Post Office Square.



    Can it be biking season is actually here? Hubway Station Technician Lindsey Daman calibrates a bike dock at the station on Pearl Street in Post Office Square in preparation for bicycle availability starting April 17th.

    Updates to User Agreement & Privacy Policy


    We’re updating the Hubway Privacy Policy and Bicycle Rental Agreement, Liability Waiver and Release to clarify that Hubway is owned by a number of municipalities (currently Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville)(the “Municipalities”) and operated by Motivate International Inc. (“Motivate”). As the owners of Hubway, the Municipalities are also the owners of the data that Motivate collects on their behalf. The changes provide that Motivate may share Hubway user data with, or as directed by, the Municipalities for the purposes explained in the updated Privacy Policy and Bicycle Rental Agreement, Liability Waiver and Release.

    View the new Privacy Policy here.
    View the new User Agreement here.

    These updates go into effect Monday, April 20, 2015, for current members, and immediately for new annual and monthly members who join beginning April 15, 2015.

    [Boston Herald] As You Were Saying... Steering Boston toward safe biking

    The following article was originally published by Emily Garr Pacetti in The Boston Herald on April 11th, 2015.

    As a bike commuter in Washington, D.C., Cleveland and now Boston, I have witnessed growing animosity between drivers and cyclists that is misplaced. Cyclists are frustrated with the perceived lack of respect by drivers. Drivers complain that cyclists do not respect the rules of the road.

    We each miss the point. Today’s roads and the rules that govern them were designed for a different era. It’s time that roads accommodate both cars and cyclists, and protected bike lanes are a good start.

    More bikes will roll onto the roads this spring, continuing an upward trend in the Boston area and around the country. According to Boston Bikes, the city has seen the number of estimated daily bike trips double since 2007, to about 80,000 people on bikes in 2014.

    Cyclists like me will once again squeeze by you drivers at red lights, zip past you in traffic jams and roll by you at stop signs. You might wait patiently to pass, or whiz by without a second thought.

    Unfortunately since 2010, 11 cyclists have died from clashes with motor vehicles, as reported by the mayor’s office last fall. And according to an analysis by the state Department of Transportation last year, 70 percent of bike-related collisions resulted in injuries.

    Kate Albertin, 29, was one of those cyclists. Last October she was riding from her home in Dorchester to school one morning when she was hit by an SUV that rolled through a stop sign. Albertin was thrown onto the hood of the car, sustaining severe knee and leg injuries. She is still recovering from those injuries. Albertin said that sometimes she just wished that drivers would treat her as if she were their son or daughter.

    “I’m a person. I don’t have a metal cage around me,” she said.

    Legally, however, she might as well have. Her bike was treated as a vehicle from the stop sign to the accident report.

    Albertin doesn’t plan to ride in Boston again.

    One way to make the roads safer for her and others is for cities to construct more protected bike lanes, such as the one Boston Mayor Marty Walsh is proposing for a section of Commonwealth Avenue. Protected bike lanes use physical barriers like parked cars or flex-posts to separate bikes from car traffic. They are a safer, more inviting option for cyclists — and less of a nuisance to drivers.

    And they work.

    A study of 30 miles of protected bike lanes in New York City credits them with reducing serious injuries to cyclists by 75 percent.

    A growing inventory of protected bike lanes is tracked by the charitable foundation PeopleForBikes, which also lists lanes on Western Avenue and Mount Vernon Street in Boston, and Concord, Vassar and Ames streets in Cambridge. According to the PeopleForBikes’ recent report, “Boston has more potential for bike improvements than any other large city in the United States.”

    Protected bike lanes are an opportunity for drivers and cyclists alike to make commuting safer and more enjoyable.

    Let’s make it safe for people like Kate Albertin to get on their bikes again — and welcome others to do the same.

    [WBUR] Hubway bike sharing system to reopen April 17

    The following article was originally published on WBUR.org on April 9th, 2015.

    Hubway, the Boston area’s bike sharing system, is set to reopen for spring on April 17.

    All stations with the exception of 13 along the Boston Marathon route will be ready for the morning commute next Friday. Those 13 will reopen after the April 20 race.

    Most of the 140 stations Hubway operates were closed for the winter, except for 32 stations in Cambridge.

    Hubway says those 32 stations averaged about 1,900 trips per week between January and March, despite four separate shutdowns due to the winter’s record-setting snowfall.

    The number of stations in operation this season — 140 — is the same as last year, though Hubway says plans are in the works to add new stations in Boston and Cambridge.

    “The return of bikes has become a real sign of spring for the region, and we’re eager for system expansion later in the season that will continue to improve the way people move about the city,” Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said in a statement.

    Hubway says details about new stations will be released later.

    [Boston Globe] Hubway returns April 17

    The following article was originally published by Nicole Dungca in The Boston Globe on April 9th, 2015.

    Most of the stations of Hubway, the region’s bike-share system, will reopen April 17 after many closed for the winter. Thirteen stations along or adjacent to the Boston Marathon route will remain closed until after the April 20 race. Hubway began operating in the region in 2011 and now includes 140 stations and more than 1,300 bikes in Boston, Cambridge, Brookline, and Somerville. Hubway regularly shuts down most of its operations for the winter, when riders are less likely to take advantage of the system. The system closed most of its stations in November, though for the past two winters, Cambridge has kept most of its stations open. This past winter, Boston also started keeping some stations open. Officials from Somerville have also said they are considering whether to keep stations open year-round.

    [Harvard Sustainability News] Biking Her Own Path

    An interview with Harvard alum and Hubway General Manager Emily Stapleton

    The following interview was originally published by Jahred Liddie on Harvard Sustainability News on April 3rd, 2015.

    The Hubway bike share system has grown in popularity and size since its inception in 2011. Its General Manager, Emily Stapleton, earned her undergraduate degree in psychology at Harvard in 2005, and later completed her MBA at Harvard Business School in 2011. She has also held positions at RelayRides, a peer-to-peer car sharing service and Bauer’s Intelligent Transportation, a motor coach company. Jahred Liddie, College ‘16, recently interviewed Emily about her interest in sustainable transportation and her journey out of the College and into the professional world.

    Jahred: Let’s start broad. What motivates your interest in sustainability and transportation?

    Emily: To me, transportation is fundamental. People need to get to work, to school, to the grocery store, to visit family and friends, and to explore the communities around them. Instead of being a source of major frustration, I think transportation can be active, enjoyable, and sustainable. Transportation is a sector that can have one of the largest impacts on reduction of the use of fossil fuels. 

    Jahred: Give us a little more information about your professional life. Where has your professional trajectory taken you since graduating from the Business School?

    Emily: When I left HBS, I took a summer internship at the start-up of a fellow HBS’er, Shelby Clark (HBS ’10). He had founded RelayRides while a Business School student and by the time I joined the team full-time, the company was headed for a nation-wide launch of a service that began only in Boston-metro and San Francisco. My primary focus at RelayRides was Trust and Safety, including vetting of riders and establishing a rating system for car renters and car owners.

    Jahred: Why Hubway?

    Emily: I personally am a bicycle commuter, and I see the huge benefit in riding a bicycle around the city. The bicycle is often the fastest way to get around, and riding also helps improve fitness and engagement with the physical environment. Hubway bicycle sharing has added a new dimension to the metro-Boston transportation network. It is an efficient mode of transportation that allows people the freedom to take one-way trips, ditch their cars in favor of linking commuter rail or T with Hubway, or take a leisurely ride along the Esplanade.

    Jahred: What’s a day in the life of the General Manager at Hubway?

    Emily: My days consist of collaborating with my clients, my team, and the rest of the Motivate staff operating bike share across the country. Hubway is a program owned by the municipalities of Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline, so as the operator of Hubway, I coordinate with the municipalities on strategic questions for the system, such as expansion planning. I coordinate with my team on staffing plans, inventory management, operations plans, and marketing plans; I manage the system’s budget and address its legal needs, such as creating license agreements with private property holders in order to operate on their property. Motivate operates bike share systems across the country, so I regularly share best practices with my peers in other markets.

    Jahred: How do you think Harvard has equipped you in your professional life? What resources did you find useful at Harvard (and beyond) in navigating the working world?

    Emily: In both my undergraduate studies as a psychology concentrator and as a business school student, the importance of data analysis was always emphasized—the ability to substantiate a hypothesis with facts gained through a combination of quantitative analysis and experimentation. Further, psychology taught me how to build successful teams and better understand others’ working styles and motivations; business school taught me how to incorporate many different perspectives into one constructive conversation.

    Jahred: If you had to give one bit of advice to a student interested in a career in sustainability, transportation, or business, what would it be?

    Emily: It is helpful to have exploratory conversations with many different people. In my time at Harvard College and Harvard Business School, I really utilized the resources available in Career Services and the advising programs. I also utilized Crimson Compass to reach out to alumni in my industry, who were very generous with their time and advice. Further, I cross-registered for a transportation class at the Kennedy School during grad school and took a class on cities at the Design School during undergrad. Utilize all the resources this great university has to offer, and do not underestimate the value of volunteering in your industry in addition to seeking internships and full time jobs.

    Bonus Tip: Harvard offers a discounted Hubway membership for all Harvard affiliates. LEARN MORE.

    [Mother Nature Network] 12 Reasons to Start Using a Bicycle for Transportation

    The following editorial was originally published by Chris Baskind on Mother Nature Network on March 18, 2010.

    We’re continuing our look at smart ways to start saddling up and using bicycles for real transportation.
    We’ve always taken the greenness of bike transport as a given. But if you’re just getting started — or perhaps trying to convince an employer that bicycle commuting is a good thing — we’ve rounded up a dozen reasons to leave that car in the driveway and start covering pavement on two wheels. Let’s ride!
    1) It’s easier to finance a new bicycle than a new car. Thanks to the recession, auto loans are hard to find these days — even if you have good credit. But for the price of a single car payment, you can buy a well-made bicycle that should outlast most cars. Add a few hundred dollars more for rain gear, lights and accessories, and you have all-weather, anytime transportation.
    2) A bicycle has a tiny manufacturing footprint when compared to a car. All manufactured goods have environmental impact, but bicycles can be produced for a fraction of the materials, energy and shipping costs of a car.
    3) Bicycles produce no meaningful pollution when in operation. Bikes don’t have tailpipes belching poisonous fumes into the atmosphere. They also eliminate the oil, fuel and hydraulic fluids dripped by automobiles onto the road surface — which means less toxic runoff into local waterways.
    4) Bikes save taxpayers money by reducing road wear. A 20-pound bicycle is a lot less rough on the pavement than a two-ton sedan. Every bicycle on the road amounts to money saved patching potholes and resurfacing city streets.
    5) Bicycles are an effective alternative to a second car. Perhaps you’re not in a position to adopt a bicycle as primary transportation. But bikes make great second vehicles. You can literally save thousands of dollars a year using a bicycle for workday commuting and weekend errands in households which might otherwise be forced to maintain two cars.
    6) Using a bike for transportation can help you lose weight and improve your overall health. The health benefits of regular aerobic exercise are well-known. Depending on your riding style and local road conditions, you could easily burn 600 calories an hour through brisk cycling. Most bike commuters report losing 15 to 20 pounds during their first year in the saddle without changing their eating habits.
    7) You can store a dozen bicycles in a single automobile-sized parking place. Parking lots have enormous environmental and financial impact, particularly in urbanized areas. The more bikes you can get on the road, the fewer parking spaces you need to build.
    8) Bicycles don’t burn gasoline. Fuel is cheap compared to last year, and the economic downturn is likely to keep a lid on petroleum demand for a while. But we’re not producing any more oil today than we were when it was more than $100 a barrel. A healthy bike culture will help ease pressure on supply once demand returns.
    9) Bicycling may be faster and more efficient than taking a car. We’re not talking about the crazy — and illegal — antics of New York bicycle messengers. But bikes are often faster than cars in urban areas, especially when city designers have set aside proper bike lanes. There’s nothing more satisfying as a bicycle commuter than breezing past a long line of gridlocked traffic.
    10) Bikes cost much less to maintain and operate than automobiles. You’ll never throw a rod on a bicycle, and dropping a transmission on a bike usually means replacing a bent derailleur hanger or worn-out chain. Bicycles do require service, but you can learn to perform most of it yourself. Even if you have a shop do things for you, costs will be trivial compared to a car.
    11) Bicycles provide mobility for those who may not qualify or afford to drive. Not everyone can get a driver’s license (or wants one), and the cost of purchasing, insuring and maintaining a car is out of reach for a lot of people. Almost everyone can afford some sort of bike. Other than walking, bicycles are the most cost-effective transportation on the planet.
    12) Studies show that bicycle commuters are healthier, more productive, and require less time off at work. This is why most enlightened employers are eager to accommodate commuting cyclists. Healthy workers are better workers — and that’s good for the bottom line. Bikes are smart business.
    So there are 12 reasons to dust-off that bicycle in your garage in time for Bike to Work Day (the third Friday in May).

    [Health.com] 5 Ways Your Commute Is Hurting Your Health

    The following article was originally published by Amanda MacMillan on Health.com on March 31st, 2015.

    The average American commute to work lasts 25 minutes, according to U.S. Census data, but many workers travel far above and beyond that number. In Los Angeles, drivers spend an average of 90 hours a year stuck in traffic alone, and employees in New York City spend an average of 48 minutes a day getting to their jobs, often switching trains or busses along the way.

    Commuting is rarely anyone’s favorite time of day, but it can be more than just an inconvenience: All those hours spent in home-work limbo can have physical and mental health implications, as well. Here are five ways your car, train, or bus ride to the office can affect your well-being, plus what to do about it.

    It may contribute to weight gain
    A 2012 study published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine found that the farther Texas residents commuted every day, the more likely they were to be overweight. Unsurprisingly, the farthest commuters were also less likely to get the recommended amount of daily physical activity. “It’s not so easy to move or change your job, so if you do have a long commute it’s important that you make a bigger effort to be active during the day,” says lead study author Christine Hoehner, PhD. “Take walking breaks, get up from your desk often, take the stairs, and make it a priority to exercise whenever you do have time.”

    If you can, it might also be a good idea to try public transportation: men and women who drove to work weighed about 6.6 and 5.5 pounds more, respectively, than their peers who walked, cycled, or took trains or buses, a 2014 study in The BMJ found.

    It’s a pain in the neck—literally
    A third of people with commutes of more than 90 minutes say they deal with ongoing neck and back pain, according to a 2010 Gallup poll. While back pain is one of the most common health complaints, only one in four people who commute 10 minutes or less reported pain in the same poll.

    The extra time spent sitting slumped forward in the driver’s seat or on the train could contribute to these issues, says Andrew Wolf, exercise physiologist at Miraval Resort and Spa in Tucson, Arizona. But making an effort to sit up straight—with a lumbar support behind your lower back, and your head evenly over your shoulders—can help you reverse bad habits. “It’s a lifestyle choice that requires that you think about it a bit every day,” he says. “Do enough of this and it will become automatic.”

