News

[Metro] #HubwayEveryday: Hubway bike design contest narrows down finalists

The following article was originally published by Morgan Rousseau, in Metro Boston on August 25th, 2014.

A bike design contest spanning Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville is close to adding a unique new design to Hubway’s fleet of more than 1,300 bikes.

Now, Hubway has narrowed down its five top picks, and the company is asking the public to weigh in on the winning design.

Designers were asked to submit their visual design ideas without altering the hardware and functionality of the bike. The five finalist designs include tributes to the Charles River and Boston’s patriotic history as well as an “Everyday Waterbike” honoring the city’s many waterfront attractions.

The winning design will be turned into a limited edition, one-of-a-kind, “unicorn” Hubway bike that will hit the streets this fall. Voting will run through Sept. 9. and can be done online at www.thehubway.com.

Those who vote are in the running to win a free annual Hubway membership, which typically costs $85, while the winning designer will get their bike design entered into the fleet with their @twitter handle included as well as the opportunity to be the first to ride it.

Click here to view the finalists and place your vote.

[Boston Magazine] Five Finalists Selected for Hubway's Bike Design Competition: Now it's up to the public to decide the winner

The following article was originally published by Steve Annear, in Boston Magazine on August 25th, 2014.

And then there were five.

In mid-July, Hubway turned to riders for a special project, asking those who frequent the system to help them design a new “unicorn” bike—that’s a rare, one-of-a-kind bicycle like the one with former Mayor Tom Menino’s name on it—to slip into their fleet of 1,300 rides.

The theme of the competition, called the “Hubway Everyday Bike Design Contest,” was simple, yet locally inspired, with just one major guideline: contestants had to include the hashtag #HubwayEveryday in their design concept.

After receiving 20 entries for the competition, a panel of experts from the bike-sharing company’s various communities filtered the finalists down to just five top choices, leaving it up to the public to select the grand-prize winner.

In an email sent out Monday afternoon, Hubway representatives shared the five final designs that made it to through the end of the competition. They include a bike with an MBTA map and logo etched on the side; a bike with a layout of the Charles River and Emerald Necklace, a popular biking spot; a bike bursting with bright blue hues, featuring a spinning water wheel; a basic green bike with key points where Hubway bikes are located, and one with an argyle pattern made of patriotic symbols and red, white, and blue.

To pick which bike should become part of Hubway’s lineup, users can vote online through Tuesday, September 9, just before midnight. But choose wisely, because you can only vote once.

Not only will the winner have their design featured on one of the bikes traveling between the four cities and towns that have Hubway docking stations, they will also have the honor of their name —or Twitter handle—appearing on the bike, putting them in the ranks with Menino.

Click here to view the finalists and place your vote.

[Xconomy] Carless in Cambridge: Bike & Car Sharing and the Future of Traffic

The following article was originally published by Wade Roush, in Xconomy on August 15th, 2014.

Wade Roush is the Acting Director of Knight Science Journalism at MIT.

Nine weeks ago, I lost my fancy hybrid street/trail bike to one of San Francisco’s plentiful bicycle thieves. Seven weeks ago, in preparation for a big move east, I sold my car. Now I’m settling into a new apartment in Cambridge, MA, and for the first time in my adult life, I don’t own a set of wheels.

It’s a strange feeling—both disorienting, since it takes a little longer to figure out how to go places, and liberating, since I no longer need to pay for gas or worry about where to park my car or lock my bike. At the moment, I have no plans to buy a new car, and I’m not even sure if I’ll get a new bike. Thanks to the Boston area’s extensive public transportation system and its dense vehicle-sharing network, I don’t really need them…

Click here to read the rest of the article.

6 Reasons for Companies to Bike Share

Tom Davis writes about personal finance – including tips to save money and time, and increase productivity.

Bike share companies are popping up all over the country to provide residents with quick and affordable transportation. However, these fleets of bicycles offer a lot more than an alternative ride home - they’re an excellent solution for companies looking to provide community-boosting employee benefits. Check out these six reasons why you should consider joining a bike share program and subsidizing the price of membership for your employees.

1. Reduce Transit Concerns

Major metropolitan areas aren’t known for quick-moving traffic during rush hour. Many employees struggle to get to work in the morning, fighting traffic jams and unexpected accidents. Even folks taking public transport have to leave home early to account for traffic and multiple stops along the way.

For any employees living within cycling-distance of the office, bike share programs provide them the opportunity to breeze past traffic jams and speed up their daily commutes. According to research gathered in London, many users replace public transport with cycling, and reduce their commute time by 20% as a result. Not to mention, the more people using bikes to travel to and from work, the fewer people there are on the roads jamming them up.

2. Support a Green Environment

Bike share programs also support a greener environment by reducing air pollution. As more people ride bikes to and from work, to run errands, or tour the city, fewer cars are on the roads emitting noxious gas. In a time where a company’s carbon footprint is every bit as important as an individual’s, supporting your employees’ pro-environment habits can seriously boost your company image.

3. Encourage More Activity

My background is in exercise science - in fact, I have two degrees in the field. I can say confidently that the activity level of the majority of Americans ranges from poor to very poor. Apart from affecting physical health, this is also associated with mental health, productivity, memory, and mood. If you can promote activity amongst your staff, you’re likely to end up with a group of individuals who get more done and maintain a better attitude than their less-active peers. Who wouldn’t want that?

4. Improve Employee Health

According to the American College of Sports Medicine, adults should aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity the majority of the week to maintain health and ward off chronic disease. By making it easy for your employees to ride a bike on their commutes, take a mid-day cycle with co-workers, or run errands with their bikes, you’re supporting their ability to achieve those recommended levels of physical activity.

