News

Station Alert: Allston Green District station at Commonwealth Ave & Griggs St, redeployed and active

Station Alert: Effective Friday morning, July 25th, the Hubway station, Allston Green District, is open & operational in Boston. This station is a 15-dock station, located at Commonwealth Avenue & Griggs Street.

Thank you for your patience during the construction.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

Hubway Pro Tips: Safety Reminders

There’s a lot of traffic on the roads of metro-Boston, and while you can’t control the actions of other riders and drivers, there are some simple day-to-day and ride-to-ride things you can do to keep yourself and others as safe as possible when riding Hubway.

We recently affixed these stickers to the frames (just below the handlebars in front of the rider) on each Hubway bike. Have you seen ‘em?

On your next Hubway ride, take a moment before you start pedaling to review these reminders.

  • Stop at lights.
  • Yield to pedestrians.
  • Ride with traffic.
  • Avoid sidewalks.
  • Watch for doors.
  • Wear a helmet.

Hubway bicycles are easily identifiable everywhere on the streets of metro-Boston, and we hope that our riders will continue to be model citizens when it comes to safe riding practices.

Thanks for riding Hubway safely!

[Strat Farm] How Boston Built a Better Bike Share Program

This article is was originally published in the Strat Farm blog on July 14th, 2014.

If America’s major metropolises were competing in the Tour de France of health and wellness policymaking, then we would be inclined to believe that Boston would be leading the peloton (image above via The Hubway). The city is now allowing doctors to prescribe discounted bike share memberships to low-income residents. While this is certainly a victory for the social mobility of struggling citizens – studies, including this one, have found that access to transportation increases the odds that a disadvantaged child can work their way into a higher income bracket by the age of 30 – the ramifications for health and technology are even more radical.

The day could come very soon when a doctor might be able to prescribe a connected bike-share program (or really any lifestyle change), and then leverage wearable technology to track a patient’s progress and adherence to the program. As the device collects data, it could be funneled back to an app that tracks and calculates the various benefits of different activities in biometrics like heart rate.

The synthesis of measurement and feedback could empower and motivate the patient, perhaps by helping them to identify what levels and types of activity provide the biggest results in terms of health improvement. Measurements could be put into a game designed by wellness experts to challenge participants as well as to motivate them to compete against each other. All of these technological advances, working in concert, could represent a quantum leap in prevention of a host of problems associated with a sedentary lifestyle.

Making these ideas work will involve a number of players, and will depend on the robustness of the strategies underneath them. Fitness experts and physicians can provide the know-how on extracting and interpreting health data. Hardware designers can create the next generation of bio-measuring technology to capture measurements accurately, and software developers will be crucial to figuring out how to house, process, and present the results. And just as crucially, advertising and marketing experts can share the consumer insights necessary to ensure adoption at scale – and of course, to help sell the concept to health care providers and users themselves.

The benefits from this arrangement will echo back to brands in astounding ways. This data will provide unprecedented consumer insight, on individual and demographic levels. Brands will have the opportunity to develop more personalized experiences that effectively influence buyer’s decisions and generate greater loyalty. The quiet revolution in data driven development is here, arriving – not coincidentally – at the peak of consumer interest in wellness.

There are sure to be unforeseen issues that arise with Boston’s embrace of bike-sharing as a health management tool. But innovative policies like this are a brave sally at creating solutions to a host of medical and social ills. When technology, marketing, and enterprise get savvy to integrated wellness, we’ll all be a lot closer to addressing some of the biggest quality-of-life questions of the 21st century.

New Station Alert: Alewife, Cambridge

New Station Alert: Effective Friday afternoon, July 11th, the new Hubway station, Alewife at Russell Field, is open & operational in North Cambridge. This station is a 23-dock station, located near the entrance to the Alewife T station on the east side of Alewife Brook Parkway (routes 2 & 16), adjacent to the Alewife Linear Path and Russell Field, and north of Jerry’s Pond. Please note the placement of the station in the image below.

Please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com for up to the minute system information on system availability.

Thanks for using Hubway!

Station Alert: construction adjacent to Faneuil Hall Hubway station throughout July

Station Alert: We have been informed by the City of Boston that construction will take place on Union Street, near Faneuil Hall, Mondays through Thursdays between the hours of 7am and 4pm, beginning the week of July 7th and continuing throughout the month.

Access to Union Street will be limited to delivery vehicles, including Hubway staff, but Hubway riders can still access the Faneuil Hall - Union Street at North Street station by letting a representative from the construction team know that they would like access. Please note that while riders will be allowed access, you may have to wait a few moments due to safety concerns. Thank you for your patience during the construction.

Updates will be posted when available on Hubway’s Twitter & Facebook pages. For station map and up to the minute system availability, please use our Spotcycle app for smartphones or visit www.hubwaytracker.com. During the outage, that station may not appear on those services, nor on the website station map.

We apologize for any inconvenience caused by the construction, and thank you for using Hubway.