    It affects your mood
    People who drove, carpooled, or took public transportation to work were less able to enjoy daily activities and had more trouble concentrating compared to walkers or cyclists in a 2014 study from the University of East Anglia. Interestingly, the researchers found that wellbeing scores decreased for car commuters as time spent behind the wheel increased. But for walkers, the opposite held true: Those who traveled farther to work on foot had better mental health scores.

    If there’s no getting around public transportation for you, one thing you might try is talking to strangers. According to a 2014 study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, bus and train commuters reported more positive experiences when they connected with other riders than when they kept to themselves.

    It stresses you out
    People who commute by private car (no matter how long the trip)—or those whose trips lasted longer than 30 minutes by train, bus or on foot—had higher anxiety levels compared to people who made shorter trips, according to a 2014 report from the U.K.’s Office of National Statistics.

    Hoehner’s research also found that the longer people’s car commutes were, the more likely they were to have elevated blood pressure—even when she controlled for physical activity level. “That finding suggested that there’s something going on independent of the fact that people are less active, potentially something related to stress,” she says. (Other risk factors for hypertension, like lack of sleep, poor diet, and social isolation, could also play a role.)

    “One way to combat this could be for employers to allow people to commute at different times of the day, so they’re not spending so much time in traffic,” Hoehner adds. Can’t switch up your schedule? Turn on a soothing playlist or practice slow, deep breathing when you feel yourself tensing up.

    It exposes you to more pollution
    In a 2007 study of Los Angeles residents, up to half of their exposure to harmful air pollution occurred while they traveled in their vehicles. Driving with the windows up, using recirculated air, and driving slower than 20 miles per hour can reduce exposure, say the study authors, but not as much as cutting back on driving time.

    Cycling to work increases exposure to pollutants, as well, according to a 2010 Dutch study—but the same research also found that its health benefits of getting your heart rate up on your ride still outweigh its risks by at least nine times.

    [Jamaica Plain Gazette] Editorial: Farewell to Bike Czar

    The following editorial was originally published in the Jamaica Plain Gazette on March 27th, 2015.

    We will miss Nicole Freedman, the JP resident who long served as the City’s pioneering Bike Program leader.

    Freedman’s hiring was a legacy of the late Mayor Menino’s unexpected conversion to the bicycling gospel. She got Boston up to speed at a velocity one would expect from a former Olympian. A plethora of bike lanes and the Hubway bike share system are among her obvious contributions to a city that was once a virtual enemy to bicyclists.

    From the JP perspective, it was a benefit to have the Bike Program director riding our streets on a daily basis to know bike issues first-hand.

    Mayor Walsh is showing a commitment to continuing the bike improvements and pushing them close to the cutting edge, and also to making more transparent decisions on such roadway infrastructure. Meanwhile, thank you, Nicole, for getting Boston started on that journey.

    System Alert: seasonal station deployment begins Thursday, March 26th, full-system reopening to follow within a few weeks

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway will begin deploying stations in Boston, Brookline, and Somerville beginning today, Thursday, March 26th, 2015.

    PLEASE NOTE: While the Cambridge operations are still taking place as normal, at this time Boston / Brookline / Somerville stations are not operational, they will not accept bicycle returns and bikes should not be docked at those stations until the full system is opened. Plans are to fully connect all deployed stations within the next few weeks. Sign up to receive the reopening announcement by entering your email on the Hubway homepage.

    If you have any question about whether a particular station is open or closed, please check Hubway Tracker or download Spotcycle for your smartphone for the most up-to-date information, or call to speak with a Member Services Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    Still riding in Cambridge, spring full-system reopening date still TBD

    photo credit: Alex Nenopoulos.

    We’re excited and anxious to get you pedaling into spring. The season-change is just around the corner, and Hubway’s full-system station deployment will follow soon after. The specific date, however, is still to be determined, and is dependent to some extent on remaining snow & ice conditions at station locations.

    We thank you for your patience after the record-setting winter we experienced. As with last year, the system remains open and operational at all Cambridge-based stations.

    Want to be the first to know when stations are opening?

    Follow Hubway on Twitter & Facebook, and sign up to receive Hubway’s email announcements by clicking here.

    [Bike League] Why Bike? It makes us happy, researchers say

    The following article was originally published by Liz Murphy of The League of American Bicyclists on March 16th, 2015.

    Why do we bike?

    As advocates, we’re quick to point out the benefits we can measure: It burns calories, reduces air pollution, relieves traffic congestion and costs less than car ownership. But, for those of us who ride, we know there are even bigger upsides to cycling: Biking makes us feel good. And now there’s data to prove it.

    Thanks to researchers at Clemson and the University of Pennsylvania, a study released in 2014 made it official: Folks who bike to their destinations are the happiest. Using the American Time Use Survey, collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Eric Morris and Erick Guerra were able to determine the average mood felt by people during different types of travel — and the demeanor of cyclists was significantly better than car drivers, passengers or public transit riders. Talk about a selling point for cycling.

    “Happiness is one of the most ancient subjects researchers have thought about: how do you live the good life?” Morris told us. “With modern data gathering, we can finally get some empirical answers with evidence rather than just speculation. Happiness is very widely studied in economics and psychology, but the study of happiness has come late to the field of transportation, urban planning and cities.”

    Morris isn’t a bicyclist himself, and, honestly, didn’t go into the research with any sense that cycling would play significantly into the findings. And while the magnitude of the results — the far more positive moods of bicyclists even when controlling for the physical health of the traveler — was surprising, the notion that bikes give us a mental boost is backed by other research.

    “First, exercise really elevates your mood,” Morris said. “But also, I think you’re probably made happier on a bicycle because you feel you’re achieving something. It’s been shown that people don’t like tasks that are way too hard for them — but they do like a task that is difficult and they can just accomplish it. From bicycling, you get that sense of mastery and proving to yourself that you’re skilled, rather than just sitting and riding in a bus or a car.”

    What does that mean for marketing biking to the masses? While cycling has plenty of perks, this type of research helps advocates make the ultimate pitch.

    “Bicycling has got a lot going for it,” Morris said. “Finding that people are also quite happy while doing it is one more thing that suggests we should put more effort into promoting it.” Thanks to researchers like Morris we can say with a straight, er, smiling face that bikes make us healthier and happier.

    The Patriots won, which means Hubway won the #BikeShareSuperBowl

    ICYMI: Our beloved New England Patriots won the big game (again)! In case that wasn’t enough to get us through the bitter winter, we’re extra happy because it meant Hubway won the Bike Share Super Bowl, too! We had a little wager riding on The Game with our friends at Seattle’s Pronto! Cycle Share: the system whose team lost had to pedal around their town wearing the jersey of the winning team.

    We almost felt bad sending them a Pats’ Tom Brady #12 jersey and asking them to make good. Almost. But let’s put it this way—you can’t say they’re not good sports in the Pacific Northwest. Pronto’s Biz Dev guy, Sean, bit the bullet for their crew, donned the jersey, ignored the jeers, and rode out to the Space Needle. PIC TO PROVE!

    Brady willing, we’ll see you guys in the Bowl again next year ;)

    In Seattle? #GoPronto!
    Near Boston? #TakeHubway!
    As always, ride safe & have fun.

    Now that it’s getting warmer, we want to see you repping your local teams! Break out your favorite hometown jersey (Hideo Nomo’s Sox jersey, anyone?), grab a Hubway, and post your pics with the hashtag #TakeHubway.

    System Alert: Hubway has reopened (all stations in Cambridge)

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Tuesday, February 16th, at 6pm. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather and ongoing station cleanup. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Saturday, February 14th, at 7PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a Blizzard Warning from the National Weather Service (NWS), Hubway will temporarily close all stations at 7:00PM on Saturday, February 14th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun. Any bikes in use at the time of closure can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We expect Hubway to remain closed for the duration of the NWS Blizzard Warning and thereafter until conditions have improved. Annual and monthly members will be informed of re-opening plans via email. Closure and re-opening information will also be posted here on the Hubway website, Facebook, and Twitter. We will also email riders to inform them of closures and re-openings. Register for Hubway’s email list by clicking here.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway has reopened (all stations in Cambridge)

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Tuesday, February 10th, at 5pm. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather and ongoing station cleanup. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Sunday, February 8th, at 9:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a Storm Warning from the National Weather Service (NWS), Hubway will temporarily close all stations at 9:00AM on Sunday, February 8th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun. Any bikes in use at the time of closure can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We expect Hubway to remain closed for the duration of the NWS Blizzard Warning and thereafter until conditions have improved. Annual and monthly members will be informed of re-opening plans via email. Closure and re-opening information will also be posted here on the Hubway website, Facebook, and Twitter. We will also email riders to inform them of closures and re-openings. Register for Hubway’s email list by clicking here.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway has reopened (all stations in Cambridge)

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Tuesday, February 3rd, at noon. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather and ongoing station cleanup. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Monday, February 2nd, at 8:00AM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a Storm Warning from the National Weather Service (NWS), Hubway will temporarily close all stations at 8:00AM on Monday, February 2nd, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun. Any bikes in use at the time of closure can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We expect Hubway to remain closed for the duration of the NWS Blizzard Warning and thereafter until conditions have improved. Annual and monthly members will be informed of re-opening plans via email. Closure and re-opening information will also be posted here on the Hubway website, Facebook, and Twitter. We will also email riders to inform them of closures and re-openings. Register for Hubway’s email list by clicking here

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway has reopened (all stations in Cambridge)

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has re-opened as of Wednesday, January 28th, at 4PM. Thank you for your patience during the inclement weather and ongoing station cleanup. Please review our winter-weather riding tips, and ride safely.

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Monday, January 26th, at 7:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a Blizzard Warning from the National Weather Service (NWS), Hubway will temporarily close all stations at 7:00PM on Monday, January 26th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun. Any bikes in use at the time of closure can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    Please note: throughout the day, Hubway field staff will be applying covers to some of the docking points at many stations to protect them from snow accumulation. This will reduce the actual number of docks available in the system and will impact the accuracy of dock availability numbers displayed on Spotcycle and other Hubway-related apps.

    We expect Hubway to remain closed for the duration of the NWS Blizzard Warning and thereafter until conditions have improved. Annual and monthly members will be informed of re-opening plans via email. Closure and re-opening information will also be posted here on the Hubway website, Facebook, and Twitter. We will also email riders to inform them of closures and re-openings. Register for Hubway’s email list by clicking here

    If you have any questions, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929). The Hubway Severe Weather Closure Policy can be found here.

    SYSTEM ALERT: December 31st is final day for Boston-based stations

    SYSTEM ALERT: The final day of 2014 winter operations for all Boston-based stations will be Wednesday, December 31st! Though you may continue to see the Boston-based stations during the first week of January, they will not be operational, and riders will not be able to rent or return bikes to these stations. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. All closed Boston stations, in addition to those based in Brookline & Somerville, are expected to relaunch again in March or April 2015.

    Click here to register for email system alerts. If stations you typically use are within Boston city limits, we recommend making alternative arrangements for your trips beginning on the 31st.

    Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for almost 3 million rides… and counting!

    [About Travel] Boston Holiday Gift Guide 2014

    Hubway has been featured in this gift guide (excerpt below) by Sarah Pascarella, originally published on About.com.

    Holiday shoppers — or should I say holiday procrastinators — it’s not too late to snag an ideal gift for the Bostonian (or frequent Boston visitor) on your list. I’ve put together five options that will please foodies, families, and fans. And with many of my gift ideas focusing on experiences (rather than stuff), these presents will be appreciated—and memorable—all the year through.

    In the spirit of the season, Happy Hanukkah, Merry Christmas, Joyous Kwanzaa, and Happy New Year to you and yours! Here are my picks for this year’s Boston Holiday Gift Guide.

    Hubway Membership

    A membership to Hubway, the popular bike-share service in greater Boston, is a great gift for both locals and visitors. Hubway memberships start at $6 for a day rental and go up to $85 for an annual pass. And if you’re one of the first 100 people to purchase a Hubway gift membership, you’ll get a free cone from Ben & Jerry’s to add as a stocking stuffer (or to keep for yourself).

    [UPDATE} Reinstalled Station Alert: Boston Medical Center

    [UPDATE: 12/15/14] Reinstallation of the Boston Medical Center station is awaiting seasonal licensing, and has not yet been installed. Station installation and removal schedules are subject to change. We apologize for any confusion or inconvenience.

    REINSTALLED STATION ALERT: The Boston Medical Center Hubway station is scheduled for reinstallation by the end of the day on Friday, December 12th, and is expected to remain open and operational through the end of December, weather permitting. The 15-dock station will be placed in its new location on the West side of Mass Ave between Albany Street and Harrison Ave.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway!

    Reinstalled Station Alert: Charles Circle - Charles St at Cambridge St

    REINSTALLED STATION ALERT: The Charles Circle - Charles St at Cambridge St Hubway station is scheduled for reinstallation by the end of the day on Friday, December 12th, and is expected to remain open and operational through the end of December, weather permitting. The 15-dock station will be placed in its new seasonal location on the north side of Cambridge Street (heading towards Cambridge), just as it splits into the entry ramps for Storrow, the Longfellow, and Charles Street.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway!

    Reinstalled Station Alert: JP Monument - South St at Centre St

    REINSTALLED STATION ALERT: The JP Monument - South St at Centre St Hubway station is scheduled for reinstallation by the end of the day on Friday, December 12th, and is expected to remain open and operational through the end of December, weather permitting. The 15-dock station will be placed in its new seasonal location in front of Curtis Hall, 20 South Street, across the street from its previous location.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway!

    Exclusive for Hubway Members: 20% off tickets to see Irving Berlin's White Christmas

    Dreaming of a White Christmas? Get one with a special ticket offer for Hubway members only! Start with a timeless tale of joy & goodwill, fill it with classic Irving Berlin songs, and top it off with glorious dancing and lots of snow!

    Hubway members receive 20% off select tickets to select performances.
    Visit citicienter.org/merry for tickets, and use code HOLIDAYS for available tickets for these performances:

    • Tuesday, 12/16, 7:30pm
    • Wednesday, 12/17, 7:30pm
    • Thursday, 12/18, 7:30pm
    • Friday, 12/19, 8:00pm
    • Sunday, 12/21, 6:30pm
    • Tuesday, 12/23, 7:30pm
    • Wednesday, 12/24, 2pm
    • Sunday, 12/28, 6:30pm
    • Happy Holidays!

    [TimeOut] The 50 best things to do in Boston

    The following is an excerpt of an article that was originally published by Jessie Rogers on TimeOut.com.