And guess what? If your staff members exercise more, they’re less likely to get sick. And, if they don’t get sick as frequently, your health insurance rates could go down. It’s a win-win for everyone.

5. Enhance the Workplace Atmosphere

The great thing about having a fleet of bicycles available at your fingertips is it becomes incredibly easy to organize health-focused workplace outings. Schedule a weekly group ride through a local park, or organize a monthly restaurant trip for those willing to ride a bike there. The more you support a fun, relationship-building environment, the more likely your employees are to actually enjoy work.

Encouraging this type of outing may inspire your employees to organize their own trips during the day. For instance, rather than driving five blocks to a print shop and spending 20 minutes looking for parking, they may grow accustomed to grabbing their bikes, running the errand, and returning - all in less time than it would have taken to drive, park, and re-park.

6. Support Local Businesses

According to research conducted by the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs, a bike share program in the Twin Cities resulted in a spending increase near bike share stations of approximately $150,000 over the course of the season. Much of that increase was attributed to restaurants, coffee bars, grocery stores, and nightclubs. Essentially, those using the bike share program were more likely to head out to, and spend more at, local eateries. Companies looking to support their local economy should take these results into account when considering a bike share program.

Final Thoughts

Getting involved in a bike share program is usually easy, and, from a benefits standpoint, quite affordable. Bike share companies want to work with businesses, so they often provide a discount for each employee enrolled. For instance, Hubway typically costs $85 per year for an individual, but the price is reduced to $50 when a company signs up for a corporate account. Split that price between company and employee, and both parties get a deep discount. When you compare the cost to other benefits, such as gym memberships or employee meals, its advantages become very clear.

Do you have a bike share program in your area? Have you tried it out? Over 175 companies take part in Hubway’s Corporate Accounts program, providing memberships for their employees, offering health benefits, commuting options, and another fun way to stay active and get to work or anywhere else around town. Want to sign your company up? Visit the Corporate Member info page here.

[Strat Farm] How Boston Built a Better Bike Share Program

This article is was originally published in the Strat Farm blog on July 14th, 2014.

If America’s major metropolises were competing in the Tour de France of health and wellness policymaking, then we would be inclined to believe that Boston would be leading the peloton (image above via The Hubway). The city is now allowing doctors to prescribe discounted bike share memberships to low-income residents. While this is certainly a victory for the social mobility of struggling citizens – studies, including this one, have found that access to transportation increases the odds that a disadvantaged child can work their way into a higher income bracket by the age of 30 – the ramifications for health and technology are even more radical.

The day could come very soon when a doctor might be able to prescribe a connected bike-share program (or really any lifestyle change), and then leverage wearable technology to track a patient’s progress and adherence to the program. As the device collects data, it could be funneled back to an app that tracks and calculates the various benefits of different activities in biometrics like heart rate.

The synthesis of measurement and feedback could empower and motivate the patient, perhaps by helping them to identify what levels and types of activity provide the biggest results in terms of health improvement. Measurements could be put into a game designed by wellness experts to challenge participants as well as to motivate them to compete against each other. All of these technological advances, working in concert, could represent a quantum leap in prevention of a host of problems associated with a sedentary lifestyle.

Making these ideas work will involve a number of players, and will depend on the robustness of the strategies underneath them. Fitness experts and physicians can provide the know-how on extracting and interpreting health data. Hardware designers can create the next generation of bio-measuring technology to capture measurements accurately, and software developers will be crucial to figuring out how to house, process, and present the results. And just as crucially, advertising and marketing experts can share the consumer insights necessary to ensure adoption at scale – and of course, to help sell the concept to health care providers and users themselves.

The benefits from this arrangement will echo back to brands in astounding ways. This data will provide unprecedented consumer insight, on individual and demographic levels. Brands will have the opportunity to develop more personalized experiences that effectively influence buyer’s decisions and generate greater loyalty. The quiet revolution in data driven development is here, arriving – not coincidentally – at the peak of consumer interest in wellness.

There are sure to be unforeseen issues that arise with Boston’s embrace of bike-sharing as a health management tool. But innovative policies like this are a brave sally at creating solutions to a host of medical and social ills. When technology, marketing, and enterprise get savvy to integrated wellness, we’ll all be a lot closer to addressing some of the biggest quality-of-life questions of the 21st century.

[Wicked Local Cambridge] City looks to reduce traffic, improve transportation options near Alewife

The following excerpt is from an article that was originally published by Sara Fiejo in Wicked Local Cambridge on June 23rd, 2014.

According to Bill Deignan, the city’s transportation program manager, a Hubway station will be installed within the next month at the Alewife Station near the headhouse at Russell Field and Rindge Avenue.

Additional stations will be built at the Fresh Pond Water Treatment Plant and other locations in late 2014 or early 2015, he said.

Click here to read the full Wicked Local Cambridge article.

[Boston Globe] Cambridge debuts first bicycle traffic signal

This article is was originally published by Martine Gomes in The Boston Globe on June 22nd, 2014.

If it was going to happen, it was going to happen in Cambridge.

In recent weeks, a new traffic signal has appeared on Cambridge’s Western Avenue, between Massachusetts Avenue and Memorial Drive, to accompany the new separated cycle track recently finished in a round of construction.

What makes this signal special? It’s specific to bikes, and each of the lights on the signal shows a little red, yellow, or green bicycle to indicate exactly when cyclists are expected to stop or proceed through the roadway.

It is the kind of thing that has become much more common in bike-crazy European cities such as Amsterdam and Copenhagen, or in hippy-dippy US counterparts like Portland, Ore., or Austin, Texas. Now, the People’s Republic of Cambridge appears to be wading into these experimental traffic engineering waters.

“Only in Cambridge,” wrote Edgar Dworsky, a resident who lives a few blocks away and e-mailed to point out the existence of the new signal.

The new Western Avenue bike signal is not the first traffic light in Cambridge installed for the sake of bike riders. The city has two other bike-specific traffic lights — one in Harvard Square, the other in Porter Square — that both aim to help cyclists turn left safely at dicey intersections. But both those traffic signals feature regular round red, yellow, and green lights, with a sign that indicates that they are meant for bike riders.

The Western Avenue signal is timed so that cyclists get a green light a few moments before their vehicular counterparts headed toward Memorial Drive; that way, cyclists have several seconds of a head start to get out ahead of the cars and become more visible to motorists, especially motorists turning right who may not think to look for cyclists approaching on their right side.

Additionally, signals like this one address one of the biggest gripes motorists have with bike riders: that they’re constantly running red lights. For cyclists, there can be no confusion whether they’re expected to stop at a red light when that light shows a little bicycle. Many engineers believe that when cyclists are assured that a traffic light is targeted at them and designed to protect their safety, they’re much more likely to wait for their rightful turn to proceed through the intersection.

It may not be long before residents see more of these signals — and not just in Cambridge. Boston officials say they are looking to install a bicycle traffic light in the near future; the idea is included in Boston Bike Network Plan, a blueprint released last year that outlines the city’s long-term plans for bike infrastructure.

[Bicycling Magazine] Inside Boston's Hubway Repair Shop

This article is was originally published as part of a slideshow by Adam Kroopnick (photos by Dan Justa) for Bicycling Magazine on May 21st, 2014.

The repair facility for Boston’s Hubway bike share program is not your neighborhood bike shop. The 30,000-square-foot former metal shop stores almost 1,300 bikes during the winter and is fully stocked with replacement parts and specialty tools. Let’s take a peek inside. Click the image below for the full slideshow.

Photo: Dan Justa

New Station Alert: Binney St at Sixth St

New Station Alert: Effective Friday, August 9th, our Binney St/Sixth St station is now open. This station is a 19 dock station, located on Binney St heading towards Memorial Drive.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


Thanks for using Hubway!

Back in black: New commemorative Hubway bike arrives at South Station

This article was originally published by Martine Powers on Boston.com on 7/29/2013

There’s a new ‘it’ bike in town, and today, it hit the streets of Boston.

To celebrate the two-year anniversary of Hubway bike-share, along with the program’s one-millionth ride, Hubway officials released a special commemorative bike Tuesday morning that strikes a look that’s different from its old-school counterparts.

Black, it seems, is the new silver.

In addition to the suave color, the bike carries a special message on its rear fender: “1 Million Rides! And counting ...”

The bike was first docked Tuesday at South Station, but Brooke Savage, a South End resident designated as Hubway’s one-millionth rider, quickly laid claim to the bicycle and decided to take it for a spin to another station.

Local transportation officials hope the bike will be a hot ticket for commuters, and a source of excitement for people who spot the unusual member of the Hubway fleet in stations around Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline — kind of like being handed a two-dollar bill with change at the grocery store.

“It’s going to be a special sought-after bike,” said Bill Deignan, transportation program manager for the city of Cambridge. “People will see it and be happy they saw the bike there, and they’re going to want to take it.”

In the two years since Hubway’s debut, the system has logged more than 1.1 million miles ridden between the 113 stations located throughout the metro Boston area.

In the next few weeks, Hubway will be adding 20 more stations, which will be located in Jamaica Plain, Roxbury, South Boston, and north Dorchester.

            

Rethinking Our Reliance On Cars

This article and radio show was originally published on WBUR.org on 7/29/2013


Boston’s Hubway bike-sharing program just topped a million rides. It’s a symbolic milestone for the less than two-year-old system. But it also points to a bigger trend: all over the Boston area, more people are choosing to get around without a car.


There’s been a lot of research recently showing that our relationship with cars is changing in significant ways. Earlier this summer, the US Public Interest Research Group found that Americans — especially those under 30 — have been driving less and less each year since 2004.


Click here to listen to the show.

Station Alert: Highland Ave/Crocker St

SERVICE ALERT: Due to construction, Highland Ave/Crocker St station will be closed from 9:00 AM -3:30PM 7/31 through 8/2. Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information.

Hubway celebrates two years and one million rides.

This month, Hubway celebrates two successful years in operation, during which members and casual users have logged over one million rides. Since launching on July 28th, 2011, Hubway has expanded to provide over 1,100 bikes at more than 110 stations in four major metro areas: Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville. Hubway is the metro area’s largest bike sharing network, providing a fast, convenient, and cost-effective transportation alternative to residents and visitors alike. To date, over 8,100 active annual members and tens of thousands of casual users have embraced this fun and environmentally friendly way to rediscover their favorite spots in and around the Hub.

Hubway riders have achieved some impressive results:

  • Total trips – 1,069,766 and counting….
  • Total miles ridden – 1.2 million
  • Total calories burned 40 million
  • Total pounds of carbon offset 285 Tons
  • Hubway will continue to grow throughout the 2013 season, building on some recent infrastructure expansions and improvements, including:

  • Three new stations launched in July in Somerville: Teele Square, Packard Ave/Powderhouse Blvd, and Highland Ave/Crocker St
  • Two stations launched in June in Cambridge: Porter Square T and Mass Ave/Linear Park with another station launching in Kendall Square in the coming weeks
  • Brookline added a station at JFK Crossing on Harvard Ave at Thorndike St
  • Boston has ordered 20 additional stations and plans to roll them out in August and September
  • For up-to-date information about the Hubway program, visit thehubway.com.