    Your ultimate guide to things to do in Boston—from the city’s best restaurants and shops to museums and sightings

    Ride the Hubway

    While driving around Boston can be, at times, both mystifying and terrifying, biking is a really great way to zip around the city. The city’s bike-sharing system, Hubway, offers up affordable bikes for the commitment-phobic: you determine your level of involvement, choosing between one-day, three-day or annual memberships. You can pick up a bike at one kiosk and leave it at another at your leisure—it’s so convenient that we’d love to see this system used for other things. See you later, pants.


    The Perfect Stocking-Stuffer


    THE PERFECT STOCKING-STUFFER
    Gift certificates are available now and through the holidays.


    There’s a gift level for everyone, whether you’re buying for friends and family who live and work in the metro-Boston area, students, or even out-of-town guests. And for a limited time, each gift certificate you purchase gets YOU a free ice cream cone from Ben & Jerry’s Boston!

    ORDER NOW

    Check someone off your gift list! Visit the Hubway online store right now to purchase gift certificates redeemable for Hubway passes and memberships of all levels! Print them right from your computer!


    Station Move Alert: MIT Stata Center at Vassar St / Main St [Cambridge]

    STATION MOVE ALERT: On Friday, December 5th, the MIT Stata Center at Vassar St / Main St Hubway station in Cambridge will be placed in its new permanent location across the street from the entrance/exit to the Stata Center. This 23-dock station is expected to remain open and operational all winter, weather permitting. For a brief period during the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway.

    Reinstalled Station Alert: Kenmore Square / Commonwealth Ave

    REINSTALLED STATION ALERT: The Kenmore Square / Comm. Ave Hubway station is scheduled for reinstallation by the end of the day on Friday, December 5th, and is expected to remain open and operational through the end of December, weather permitting. The 15-dock station will be placed in its new seasonal location across the street on the sidewalk on the inbound side of Commonwealth Avenue in front of 540 Commonwealth Ave, adjacent to the intersection of Commonwealth Avenue, Brookline Avenue, and Boylston Street.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway!

    Reinstalled Station Alert: Charlestown - Main St at Austin St relaunching on Friday

    REINSTALLED STATION ALERT: The Charlestown - Main St at Austin St Hubway station is scheduled for reinstallation by the end of the day on Friday, December 5th, and is expected to remain open and operational through the end of December, weather permitting. The 11-dock station will be placed in its new seasonal location on the sidewalk adjacent to the intersection of Main & Austin Streets.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway!

    Station Removal Alert: Northeastern University / North Parking Lot

    STATION ALERT: On Friday, December 5th, the Northeastern University Hubway station located in the school’s North Parking Lot, will be removed for the winter season. If you were planning on using that station, we recommend making alternative arrangements.


    Almost all Cambridge-based stations are remaining open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. For more information on Hubway’s winter operations, visit thehubway.com/winter.


    PLEASE NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes.

    Thank you for riding Hubway.

    The perfect stocking stuffer comes with free ice cream!

    We’ve extended this offer through the entire month of December!

    Purchase a Hubway gift certificate today and you’ll receive a coupon for a complimentary Ben & Jerry’s cone!


    Click here to purchase your gift certificates now!

    Station Move Alert: Jackson Square [Boston]

    Station Move Alert: Beginning Thursday, December 4th, the Jackson Square T at Centre St Hubway station in Boston will be placed in its new seasonal location across the street from the entrance/exit to the Jackson Square T station. The station is expected to remain open and operational through December, pending favorable weather conditions.

    For a brief period during the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: Milk St at India St [Boston]

    Station Move Alert: Beginning Wednesday, December 3rd, the recently removed Milk St at India St Hubway station in Boston will be placed in its new seasonal location at the triangle of Franklin St, India St, and the John F. Fitzgerald Surface Road. The station is expected to remain open and operational through December, pending favorable weather conditions.

    During the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    Two Station Alerts: Cambridge station updates (Dana Park, Lafayette Square)

    Station Alert: The Dana Park Hubway station located on Lawrence Street between Pearl and Magazine, and adjacent to the Dana Park, will be removed for the winter season on Wednesday, December 3rd.

    The station is the only Cambridge-based station scheduled for removal for the season, and it is expected to return by April 2015.


    Station Move Alert: Beginning Wednesday, December 3rd, the Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main St / Columbia St Hubway station in Cambridge will move across the street to its new seasonal location at 402 Massachusetts Avenue. The new location is being considered permanent through the remainder of the winter season.

    During the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    Your Hubway CyberMonday deals are here!

    Click here to purchase your gift certificates now!

    HUBWAY MEMBERS: here’s an extra CyberMonday deal just for you!

    Click here today to unlock up to 20% off Citi Bike passes for your next trip to NYC!

    Station Alert: UPDATED Station Removal Schedule for November 24-26 2014

    UPDATED STATION ALERT: Seasonal phased station closures have begun. The final day of 2014 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 26th. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Click here to view a list of the stations confirmed open for winter operations. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. Click here to register for email system alerts on days when stations are removed.

    Here is the schedule for station removals (subject to change) for November 24th through November 26th:

    Monday, 11/24 (7 stations)

  • Boylston at Fairfield
  • Boylston St / Berkeley St
  • Beacon St / Mass Ave
  • Newbury St / Hereford St
  • New Balance Store - Boylston at Dartmouth
  • Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main St / Columbia St (Cambridge)
  • Washington Square at Washington St (Somerville)
  • Tuesday, 11/25 (6 stations)

  • E. Cottage St at Columbia Rd
  • Upham’s Corner - Ramsey St at Dudley St
  • Mt Pleasant Ave / Dudley Town Common
  • Brigham Circle / Huntington Ave
  • Hyde Square at Barbara St - Jamaica Plain
  • JP Center - Centre St at Myrtle St, Jamaica Plain
  • JP Monument - South St at Centre St Jamaica Plain
  • Boylston / Mass Ave
  • Charles Circle
  • Wednesday, 11/26 (7+ stations*)

  • Post Office Square
  • Charlestown - Main St at Austin St
  • Kenmore Square / Comm. Ave
  • Milk St at India St
  • BMC - E Concord at Harrison Ave
  • Allston Green District - Commonwealth Ave & Griggs St
  • BIDMC - Brookline at Burlington St
  • *PLEASE NOTE: Brookline- and Somerville-based stations may physically remain in the field beyond Wednesday, 11/26, but after that date they will no longer be in operation, and riders will not be able to rent or dock bikes at these station. Again, all closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015.

    ALSO NOTE: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 3 million rides… and counting!

    Member Perk: Unlock NYC with this Citi Bike discount, now through December 1st

    Our bikeshare friends to the South, Citi Bike, launched last year and will double in size by 2017, but you can ride NYC now! As a Hubway member, you have access to purchase Citi Bike casual passes and annual memberships at a discount.

    Planning a trip to the Big Apple? Pick up a 24-Hour or 7-day pass for yourself!

    Have friends in NYC? Grab passes or a membership as a holiday gift.
    They make great stocking stuffers!


    Citi Bike Membership/Pass
    New Yorkers pay
    Hubway members pay
    YOU SAVE…
    24-Hour
    $9.95
    $7.95
    $2 (20%)
    7-Day
    $25
    $20
    $5 (20%)
    Annual
    $149
    $139
    $10 (6%+)

    This offer ends on CyberMonday, December 1st, 2014.
    Here’s how to grab your Citi Bike passes now:

    1) Email Citi Bike Sales Manager, Meghan Leys, at meghanleys@nycbicycleshare.com.
    2) Include your Hubway member number. Log in to get it from your profile page.
    3) Include the types of passes and quantity you’d like to buy.

    You’ll receive a response within two business days with your personalized codes to purchase the passes online or at a Citi Bike station kiosk.

    Station Alert: UPDATED Station Removal Schedule for November 20-23, 2014

    UPDATED STATION ALERT: Seasonal phased station closures have begun. The final day of 2014 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 26th. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. Click here to register for email system alerts on days when stations are removed.

    Here is the updated schedule for station removals (subject to change) for November 20th through November 23rd:

    Thursday, 11/20: No stations are scheduled for removal today.

    Friday, 11/21 (6 stations)

  • University of Massachusetts - Boston
  • Andrew Station - Dorchester Ave at Humboldt Pl
  • Franklin St / Arch St
  • Congress / Sleeper
  • Hayes Square at Vine St
  • Washington St at Waltham St
  • Saturday, 11/22: No stations are scheduled for removal today.

    Sunday, 11/23: No stations are scheduled for removal today.

    Please note: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 3 million rides… and counting!

    Here are the stations that will be open this winter

    If you haven’t heard the news that Hubway’s winter operations have expanded this season, check it out! All Cambridge-based stations will once again be open throughout winter, and approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. Plus, all closed stations are expected to reopen in March or April 2015.

    Click here to view the list of stations (subject to change) that will be open during some or all of the winter season

    Station Alert: Station Removal Schedule for November 20-23, 2014

    PLEASE NOTE! The schedule below has been updated. Click here to view the latest schedule, updated on Thursday, 11/20.


    STATION ALERT: Seasonal phased station closures have begun. The final day of 2014 full-system regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 26th. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. All closed stations will relaunch again in spring 2015. Click here to register for email system alerts on days when stations are removed.

    Here are the scheduled station removals (subject to change) for November 20th through November 23rd:

    Thursday, 11/20 (4 stations)

  • Andrew Station - Dorchester Ave at Humboldt Pl
  • Congress / Sleeper
  • Franklin St / Arch St
  • Hayes Square at Vine St
  • Friday, 11/21 (6 stations)

  • University of Massachusetts - Boston
  • JFK / UMass
  • Day Boulevard - DCR
  • E. Cottage at Columbia Rd
  • Upham’s Corner - Ramsey St at Dudley St
  • Mt Pleasant Ave / Dudley Town Common
  • No stations are scheduled for removal on Saturday, November 22nd, and Sunday, November 23rd.

    Please note: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. Hubway will continue to post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 3 million rides… and counting!

    System Alert: station locations to move on November 17 & 18

    SYSTEM ALERT: Prior to seasonal phased station closures, some Hubway stations will move this week from their on-street locations to adjacent or nearby off-street locations.

    *Here is the current station move schedule for Monday & Tuesday:

    Monday, November 17th (4 stations):

  • B.U. Central: moved 2 blocks north
  • Agganis Arena - 925 Commonwealth Ave: moved 1 block south
  • Yawkey Way at Boylston St: moved around corner on Boylston
  • Boylston St at Arlington St: moved 1 block east (toward the Common), onto the median
  • Tuesday, November 18th (2 stations):

  • Faneuil Hall - Union St at North St: moved onto Congress St, behind City Hall
  • Cambridge St at Joy St: moved to median strip across street

  • UPDATE (11/18): This week’s originally scheduled moves for the following stations have been postponed. A new date for the moves has not yet been set. Station Alerts will be made when more information is available:

  • Boston Medical Center -  East Concord at Harrison Ave
  • Charlestown - Main St at Austin St
  • Jackson Square T
  • Kenmore Square / Commonwealth Ave

  • *Please note: the schedule is subject to changes due to weather, street access, and other logistics. These stations are being moved in close proximity to their current stations, though the new location may not be visible from the prior location.

    The Hubway system will begin seasonal phased station closures on Thursday, November 20, 2014. The final day of 2014 regular season operations will be Wednesday, November 26th. Almost all Cambridge-based stations will remain open throughout the winter. Approximately 60 Boston-based stations will remain open through December. All closed stations will relaunch again in March or April 2015. Click here to receive email system alerts on the days that stations are removed.

    Hubway will post updates on its website in addition to its facebook and twitter pages, so make sure to check those sites for the latest info, and to develop a contingency plan for your routes. Thank you for 3 million rides… and counting!

    Sign up to get station-specific seasonal closure alerts

    Hubway will begin its regular season-end station closures on Monday, November 17th, with Brookline and Somerville concluding operations on Wednesday, November 26th. For the second year in a row, Hubway will continue to be available to riders throughout winter at almost all Cambridge-based stations. And for the first time, a reduced number of stations in Boston will remain open through December. The entire system is expected to re-open in March or early April, depending on weather conditions.

    And now you may find yourself asking:

    “Will my station close for the year? And if so, when?”


    To keep you up-to-date on the latest news & seasonal station closures, you can sign up to receive email system alerts on the days that stations are removed. That way you can easily get the latest info and develop a contingency plan for routes that involve your favorite stations. And as usual, we’ll publish specific station closure and system alerts on the Hubway website, as well as Hubway’s facebook page and twitter profile.

    Click here to sign up for station closure alerts!

    [Press Release] Hubway to continue year-round operations in Cambridge











    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to download PDF.
    November 6, 2014

    CONTACT:
    Benjy Kantor, Hubway
    benjykantor@altabicycleshare.com, 617.968.0361

    Cara Seiderman, City of Cambridge Development Department
    cseiderman@cambridgema.gov, 617.349.4629

    HUBWAY TO CONTINUE YEAR-ROUND OPERATIONS IN CAMBRIDGE
    Cambridge-based Hubway Bike Share Stations Will Remain Available through the Winter


    For the second year in a row, Hubway, the metro-Boston area’s public bike share system, will continue to be available to riders throughout winter at almost all Cambridge-based stations. Last year, the City of Cambridge piloted year-round Hubway service, which was very successful with over 35,000 rides from December through March, despite the exceptionally harsh winter.

    “Cambridge broke new ground last year with our first- in- the- region winter operation of a bike share system,” said Cambridge City Manager Richard C. Rossi. “We are pleased to be able to build on last year’s success by continuing to offer this sustainable transportation option throughout the coming winter season.”

    Almost all stations in Cambridge will remain operational throughout the winter, though stations located at Lafayette Square/Main Street and Dana Park will be removed from the street for the season to accommodate snow plowing operations. All station updates will be posted on the station map at www.thehubway.com/stations, www.hubwaytracker.com, and on the Spotcycle app for smart phones (www.spotcycle.net). Annual members may continue to use the Cambridge stations during the season at no additional cost. 24-hour, 72-hour, and monthly passes will be available for purchase as usual.

    As was the case last year, snow removal will be part of the daily responsibilities of the Hubway field staff in addition to the daily rebalancing of the system in order to meet peak demand cycles.

    Users should bear in mind that only Cambridge-based stations will be in operation throughout winter. Closures of other stations will begin in mid-November, with Brookline and Somerville concluding operations on Wednesday, November 26th. For the first time, a reduced number of stations in Boston will remain open through December. The entire system is expected to re-open in March or early April, depending on weather conditions.

    During extreme inclement weather conditions, Hubway may temporarily close the system, and public announcements will be made via social media and the Hubway’s website. Station alerts will also be emailed to annual and monthly Hubway members, and all riders can consult the Spotcycle app to learn whether or not bicycles are available. In the event of a system closing, riders will be able to return bikes to all stations securely, but will not be able to check bikes out.