    Cambridge: “We are delighted to be celebrating the one year anniversary of Hubway in Cambridge together with the other exciting milestones the system has reached,” said Cambridge City Manager Richard C. Rossi. “It has been remarkable to witness the ever-increasing popularity of bike share and we look forward to continuing expansion of the system in the future.”
    Somerville: “Hubway has been extremely beneficial and important to our efforts to make Somerville the most bikeable community in the nation,” said Somerville Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone. “Its program expansion in our community in 2013 combined with our ongoing efforts to increase bike infrastructure citywide, and as evidenced by the high ridership throughout this multi-community partnership, our efforts are working.”
    Alta Bicycle Share Quote: “The positive impacts of bike share are varied and many,” said Scott Mullen of Alta Bicycle Share, who is general manager of the Hubway. “There is the public health component, the air quality piece, congestion mitigation, local economic impact, reconnection of people to urban places. And if those weren’t enough, riding Hubway is a ton of fun!”
    For Boston quote, please contact Nicole Freedman at Nicole.freedman.bra@cityofboston.gov
    For Brookline quote, please contact Joe Viola at jviola@brooklinema.gov
    About Hubway
    Hubway is metro Boston’s largest bike sharing system, providing easy access to more than 1,100 bikes at 113 existing locations in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville with more expansion on the way. Riding is fast, convenient, and fun, and with Hubway, users can reclaim a commute or enjoy a leisurely ride to the area’s favorite restaurants, coffee shops, and parks. One or three day passes and monthly or annual membership are available for purchase online or at Hubway stations. Every ride under thirty minutes is free, and longer trips cost only a few dollars per hour. More info can be found at www.thehubway.com
    For up to the minute information on station installs, visit http://www.thehubway.com or download the FREE SpotCycle app for smartphones. You can also monitor our Twitter feed - @hubway - or our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/hubway

    Two Years, One Million Rides, and Lots of Reasons to Celebrate!

    In case you haven’t heard the big news, we’ve reached a pair of major milestones this summer: Hubway is officially two years old and over one million rides have been completed using the silver bikes!

    As a way to say thanks to our members, we’ll be at South Station today (Tuesday, July 30th) starting at 10 AM for a press conference to christen our specially branded ‘One Million Rides’ bike and to give out limited edition Hubway t-shirts to mark the milestone. After that, we’ll head over to Dewey Square until 2 PM to keep the t-shirts flowing (while supplies last). Come on out and flash your Hubway key to get yours.

    And while you’re outside enjoying the weather, grab some lunch from our friends at Momogoose and some coffee from The Coffee Trike. Show your Hubway key at Momogoose when you buy an entrée, and you’ll get a free crispy roll or pan-seared ravioli.

    Come on out and join us this Tuesday. You’ve got plenty of reasons to celebrate!

    The Team at Hubway

    #biketothefuture

    Celebrate 1 Million Trips at Artcrank on Saturday, July 20!

    You’re cordially invited to join us at the upcoming Artcrank Boston event at Fourth Wall Gallery in Fenway (132 Brookline Ave) from 5p-11pm this Saturday, July 20. Artcrank is a bicycle themed art exhibit and benefit for our friends at Livable Streets Alliance.


    Enjoy original bicycle art, soft drinks, beer from Widmer Brothers Brewing, and the chance to mingle with bike enthusiasts just like you.


    Hubway is proud to support our local artists. When you purchase a poster, we’ll say thanks with a special gift - just flash your Hubway key at checkout to receive a LIMITED EDITION HUBWAY POSTER. So hop on a Hubway and head on over! We hope to see you at there.

    One Million Trips Infographic:

    Hubway Riders Top ONE MILLION TRIPS!

    Within less than two years’ time, Hubway hit 1 million rides on the afternoon of Saturday, July 13 marking a significant milestone for the ever-expanding system.


    Brooke Savage, a resident of Boston and annual member since 2012, checked out a bike from Washington St. at Waltham St. in Boston at 2:00 in the afternoon, and rode for about 10 minutes, dropping it off at Franklin St. / Arch St. The well-timed ride was the 1 millionth tripped logged on a Hubway bike since the system was launched on July 28, 2011.


    In other exciting news, Hubway members to date have collectively ridden nearly 1.1 million miles, burned nearly 40 million calories and offset an estimated 285 tons of CO2.


    As Hubway approaches its second anniversary, there are now more than 8,100 active annual members with access to a fleet of 1100 bikes and 113 stations, which includes locations in Boston, Brookline, Cambridge and Somerville.


    More trips start and end at South Station than any other, with over 41,000 rides flowing through its docks. Hubway currently averages more than 3,800 trips per day, system-wide, and July 12th holds the record for the highest daily usage, with 5,216 trips taken. 


    System partners include: the cities of Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, the Town of Brookline; and Alta Bicycle Share.



    ####


    Bicycle sharing contributes to economic progress, reducing emissions, and improving health, equity and safety in transportation. . Bicycle sharing is an innovative approach to urban mobility, combining the flexibility of a private vehicle with the accessibility and reliability of mass transit.

    3 More Stations Launched in Somerville

    3 More Stations Launch in Somerville

    Published July 11, 2013

    The summer is in full swing and so is the Hubway expansion. Somerville recently added three more stations to its network, bringing the total station count to 11 within the ‘Ville. The new additions that launched on 7/10 are:

    Teele Square at 239 Holland St: Located in curbside on-street spaces just south of the main intersection with Broadway.