    Find out more about the Hubway system at www.thehubway.com.

    ###

    #HappyHubwayHalloween Treat Photos!

    We’re excited to present some of our favorite photos from participants in the #HappyHubwayHalloween Treat or Treat promotion! Thank you to our awesome prize partners listed here, and thanks to everyone who participated and rode this Halloween!

    Pro-Tip: Always Double-Check Your Docking

    Didn’t see a green light when you docked? Lift the bike ever-so-slightly by the seat and give a tug to make ensure that it is fully secure and that your trip has closed.

    If you ever have that “left-the-oven-on” feeling later in the day that perhaps you didn’t see that green light, log into your Hubway member account here and click the “Rentals” tab to confirm your trip was successfully closed.

    Of course, you can always reach the Hubway customer support team, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, by calling 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929).

    A Tip of the Cap (Helmet) to Mayor Menino

    With heavy hearts, we mourn the passing of Thomas M. Menino, Boston’s longest serving mayor. The following letter from Hubway General Manager, Emily Stapleton, was distributed to all Hubway staff yesterday afternoon. Some pictures follow.


    All,

    As a tribute to Mayor Menino, here are some words from the mayor himself almost exactly one year ago during a Climate Sustainability speech:

    “The mayor acknowledged that ‘climate work is unending’ and will require a total team effort in order to engage all of Boston’s communities in implementing environmental strategies…Boston’s Hubway program has been a big part of this [green house gas emission] reduction. Hubway bikes have provided 675,000 rides to people around the city, Menino said, preventing 230 tons of carbon gas from entering the atmosphere.” [Boston-specific #s as of 2013.]

    Mayor Menino’s choice to champion bike share in Boston was purposeful and forward-thinking at a time when the feasibility and popularity of bike share in the United States was still considered uncertain and untested. After all, Capital Bikeshare, which launched in 2010, was the only other large-scale bike share program in the U.S. that—only slightly—preceded Boston’s launch in 2011.

    Hubway has certainly been a trailblazer in demonstrating the viability of bike share in a large urban environment in the United States, and I would venture to say that biking in general became more safe, pleasant, and accepted by pedestrians, cyclists, and motorists alike in Boston as a result of Mayor Menino’s leadership.

    “The car is no longer king,” indeed.

    Members of our staff locked down the Mayor’s Bike at City Hall today with respect.

    Emily Stapleton,
    General Manager
    Alta Bicycle Share, Inc.
    Operator of Hubway Bicycle System




    Get Spokey This Halloween! Win Ghoul Stuff!

    Post Your #HappyHubwayHalloween Photo

    and you could win one of more than 50 Scary-Good Treats!


    Nothing is more ghoulishly fun than Greater Boston on Halloween. This year we’re making it extra spo(o)key with some #HappyHubwayHalloween photo fun! You could win a super-sweet Treat from one of our prize providers below.


    HERE’S HOW TO ENTER:

    (1) Snap a photo that includes you in your costume with or near a Hubway bike or station (no need for an action shot). Please be safe! No in-motion selfies while riding, unbikeable costumes, or things dangling in spokes.

    (2) Between October 30th and November 2nd, EITHER upload your photo to Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook (make sure we see it by including the #HappyHubwayHalloween hashtag or by tagging @Hubway), OR email it to socialmedia@thehubway.com (include your permission for us to post it on social media).


    On November 3rd, more than 50 winners will be randomly selected from entries to receive one* of these prizes below. Plus, we’ll be posting our favorites on the Hubway blog! So be scary, funny, clever, and creative! Most of all, be spokey! Group photos are welcome, though only the user who submits the photo is eligible for the prize! Start snapping your #HappyHubwayHalloween now for your chance to win one of these delicious treats:

  • $10 Gift Certificate from Boloco. (5 available)

  • $10 Gift Certificate from Bon Me. (5 available)

  • $5 Gift Certificate from Burger King. (10 available)

  • Pair of Tickets to the Coolidge Corner Theatre. (5 available, $22 value each)

  • $5 Gift Certificate from El Pelon Taqueria. (8 available)

  • $10 Gift Certificate from Flat Top Johnny’s. (3 available)

  • Hubway Annual Membership ($85 value). (1 available)

  • Pair of Tickets to Improv Asylum. (2 available, $50 value each)

  • Pair of Tickets to Laugh Boston. (2 available, $50 value each)

  • $10 Gift Certificate from New Balance. (5 available)

  • $10 Gift Certificate to Passim. (5 available)

    BUT WAIT… THERE ARE TWO GRAND PRIZES!
  • Free One-night stay at the Lenox Hotel in Boston’s Back Bay (a $555 value)!

  • $150 restaurant Gift Certificate for either City Table or Solas at the Lenox.

    Both grand prizes come with a new bike helmet, courtesy of Bern Unlimited!

    *PLEASE NOTE: Post as many #HappyHubwayHalloween pics as you like, but since we want to spread the Halloween spirit around, you can only win once.

    Treats provided by:



  • [Press Release] Bikeshare Holdings LLC Signs Agreement to Acquire Alta Bicycle Share

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Oct. 28, 2104
    Click here to read release from Alta Bicycle Share.

    You're Invited to the Hubway "Unicorn" Launch this Thursday, October 23rd

    Please note: This event has been moved inside 1350 Mass Ave, in the Harvard Information Center room just off the Smith Campus Center arcade.


    HUBWAY’S “EMERALD EXPLORER” UNICORN LAUNCH DAY
    Thursday, October 23, 2014—Rain or Shine!
    Harvard’s Forbes Plaza
    Outside the Smith Campus Center
    1350 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
    Noon-1pm

    Over 2,000 people voted, and your choice, “the Emerald Explorer,” designed by artist and Hubway member Amy Fater, will enter our fleet as the newest, limited edition, one-of-a-kind Hubway bike this Thursday at noon!

    Come join us, together with Harvard’s CommuterChoice, as the bike is unveiled for its inaugural ride! Be the first to see the Emerald Explorer in person. While you’re there, grab a complimentary 24-hour Hubway pass courtesy of CommuterChoice, enter to win a free helmet, chat with Hubway reps and dignitaries from Hubway member municipalities, and say hi to Amy!

    This event is brought to you by:


    Station Alert: Beacon/Charles station returns today, fully operational

    Station Alert: The Beacon/Charles Hubway station has returned to its previous location adjacent to Beacon Hill and the Boston Public Garden, as of Tuesday morning, October 14th. The station had been temporarily removed in late August for city sidewalk construction, but is now back and fully operational.

    Thank you for your patience. Station updates are posted on Hubway’s Twitter & Facebook pages. For up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit Hubway Tracker or the Hubway website station map.

    Thank you for using Hubway.

    Mayor's Cup Mascot Race 2014

    What happens when you take 9 of the Boston-area’s sports & company mascots,
    and put ‘em all on Hubway bikes for a race around City Hall? Watch the video and find out!

    The TD Bank Mayor’s Cup is an annual bicycle race that is hosted by the City of Boston’s Mayor Martin J. Walsh. Boston Bikes, a department of the City takes the lead with the organizing and TD Bank graciously sponsors the event. Hubway provided the bikes for the mascot race. Enjoy the video!

    When to Mark a Bike for Repair: The Wrench Button

    Ever wonder what this button is for?

    Hubway wants to make sure all riders have a safe, enjoyable experience riding our bikes, so rest assured that we are constantly tuning the fleet for optimal performance. We have dedicated Bike Mechanics at our warehouse who conduct a wide variety of bike repairs, and we also have a field-based Bike Technician team to check each bike in the system at least once per month and can make many adjustments in the field.

    Even so, you may sometimes encounter a a bike that requires some extra TLC. If you’re ever riding a Hubway bike that has a low or flat tire, skipping gears, a dragging chain, or otherwise in need of maintenance, return it to a dock and press the wrench button.

    This does three things. First, it locks the bike into the dock, so that no one else can ride it before we fix it. Second, it activates a red light so other riders know they won’t be able to use it until it’s been checked by our mechanics. Lastly, it lets our dispatch office know where to send our field staff to get it fixed.

    Hubway’s Field Bike Technicians can make minor tune-ups on the spot, but sometimes they hit the wrench button again if the bike needs more work. These bikes are then scooped up by our Rebalancers, who bring them into the garage for repair.

    You might ask:

    Can someone just come by and press all the wrench buttons? No worries! The wrench buttons can only be activated for a minute after a bike is docked, so only the most recent rider will be able to mark it for repair. If you check out a bike and immediately notice something wrong, dock it and press the wrench button. One minute later you’ll be able to check out another bike.

    Can someone “reserve” a bike by pushing the wrench button to lock it in place and then come later to unlock it? Nope. Once a bike is locked in with the wrench button it takes a special staff key to unlock it again.

    When I press the wrench button do you automatically know what’s wrong with the bike? Unfortunately not. All we can tell is that there’s something that needs fixing. Each bike in our shop will be thoroughly checked by our mechanics to make any necessary repairs and adjustments, but you can help! When you push the button, you’ll automatically receive an email from us—just reply to that email and let us know more about the issue you had with the bike. You can also tweet at us or contact customer service with the bike number. You can find the bike number on a bar code sticker on the bike frame just below the seat.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Brisk fall weather approaching: some tips for riding in the colder temps

    The brisk New England fall weather will be upon us soon. We’re not happy about it, either, but it does provide for some lovely leaves-changing-color rides and viewing. If you’re going to be out biking as the temperatures get colder, here are a few things to keep in mind to prepare for your outings:



    Wear layers, but remember that riding will warm you up. If you get hot as you ride, pull over and remove a layer, but always keep your ears and hands shielded.



    Wear gloves or mittens to keep your hands warm. Just make sure you’re still able to work the brakes, gears, and bell.



    Local bike shops offer bike-appropriate gloves and earmuffs that do not obstruct the use of your helmet. Make sure you can hear what’s going on around you.



    Your core will stay warm as you ride, but make sure you’ve got your extremities covered. Wear shoes with enough room for thick, warm socks.



    The weather can change quickly here, so make sure you have a back-up plan if you don’t feel comfortable on a bike. Plan your route ahead of time. If the weather isn’t good for biking, take the train, bus, or a cab.



    It’s important to decide for yourself when you’re comfortable riding and when you’re not. Each rider has a different comfort level in inclement weather, so don’t let a riding partner push you past your comfort zone. If you are uncomfortable for any reason while biking, stop riding and walk your bike to the nearest docking station. If you are cold, make your way indoors to warm up.



    Visibility is particularly limited during the winter, with fewer daylight hours, glare, and foggy conditions. Hubway bikes have 24-hour lights, but it is also a good idea to wear light colored clothing and reflective materials if possible. Always make sure you can be seen by vehicles.



    Use extra caution under wintry conditions, as roads may not be completely cleared of snow and ice. You are always permitted to ride in the general travel lane (not only the bike lane) and should do so if the bike lane is snowy or icy. Keep your eyes open for piles of leaves of patches of ice. It’s better to continue straight through these obstacles than turn or lean through them. Also be careful to avoid using your front brakes, as it could cause you to lose control.



    Hubway bikes can hold up to cold weather. They’re checked regularly by our bike mechanics, so leave your bike at home and let us worry about hardware wear & tear.



    In cases where the system is shut down due to severe weather conditions, we’ll notify the public via press release and social media. We’ll also notify our Members via email. Find out more about the Hubway system, extensions, station outages/closures at thehubway.com, on Twitter, and on Facebook.

    Station Alert: Boston Public Library station closed Sunday, September 28th, 1-7pm

    Station Alert: Due to film production, the Boston Public Library Hubway station located at 700 Boylston Street, will be temporarily closed and inaccessible on Sunday, September 28th, between the hours of 1pm and 7pm. During this time, the station will be unavailable for renting or docking bikes. If you are planning to use Hubway in the area during this period, please make arrangements to use alternate stations. The closest stations are:

    • New Balance Store - Boylston at Dartmouth
    • Boylston St / Berkeley St
    • Back Bay / South End Station
    • Boylston at Fairfield

    The station is expected to reopen and be fully operational at 7pm on Sunday evening. For station map and up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this planned outage, and thank you for using Hubway.

    [AUDIO] RadioBoston, 90.9 WBUR: 8 Ways To Diversify Transportation In Neighborhoods Like Somerville's Union Square

    “What I think people haven’t really taken into account is this really is a mobility revolution we’re in the middle of. And it’s not just about the green line. Right behind you there’s Hubway bikes… and all those bikes are gone, somebody’s taken all of them somewhere else. We are going to have more and more car sharing here. There’s a Zipcar…station right behind us over there. We have people walking here, biking here, taking the train. There’s a huge amount of change [that’s] going to be happening in the way we use our cars in the future. [The] millennial generation — fewer and fewer of them are getting driving licenses now. People don’t want to use cars, they don’t want to own cars.” Click here to read and hear more.

    Station Move Alert: Beacon Street at Washington / Kirkland [Somerville]

    Station Move Alert: Beginning Thursday, September 11th, the Beacon Street at Washington / Kirkland Hubway station in Somerville will move around the corner onto Washington Street, directly across from the Wine & Cheese Cask. The move is due to a large-scale road improvement project along Beacon Street. The new location is being considered permanent through the end of the 2014 riding season.

    During the move the station will be temporarily out of order, and you will not be able to check out or return bikes there. If you are planning to utilize that station on the date of the move, please be prepared to use alternate stations. Thanks for your patience during this time.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated at the time of the move. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for riding Hubway!

    These 12 "Don'ts" of Bicycling still apply 45 years later!

    Increased safety isn’t the sole responsibility of any one party or group of individuals. The responsibility for increasing safety for bicycles, drivers, and pedestrians alike lies in the concerted efforts from (and respect for) all parties & individuals, and each of us can take responsibility for the safety of both ourselves and others.

    That being said, we thought the image below from a 1969 bicycle safety manual, found in a 2012 blog post by Maria Popova in Brain Pickings, was pretty spot on. Click the image to view the full post and other fantastic images from the manual.

    System Alert: Cambridge Road Closure, Sunday, September 7th

    SYSTEM ALERT: CAMBRIDGE ROAD CLOSURES ON SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7th, DURING CAMBRIDGE CARNIVAL INTERNATIONAL PARADE

    The Cambridge Carnival celebration, to be held on Sunday, September 7th, is the largest festival in Cambridge, and we strongly recommend taking an extra moment to review stations which may be affected by temporary road closures and detours beginning at 8am that day. It is possible that some closures will affect Hubway staff’s ability to access and balance stations, and we ask for your patience during this time.