    Packard Ave/Powderhouse Blvd: You asked for it, Tufts, and you got it! This station is located on the west edge of campus in on-street spots on Packard Ave.

    Somerville Hospital at Highland Ave/Crocker St: This station fills a critical gap right in the heart of the Somerville system and is a great addition to the Spring Hill neighborhood.

    View our complete station map here and be sure to download our Spotcycle app for realtime information on your smartphone.

    Now go out and #GetYourRideOn…

    Cambridge Expands Network By Two Stations

    Just in time for the 4th of July, Cambridge has expanded it’s Hubway network to 26 stations. The new additions as of 7/2 are:


    Linear Park – Mass. Ave. at Cameron Ave: This extends the system boundary beyond Davis Square and will be the perfect accompaniment to the upcoming Teele Square station in Somerville.


    359 Broadway - Broadway at Fayette Street: This new station will fill a critical gap between the Inman Square/Vellucci Plaza and Central Square stations. A huge addition for the neighborhood!


    View our complete station map here and be sure to download our Spotcycle app for realtime information on your smartphone.


    Now go out and #GetYourRideOn...

    New Station Alert: Porter Square

    Service Alert: Effective Monday, June 17th, the Porter Square station is now open. This station is located on the cobbled plaza just behind the bus shelter on Mass Ave adjacent to the Porter Station head house.

    Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.


    Thanks for using Hubway!

    Station Alert: Overland/Brookline Station Is Closed

    Service Alert: Due to adjacent water main construction, the Overland/Brookline station will be closed until further notice. Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information.

    Celebrate Bike to Work Week with Hubway and Bicycle Benefits!

    Hubway recently partnered up with Bicycle Benefits to bring hundreds of discounts to our registered users! For those signing up online for Annual or Monthly membership, we will mail a BB sticker to you in your new member packet. But if you’re an existing member, we have three opportunities this week to come out and grab one on the fly:

    Wednesday, May 15th

    Charles MGH Hubway Station
    8:30AM to 10:00AM

    Harvard University’s CommuterChoice Program’s
    Bike to Work Appreciation Breakfast
    Outside of Au Bon Pain
    1360 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA
    7:30 AM to 9:00AM

    Thursday, May 16th

    Dewey Square - Standing next to The Coffee Trike
    8:30AM to 10:00AM

    Friday, May 17th

    Intersection of Silber Way & Comm Ave
    Near Blandford MBTA Station
    6:00PM to 7:30 PM
    Look for someone in a Hubway shirt!

    Just roll up to any of our three locations this week, say hello to our Hubway representative (you’ll see him), and show your key fob to get your very own Bicycle Benefits Sticker. Simply mount the sticker on your helmet and you’re entitled to discounts at local businesses all over town!

    For a full list of participating businesses, visit: http://www.thehubway.com/bicycle-benefits

    At Last, Hubway Offers Monthly Memberships

    This article was posted on BostonMagazine.com on May 2nd, 2013

    By Eric Randall | Boston Daily

    Hubway, Boston’s bikeshare system, announced in a blog post this week that it will now offer $20 monthly membership in addition to their short term and annual offerings. This is pleasant news for a few groups of people. Among them: college students and anyone who wants to try out the Hubway on a more sustained trial basis before taking the year-long plunge.

    Previous to the announcement, monthly memberships seemed (to this writer and Hubway user anyway) like a notable absence in the membership offerings, which skipped from a 3-day access pass to an annual membership. Other big city bikeshares, like D.C.’s offer the monthly rate. It’s a good way for someone considering Hubway to decide whether they’re really going to “save sOoOoOo much money on T fare by just taking Hubway to and from work all the time,” as a certain Boston Magazine employee (who took two buses to get to work today despite the 70 degree weather) may or may not have thought to himself once upon a time.

    Also, given Hubway shuts down for the winter and Boston’s collegiate herds migrate elsewhere for the summer, the monthly memberships might make more sense for university students, who are, realistically, only going to use it for April, a piece of May, September, October, and November. (That calculation will change if Hubway manages to make it year-round.)

    The monthly membership comes with cool features. Like annual members, you get the big-kid pass that means you don’t have to play with the station kiosks, and if you use it after your membership date is up, Hubway just charges you for another month. (Okay, so if you accidentally incur an extra $20 charge because you forget that your membership ran out, you might actually find this really annoying.) Also, if you do opt for a monthly membership to sample it and decide that you actually use it on the regular, they’ll offer a $20 credit toward the $85 membership. (That’s something D.C. doesn’t offer.) Basically, it just got even easier for the tepid among us to dip our toes into the world of bikesharing. But then, we suspect Hubway knew that when they made this offering.

    Hubway announces new Monthly Membership option

    The Hubway, Metro-Boston’s bikeshare system, is proud to announce a new Monthly Membership offering. As with Annual Membership, the Monthly Membership is available at www.thehubway.com/signup and Monthly Members will receive a key in the mail. This key allows the user to bypass a transaction at the station and to proceed directly to the bicycle. By simply sliding the key into the dock, the bicycle will release and be ready to ride.

    Similar to the MBTA’s Charlie Card, the Hubway Monthly Membership will be valid from the first day of the month to the last. Also like the Charlie Card, your membership is only good during a single month. If you activate your key on the 15th, your membership still expires at the end of that month. Renewing is a snap..simply insert your expired key into any dock to release a bicycle and the monthly fee will be automatically charged to the credit card associated with your account.

    No visit to the website needed, it’s that easy!

    “The Monthly Membership offers the convenience and savings of annual membership but with flexible, monthly terms,” said Hubway general manager, Scott Mullen. “It’s perfect for students or anyone who wants to try Hubway on for size.”

    The cost of a Monthly Membership is only $20. Those who decide to upgrade to an Annual Membership after trying Hubway for a month will receive a $20 credit toward the $85 annual cost. Simply log in to your member page and click the ‘Change Plan’ button.

    Members of the Press – email ‘media@thehubway.com’ if you’d like to speak with a Hubway representative or someone from any of the participating municipalities (Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, and Somerville).

    As Hubway reopens, agency eyes Roxbury, Dorchester, and South Boston for possible expansion

    This article was posted on Boston.com on April 4th, 2013

    As the bicycle rental system Hubway begins opening for the season, commuters in Roxbury, Dorchester, and South Boston still don’t have many locations.

    But administrators with the program say the neighborhoods could see new stations in the coming year.

    Celebrate Hubway’s Opening Day with A Rolling Celebration!

    Joining together two of the region’s early signs of spring, Hubway and the Boston Red Sox Foundation have teamed up to commemorate the bike share system’s “Opening Day” re-launch on April 8, 2013.  The rolling relaunch celebration will feature Hubway team members circling Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline on a celebratory route.  Hubway members that greet the Hubway team along this route will receive a free Boston Red Sox tee shirt and/or a free day pass for Hubway. We’re even sending one Hubway member to the Red Sox Opening Day home game.  And of course, everyone can ride to the game. The Red Sox Foundation bike share station is right in Kenmore Square, which is where the party begins!

    Route below:

    Kenmore Square (11:00AM to 11:45AM)

    JFK Crossing Brookline (12:30PM to 1:15PM)

    Central Square Post Office (1:45PM to 2:30PM)

    Davis Square (3:00PM to 3:45PM)

    Boston Public Library (4:15PM to 5:00PM)

    Come join us for the celebration! It’s springtime in New England and it’s time to ride…

    Stay tuned to www.thehubway.com, www.facebook.com/hubway, and our Twitter feed (@Hubway) for up to the minute info on schedule/route.

    Changes and Updates for 2013

    There are many exciting changes for spring 2013! The current Hubway footprint is 112 stations and 1100 bicycles with several updates to the 2012 configuration:

    Boston:
    - Additional bikes installed at many of the most highly utilized stations, including:
    o Congress/Sleeper,
    o Post Office Square,
    o Beacon/Mass Ave
    o Charles Circle
    o Stuart St at Charles St
    o Boylston at Arlington
    o Newbury St / Hereford St
    o Cross St. at Hanover St.
    - Summer/Arch station has moved one block to the corner of Franklin/Arch and has added 12 bikes to accommodate demand
    - TD Garden/Legends Way station has moved to the sidewalk along Causeway St at Portal Park and added 7 bikes
    - New station at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital’s Navy Yard facility
    - Marathon disruptions: Boylston/Fairfield and Boylston Berkeley will not be installed until after the Marathon cleanup is complete (estimated date week of 4/21). Boston Public Library will be removed on 4/9 and re-installed the week of 4/21.

    Brookline:
    - Washington Square will get a station in metered parking spots along the median of Beacon St (to be installed after the Boston Marathon)
    - New station in on-street parking spots along Harvard Ave in the Kennedy Crossing area of Brookline, providing a critical link between Coolidge Corner and Allston

    Cambridge:
    - New station at the Radcliffe Quad, at Garden St/Shepard St
    - Harvard University – DeWolfe/Cowperthwaite station is moving due to construction, final site TBD
    - Planned station for the Porter Square T plaza

    Somerville:
    - New station at Highland Ave/Somerville Hospital
    - New station at Teele Square/Holland St
    - New station adjacent to Tufts at Packard Ave/Powderhouse Blvd
    - Ball Square station moving down the block to Bristol Rd at the intersection of Broadway
    These are just the spring updates..stay tuned for more surprised later in the season. Be sure to download our Spotcycle app to get real time updates on your smart device. Thanks for making Hubway metro-Boston’s #realtransportation network!

    Hubway Is Open For The 2013 Season!

    Effective Tuesday, April 2, the Hubway bikeshare network will be open for the 2013 season! Nearly 75% of the system will be operational and full station deployment is expected by mid-April. There will be an official ‘Opening Day’ launch event on Monday, April 8. Stay tuned to our Twitter feed and Facebook page for event details. Use our FREE Spotcycle smartphone app for up to the minute information on station deployments and system status. Thanks for your support of Hubway!

    The New Sign of Spring: The Hubway Installations Begin

    This article was posted in the Boston Magazine on March 25, 2013

    The Hubway bike share program is set to launch next week (depending on the snow, of course).

    Forget about the trees budding, the snow melting, or the Red Sox playing in Fort Myers, once the Hubway stations are re-installed then you know the season is almost here.

    Hubway leader speaks at Arlington Bicycle Winter Social

    This article was posted on Wicked Local Arlington on March 22, 2013

    Despite the chilly air, a few people walked into the auditorium of the Arlington Center for the Arts last Thursday night carrying bike helmets or dressed for riding.

    One of those topics: The bike renaissance spreading through Boston as more people hop onboard this two-wheeled enterprise transit system, according to Hubway Bikeshare General Manager Scott Mullen, the guest speaker for the evening.

    Hubway looks to add new Davis Square terminal

    This article was posted on Boston.com on March 21, 2013.

    Hubway is looking to add a new bike rental terminal in Davis Square, and the city will consider the plan Thursday.

    13 Percent of Hubway Rides Replace Cars

    This article was posted on the Jamaica Plain Patch on March 1, 2013.

    Boston’s popular three-season bicycle share system has done more than provide residents with a quick, cheap mode of transportation, it’s taken a few cars off the road in the process.