    The following stations in Cambridge, along or adjacent to the Parade route, may especially be affected:

    • Central Square at Mass Ave / Essex Street
    • Lafayette Square at Mass Ave / Main Street / Columbia Street
    • MIT Stata Center at Vassar Street / Main Street
    • Kendall T at Main Street
    • One Broadway / Kendall Square at Main Street / 3rd Street

    To view the City of Cambridge Traffic Management Plan for the event, including specific road closures, please click here.

    You can find more information about the parade at CambridgeCarnival.org Please use Spotcycle or Hubway Tracker for up to the minute system information and bike/dock availability.

    New Station Alert: Rindge Ave, Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, August 29th, the new Hubway station, Rindge Avenue, is open & operational in North Cambridge. This station is a 19-dock station, located on Rindge Avenue at the intersection of Yerxa Road, along a parking lot serving the O’Neill Branch of the Cambridge Public Library. This is Hubway’s 140th station.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Exclusive for Hubway Members: 10% off Charles River Bistro Weekend Soul & Jazz Brunches

    Saturday Soul Brunches & Sunday Jazz Brunches are held every weekend through October from 8am-1pm (music starts at 10am) along the Charles River. View the menu here.

    Find the Bistro’s tree-lined Parisian style seating and outdoor lounge areas just off the banks of the Charles River lagoon, in front of the DCR Memorial Hatch Shell, and just across the Fiedler Bridge from Hubway’s Esplanade station at Beacon & Arlington Streets.

    Bike to brunch and show your Hubway keyfob or your Hubway receipt at the register for 10% off your meal!

    Exclusive for Hubway Members: $5 Discount for Hub On Wheels

    Join us for the 10th Annual Hub On Wheels citywide bike ride on Sunday, September 21st.

    Experience a car-free Storrow Drive, explore hidden pathways and historic neighborhoods, and take in views of the Boston Harbor that you’ve never seen before.

    The ride starts and finishes on Boston City Hall Plaza, with three different routes to choose from: 10, 30 and 50 miles.

    Sign up online using discount code HUBWAY5 by Friday, September 19th, to receive $5 off the registration fee!

    Exclusive for Hubway Members: $5 Discount on Boston Duck Tours

    There’s one place Hubway can’t go. The water!
    But Boston Duck Tours can.


    If you’ve never been on a Boston Duck (or even if you have), Hubway is making it easier for you by giving you $5 off the price of each ticket! Use promo code HUBWAY to purchase your tickets on the Boston Duck Tours website and claim your discount, or show your Hubway keyfob along with this coupon on your smartphone to purchase in person!


    Take the ride of your life!
    This offer is good through November!

    New Station Alert: Channel Center - A Street / Richards Street

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, August 8th, the new Hubway station, Channel Center, is open & operational in Boston. This is a 19-dock station, located at the intersection of A Street and Richards Street, adjacent to the State Street Channel Center building.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New/Returning Station Alert: Charles Circle, Charles Street at Cambridge Street redeployed

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, August 8th, the new Hubway station, Charles Circle, is open & operational in Boston. This is actually a returning station, being redeployed following a period of construction near the Longfellow Bridge. It is a 15-dock station, located near the base of the Bridge, on Charles Street at Cambridge Street.

    During the 2013 season, the Charles Street station was the 3rd busiest Hubway station.

    Photo by Wade Roush.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: West Broadway at Dorchester Street, South Boston (now on sidewalk)

    Station Move Alert: The station located on West Broadway at Dorchester Street, in South Boston, will be moved today, Friday, August 8th, to the sidewalk, adjacent to its former location. This is a 17-dock station. There will be no additional changes to the station, though there may be a short period during the move when it will be inaccessible. An extended outage is not expected.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map will be updated. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Move Alert: JP Centre station redeployed

    Station Move Alert: Effective Friday, July 25th, the JP Centre Hubway station has been returned to its original location at the intersection of Centre and Myrtle Streets. This is a 15-dock station, adjacent to the Post Office and JP Licks.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map have been updated. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Allston Green District station at Commonwealth Ave & Griggs St, redeployed and active

    Station Alert: Effective Friday morning, July 25th, the Hubway station, Allston Green District, is open & operational in Boston. This station is a 15-dock station, located at Commonwealth Avenue & Griggs Street.

    Thank you for your patience during the construction.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Video] Fox 25 Morning News: Hubway launches 'design a bike' contest

    This morning, Hubway Marketing Manager, Benjy Kantor, joined MyFoxBoston’s Lilly Hopkins to discuss the #HubwayEveryday Bike Design Contest.

    Boston News, Weather, Sports | FOX 25 | MyFoxBoston

    Hubway Pro Tips: Safety Reminders

    There’s a lot of traffic on the roads of metro-Boston, and while you can’t control the actions of other riders and drivers, there are some simple day-to-day and ride-to-ride things you can do to keep yourself and others as safe as possible when riding Hubway.

    We recently affixed these stickers to the frames (just below the handlebars in front of the rider) on each Hubway bike. Have you seen ‘em?

    On your next Hubway ride, take a moment before you start pedaling to review these reminders.

    • Stop at lights.
    • Yield to pedestrians.
    • Ride with traffic.
    • Avoid sidewalks.
    • Watch for doors.
    • Wear a helmet.

    Hubway bicycles are easily identifiable everywhere on the streets of metro-Boston, and we hope that our riders will continue to be model citizens when it comes to safe riding practices.

    Thanks for riding Hubway safely!

    New Station Alert: Alewife, Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, July 11th, the new Hubway station, Alewife at Russell Field, is open & operational in North Cambridge. This station is a 23-dock station, located near the entrance to the Alewife T station on the east side of Alewife Brook Parkway (routes 2 & 16), adjacent to the Alewife Linear Path and Russell Field, and north of Jerry’s Pond. Please note the placement of the station in the image below.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: construction adjacent to Faneuil Hall Hubway station throughout July

    Station Alert: We have been informed by the City of Boston that construction will take place on Union Street, near Faneuil Hall, Mondays through Thursdays between the hours of 7am and 4pm, beginning the week of July 7th and continuing throughout the month.

    Access to Union Street will be limited to delivery vehicles, including Hubway staff, but Hubway riders can still access the Faneuil Hall - Union Street at North Street station by letting a representative from the construction team know that they would like access. Please note that while riders will be allowed access, you may have to wait a few moments due to safety concerns. Thank you for your patience during the construction.

    Updates will be posted when available on Hubway’s Twitter & Facebook pages. For station map and up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused by the construction, and thank you for using Hubway.

    System Alert: July 4th Weekend High Traffic, Road Closures, etc.

    SYSTEM ALERT: With July 4th weekend approaching, Hubway reminds you to take an extra moment to review stations which may be affected by temporary road closures, detours, and high traffic. In past years during this holiday weekend, some closures have affected Hubway field staff’s ability to access and rebalance stations. We ask for your patience during this time, and recommend reviewing the information below and planning accordingly.

    The following stations in the Back Bay, along the Charles, and near MBTA stations may especially be affected:

    • Esplanade, Boston
    • Beacon/Charles, Boston
    • Mass/Beacon, Boston
    • Boylston/Arlington, Boston
    • Mass/Amherst, Cambridge
    • 1 Broadway, Cambridge
    • Kendall T, Cambridge
    • Lechmere, Cambridge
    • EF - North Point Park, Cambridge [new in 2014]
    • Magoun Square @ Trum Field, Somerville

    Please note that the Somerville fireworks celebration is Thursday, July 3rd, at Trum Field, and the adjacent roadway will be closed, with access to the Hubway station prohibited from 5pm-10:30pm.

    In conjunction with festivities occurring with July 4th, there are also events in the Seaport area of Boston. Boston Harborfest is taking place from July 3rd through July 6th. South Station and all Hubway stations in and around the Seaport area could be affected. Please visit the Boston Harborfest website for event details.

    Road closures for the City of Cambridge can be found here.

    Road closures for the City of Boston can be found here.

    [Video] Hubway Everyday PSA


    Thanks to our friends at

    Station Alert: Temporary removal of Allston Green District station at Commonwealth Ave & Griggs St, beginning July 7th

    Station Alert: Due to planned construction, the Allston Green District Hubway station located at Commonwealth Avenue & Griggs Street, in Boston, will be temporarily removed, beginning Monday, July 7th.

    Plans are to redeploy the station in the same location after construction has been completed. During this time, the station will not be available for renting or docking bikes. If you are planning to use Hubway in the area during this period, please make arrangements to use alternate stations. The closest stations are:

    • JFK Crossing at Harvard & Thorndike Streets, Brookline
    • Union Square, Brighton Avenue at Cambridge Street, Boston
    • Packard’s Corner, Commonwealth at Brighton Avenue, Boston

    Updates will be posted when available on Hubway’s Twitter & Facebook pages. For station map and up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this planned outage, and thank you for using Hubway.

    Hubway's 2 millionth rider will win!

    As of Thursday morning, June 26th, Hubway riders have taken 1,982,092 trips since the system launched on July 28, 2011. Two million rides in less than three years is cause for celebration, and our friends at New Balance have graciously added to the party! The rider who takes Hubway’s ride #2,000,000 will receive a gift certificate for $130 of gear from New Balance so you can outfit yourself for ride 2,000,0001 and beyond! We recommend the New Balance Experience store at 583 Boylston.

    The winner will ride sometime this weekend, so make sure to grab a Hubway bike today! Will you be the lucky rider?!?

    Thank you to:
    New Balance

    Hubway Pro Tips: Use real time data to plan your trips

           

    HUBWAY PRO TIPS: USE REAL TIME DATA TO PLAN YOUR TRIP

                           

    There are a number of bikeshare-related applications available for mobile use. We recommend Spotcycle, available on both iPhone and Android devices. With Spotcycle, you can locate nearby stations and see how many bikes and docks are available at each. If bikes are unavailable at one station, easily find the next closest station that has a ride ready for you (or a dock to park the one you’ve got)! And since Spotcycle is powered by the same software that operates Hubway stations, you know you’ll be getting the most up-to-date information.

     

    And for those of you who absolutely LOVE data, you’ll want to check out Hubway Tracker from your desktop computer. The Tracker not only gives you real-time bike & dock availability, but can give you a sense of what times will be best for bike/dock availability, which comes in handy if you have a little wiggle room in your commute times. The Tracker will also show you how many Hubway bikes are currently in use, trends and historical data for every single station, and a list of every system “outage” (that’s what we call a station that is either completely full or completely empty). There is a ton of data available. Click here and dive in! 

    New Station Alert: EF North Point Park, East Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday morning, June 25th, the new Hubway station, EF North Point Park, is open & operational in Cambridge. This station is a 23-dock station, located on the south side of North Point Boulevard just west of Education Street, adjacent to North Point Park in eastern Cambridge. You’ll find the station right near the base of the North Bank Bridge to Charlestown.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Congress / Sleeper station out of service, Saturday, June 14, 8am-4pm

    Station Alert: Due to construction, the Hubway station located at Congress & Sleeper Streets, near the Boston Children’s Museum between the Fort Point and Seaport areas, will be out of service on Saturday, June 14th, beginning at 8am. The station is expected to be back in service by 4pm that day.

    If you were planning to use that station on Saturday, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

    We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this planned outage, and thank you for using Hubway.

    Next time you ride a Hubway, you might get something extra!

    Each month, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum hosts a special evening event as part of their Third Thursdays series. The next one is a Garden Party on Thursday, June 19th, and Hubway has an exciting way for you to attend. All Hubway members will receive $5 off the cost of admission (just bring your key fob), and 20 lucky (or savvy) Hubway riders will also find a pair of free tickets attached to their bike baskets!

    The bikes with the special prizes are being distributed into the Hubway system today (some are already out), so hurry out to your nearest station to check! They’re attached in weather-proof baggies. If you find one, let us know!






    More about Third Thursdays
    Third Thursdays is a chance to gather in the evening at the Gardner, soak up the atmosphere of the historic Courtyard garden, and explore the light-filled spaces of the Museum’s new wing. The evening features free music and a cash wine bar, plus artist and spotlight talks in the galleries. Join in clever gallery games, sketching, and a chance to get a little messy in the Gardner’s new art studio too. Even if you’ve been to the Museum recently, Third Thursdays are a unique way to spark conversation and delight.

    Member Benefit: $5 off Rock and Blues Cruise Opening Night with John Brown's Body, Friday, June 6th

    Hubway riders recently broke the single-day trips record, and we’re celebrating with a scenic boat ride along Boston Harbor this Friday night, June 6th, aboard the Provincetown II for opening night of this season’s Rock and Blues Cruise concert series.

    And we want you there with us! As a member of Hubway, you’ll receive $5 off the price of your ticket when you book online with promo code HUBWAY.

    Join us for the night, and be treated to performances from roots/reggae band John Brown’s Body and special guests The Nth Power and Van Gordon Martin!

    Book your cruise now by clicking on the Rock and Blues Cruise image.

    Station Move Alert: Buswell Street at Park Drive [Boston]

    Station Move Alert: As of Wednesday afternoon, May 28th, the Buswell Street Hubway station at Park Drive has moved across the intersection to its new location on the sidewalk along Park Drive.

    All apps, including Spotcycle, Hubway Tracker, and the official Hubway station map have been updated. Please look to those for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Cambridge rolls out spring station poster campaign

      Take Hubway...
    • out for coffee
    • to the park
    • to the library
    • to work
    • to save time
    • to the market
    • to class

    You can take Hubway almost anywhere, and the Cambridge Community Development Department (CDD) wants to remind you with its release of a series of spring posters, designed by boutique creative agency Allen Creative Group, and displaying now at Hubway station kiosks throughout the city. Scroll below for larger versions, and spread the word!

    Hubway included in BostInno's list of romantic (and inexpensive) dates in Boston

    This is an excerpt of an article that was originally published by Caroline Earle on BostInno on May 19th, 2014.

    6 Active and Romantic Date Ideas in Boston (and you won’t have to spend your whole paycheck)

    #5: RENT A HUBWAY
    You’ve seen them parked all around the city, but we’re sure you haven’t thought about them as a date idea. Hopping on a Hubway will give you and your date the flexibility to ride to your hearts’ content and then find a station to park it while you grab a quick bite to eat. Cruising the Charles never seemed so sexy.

    Check out the other date ideas here.

    Planning has Begun for the Cambridge Bicycle Network Plan

    Cambridge has a Bicycle Friendly City GOLD rating but we are continuing to improve our city for bicycling!

    Here is your chance to say what you would like the future to look like. What would make this the most bicycle friendly city on the planet? What are the ways, small or large, short-term or long-term, that would make a difference for you?

    Towards a Bikeable Future (Cambridge’s Bicycle Master Plan, currently in process) will use your input to guide bicycle planning in Cambridge. This plan is intended to be a visionary document that will help Cambridge be a true “8-80” City, one where everyone—whether they are eight or 80 years old—will be able to choose to bicycle comfortably and safely throughout the city.