    JP Hubway Would Require Network of Stations

    This article was posted on the Jamaica Plain Patch on February 28, 2013.

    A city official said in order to have a station in a neighborhood a network would have to be built.

    Five Lessons for Seattle Bike Share from Boston’s Hubway

    This article was posted on Transportation Nation on February 13, 2013

    The plan to create a bike sharing program in Seattle is clicking into a higher gear. Puget Sound Bike Share hopes to launch in 2014. Organizers updated Seattle officials Tuesday saying they hope to hire a vendor by the spring.

    To get some guidance for the Seattle effort, KUOW spoke with the founder of one of the fastest-growing systems in the US, Nicole Freedman. Freedman started Boston’s program, The Hubway, which launched in 2011.

    Portland in the running for bike-share program

    This article was posted in the Press Herald on February 11, 2013

    PORTLAND — Portland could be joining the growing list of cities that offer bike-sharing programs, but some question whether the city is large enough to support one.

    Portland officials will study the issue this spring as part of a planning initiative funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

    Bike sharing goes big — but can it get over its little helmet problem?

    This article was posted on Grist.org on February 7, 2013

    By Daniel Penner

    Seattle crunches quite a bit of granola, hugs more than its allotted trees, and has the second highest bike commute rate for U.S cities. But, as of yet, it has no bicycle sharing system — which is what all the cool, sustainable cities are doing. (I see you, Tulsa.)

    The Best Cold-Weather Fix for the T: Hubway

    This article was posted on the Boston Magazine Blog on January 23rd, 2013.

    By Jason Schwartz

    It sounds a little crazy, but we’re basically at the point where you should think twice about taking the T in really cold weather. Today, it’s about 10 degrees out, closer to zero with windchill. And lo and behold, the Green Line has broken down. Around 8:00 a.m., a cable caught fire in the Arlington station, forcing the line to shut down between Kenmore and Government Center and sending everybody above ground into the cold to wait for shuttle buses (which, of course, take forever). With the T’s busiest stretch of track knocked out during rush hour on a freezing cold day, naturally, the Twittering masses were unhappy. A look at some of the carnage, in picture form:

    Bike sharing systems push to reach underrepresented groups

    This article was posted on Greater Greater Washington on January 11, 2013

    Bike sharing has been a huge success in many cities and received many well-deserved plaudits, but some have criticized bike sharing for not necessarily serving all segments of the population. What are bike sharing systems doing to expand their reach?

    Nicole Freedman returns as Boston Bikes director

    This article was posted on boston.com on January 3rd, 2013

    Nicole Freedman this week returned to her old job as director of the City of Boston’s bicycle programming, city officials announced.

    Councilor Pushes for More Access to Hubway Bike Sharing Program

    This article was posted on Open Media Boston on December 28th, 2012

    Boston’s bike-sharing program is heading into its third year as a major success, exceeding ridership expectations and planning to expand. But one city councilor has expressed concern that not all parts of the city are benefitting from the project’s success.

    What Boston’s public bikes tell us about the city

    This article was posted in the Boston Globe on December 22nd, 2012

    A competition to visualize data from the Hubway system yields beautiful insights.

    Making Boston a safe place for bicyclists

    This article was posted in the Boston Globe on December 12, 2012

    By Thomas M. Menino

    Last week our cycling community, and the city, was rocked by the tragic death of Boston University student Christopher Weigl. By coincidence, a hearing on bicycle safety brought the community together at City Hall later that day. Both events have many left asking what’s being done to make our city safe for cyclists, and rightfully so. Personally, I have been inspired by the outpouring of concern, support, validation, and sense of togetherness in our efforts to make Boston a world-class caliber city for bicycling.

    Hubway Hopes to Extend Services Through Winter, But Are Boston Bikers Snow-Savvy?

    This article was posted on Bostinno on December 4, 2012.

    Word came out this week that Hubway hopes to extend its services all year round beginning as soon as December 2013.

    As Hubway closes for winter, officials look to expand

    This article was posted in the Boston Globe on December 1, 2012.

    Plans are being made to grow Hubway into a year-round system

    Berklee student Michal Skrzypek was walking past the Christian Science Plaza one afternoon when a row of silver-and-green bicycles caught his eye, docked near what looked like a solar-powered ATM. Intrigued, he paid $5 for a 24-hour Hubway pass and took his first bike ride in Boston.

    Hubway Has Saved Commuters 45,218 Hours Since Its Launch

    This article was posted on Boston Magazine on November 14, 2012.

    A few months ago, Boston’s bike share service Hubway released tons of data about the individual trips its users have taken since its launch and asked the crowd to create cool ways to visualize the information. The judges announced the results Tuesday, and the overall winner of the Hubway Data Visualization Challenge is Virot “Ta” Chiraphadhanakul, a PhD candidate at MIT who studies transit issues.

    Bike Sharing in Boston

    This article was posted on Living On Earth on November 9, 2012.

    Bike share programs are increasingly popular, with nearly 200 world wide. In Boston the Hubway allows riders to take out a sturdy bike for 30 minutes at a time to help commuters the last mile of their commute. Living On Earth’s Bobby Bascomb reports.

    Three months of Hubway bike sharing: how’s it going?

    This article was posted on The Tech on November 9, 2012.

    With over 628 MIT memberships sold, Hubway’s two on-campus bike stations serve 177 trips daily.

    Roxbury welcomes new Hubway station

    This article was posted on Boston.com on October 26, 2012.

    Roxbury is now home to its fifth Hubway station, after the program installed a new location on the corner of Blue Hill Avenue and Mt. Pleasant Avenue.