    The Bicycle Network Plan is a core component of the broader ambition in Towards a Bikeable Future, and the City wants to hear from you!. Click here to visit the cambridge bicycle network plan website for ways to provide your input.

    New Station Alert: BioMed - Kendall Street, Cambridge

    New Station Alert: Effective Wednesday morning, May 14th, the new Hubway station, BioMed - Kendall Street, is open & operational. This station is a 15-dock station, located on the sidewalk of Kendall Street off of Third Street in Cambridge.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Exclusive for Hubway Members: National Bike Month Discount at City Sports

    May is National Bike Month! Now that it’s warmed up, we’ll be celebrating all month long, and City Sports has joined in to make the month even more of a party for Hubway members!

    Bring your Hubway key fob into any Boston-area City Sports store this month, and you’ll receive 20% off on all cycling apparel, footwear, and equipment!

    Happy Bike Month!

    [The Somerville Times] Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone: Hubway, regional bike investments build community

    This article is an op-ed that was originally published by Joseph A. Curtatone, Mayor of Somerville, MA, in the Somerville Times on May 1st, 2014.

    Hubway, regional bike investments build community
    By Joseph A. Curtatone

    In early April I joined in the reopening celebration of Hubway, one of the smartest bicycle infrastructure investments our region has made—and one of the most telling when it comes to understanding how our city and our nation are evolving. The country is undergoing the greatest demographic shift since the 1950s when people fled cities for the suburbs. Today that trend is reversing. People are returning to the urban core at historic levels as they seek the vibrancy and connectivity of bikeable, walkable, transit-oriented urban neighborhoods. Somerville, and the Boston region, are experiencing this shift too as we seek to make Greater Boston the most bikeable and walkable region in the country. But it’s about far more than sustainable transit. I believe what’s driving this trend is also a desire for community, which is at the heart of what makes Somerville the city we love.

    People today demand neighborhoods where they can walk or bike to public transit, work, stores and services. Families want options for getting to work that don’t include sitting in traffic, and want to live where it’s easy for their children to lead active lifestyles. Young professionals crave walking routes and bike lanes, along with access to public transit. Retirees want to walk to the neighborhood store and the local coffee shop. Ultimately, all of these groups want to live in the kind of vibrant, close-knit communities that are created when faces aren’t blurs seen through car windows, but people out on sidewalks and in the streets and paths, walking, pushing strollers and biking.

    Somerville is working to meet that demand by making it easier, safer and more appealing to bike and walk. On the biking side, we have doubled our bike network that now has more than 30 miles of bike lanes in a 4.1 square mile city, and added more than 300 new bike parking spots to city streets since 2011. Two years ago, we joined the Hubway bikeshare system with 12 stations, garnering thousands of rides monthly. And the soon-to-be completed Community Path extension will connect it to the future Lowell Street Green Line station and eventually to Cambridge, Boston and beyond.

    Meeting that demand cannot be incumbent on a single city, though, and fortunately Somerville is not alone. MassDOT’s rehabilitation of the Longfellow Bridge between Boston and Cambridge will make this heavily trafficked commuter route better and safer for bicyclists and pedestrians, and plans for the Cambridge Street bridge in Allston now include a cycle track with dedicated bike lanes and barriers separating them from the car lanes. Elsewhere in the metro region, a 4.1 mile stretch of the Northern Strand Community Trail has been paved from Malden to Everett, bringing us closer to a true seamless bike and walking connection from Malden to Somerville’s own Community Path. And MetroWest communities are getting closer to turning a 23-mile abandoned rail line into a bike and walk path that could reach the Waverly commuter rail station in Belmont—not too far from where it could also eventually connect to our Community Path.

    Greater Boston is creating a biking and walking network, and we’re seeing the effects of investment. In Somerville, biking has risen by 56 percent over two years. Biking and walking to work continues to increase according to the Alliance for Biking and Walking’s biennial report released this past month, most noticeably in cities, and Boston has the highest share of walking commuters. Meanwhile, the long-term trend for bicycling and pedestrian fatalities is downward, and biking is safer in larger cities where roads are evolving to accommodate all forms of travel.

    We need to seize this opportunity because developing our pedestrian and bike infrastructure, along with building near transit, can eliminate traffic impacts and over time shift more commuters from the roads onto our sidewalks, subways and bike routes. It helps achieve environmental justice: a recent study by the University of Minnesota found that non-white people inhale 38 percent higher levels of air pollution than whites, and Greater Boston has the fourth highest pollution disparity between whites and nonwhites. That’s particularly important to Somerville, where approximately 38,000 of our residents live within environmental justice zones, shouldering a disproportionate burden of environmental impacts caused by traffic and industry.

    Building routes for bikes and pedestrians also brings community because it builds the vibrancy that comes when increased foot traffic helps the stores, restaurants, cafes and services in our neighborhoods flourish. And when our businesses flourish our squares and nearby parks are filled—with our neighbors. Making our region walkable, bikeable and transit-oriented creates urban rooms—active streetscapes supported by workers during the day and residents during the night.

    This isn’t just about biking. This is about the kind of community we want to build—equitable, connected, healthy and convenient for residents—and a place where you bump into friends on a street corner, chat with other parents at the neighborhood park, or wave to your barber when you walk by his shop. Economic health then follows suit. Thriving squares filled with busy businesses creates a resilient, self-sufficient economic base for cities and the region. And when we make connections that move pedestrians and cyclists between neighborhoods, we create the growth and vitality that will help us bring back historic neighborhoods such as Brickbottom and Inner Belt. Hubway is one of a number of invaluable tools to make and increase those connections. I’m pleased that a new Hubway station is now open at Magoun Square and I look forward to the expansion of Hubway eastward in our city. Spring is here—let’s get out and ride.

    Station Alert: Summer/Cutter station (Somerville) is back

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 25th, the Hubway station located at Summer Street and Cutter Avenue is back, fully deployed, and operational. This is an 11-dock station, located on the outskirts of Davis Square in front of the VFW at the intersection of Summer St and Cutter Ave, near the intersection of Elm and Russell. Please note: Summer/Elm is where Russell becomes Cutter.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: remaining Brookline stations return today

    Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, April 25th, the Hubway stations listed below, located along the Boston Marathon route in Brookline, have returned, and are fully deployed and operational:

    • Washington Square: This is a 15-dock station, located along Beacon Street inbound just east of Washington Street.
    • Coolidge Corner: This is a 19-dock station (pictured below), adjacent to the T tracks (between inbound/outbound Beacon) between Centre Street and Winchester Street.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Two more Back Bay stations return today

    Station Alert: Effective Thursday afternoon, April 24th, the following Hubway stations located in the Back Bay close to the Boston Marathon route, have returned, and are fully deployed and operational:

    • Newbury Street / Hereford Street: This is a 13-dock station, located on the northwest side of the intersection of Newbury and Hereford.
    • Charles Street at Beacon Street: This is a 15-dock station, located where Charles meets Beacon, near the intersection with River Street. Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability. Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Four Boylston Street stations return today

    Station Alert: Effective Thursday afternoon, April 24th, the following four Hubway stations located along the Boston Marathon route, have returned, and are fully deployed and operational:

    • Boylston at Berkeley: This is a 15-dock station, located on the south side of Boylston between Berkeley and Clarendon.
    • Boylston at Fairfield: This is a 19-dock station, located on the north side of Boylston between Fairfield and Gloucester.
    • Boston Public Library - 700 Boylston: This is a 25-dock station, located in front of the Boston Public Library entrance on Dartmouth.
    • New Balance Experience Store - Boylston / Dartmouth: This is a 15-dock station, located in front of the New Balance store at 583 Boylston between Dartmouth and Clarendon.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Hubway's new customer support phone number

    EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY: Hubway’s new customer support phone number is 1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929)

    We only changed one digit, but it’s an important one. Starting today, Tuesday, April 22nd, Hubway Customer Support has a new phone number. Hubway’s keys, docks, bikes, and stations are designed to be intuitive, but if you ever need any help, ignore the old number on your key fob, drop us a line here, and we’ll be happy to help.

    1-855-9HUBWAY (948-2929)
    24 hours a day / 7 days a week
    in English and Spanish.

    If you have suggestions for future station locations, please continue to use our Station Locator Tool to tell us exactly where you want to see them. Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Hubway Everyday,

    The Hubway Team

    Station Relocation Alert: Harvard University Housing & Harvard University Transportation Services stations in slightly different locations

    Station Alert: The following two Hubway stations were deployed today, Thursday, April 17th, but the locations are slightly different than last year:

    • Harvard University Housing - 111 Western Ave at Soldier’s Field Park This is a 15-dock station that is now closer to Soldier’s Field.
    • Harvard University Transportation Services - 175 North Harvard St This is a 19-dock station that was formerly located in the parking lot at the intersection of N Harvard and Western and has now moved around the corner onto N Harvard.

    Both stations are open & operational.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [PeopleForBikes] Protected bike lanes coming to town will make biking easy on big streets

    The following is a guest post by PeopleForBikes, a movement to improve bicycling in the U.S.

    Great news for comfortable biking: Boston is one of six cities recently selected to receive two years of free expertise and support for building a network of protected bike lanes that physically separate bike and auto traffic. The PeopleForBikes Green Lane Project will help the city build the Connect Historic Boston project, which starts construction this fall on a family-friendly figure-eight bike loop around and through downtown.

    New York City’s network of protected bike lanes, currently the country’s biggest, has been a big part of making Citi Bike bikeshare so popular there: in a recent Manhattan bike count, 45 percent of Citi Bike users were using the protected lanes. We’re eager to see more of this modern bike infrastructure hit the streets. The image above is an artist rendering from Connect Historic Boston of what the protected lanes might look like on Causeway Street at Haverhill Street.

    To join PeopleForBikes and support its programs like the Green Lane Project, visit peopleforbikes.org/hubway.

    Station Alert: List of station deployments delayed until after Boston Marathon

    Station Alert: As requested by the City of Boston, the following stations will not be deployed until late April, after the Boston Marathon:

      BROOKLINE
    • Coolidge Corner - Beacon St @ Centre St
    • Washington Square at Washington St. / Beacon St
      BOSTON
    • Newbury St / Hereford St
    • Boylston at Fairfield
    • Boylston St / Berkeley St
    • Boston Public Library - 700 Boylston St.
    • New Balance Experience Store - Boylston / Dartmouth
    • Charles St at Beacon St

    These stations are expected to be deployed the week of April 22nd, but the schedule is subject to change. Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Charles Circle / MGH station expected to return late April

    Station Alert: Due to Longfellow Bridge construction, the deployment of Hubway’s Charles Circle / MGH location is delayed as a location is finalized near the previous location. The station is expected to be deployed in April but the exact timing has yet to be determined.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Day Boulevard, South Boston

    New Station Alert: Effective Friday morning, April 11th, the new Hubway station, Day Boulevard, in South Boston, is open & operational. This is a 19-dock station, located on a wide sidewalk alongside Day Boulevard, just north of the rotary intersection with Broadway.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    New Station Alert: Dana Park, Cambridgeport

    New Station Alert: Effective Thursday morning, April 10th, the new Hubway station, Dana Park, in the Cambridgeport region of Cambridge, is open & operational. This station is a 19-dock station, located on Lawrence Street between Pearl and Magazine, adjacent to Dana Park.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: New (temporary) location for JP Centre Station, Jamaica Plain

    Station Alert: Effective Wednesday morning, April 9th, the JP Centre Hubway station located on Centre Street at Myrtle Street in front of the post office, has been deployed down the block to Centre Street at Seaverns. This station is a 15-dock station, adjacent to the Bank of America, and is fully operational. This is a temporary location, pending a community meeting later this spring.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

    Thanks for using Hubway!

    [Boston Globe] Public-Private Funding for Hubway paying off

    This article was originally published by Martine Powers in the Boston Globe on April 7th, 2014.

    PUBLIC-PRIVATE FUNDING FOR HUBWAY PAYING OFF
    City in line for more profit in Year 4

    For some bike-share programs in North America, it was a winter of discontent.

    In January, Montreal’s bike-share program Bixi filed for bankruptcy. Then, last month, reports surfaced that the operators of New York’s Citi Bike had asked for tens of millions of dollars in aid from the City of New York.

    But in Boston last week, Hubway opened for its fourth season with a rosy financial prognosis, a fresh contract between the City of Boston and bike-share operators, an expectation that the system will continue turning a profit, and plans for 10 new stations.

    “We’re in a very, very solid financial place,” said Nicole Freedman, director of the city’s Boston Bikes program. “We’re in a position to fund expansion.”

    Some have attributed Hubway’s success to its more conservative choices — closing for winter and launching with a compact system that spread cautiously — as well as its dependence on both public and private money.

    “Bike share systems in Boston, Denver, Chicago, Minneapolis, and Washington, D.C., all of which started relatively small and relied on public sector funds, were able to launch with success, iron out kinks, stabilize, and expand quickly,” said Mia Birk, Hubway Bike Share vice president.

    Now, Boston will pay a lower rate for bike-share operations with a new contract that stands to allow the city to collect larger profits.

    Previously Boston divided the costs of operating the system 50-50 with Alta Bicycle Share, the contractor that operates and maintains the system’s bikes, stations, software, and memberships. Boston uses public grant money, along with private sponsorships, to pay the city’s share without dipping into municipal coffers — and up until now, Alta and Boston have split the profits in half. It was a risk-sharing model favored by former mayor Thomas M. Menino, who was wary of placing the city on the hook if forays into bike share fell flat, Freedman said.

    Now, Boston will pay Alta for the full operations cost, but in turn, the city will take all of the profits from membership fees and advertising — a sign that city officials are confident in the bike-share program’s continued profitability. And the city is getting Alta’s services at a new, lower rate: Boston will pay the company about $70 per bike dock per month for maintenance and operations, about a 30 percent reduction from previous operation rates, and well below the average price for other bike-share systems, such as the $111 rate paid by Capital Bikeshare in Washington, D.C.

    The cities of Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline — some of which use municipal dollars to help pay their share — are considering whether to switch to Boston’s funding model.

    Hubway’s diversified funding approach has been championed by some as the most stable option.

    In January, Bixi, the company that operated bike shares in Montreal and Toronto and also manufactures bike-share equipment, filed for bankruptcy protection. The City of Montreal, which is owed about $30 million from Bixi, has seized the company’s Montreal assets. The City of Toronto has taken over its own bike-share operations.

    And New York’s Citi Bike — widely touted for being funded entirely through private sponsorships and membership fees — is now seeking tens of millions of dollars from the City of New York to maintain and expand operations, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal. Citi Bike, also operated by Alta, has proven popular with residents, but a faulty software system and sparse winter ridership incited financial concerns.

    “As with any new industry, there are challenges,” Alta officials said in a statement, adding that the challenges are fixable “and we are working diligently to fix them.”