    A Day in the LIfe of Hubway Bikes [Video]

    This article was posted on BostInno.com on October 26, 2012.

    Earlier this month, Hubway launched a Data Visualization Challenge, tasking the creative minds in Boston with building maps, animations, infographics and the like about Hubway usage.

    How Many Bikes are Rented at 2am? Hubway Launches Challenge to Visualize Rider Data

    This article was posted on BostInno.com on October 15, 2012.

    Ever wondered how many uphill rides Hubway users take? Or how long it takes them to ride from Kendall to Harvard? Or how many people take out bikes at 2 a.m.?

    Hubway shares data on over half a million Boston rides

    This article was posted on Boston.com on October 11, 2012.
     
    Hubway is offering a chance to play around with some data of its own: The company’s posted a CSV of every trip ever taken with the bike sharing service, including date, time, origin and destination stations

    What NOT to do with your bikeshare bike

    This article was posted on Boston Daily on September 28, 2012.

    Introducing a bike share system like Boston’s own Hubway into a major city will always yield some growing pains.

    Hubway bike share adds four stations in Somerville

    This article was published in the Boston Globe on October 2nd, 2012.

    The City of Somerville said Tuesday four more Hubway bike sharing stations will be installed this week, bringing the total number of the rental racks in the city to eight.

    Boston "a better city" thanks to Hubway bike-sharing

    This article was published by the United States Department of Transportation on October 4th, 2012.

    We know that innovative partnerships can deliver tremendous benefits. Regional partnerships have proven successful in many of DOT’s TIGER projects.

    Keeping the Roads Safe as More Bikes Hit the Road

    This story was posted by Boston Public Radio on September 19th, 2012.

    WGBH and David Watson, director of MassBike, discuss the importance of bicycling safety in our growing bike community.

    Listen here for the full story.

    Bike rental provider expands into Somerville

    This article was published in the Tufts Daily on September 19th, 2012.

    [Hubway], the Metro-Boston bicycle rental provider, this summer began its expansion into Somerville, following a phased launch that began July 28 of last year.

    Boston region to celebrate Hubway expansion

    This article was published in the Boston Globe on August 5th, 2012.

    CAMBRIDGE — Matt Miller shapes his schedule around the area’s public transportation infrastructure. He said his system for getting around was nearly perfect, but the influx of bicycle sharing in Cambridge completed it.

    Hundreds Attend Hubway Birthday Bash

    This article was published by The Boston Globe on July 25, 2012.

    Hundreds packed a downtown exhibition space inside the Atlantic Wharf tower on Tuesday to celebrate the first anniversary of the Hubway bike-sharing system in Boston.

    Hubway's Official 2012 Kick Off Event!

    You are cordially invited to join Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino as he officially launches the 2012 New Balance Hubway season at noon on Tuesday, April 3. The Mayor will be joined by Nicole Freedman, representatives from the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, and other Hubway dignitaries at the Boston Public Library Hubway Station to remind us that “the car is no longer king in Boston.”

    New Balance Hubway Relaunch begins Thursday, March 15

    New Balance Hubway is pleased to announce that our system will reopen for both annual and casual membership use on Thursday, March 15 with approximately 60% of Hubway stations live and operational.  Hubway will continue to work on installing stations through the end of the month, with full system deployment by April, 1.

    Get Hubway for the Holidays: $60

    Give and Get Hubway for $60 this Holiday Season

    Alison Cohen for Alta Bicycle Share on Yoxi TV

    Alta Bicycle Share President, Alison Cohen, was featured as a rising social entrepreneur star at the Opportunity Green Business Conference, November 10-11 in Los Angeles. The video was produced by Yoxi TV (www.yoxi.tv). Check out the video to see why bike share inspires Alison every day!

    Alison Cohen / Alta Bicycle Share from Yoxi on Vimeo.

    Boston's new Hubway system could transform how you get around town

    This article was published by The Boston Phoenix on May 9, 2011.

    On April 21, amid a throng of cyclists gathered at City Hall Plaza, Boston Mayor Tom Menino announced that the city had just inked a deal to institute a bike-sharing system that would be operational by mid-summer this year. The Hubway, as it will be called, will offer more than 600 bikes at 61 stations strategically located throughout Boston. The system will be the fifth of its kind in a major US city (following Minneapolis, Miami, Denver, and Washington, DC).

    Mayor Menino Signs First-Ever Bike Share Contract Launching Hubway in Boston

    This Press Release was published by the Mayor’s Office on April 21, 2011. 

    Today, surrounded by cycling advocates as well as city and state officials, Mayor Thomas M. Menino signed a contract with Alta Bicycle Share to bring a cutting-edge bike share system to the City of Boston, one of the first in the country. Dubbed Hubway specifically for the region, the installation of the system will begin soon with 61 stations located across the entire city, incorporating over 600 bicycles. The official opening of the system is scheduled for this summer and locations will include Kenmore Square, Roxbury, the South End, the Longwood Medical area, Allston, Brighton, the Back Bay and more. Hubway is a program under Mayor Menino’s nationally recognized Boston Bikes Program that he launched to make Boston one of the world’s premiere cycling cities.

    Hub set to launch bike-share program

    This article was published in The Boston Globe on April 21st, 2011

    As early as this summer, residents and visitors taking quick trips in Boston will be able to rent bicycles from dozens of sidewalk kiosks, under an agreement expected to be signed today that will create a bike-sharing network inspired by those in Paris and Washington.

    Boston officials said the system, to be called Hubway, will open in July with 600 bicycles and 61 stations in the city, though they envision growing in a few years to as many as 5,000 bikes at more than 300 kiosks, from Brookline to Somerville.