    But some, such as Caroline Samponaro, senior director for campaigns and organizing at Transportation Alternatives, a New York City transit advocacy group, think that Citi Bike should adopt Hubway’s model, incorporating corporate sponsorships and public money.

    Starting the system without public funding was necessary in a city where naysayers threatened to prevent the bike share from getting off the ground, she said. But, she continued, government funding is now necessary to ensure stations spread evenly across the city’s neighborhoods.

    “It’s a new thing to think about bike share as a public transit system, but now that’s where we are, and it’s important to bring some amount of subsidy so our program can grow to a scale that’s equitable,” Samponaro said.

    Encouraging an equitable distribution of bikes and stations is also a problem in Boston, where large swaths — East Boston, Dorchester, Roxbury, Mattapan, and Hyde Park — have few or no stations.

    This year, Cambridge embarked on a pilot to test how the system would fare during the winter. Emily Stapleton, Hubway general manager, said ridership in Cambridge was 15 to 20 percent of regular season averages. And there were no Hubway crashes through the winter — a sign of success, said Cara Seiderman, Cambridge’s transportation program manager.

    “It was a very tough winter, and counter to what you might expect, we were very happy about it,” Seiderman said. “It gave us the opportunity to do exactly what we wanted to do with this pilot, figuring out what happens when you have cold and difficult winter.”

    Still, Cambridge officials have not decided whether year-round service will be permanent. Likewise, Freedman said a decision has not been made on whether Boston will experiment with an all-seasons operation. With fewer winter riders, she said, each ride becomes more expensive, and that is money that could also be used to expand the system into other neighborhoods. Instead of going year-round, she conjectured, the off-season could be shortened to just January and February.

    “It really comes down to cost and benefit,” Freedman said. “And if we have a limited amount of money, how do we use that money?”

    [Boston Globe] Boston's bike share program thrives, official says

    This article was originally published in the Boston Globe on April 7th, 2014.

    BOSTON (AP) — Boston’s bicycle sharing program, which just opened for its fourth season, is thriving, the program’s director said, at a time when similar programs in other cities are struggling financially.

    Hubway opened last week with a positive financial prognosis, a fresh contract between the city and bike-share operators, an expectation that the system will continue turning a profit and plans for 10 new stations, The Boston Globe reported (http://b.globe.com/1mU7vFD ).

    ‘‘We’re in a very, very solid financial place,’’ said Nicole Freedman, director of the city’s program. ‘‘We’re in a position to fund expansion.’’

    Montreal’s bike-share program filed for bankruptcy in January. Last month, reports surfaced that operators of New York’s program had asked for tens of millions of dollars in aid from the city.

    Some have attributed Hubway’s success to more conservative choices — closing for winter and launching with a compact system that spread cautiously — as well as its dependence on both public and private money.

    Boston will now pay a lower rate for bike-share operations with a new contract that could allow the city to collect larger profits.

    Previously Boston divided the costs of operating the system 50-50 with Alta Bicycle Share, the contractor that operates and maintains the system’s bikes, stations, software and memberships. Boston uses public grant money, along with private sponsorships, to pay the city’s share without dipping into municipal coffers. Up until now, Alta and Boston have split the profits in half.

    Now, Boston will pay Alta for the full operations cost, but in turn, the city will take all of the profits from membership fees and advertising.

    PRESS RELEASE: Hubway Reopens System-Wide Operations Wednesday, April 2nd








    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Click here to download PDF.
    April 1, 2014

    CONTACT:
    Nicole Freedman, Boston Bikes / City of Boston
    nicole.freedman@boston.gov,617.918.4456

    Joe Viola, Town of Brookline Community Planning
    jviola@brooklinema.gov, 617.730.2125

    Cara Seiderman, City of Cambridge Development Department
    cseiderman@cambridgema.gov, 617.349.4629

    Sarah Spicer, City of Somerville Transportation & Infrastructure
    sspicer@somervillema.gov, 617.625.6600 x2519

    Benjy Kantor, Hubway
    benjykantor@altabicycleshare.com, 617.968.0361

    HUBWAY REOPENS SYSTEM-WIDE OPERATIONS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2nd
    Mayor Walsh to officially “flip the switch” at New Balance Experience Store
    as Boston, Brookline, Somerville rejoin Cambridge after successful winter operations.


    Hubway, metro-Boston’s public bike share system, will formally reopen system-wide operations with a special reopening day party hosted by New Balance at the New Balance Experience Store in Boston (583 Boylston Street), on Wednesday, April 2nd, from Noon to 2pm. Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh is scheduled to speak at 12:30pm and will officially reopen Boston, Brookline, and Somerville’s stations by docking the first bike of the season at the New Balance Hubway station on Boylston Street.

    “Mayor Walsh is thrilled to be reopening Hubway,” said Nicole Freedman, Director of the city’s Boston Bikes program. “It’s really become part of the transportation fabric of Boston.”

    In addition to Mayor Walsh, speakers at the event will include Somerville Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone; Brookline Selectman, Neil Wishinsky; New Balance President & CEO, Rob DeMartini; Boston Bikes Director, Nicole Freedman; and Hubway General Manager, Emily Stapleton. The event will feature special guests including Red Sox mascot Wally the Green Monster and “Newbie” the New Balance mascot, who will be taking pictures with attendees in the Hubway photo booth. There will also be giveaways of New Balance shoes, Hubway memberships, Hub On Wheels registrations, gift certificates, and other bike-related gear, and free food will be provided by Boloco and Ben & Jerry’s.

    The Hubway bike share is a regional partnership between Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville. Wednesday’s system-wide reopening connects seamlessly with a Cambridge year-round operations pilot that saw an average of approximately 2,000 Hubway trips per week during the winter season with no incidents or injuries reported. “Cambridge is very excited for the return of Hubway to other points in the network,” says Cambridge Mayor David Maher. “Our pilot program kept Hubway available throughout the winter and has shown the incredible strength of this program. I know that both residents and visitors benefit a great deal from this car-free solution, and our city is committed to continue encouraging this type of mode-shift for commuters.”

    This season, 1,300 shared Hubway bicycles will be distributed throughout the system’s 140 stations across the region. While station expansions last fall brought service to neighborhoods in Jamaica Plain and Dorchester, 10 new expansion stations are planned for 2014.

    The City of Cambridge has announced plans to add six new Hubway stations, including one on Kendall Street donated by BioMed Realty. “We congratulate the City of Cambridge on the opening of new Hubway stations across the city, including the Kendall Street station,” said Bill Kane, Vice President, Leasing and Development at BioMed Realty. “We are excited to be a part of the Hubway program and the bike share initiative which is consistent with our sustainability efforts throughout Cambridge.” The other five Cambridge locations will be announced in April as they are deployed.

    The City of Boston has added two new stations in the Seaport District on the campus of station sponsor Design Center, as well as two additional sites to be announced.

    Four stations in Brookline are expected to reopen in the same locations as last year. “We’re excited to begin our third year as a member of the bike share program,” says Betsy DeWitt, Chairwoman of the Brookline Board of Selectmen. “Hubway has provided Brookline residents with a great addition to the regional transit system. Hubway stations are located in the Town’s major commercial areas – Coolidge Corner, Washington Square, Brookline Village – with direct access to public transportation so that riders can easily travel intercity.  Brookline residents are strong supporters, as the continued increase in ridership has shown.  We look forward to another successful season.”

    Somerville will be reopening its 12 stations in 2014, with two location changes; one from Ball Square to Magoun Square, and the other to be announced. “Bicycle infrastructure connects people with mass transit and jobs,” says Somerville Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone. “It brings more customers to local businesses and attracts developers with vibrant, active streets filled with faces seen on foot or bicycle rather than through the windows of cars. Hubway is one of the best investments our administration has taken on.”

    By April 2nd, approximately 100 stations will have been deployed and will be activated for customer use. The remaining 40 stations are expected to be deployed in the coming days and weeks. Stations in Brookline and Boston that are located along the Boston Marathon route, for example, will not be deployed until after the running of the marathon, which is scheduled to take place Monday, April 21. Customers can view the Hubway website or use the Spotcycle app to confirm station availability.

    Since opening in 2011, the Hubway system has logged over 1.7 million bicycle miles, and Hubway riders have burned 67 million calories and offset 500 tons of CO2 emissions. Hubway has nearly 10,000 annual subscribers and last year sold more than 79,000 24-Hour subscriptions, 9,000 72-Hour subscriptions, and 2,000 monthly subscriptions.

    Find out more about the Hubway system, station expansions, deployments and outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    ###

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Hubway Launches World's First Unicycle-Share

    Does the Hubway garage have a unicycle? YES!
    Does our mechanic, Mary, know how to ride it? YES!
    Is Hubway rolling out the first unicycle-share in the country? ABSOLUTELY NOT!

    If we didn’t have an actual, very cool announcement about tomorrow’s (April 2, 2014) system-wide reopening, we’d take this April Fool’s joke a bit further. But we don’t want to tease you too much, so for now enjoy the picture of the unicycle docked safely at a Hubway station, and read the real, complete press release by clicking the headline or image below:

    HUBWAY REOPENS SYSTEM-WIDE OPERATIONS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2nd
    Mayor Walsh to officially “flip the switch” at New Balance Experience Store
    as Boston, Brookline, Somerville rejoin Cambridge after successful winter operations.

    Add a description

    [WBUR - NPR] Hubway Set To Reopen With 10 New Stations

    This article was originally published by Martin Kessler on WBUR.org on April 1st, 2014.

    BOSTON — The Boston-area bike-sharing program Hubway reopens Wednesday.

    Most of the 140 stations operated by Hubway — a program that allows riders to pick up and drop off rented bikes at stations in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville — were closed for the winter. About 100 stations, including 10 new ones, will open Wednesday.

    The remaining stations will reopen throughout April. Stations along the Boston Marathon route will not reopen until after the April 21 race.

    Four of the new stations will be located in Boston; the other six will be in Cambridge.

    In a pilot program to test the feasibility of yearlong service, stations in Cambridge were open throughout the winter. According to Hubway, approximately 2,000 trips were made per week throughout the winter.

    “The fact that we were able to pilot running year-round operations turned out to be one of the most popular things that we’ve done,” Cambridge Transportation Program Manager Cara Seiderman told WBUR. “Everything really went smoothly.”

    Hubway came to Boston in 2011. Last summer, it expanded to Brookline, Somerville and Cambridge.

    In an effort to address health disparities, Boston last week announced the creation of the “Prescribe-a-Bike” program, which allows Boston Medical Center physicians to refer low-income patients for a $5 Hubway membership. A typical annual membership costs $85.

    [Metro Boston] Cambridge cyclists took 32,000 Hubway trips this winter

    This article was originally published by Morgan Rousseau in Metro Boston on March 31st, 2014.

    Despite the bitter, seemingly endless cold and snow that wore away at New Englanders in recent months, Hubway is reporting that the winter blues didn’t keep Cambridge’s cyclists off the roads.

    Last year, Hubway announced that it would test a pilot program in Cambridge. Most stations operated throughout the winter to test year-round feasibility.

    Due to the positive reception, Cambridge cyclists can expect year-round operations to continue.

    “We received a considerable amount of positive feedback from Hubway users about keeping the system open year-round and the team did a great job of managing operations including through the various storm events,” said Seiderman.

    Although no formal decision has been made, the city anticipates that it is likely it will continue with year-round operations.

    “The other municipalities are [sic] considering what they will do and I expect an announcement will be forthcoming, although their focus right now is on spring re-opening and getting new stations out,” she said.

    The busiest Cambridge stations this winter generally were the MIT stations, Central Square, Kendall Square and Inman Square.

    Hubway is set to open its spring operations Wednesday.

    [Video: CBS Boston] Hubway Gears Up For Bike Share Program's Spring Launch

    This piece originally aired on CBS Boston on March 28th, 2014.


    BOSTON (CBS) – On the streets of downtown Boston, pedal power is returning from hibernation

    So inside a Charlestown warehouse, mechanics are going full tilt on the tuneups to make sure the Hubway fleet is roadworthy.

    Hubway is the public bike-share program whereby you can grab some wheels at docking stations around town, pedal to your destination and drop it off at another station.

    The service comes with online trackers and mobile apps.

    “So there is some planning and thinking involved to starting your trip,” said Hubway’s Emily Stapleton.

    Next week 1,300 bikes now in the warehouse will be out on the streets when about two-thirds of Hubway’s 140 stations will open up in Boston, Cambridge, Brookline and Somerville.

    Roughly 9,700 folks now pay an annual fee of $85 to Hubway, which entitles riders to unlimited trips under 30 minutes.

    But a new program will let doctors at Boston Medical Center actually prescribe a membership to low-income patients as part of an exercise regimen for just $5.

    “For the mayor it’s very important that this program is for all Boston residents regardless of income,” said Nicole Freedman, Boston’s bike czar.

    Believe it or not, some Hubway bike stations were open all winter long in Cambridge to test snowy ridership — and people still made 2,000 trips per week.

    But the lion’s share of docking stations – and bikes – spend the winter inside and have to be hauled back outside each spring.

    Hubway’s spring launch is actually earlier this year than last, despite our nasty winter.

    So the next several days are going to be kind of crazy in the repair shop.

    [Boston Herald] Soon-to-reopen Hubway pedals 10 new stations

    This article was originally published by Marie Szaniszlo in the Boston Herald on March 28th, 2014.

    In what may be the surest sign yet that spring has arrived, the Hubway bike-share program is set to reopen next week with 10 new stations and new, subsidized memberships for low-income patients of one Boston hospital.

    After a year-round Cambridge pilot program that averaged 2,000 trips per week during the winter, nearly 100 of the 140 stations in that city, as well as in Boston, Brookline and Somerville, are expected to be operational by April 2, with most of the remaining ones to be rolled out in early April.

    Eight stations that are along the marathon route will be deployed after the April 21 race, said Emily Stapleton, general manager of Alta Bicycle Share, the Oregon-based company Boston hired to run the program in 2011.

    Since then, Hubway has logged about 1.6 million trips and 9,700 annual members among the four communities, Stapleton said.

    “Mayor (Martin J.) Walsh is thrilled to be reopening Hubway,” said Nicole Freedman, the city’s director of bicycle programs. “It’s really become part of the transportation fabric of Boston.”

    Two of the 10 new bike stations will be at the Boston Design Center, which is sponsoring them, Stapleton said.

    The exact locations of two other new Boston stations and six new Cambridge stations are expected to be announced next month.

    Walsh and Boston Medical Center this week also announced the launch of “Prescribe a Bike,” a new program that allows BMC doctors to write prescriptions for $5 Hubway annual memberships, which normally cost $85, to low-income residents.

    You're invited to Hubway's Official System-wide Reopening Day Party, Wednesday, April 2nd

    This is no April Fool’s joke! System-wide Hubway begins anew as Boston, Brookline, and Somerville rejoin Cambridge operations. Join us to celebrate at the official reopening day party!

    Wednesday, April 2nd, Noon-2pm
    New Balance Experience Store
    583 Boylston Street, Boston
    RSVP here!


  • FOOD: Free burritos from Boloco & ice cream provided by Ben & Jerry’s Boston.

  • FREE STUFF: Giveaways & discounts from New Balance, Hubway, Hub on Wheels, and more.

  • DIGNITARIES: Speakers from Hubway member municipalities.

  • MASCOTS EVERYWHERE: Wally the Green Monster & Newbie!

  • PHOTO BOOTH: Get your picture taken Wally, Newbie, and friends!

  • FREE PASSES: Grab a free Hubway 24-Hour pass.

  • Music, merriment, special announcements, and more!

    More details to be announced on March 31st.
    RSVP here to let us know you’re coming!

    Thank you to:

    Add a description      Add a description




    Add a description      Add a description

  • System Alert: System-wide Hubway operations reopen Wednesday, April 2nd

    Boston, Brookline, Somerville rejoin Cambridge as Hubway reopens system-wide on Wednesday, April 2nd.

    “Spring must be on its way if Hubway is setting up shop!”
    “I get so excited when I see Hubway stations back again #springishere”
    “Yaaaaasss can’t wait for Hubway season #suchatease.”


    Snow may be on the way this week, but we have something for you to look forward to! Consider yourself the first to know: After a successful year-round pilot program in Cambridge, Hubway’s system-wide operations begin anew with an official reopening on Wednesday, April 2nd.

    The Hubway team has been hard at work deploying stations, and nearly 100 stations (out of 140) are expected to be operational by April 2nd, with most remaining stations to be rolled out in early April. Please note: stations along Boylston Street in Brookline and Boston will not be deployed until after the Boston Marathon.

    For up-to-the-minute station, bike, and dock availability, we recommend using the Spotcycle smartphone app, or Hubway Tracker from a desktop computer.

    Get ready to ride.

    New(ish) Station Alert: Lafayette Square station returns

    New(ish) Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, March 21st, the Hubway station located at Lafayette Square in Cambridge, has been re-deployed in the same location as last year, and is fully operational. This station is a 19-dock station on Mass Ave at Lafayette Square adjacent to Main & Columbia Streets.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    System Alert: deploying stations for full system reopening

    SYSTEM ALERT: Hubway has begun deploying stations in Boston this week in preparation for the spring season. Somerville and Brookline stations will follow shortly.

    PLEASE NOTE: While the Cambridge winter pilot is still taking place as normal, at this time Boston / Brookline / Somerville stations are not operational and they will not accept bicycle returns. Plans are to fully connect all deployed stations within the next few weeks. Sign up to receive the reopening announcement by entering your email on the Hubway homepage.

    If you have any question about whether a particular station is open or closed, please check Hubway Tracker or download Spotcycle for your smartphone for the most up-to-date information, or call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-4HUBWAY (448-2929).

    [Boston Magazine] Boston selected for national project to create cycletracks

    This article was originally published by Steven Annear in Boston Magazine on March 11th, 2014.

    The country’s “leading bicycle movement” has selected Boston as one of just six cities in the country to get new bike lanes designed to help keep cyclists separated from vehicles on the roadways.

    Nicole Freedman, director of the city’s Boston Bikes program, sent out an email Monday announcing that The PeopleForBikes Green Lane Project will work with officials to implement “its intensive two-year program to build protected bike lanes” on city streets.

    Under the terms of the partnership program, Boston will get strategic, technical assistance from The Green Lane Project, an initiative run by the non-profit PeopleForBikes, to speed up the installation of protected bike lanes—also known as cycle tracks—already in the works. The lanes will keep cyclists and cars in two different sections of the roadways by using either raised curbs, planters, parked cars, or posts “to make riding a bike an appealing option for more people.”

    Freedman said the projects vary. Some of the proposed tracks can be done by repainting roadways, while others are still in the design phase. The tracks are city-funded, but will most likely be paid for through grant money. The Green Lane Project helps push the projects forward in a timely manner. “We proposed a specific number of projects in our application all in various levels of design, from early concept to advanced design. Implementation is subject to the public process,” she said.

    Boston was picked from a pool of 100 cities across the country and will join Atlanta, Denver, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, and Seattle as the test cities for the program. The folks at PeopleForBikes said it was a tough decision sifting through the various cities that applied for the installation project, but because Boston has a reputation for getting certain things done in record time, it made the area an obvious choice for the grant.

    “It was extremely difficult to narrow down our selection to just six cities; we are seeing an upsurge of interest in accommodating bikes on busy city streets,” said Martha Roskowski, PeopleForBikes’ vice president of local innovation. “Boston has ambitious goals and a strong vision supported by the elected officials and the community. They are poised to get projects on the ground quickly and will serve as an excellent example for other interested cities.”

    Boston leaders will join the Green Lane Project at an official kickoff event in Indianapolis in late April, according to Freedman.

    “This is just what Boston needs to jumpstart the expansion of protected bike lanes here,” said David Watson, executive director of the Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition, or MassBike. “We sent a letter of support for the city’s application to the Green Lane Project, and we are looking forward to seeing more people of all ages and abilities biking safely in Boston.”

    The announcement comes just days after the city hosted a meeting to outline the design plans for a new network of bike paths that will loop around the historic monuments Boston has to offer, as part of the “Connect Historic Boston” project.

    According to project details, a four-mile track will circle the downtown area after modifications to busy streets are made to better connect cyclists with regional paths and T stations. The bike trail will include a two-way, elevated bicycle track along Staniford, Causeway, and Commercial Streets, as well as Atlantic Avenue. It will also require the reconstruction of Lowell Square and Keany Square.

    “Over the next six years, I want to take Boston from one of the best bicycling cities in the country to one of the best in the world. Investing in protected bike lanes is a critical path to that success,” Mayor Marty Walsh said in a statement Monday.

    Since 2007, Boston has added 82 miles of bike lanes to city streets and 1,500 bike racks. The city also launched one of the first bike share systems in the country, Hubway, which has grown to 130 stations and more than 1,100 available bicycles.

    “With Connect Historic Boston planning underway, we are on track to see some incredible improvements over the next few years, not just for people on bikes, but for all road users, ” Freedman said.

    [Boston Cyclists Union] Boston selected for national project to create cycletracks

    This article was originally published by the Boston Cyclists Union on March 10th, 2014.

    The PeopleForBikes Green Lane Project has selected Boston as one of six new U.S. cities to join its intensive two-year program to build protected bike lanes. Boston will receive financial, strategic and technical assistance to create protected bike lanes, also known as cycletracks. The Boston Cyclists Union helped support the city’s application this year, and also helped the city apply for the first year of the program in 2012. Boston, Atlanta, GA, Denver, CO, Indianapolis, IN, Pittsburgh, PA and Seattle, WA.,were chosen from more than 100 U.S. cities that submitted letters of interest for the program.
    Cycletracks are separated from traffic by curbs, planters, parked cars or posts to make riding a bike an appealing option for more people.

    “It was extremely difficult to narrow down our selection to just six cities; we are seeing an upsurge of interest in accommodating bikes on busy city streets,” said Martha Roskowski, PeopleForBikes Vice President of Local Innovation. “Boston has ambitious goals and a strong vision supported by the elected officials and the community. They are poised to get projects on the ground quickly and will serve as an excellent example for other interested cities.”

    “Over the next six years, I want to take Boston from one of the best bicycling cities in the country to one of the best in the world. Investing in protected bike lanes is a critical path to that success,” Boston’s Mayor Martin Walsh said.

    Since 2007, Boston went from the worst bicycling city in the country, according to Bicycling Magazine, to one of the best. Boston launched one of the first bike share systems in the country, the New Balance Hubway system, which has since grown to 130 stations and more than 1100 bicycles. Boston has added 82 miles of bike lanes and1500 bike racks and created one of the most successful community bike programs in the country, donating 1,000 bikes to low income residents and training 5,000 youth in 2013.

    Under Mayor Walsh’s leadership, Boston will begin investing in protected bike lanes consistent with the recently completed Bike Network Plan, implement a women’s cycling program and expand Hubway into the neighborhoods. “With Connect Historic Boston planning underway, we are on track to see some incredible improvements over the next few years, not just for people on bikes, but for all road users, “said Boston Director of Bicycle Programs, Nicole Freedman.

    In the first two years of the program (2012 and 2013), the Green Lane Project worked closely with other major U.S. cities – Austin, TX, Chicago, IL, Memphis, TN, Portland, OR, San Francisco, CA and Washington, DC – to build protected bike lanes. Since then, the number of protected bike lanes on city streets nationwide has nearly doubled from 80 to 142 – with more than half of all growth coming from the Project’s six focus cities. The founding cities will continue as mentors to the new class while continuing to build their bicycling networks with the momentum driven by the Project.

    Boston leaders will join the Green Lane Project at an official kickoff event in Indianapolis in late April.

    #WinterWonderHubway Photo Contest Winners Receive Their Prizes

    When Hubway teamed up with the awesome crew at Timbuk2 to present the #WinterWonderHubway photo contest, we knew we would be introduced to some of our most creative and dedicated Hubway riders! So it was a special treat for us to gather together with them last month at Cambridge City Hall Annex to hand them their very cool custom bag prize and talk with them about why they plan to #hubwayeveryday.

    We captured their first reactions to their new bags! Check out the video!

    And click here to view the winning contest entry photos!

    [BostInno] Boston Among 6 Cities Selected to Create More Green Bike Lanes

    This article was originally published by Nate Boroyan in BostInno on March 11th, 2014.

    The PeopleForBikes Green Lane project has chosen Boston to join an intensive two-year program to build protected, green cycling lanes throughout each city. During the course of the project, Boston will receive financial aid, strategic and technical assistance to create cycletracks.

    “Over the next six years, I want to take Boston from one of the best bicycling cities in the country to one of the best in the world. Investing in protected bike lanes is a critical path to that success,” Boston’s Mayor Martin Walsh said in a statement.

    Boston, along with Atlanta, GA.; Denver, CO.; Indianapolis, IN.; Pittsburgh, PA.; and Seattle WA.; were the six cities chosen this year out of 100 applicants.

    Boston’s application to the Green Lane Project was backed by the Boston Cyclist Union, which also helped the city apply in 2012.

    “It was extremely difficult to narrow down our selection to just six cities; we are seeing an upsurge of interest in accommodating bikes on busy city streets,” said Martha Roskowski, PeopleForBikes Vice President of Local Innovation, in a statement.

    Programs such as Connect Historic Boston and the possibility of expanding Hubway service into neighborhoods, Boston Bikes Director Nicole Freedman said, indicates the city is “on track to see some incredible improvements over the next few years, not just for people on bikes, but for all road users.

    The Green Lane Project is entering its third year. Since 2012, the project has nearly doubled the amount of bike lanes nationwide, from 80 up to 142.

    [Montreal Gazette] Bike-sharing has health benefits, study finds

    This is an excerpt of an article that was originally published by Jill Barker in The Montreal Gazette on March 2nd, 2014.

    In one study, most of the users of a bike-share program were men 15 to 44. Bixi could maximize health benefits by trying to boost ridership among women and older cyclists. Men benefit from a decrease in heart disease, while women have a reduction in depression, the study, in London, showed.

    When all factors were considered, including the risks associated with cycling, the boost in physical activity among bike-share users resulted in significant health gains at the population level. Men benefited from a decrease in heart disease while women had a reduction in depression. Because women used the service less than men, though, they realized fewer health benefits.

    At the individual level, however, the health benefits were small, due mainly to the infrequent use of the bikes. Researchers estimated a reduced death rate of 3.3 — 10.9 deaths per million users per year.

    As for the effects of air pollution on urban cyclists, the researchers estimated that exposure levels were small and of little effect as compared to other modes of transportation.

    When it came to road injuries, the rate of injury was lower than for cycling in general, despite the lack of compulsory helmets. It was hypothesized that the heavier, sturdy bikes resulted in reduced speeds, which when combined with designated bike paths and built-in lights, made the use of city bikes safer than traditional road bikes.

    Overall, the researchers concluded, the benefits of using bike-share programs outweighed any risk. This is especially true as cyclists got older. In a younger population, 30 to 44 years old, where the risk of chronic disease is lower, the health effects were minimal. But for bike-share users 45 to 59 years of age, the extra physical activity had a far greater impact on health.

    To read the full article, click here.

    Press Release: Data Geeks: Rejoice! 2013 Comprehensive Hubway Trip Data Released













    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 27, 2014
    Click here to download PDF.

    CONTACT: Jessica Robertson, Transportation Coordinator, MAPC
    JRobertson@mapc.org

    DATA GEEKS: REJOICE!
    Metropolitan Area Planning Council and Hubway
    Release New Comprehensive Hubway Trip Data


    Boston – The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), in partnership with Hubway, the City of Boston, the City of Cambridge, the City of Somerville, and the Town of Brookline, today released new and comprehensive trip data from the Hubway bike-share system. Taken as a whole, these data can illustrate major travel patterns, help Hubway plan new stations and optimize rebalancing, and even show where new transit connections might be needed.

    The data include information on Hubway trips from the July 2011 launch through the end of the regular 2013 season. Information includes the starting and ending time and date of every Hubway ride; which Hubway bike was used and from which station; whether the rider was an annual or monthly member or was using a one-day pass; and the gender and zip code of the rider.

    This release updates the data on which the 2012 Hubway Data Challenge, MAPC’s public data visualization competition, was based. The new data are available for download at www.hubwaydatachallenge.org, where all the entries from the data challenge are still available.

    STAY TUNED: MAPC will be announcing another transportation-related data challenge in early March.

    For more information about the Hubway data release, please contact Jessica Robertson, Transportation Coordinator at MAPC, at JRobertson@mapc.org.

    ###

    ABOUT MAPC
    The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning agency serving the people who live and work in Greater Boston. Our work is guided by our regional plan, “MetroFuture: Making a Greater Boston Region.”

    Find out more about the Hubway system, extensions, station outages/closures at www.thehubway.com, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/hubway, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Hubway.

    System Alert: Hubway will temporarily shut down on Saturday, February 15th, at 5:00PM

    SYSTEM ALERT: Due to a forecast of inclement weather, we will temporarily close Hubway at 5:00PM on Saturday, February 15th, to protect the safety of our members and staff. No bikes can be rented after the temporary closure has begun, though any bikes in use at the time can be returned to any Hubway station with an available dock.

    We understand that forecasts vary and may change. Closure and re-opening information will be posted here on the Hubway website, in addition to Facebook and Twitter. Annual and monthly members will also be informed of closure and re-opening via email.

    If you have any question about whether the system is open or closed, please call to speak with a Member Service Representative at 1-855-